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Title: Good boys
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004060/00001
 Material Information
Title: Good boys
Physical Description: <16> p. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: unknown
Bolton, Thomas, fl. 1851-1893 ( Engraver )
Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905 ( Engraver )
Routledge, Warne, & Routledge ( Publisher )
Publisher: Routledge, Warnes, & Routledge
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Edmund Evans
Publication Date: 1866
Copyright Date: 1866
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
School children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Poor -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1866
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Most ill. engraved and signed by T. Bolton, some by E. Dalziel.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004060
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5768
notis - ALG3845
oclc - 49059629
alephbibnum - 002223594

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page i
        Front page ii
        Front page iii
        Front page iv
    Main
        Front page 1
        Front page 2
        Front page 3
        Front page 4
        Front page 5
        Front page 6
        Front page 7
        Front page 8
        Front page 9
        Front page 10
        Front page 11
        Front page 12
        Front page 13
        Front page 14
        Front page 15
        Front page 16
        Front page 17
        Front page 18
    Back Cover
        Front page 19
        Front page 20
Full Text





















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OO D BOYS.




THE Papa and Mamma of James and Harry Mildmay
lived at a pretty house, about a mile from town, and
every day the boys walked to the school in the town,
except it was rainy, and then Papa took them in the
carriage; for they never missed school, unless they
were ill. Dr. Bennet said, that James and Harry
were the best behaved boys in his school; they were
always in their seats before school began; they did
their lessons as well as ever they could; they were
always quite silent when they were at work, and they
left the school-room quietly and politely, like little
gentlemen.
Both James and Harry liked school very much;
they said, We will work hard, and do all that our
master orders, when we are in school; we shall have
time enough for play, when we have done our tasks."






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GOING TO CItJ)UL.


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SCHOOL DAYS.
And when school was over, and tasks done, they were
always ready for cricket, or foot-ball; were the best
and merriest players on the play-ground, and very
happy fellows, for they had done their duty.
Oue day, Harry said to little Willy, who was too
young to go to school, Willy, we shall have such
good fun to-morrow! We shall break up for the
Midsummer holidays."
"What is breaking up ?" said little Willy.
SWell, we shall shout, and make as much noise
as ever we like, and throw up our caps, and run out
of the school," said IIarry,
"Is that fin, brother Harry?" asked Willy.
Harry talks nonsense, Willy," said James, who
was older and wiser. We are not glad because we
can be rude and noisy, but because we shall have a
short rest from tasks and hard work, and long play-
hours. And perhaps we may go to Uncle John's
country-house, where we shall see many new things.
Oh, Willy so many cows, and sheep, and deer, and
ducks, and liens!"
SWill there be any pretty flowers ?" said Willy.
To be sure, Willy," said Harry; Uncle John
las all the flowers in the world."
No, no, Harry," said James; there are more
flowers in the world than any man living has ever
seen: God only sees them. But Uncle John has
hundreds of sweet flowers in his garden, and the fields
are white, and yellow, and purple, with flowers."















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GO UlD BOY ,.




B RTB A KI NXG -UtP.


When the school broke up, both the boys brought
home prizes, and a letter from Dr. Bennet, to say
that they were well-behaved and obedient. Mr.
Mildmay was so much pleased, that 3Marrma and lie
took James, and larry, and Willy, to visit Mr. John
Mildmay, who was very glad to see them, and so
was their little cousin Lucy; for she had no Mamma,
and though Miss Clayton, her governess, was very
kind, Lucy was very happy when Aunt Mildmay
came; for, she said, "Aunt was almost like a real
Mamma." So Lucy danced about with joy, and
showed James and Harry all her new books, and let
Willy have her large doll to play with.
After dinner, Lucy and Harry went with Miss
Clayton to the lall door, to take some soup and
some meat to old David, the pedlar, and his daughter,
who carried the basket of pins, and thread, and
needles, and tape, that they sold among the poor
people who were far from a shop.
Old David was very poor, and very hungry, and
always thankful for the good soup and meat he called
to get every week; and Lucy and Harry were happy
to see him eat, for God has said, we must feed the
hungry. Then Lucy came back, to tell Aunt Mild-
may how many poor people she had to visit, and
what a good Papa she had, who allowed her to help
_them all.
The next morning, when Mr. John Mildmay heard
what good boys James and Iarry had been, he gave













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THI R.:WA RiDS.


