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Group Title: Three blind mice
Title: Eventful history of three little mice and how they became blind
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004054/00001
 Material Information
Title: Eventful history of three little mice and how they became blind
Series Title: Good child's library
Uniform Title: Three blind mice
Alternate Title: Three little mice and how they became blind
Physical Description: 23 p. : ill. (wood-engravings) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: unknown
Chandler, Victor L. L., b. ca. 1836 ( Engraver )
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910 ( Illustrator )
Ballantyne, R. M ( Robert Michael ), 1825-1894
Geo. C. Rand & Avery ( Printer )
E. O. Libby & Co ( Publisher )
Bazin and Chandler ( Printer )
Publisher: E.O. Libby & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Printed by Bazin and Chandler
Publication Date: 1858
Copyright Date: 1858
 Subjects
Subject: Mice -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1858   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1858
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Hamilton, S. Amer. book illustrators (1968 ed.),
General Note: First and last leaves pasted to publisher's red and blue printed wrappers. Publisher's advertisement on lower wrapper.
General Note: "Geo. C. Rand & Avery, printers, Boston"--lower wrapper.
General Note: Words divided syllabically.
General Note: Prose retelling of the nursery rhyme. Ballantyne's three little kittens are characters within the story.
General Note: Frontispiece is by V.L.L. Chandler after Homer.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004054
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5777
notis - ALK2426
oclc - 04823499
alephbibnum - 002250678

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Page 24
Full Text
124 CTS. PLAIN.


35 CTS. COLUiED.


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TO N STrI E ET


Ent-reic accg.rdin:, to At f. Congrrsu in the yiamr 1tc.', by E. I. I.rit & Co., in he Clrrk a Office of the itilrict court uf MTa.Ra


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*nb jobi tic becanime Iink.
THREE BLIND MICE,
SEE HOW THEY RUN.
THEY ALL RUN AFTER THE FARMER'S WIFE,
SHE CUT OFF THEIR TAILS WITH A CARVING KNIFE;
DID YOU EVER SEE SUCH A SIGHT IN YOUR LIFE,
AS THREE BLIND MICE.

^^.


S. 0. LIBBY & CO., 76 and 78 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON.




























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858,
BY E. O. LIBBY & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.


















PRINTED BT BAZIN AND CHANDLBER










THREE LITTLE MICE,
AND
HOW THEY BECAME B LINED.


ALL the lit-tie boys and girls who have read the his-to-
ry of the Five Lit-tle Pigs, will re-mem-ber Far-mer
Grum-pey, who gave one of the pig-gies such a hard whip-
ping that he cried "Wee! wee! all the way home.
Al-though, in that sto-ry, Far-mer Grum-pey was a pig, yet
in this one he is a real live man, who liv-ed way up in the
coun-try, in a ve-ry large house. He had a barn, and ev-er
so ma-ny hor-ses, and cows, and pigs, and hens, which he
used to go out and feed, and take care of, eve-ry day.
Far-mer Grum-pey, as the sto-ry a-bout the Lit-tle Pigs
tells you, was a pret-ty se-vere man; but he was only cross
and ug-ly when he found any-bo-dy on his farm that did
not be-long there. So that was the rea-son that poor
Pig-gy got such a whip-ping; be-cause he was fish-ing
in the far-mer's pond.
Al-though the far-mer had a ver-y large house, he had
no child-ren. No-bo-dy liv-ed with him but his wife, and
the ser-vant girl, Su-san; so there were ev-er so ma-ny
rooms that were not oc-cu-pi-ed. In the walls of this
house, in a snug lit-tle cor-ner, liv-ed Mrs. Mouse and her
three chil-dren, Fris-key, Gray-sey, and Long-tail. They
had been nam-ed so be-cause Fris-key was the most live-ly,






6


and al-ways get-ting in-to mis-chief; Gray-sey's fur was a
lit-tle dark-er col-or than his broth-ers, and Long-tail had a
ver-y long tail. They were ver-y du-ti-ful and lov-ing lit-
tle mice, and sel-dom did any-thing ver-y naugh-ty to make
their moth-er scold them. Some-times, in-stead of go-ing
off to play in the gar-ret, or out in the barn, they would
stay at home and help their moth-er by sew-ing, (for she
had taught them how,) and by go-ing er-rands. But when-
ev-er they did go off to romp a-round and have a good
time, poor lit-tle Fris-key was al-ways get-ting in-to trou-
ble. One eve-ning (for you know the Mouse fam-i-ly
sleep al-most all day, and run a-bout in the night time,
when we are all a-sleep,) their moth-er said if they would
be ver-y care-ful, and come home ear-ly, they might go and
find some-thing to eat;
But," said she, you must not go out of the house, for
if I should hap-pen to want you, I shall call you."
"No, dear moth-er," said Long-tail, "we will on-ly go
down in-to the cel-lar, and will come to you if we hear you
call us."
So off they frisk-ed, ra-cing up and down the walls in
high glee, and I think it would have made you laugh to
see their long whi's-kers and fun-ny lit-tle tails, if you had
look-ed through a crack in the wall, through which they
used to peep, to see what was go-ing on in the house.
Well, hav-ing got tir-ed of play, they slid down the walls,
and their lit-tle claws made such a noise, rat-tling down
the plas-ter-ing, as they went by the room where Far-mer
Grum-pey was sleep-ing, that it wak-ed him up, and he
thought it was the wind shak-ing the blind, so he got out
of bed and fas-ten-ed it, and then went to sleep a-gain.








At last the three lit-tle mice reach-ed the cel-lar, and
went straight to the clo-set, for they had been there so
ma-ny times be-fore, that they knew the way ver-y well.
But when they got there, they found that the broom which
u-sual-ly lean-ed against the wall, and up-on which they
us-ed to climb up to the shelf, had been tak-en a-way, and
the shelf was so high that they could not get up with-out
the broom.
"Isn't it too bad, Fris-key ? said Gray-sey. "What
are we go-ing to do ? and Fris-key look-ed as sad and sor-
row-ful as you can im-ag-ine a lit-tle mouse could; so they
all set to work to think how they should man-age to get
up to the shelf. At last, just as they were a-bout to give
up in des-pair, Fris-key spi-ed a lit-tle piece of string on







--I






FRISKEY FINDS A PIECE OF STRING.
the cel-lar floor, and he be-gan to dance a-bout so, that his
broth-ers thought he was cra-zy.






































































































THEY SWING UP TO THE SHELF.


__


ri






9


"What are you go-ing to do with that ?" said Long-tail,
as Fris-key caught Vp the string, and ran all a-round the
cel-lar with it.
I will show you," said Fris-key, if you will on-ly wait
long e-nough;" so he took one end of the string in his
mouth, and be-gan climb-ing up the edge of the clos-et
door, were the hin-ges were, as the door was wide o-pen.
When he got high e-nough he held the string tight-er be-
tween his teeth, and call-ed out to Gray-sey to catch hold
of the oth-er end with his claws and be-gin to swing.
I am a-fraid, Fris-key; for if you let go I shall break
my head."
Oh I go a-head," said Fris-key; "I'll risk your head."
Gray-sey was still a-fraid, but Long-tail saw that it was
pret-ty safe to try it; so he took hold of the end and be-gan
to swing. And he swung fur-ther and fur-ther each time,
un-til he land-ed safe-ly on the shelf.
Now, Gray," said Fris-key, you must go this time,
and be sure and hold on to the string af-ter you get up-on
the shelf, for if you let it drop, I can't get up my-self."
So Gray-sey saw how nice-ly his broth-er got up to the
shelf, and hear-ing him munch-ing and eat-ing the good
things, he sum-mon-ed all his cour-age, and be-gan to
swing, un-til he swung him-self up to the shelf. Then
Fris-key, who was still up-on the edge of the door, let go
his end of the string, and slid down to the floor a-gain."
"Hold on as tight as I did, Gray," said Fris-key, and
he be-gan climb-ing up the string which Gray-sey held,
and he was soon with his broth-ers.