Harry a fin lre ge kite, and James a broad, painted
hoop, and Willy a cart and horses, and sent them all
out into the park to enjoy themselves. They played
with their new toys merrily for a long time; and
when James was tired of chasing his hoop over the
wide park, and Willy's arm ached with dragging his
cart, which was often turned over among the grass,
they stood still, to watch Harry fly his kite. This
kite had a large face painted upon it, with great
round eres, and a wide mouth; and when it was
sailing about, high in the air, Harry said it looked
like a giant's head flying, Then little Willy laughed,
and jumped for joy, to see how funny the giant's face
looked down upon them.
When it was time to go in, James had to help
Harry to draw down the kite; for the wind was
high, and drew the kite one way, and the boys
pulled another way, till they could hardly keep on
their feet; and Willy cried out, that the giant's head
would fly away with Harry and James. But they
got the kite down at last, and wound up the string;
and then they went home, very much pleased with
their day's sport.
When they came into the house, Nurse said,
"Come, Willy; you are to go to the pond, to see
the swans; and Cook has given me some bread, that
we may feed them."
Thlen we will go with you, too, Nurse," said
James; "for Harry has not seen the swans, and







GOOD BOYS.


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HARSH'S NEW KITE.


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IN THE COUNTRY.


they are such very handsome birds. Comec along,
Harry!"
So they went to the side of the pond, and stood
under a large tree; and James called out to the
swans, which were sailing proudly over the smooth
water, and he threw some pieces of bread to them.
Then the swans knew they were to be fed, and they
came plunging and" gliding, in great haste, to the
side. But Willy was a very little fellow, and when
he saw the large, strange birds so near to him, le
was quite afraid, and began to cry; so Nurse took
him in her arms, and then lie was pleased to look
at them. James was very brave; lie held out the
bread, and the swans stretched their long necks, and
took it out of his hands, and eat it very greedily.
Harry was not so bold as his brother; he thought
the swans looked very fierce, and when they flapped
their strong wings, he hid himself behind Nurse, and
peeped at the birds, till James laughed at him, and
made him come forward like a man.
After dinner, when the children went into the
dining-room, to have some cherries and strawberries,
Uncle John talked to the boys about the grass,
which, when it is ripe, is cut down, and dried into
hay, and built up into stacks, to feed the horses and
cows in winter. And then he spoke of the fields of
corn, which are sown in, the Spring, and grow like
tall grass till Autumn, when this grass, with its full
ears of grain, turns yellow, and is cut down, and


















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GOING FISHING.


carried away to the barn, where the grains are
thrashed from the straw, to be ground into flour,
to make bread to feed botl rich and poor.
When they are cutting and carrying away the
corn, a few cars fall out over the field. These scat-
tered cars belong to the poor, who come to glean
them, as it is called, and are very glad to carry away
a bundle, to make into bread in winter, when they
have no work and no money.
And Uncle John told them, he knew a good boy,
who was not poor himself, but who used to glean in
his play-hours, till he got a good sheaf of corn, to
give to some poor old woman, who could not glean
for herself.
James and IIarry asked their Papa and Uncle if
they might go to glean, some day, like that good
boy, and give it to some poor, tired gleaner, who
had not much corn.
The boys had many happy days in that fine sum-
mer season. They played in the park, and fed the
deer, and, when it was very hot, walked in the wood,
and picked wild strawberries, to bring home on a
large leaf, for Mamma and Cousin Lucy, who thought
they were nicer than the strawberries in the garden.
A pretty brook ran through the wood; it mur-
mured over the white pebbles, and was so cool, the
boys liked to drink from it, and so clear, that they
could see the pretty speckled trout dart after the
flies that swarmed over the water; and if they heard






GjODl) BOYi.