10


How the far-mer's wife
would have scold-ed, if she
had sedn them eat-ing up
Sli her nice mince pies, and
nib-bling the cor-ners of her
loaves of bread. There they
ate, and ate, and ate, un-til
they thought that they could
S/, r eat-no more; so Long-tail
( I t look-ed at his watch (for he
was old-er than Fris-key or
Gray-sey, and his moth-er
had giv-en him one,) and
S- ,,,,-r said it was time to go home.
SBut Fris-key was too full of
fun, and want-ed to go out
in-to the barn.
No, no !" said Long-tail,
"you know we prom-is-ed
moth-er that we would not
Sgo out of the house."
"Well, I shall on-ly be
Gone a lit-tle while. Be-
sides, it ain't half morn-ing
yet."
So the naugh-ty Fris-key
jump-ed down from the shelf
and ran a-way to the barn,
while his more obe-di-ent
broth-ers re-turn-ed to their
FRISKEY CLIMBS UP TO THE SHELF. moth-er.






11


Where is Fris-key, my dear chil-dren? said she, as
she saw them com-ing with-out their broth-er; and she was
ver-y sad when they told her where he had gone. But
you will see how he was pun-ish-ed.
Off went Fris-key to the barn, whist-ling as mer-ri-ly as
he could; but he was not ver-y hap-py, for he knew he
was do-ing wrong.
O-ho !" said he to him-self, "what a fine time I shall
have a-mong the corn; and I shall have it all to my-self,
too." So he trot-ted a-long through the barn-yard, and
went in-to the barn.
Now, the far-mer's hor-ses were all in their stalls, a-sleep.
Fris-key thought his lit-tle feet would not make e-nough
noise to dis-turb them; but just as he was pass-ing by
Peg-gy, the far-mer's fa-vor-ite horse, Fris-key hap-pen-ed to
hit him with the end of his tail, and Peg-gy lift-ed his foot,
and just graz-ed poor Fris-key's nose, and he roll-ed o-ver
and o-ver.
"Squeek-eeke!"
"Squeeke-eeke!" cried
he, as he put his paw
up to his nose, and he
crawl-ed a-long home, I
feel-ing ver-y sor-ry he
had not mind-ed his
moth-er. When he got
home, his moth-er did
not scold him, be-cause
she saw he was pun-
ish-ed for his naugh-ti-
ness al-ready; so she FRISKEY GETS KICKED.





12


al mmade a poul-tice and
put it on his nose, and
put him to bed. Poor
Slit-tle Fris-key was sick
three or four days, and
was not a-ble to go out
with his broth-ers for
Some time.
"Ah! those naugh-ty
do micee" said Su-san, the
ser-vant, when she went
down cel-lar the next
FRISKEY IS SICK. morn-ing. Here are
all my pies and bread, bit-ten and spoil-ed by those lit-tle
ras-cals. I must tell Dame Grum-pey."
So Su-san went up stairs, and told Dame Grum-pey
a-bout the naugh-ty mice. The far-mer's wife was ver-y
an-gry when she heard that the mice had been in her clos-
et, and she told Su-san that if she ever caught them, she
should do some-thing ver-y dread-ful, and al-though Long-
tail and Gray-sey were in the wall list-en-ing they could
not hear what it was that Dame Grum-pey said she should
do to them, be-cause she whis-per-ed it to Su-san. I sup-
pose she was afraid the mice would hear her, and so be
more care-ful to keep out of the way. I guess they would
have been ter-ri-bly fright-en-ed, if they had heard what
Dame Grum-pey had said. But they were full of mis-chief
and laugh-ed in their sleeves as they heard the old la-dy
scold.
Un-der his good moth-er's nurs-ing, Fris-key at last got
well. He had got so tir-ed of ly-ing in bed that one
morn-ing, just as his broth-ers came home from a lit-tle






13


jour-ney they had been tak-ing dur-ing the night, he said
to his mo-ther,
I am go-ing up in-to some of the big rooms to play a




.







THE KITTENS CHASE FRIS KEY.
Slit-tle while in the sun-shine."
So he kiss-ed his moth-er and
ran off.
S Now, I must tell all of you
,'j > f who have read the sto-ry of
Sthe Three Lit-tle Kit-tens,
-i$-; Cthat they liv-ed in this same
W / Far-mer Grum-pey's house.
SYou will re-mem-ber that just
af-ter they had found their
mit-tens, they saw a lit-tle
S" mouse peep-ing out of his
HE LAUGHS AT THEM. hole. This lit-tie mouse was





14


Fris-key him-self. He had been all o-ver the house, af-ter
he left his moth-er, and hap-pen-ed to pop in-to the ver-y
room where Spot-tey, and Whi-tey and Black-ey were. The
mo-ment Fris-key saw Spot-tey com-ing at him, he jump-ed
ev-er so far, and scam-per-ed in-to his hole as fast as he
could. And when he was safe-ly out of the reach of the
kit-tens' paws, he sat down and shook his lit-tle sides with
laugh-ter, when he heard such a me-aow-ing and
scream-ing, though he was ter-ri-bly fright-en-ed.
So Fris-key ran home to tell his mo-ther of his ad-ven-
ture.
"Oh my dear lit-tle Fris-key," said she, "I'm a-fraid
you will get kill-ed some-time. I be-lieve I shall have to
send you to school."
But Fris-key thought he knew e-nough with-out go-ing
to school. Fris-key's won-der-ful es-cape from the kit-tens
on-ly made him bold-er than ev-er. He would e-ven creep
down in-to the din-ing-room, while Far-mer Grum-pey and
his wife were at sup-per.
S- One eve-ning he came
Srun-ning home with
S-some ver-y good news.
I "I've been down in
/ I the din-ing-room," said
he, and Dame Grunm-
pey has made some
.j cheese, which she is
: 1go-ing to put in-to the
pan-try to-night."
"Hur-rah for Frisk !"
says Gray-sey.
FRISKEY GOES INTO THE DINING-ROOM.







15

"Won't we have a feast," says Long-tail. "Won't you
come too, moth-er," ad-ded he, for he was al-ways ver-y
thought-ful of his moth-er.
No, dear Long-tail," said she, "I'm a-fraid I shall get
cold. But you may bring me a piece, and I will toast it
at home."
So they wait-ed till they heard Dame Grum-pey lock the
pan-try-door, and saw the old far-mer go up to bed.
Long-tail, who was more care-ful than the rest, said he
would go and see that there was noth-ing to harm them,
and pres-ent-ly he came back, and said he heard Su-san
snor-ing, and saw the cat and her kit-tens put on their
bon-nets and shawls to go out and spend the eve-ning.
The three lit-tle mice were soon in the pan-try, eat-ing
away at the nice cheese that Dame Grum-pey had left
ere. Af-ter they had eat-en all they want-ed, Long-tail


o ,3,






THEY CUT OFF THE CHtEESE.


-~- -----------
-------
-------
----



L






16


nib-bled and nib-bled
un-til he got a piece
of cheese of such a
shape that he could tie
S t his tail a-round it.
"Now, Frisk and
Gray," said he, take
hold of my tail and
pull;" and they pull-ed
Sin-deed un-til a great
l/ 1 piece of cheese roll-ed
S1 down on to the shelf.
What is this great
/ thing ? said Fris-key,
I- just as they were all
go-ing to leave the

Let's find out," said
THEY LOOK INTO THE BOWL OF VINEGAR. o
Gray-sey. So he jump-
ed up-on Fris-key's back and look-ed in-to a great ba-sin of
vin-e-gar, which Su-san had put there.
Oh! what a splen-did place to fish in," said Gray-sey.
He had nev-er seen any vin-e-gar, and he thought it was
wa-ter.
Sure e-nough," said Fris-key, af-ter he had got up-on
Gray-sey's back, and look-ed in. We'll come here and
fish."
Then Long-tail laid ov-er on his back, and took the
piece of cheese in his claws, and Gray-sey and Fris-key
took hold of his tail and drew him home, with the cheese
for their moth-er clasp-ed tight be-tween his legs.






17


THEY DRAW HOME THE CHEESE.
Thank you, my dar-lings," said Mrs. Mouse, as they set
the great piece of cheese be-fore her. How beau-ti-ful
it smells. Now take the brush, Long-tail, and get your-self
dean, and then you had all bet-ter go and get some sleep."
So she kiss-ed them and bade them good-night.
As they were all go-ing off to-geth-er, Fris-key and
Gray-sey, who had not said any-thing to Long-tail a-bout
go-ing a fish-ing, asked him to go with them. The thought
of the fun, and a nice break-fast on fish, made Long-tail
con-sent to join them.
But," said he, "what are we go-ing to do for poles ?"
Oh, I'll get them," said Fris-key. So he went down
in-to the kitch-en, and gnaw-ed a-way at the broom with
his lit-tle teeth, un-til the floor was quite cov-er-ed with
pieces of it. Then he took the long-est and stout-est of






























































THEY GO A-FISHING.