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SATU ItDAY A-FTERNOON


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SUNDAY DUTIES.


a noise, the shy little fishes hid tbemssclves beneath a
large stone.
The brook was not deep, so James and Harry had
leave to go and fish in it. Their Uncle lent them
each a fishing-rod, and some artificial flies, and a
pannier to hold the fish they caught, and in which
they carried some buns for lunch; and they set out
very happy. How pleasant it was to sit under the
shady trees, and throw in their flies, and watch the
fish! The old trout looked at the flies very slily,
and then swam away: Harry thought they shook
their heads. Two silly young fish jumped at the
flies at once, and were caught, and one put in each
pannier. After this, they lunched, and threw in
more flies, and then watched the kingfisher plunge
its long beak into the water, and fly off with a
minnow; and James thought the kingfisher knew
how to catch fish better than they did, for they had
to walk home with one small fish in each large
pannier.
The next day was Sunday, and they all walked
through the pleasant, quiet fields to church. It was
the first time Willy had ever been to church, and lie
was very proud to walk with Papa and Mamma, and
to carry his own new Prayer-book, with the purple
ribbons to mark all the places for him.
When they got into the church, Willy was rather
afraid at first; all was so still, and, though there were
many people there, no one spoke or looked round.






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I"I S SIN DAY AT CIUIRCIl,


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GOOD BOYS.


Then Willy knew tlat all tliese people were thinking
they were in the house of God, and that God himself,
though unseen, was in tlhe midst of them. And
the little boy was glad to kneel down with everybody
there, and to say, "Our Father," mad to feel happy
that God was truly his Father, so long as he did not
forget that le was the child of God.
As they walked home, Papa said, See, my boys,
how peaceful and glad all people and all things are,
on this holy day, when all have time to rest from
their work, and meet to praise and thank Him, who1
is the God and Father of the poor, as well as of the
richh"







THE UEND.


LONDN : HINTED BY EDMULND EVANS.













































































































































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-- . .

|t~cQ jonilu tubIicatiens

J Pep. 4to, pre One ShiUing each, tih Cloth Coven,

ROUTLEDGES': NEW TOY BOOKS,
With Large Deigns by C. H. BeIrmNT, NoL lHuMIIrunE HAaILaoI W A, ;e.,
Vnierawed and Printed in Color by EVNs.

LI UST OF THE SERIES V12. --


1. HISTORY OF GREEDY JEM AND HIS
SEVEN BROTHERS. By C. H. Bzmnr.
2. THE FARM-YARD. By MIss BOWMN. Jlun.
trted by Hanruso WIL
3. THE FAITHLESS PARROT, By 0. H.
BBHFTT.
4. A LITTLE GIRL'S VISIT TO A FLOWER-
GARDEN. Illustrated by NoEL HUmPRnEI.
5. THlE FROG THAT WOULD A-WOOING
GO. By C. H. BEmmITr.
6. A LAUGHTER BOOK FOR CHILDREN:
With Pictures.
7. NAUGHTY BO'S AND GIRLS. With
Pictures.


8. STRUWELPETER With Pictures.
9. THE YOUNG RAGAMUFFINS. With
Pictues.
10. THE LITTLE MINXES. With Picturs.
11. GOOD BOYS. With Pictures
12. OUR DUMB FAVOURITES. By HA Ar.
sow WnIR.
13. HAPPY DAYS OP CHILDHOOD. By
Haiumox WmrI.
14. LITTLE MINNIE'S CHILD LIFE. With
Picture.
15. OUR PUSS AND HER KITTENS. By
HAnRi1on Walm.


ROUTLEDGES'
EIGHTEENFENNY BOOKS FOE YOUNG READERS,
In Crown 8So, tuft numerous litstrations by Aesowwo, GiTL.BRT, HARrbSO WiTR, er,,
strongly bo4nd in. a Clofh corer, printed in Colours, uwth. ColurePd Frotfispiece.

LIST OF THE SERIES, VIZ.:-
1. AMUSING TALES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. By MB. MTpr.s. With 21 Pictures.
2. THE DONKEY'S SHADOW, AND Orani STOURtL With 60 Pictrea.
3. THE BROKEN PITCHER, AnD OTHE STORnes, With 35 Pictures.
4. THE LITTLE LYCHETS. By the Author of "A Hero." With 22 Pioture.
5. HISTORICAL TALES; Tun GRsEAT EVENTs or HisroRT. With 20 Picturs.
6. THE GREAT WONDERS OF THE WORLD. By A. C. URUAN. With 32 Picture.
7. VISITS TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. With 20 Pictures.
8. THE RICHMONDS' TOUR IN EUROPE. By A. En.wu, With 28 Picture.

LONDON: ROUTLEDGE, WARNED, & ROUTLEDGE, BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL.
Umwa YW ar Wavn m as rFmmwu, aqr seem naMM 'TUa.


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