19

them, and car-ried them in-to the pan-try. On his way to
his broth-ers' bed-cham-ber he stop-ped, and got three
pieces of thread out of his moth-er's work bas-ket, and
then they all went down to the pan-try, and ti-ed the
thread to the pieces of broom which Fris-key left there.
Hur-rah," cri-ed Fris-key, as he mount-ed the edge of
the ba-sin.
Hur-rah," cri-ed Gray-sey, as he fol-low-ed his broth-er.
"Hur-rah," said Long-tail, as Fris-key and Gray-sey
help-ed him up by their side, and they made such a noise
that they were fright-en-ed lest they should wake up
Far-mer Grum-pey and his wife.
Now we will all take hold of hands," said Fris-key, "so
we shan't tum-ble in."
"Here we go! here we go !" shout-ed Gray-sey, as he
tri-ed to throw his thread into the ba-sin, and sure e-nough
they did go, for Gray-sey gave such a jerk that he lost his






20


bal-ance and fell right in-to the ba-sin. And he pull-ed
Fris-key in, and Fris-key pull-ed Long-tail in.
"Squeek-eeke! Squeek-eeke. Oh! Oh, my eyes! Oh,
dear me! Oh, what wa-ter this is! Squeek-eeke-eeke!"
they all scream-ed to-ge-ther, and such a noise you nev-er
heard three lit-tle mice make be-fore. For you must know
that mice's eyes are ver-y ten-der, and the mo-ment the
vin-e-gar touch-ed them it put them out.
Oh! Fris-key! Fris-key! what made you come here ?"
said Long-tail, while he was swim-ming about in the vin-
e-gar. "Oh! Squeek-eeke-eeke! Oh! how my eyes
smart! Oh, dear! I can't see."
"Nor I," sobbed Graysey.
Nor I ei-ther," said Fris-key. Squeek squeek-eeke !
Oh, how shall we get out."
At last Long-tail got his claws on the edge of the ba-sin
and Fris-key caught hold of his tail, and Gray-sey got hold
of Fris-key's tail. So Long-tail drew them out. Such
look-ing crea-tures as they were, you can-not im-ag-ine,
all drip-ping with vin-e-gar,and stone blind.
Poor lit-tle mice! how they scream-ed and scream-ed,
and ran a-bout the pan-try to find their hole; but they
were blind, and could not see where it was. There they
staid all night, and in the morn-ing,when Dame Grum-
pey went to get break-fast, she took her carv-ing knife,
and went to the pan-try to get some bread to cut.
I won-der what all this noise is, in here," so she un-
lock-ed the door, and there were the three poor lit-tle
mice. They could not see, so they ran a-bout squeak-ing
ter-ri-bly.







21


Three blind mice,
See how they run.
They all run after the farmer's wife,
She cut off their tails with a carving knife;
SDid you ever see such a sight in your life,
As three blind mice."













DAME GRUMPEY FINDS THE MICE.
"These are the lit-tle ras-cals I've been hunt-ing for,"
said Dame Grum-pey. So she caught poor lit-tle Fris-key
and cut off his tail, and call-ed "Black-ey Black-ey!"
and Black-ey came and swal-low-ed poor Fris-key. Then
she caught Gray-sey, and cut off his tail, and call-ed
" Whi-tey! Whi-tey !" and Whi-tey came and swal-low-ed
poor Gray-sey. Then she caught Long-tail, and cut off his
tail, and call-ed "Spot-tey! Spot-tey!" and Spot-tey came
and swal-lowed poor Long-tail. Then Dame Grum-pey
took the three lit-tle tails that she had cut off, and laid
































SIIECUTSOFF HEIRTAIL. i, o






23

them close by the hole where the three lit-tle mice us-ed
to come in.
And when their poor moth-er went to their beds to find
them, she saw they were not there. Then she ran down
to the an-try, and when she saw their lit-tle tails close
%Iii!


fr


MRS. MOUSE FINDS THEIR TAILS.
by the hole, she knew they must be dead, so she ran
a-way from the house, and the cat and her three kit-tens
fol-low-ed her, full chase, and they were nev-er any of
them seen a-gain.










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