• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Advertisements














Group Title: Webb's Jacksonville and consolidated directory of the representative cities of east and south Florida. 1886.
Title: Webb's Jacksonville and consolidated directory of the representative cities of east and south Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003784/00001
 Material Information
Title: Webb's Jacksonville and consolidated directory of the representative cities of east and south Florida
Physical Description: 2 v. : ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Wanton S. Webb
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 1886-1887
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Directories -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Directories -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: directory   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1886-1887.
General Note: Subtitle: Containing a general directory of the citizens, a business directory, a partnership directory, a street directory, a record of the city governments, institutions, societies, corporations, etc., etc., of the cities of Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Palatka, Gainesville, Orlando, Ocala, Tampa, Fernandina, Sanford, Leesburg, Kissimmee, and their suburbs. Together with business directories of Lakeland and Plant City, and an account of Haines City and Seffner. (varies slightly)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003784
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001627443
oclc - 10596791
notis - AHQ2167
 Related Items
Preceded by: Webb's Jacksonville directory
Succeeded by: Webb's Jacksonville directory

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Advertisements
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
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Full Text












, E B B'


JAC KS 0:VI LL



DI- R T 0 RY


1888





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C 8 3 r er
... .*. ...









00 0 0
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C



Santon S. .eob

Co ::,il er

New York and Jacksonville

1886





eWW Jacksntl at mQ.Q[adated Diecfy
-.' the Representative Cities of East and South Florida-1886.
W. S. WEBB, Compiler.

Je Ulnblrciijllnr agrees to take One Copy of the above work,
pay THREE DOLLARS on delivery of the book.

trfrt. ...............

-------- --------------











PREFACE.


ONE morning in the month of December, 1875, the writer arrived in
Florida from New York, for the purpose of publishing a directory of the
city of Jacksonville, which was issued early in the following year. Since
that time the directory has been published at regular'intervals of two
years, with increased appreciation and patronage. b
The rapid growth of the city necessitated a Virectory every year, of
which series this volume is the initial number.
It has betn decided to incorporate with the Jacksonville Directory a
directory of several of the enterprising cities of East and South Florida,
which will be found in this volume, and which will be included in future
issues, as circumstances and opportunity will permit.
Aside from the circulation of this volume in the cities mentioned on the
Title Page, it will be found in the saloons of the principal steamers plying
on the St. Johns river, the ocean steamships plying on the South Atlantic
Coast, the larger steamboats on the Hudson River and Long Island Sound,
steamships for Europe, and on file in the principal Exchangs~and Boards
of Trade in this country and abroad.
The writer claims no originality in the preparation of the sketches of
the several cities found herein. Hisrelation to this book and its contents
is as a c ,mpiler rather than an author. The preparation of the contents
for a dirt story admits of little literary ability or excellence.
To such well known men and excellent journalists as John P. Varnum,
Esq., and Dr. William H. Babcock, would he award that meed of praise
which belongs to the editors of such valuable publications as "The 1e-
scriptive and Statistical Report of the Jacksonville Board of Trade," ai.
"The Duval County Book," from both of which he has quoted indi,
criminately in his preparation of the sketch of Jacksonville. Webb' s
Florida has also furnished its share of facts and figures to the same end.
Directories, like newspapers, generally show the enterprise of the cities
which they represent, and this volume is no exception to that rule.
Wherever it goes it will forcibly impress the hundreds of thousands who
refer to its pages, as to the enterprise of the people of Florida-a specimen
brick, as it were, illustrating the methods with which they are building a
prmnanent success, attracting the serious attention of the whole world.
IDuring the past ten years the writer has endeavored to make "a name
and a place" in the hearts of the people of Florida by keeping faith with
them in all his undertakings. That he has been successful, is shown in
the universal patronage bestowed on all his publications, of which this
volume is a striking illustration.
With their cooperation he is enabled to produce a directory which in
mechanical execution, at least, surpasses any directory yet issued.
Thanks are due the press for its hearty endorsement, to Webb's Di-
rectory Corps for their earnest and honest work, and to the great public
for their consideration of and courtesy to "the directory man."
Very Respectfully,


Jackcsonvaille, Fla., Jan. 15, 18$6.


THE COMPILER.








T T______________________T





WEBB'S FLORIDA.


Historical, Industrial and Biographical


By WANTON S. WEBB.



Contains a general review of the State, a detailed account
of each County, its boundary, water courses, railroads, to-
pography, soil, productions, prices of lands, climate, health,
natural fertilizers, fish, game, stock raising, lumber, natural
springs; how, when and where to settle; a description of
each city, village and country post office in Florida, down to
1885. The work is 8xi2 inches in size, contains over two
hundred large double column pages of solid printed matter,
and over one hundred illustrations of Florida scenery,
some full page, the whole printed on toned paper, with an
elegant illustrated cover, designed by Brannan. The weight
of the book is one and a half pounds, and it will be sent to
any part of the world postpaid, on the receipt of ONE DOL-
LAR, addressed
WEBB'S FLORIDA,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


READ WHAT IS SAID ABOUT IT.
"Certainly the best work of its kind on Florida that I have ever seen.."-H. B.
PLANT, President Savannah, Florida, and Western Railway Co., Southern xfiress
Company, and Charleston and Savannah Railway Co.
It is, beyond any comparison, the most thorough, complete, and satisfactory pic-
torial and descriptive work on Florida that has yet appeared."-The Florida Despatch.
"We conscientiously recommend it to our readers."-The Indian River Sun.
Of all works on Florida it is the most excellent and the most accurate."-Ocala
Banner.
"Yesterday about midday, WEBB'S FLORIDA, mounted on about twenty drays, was
brought from the Fernandina Railway Depot."-Florida Journal.
"As a compendium, accurate, fresh, and complete, we know of nothing that compares
with it."-Florida Baptist.
Without a rival."-Tampa Guardian.
Throughout the work is a triumph of typographical art."-Tropical Paradise.
Altogether it is the most comprehensive book on Florida as yet published, and
fine engravings make its pages the more attractive."-The Floridian.
"Notices the most insignificant places."-The Pensacolian.


^l 4 w ^ ____ __ ^__________________________ ______ i-*














CONTENTS.


PAGE
Academies and Private Schools........ 272
American Legion of Honor............. 273
Bands ............... ............. 276
Banks ....... ........................ 267
Bible Societies ......................... 274
Blocks and Halls ..................... 11
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.. 273
Cemeteries........... ................. 285
Churches............................ 268
Clubs ............................... 278
Convent .... ......................... 277
Courts ............................... 266
Custom House.................. .... 276
Duval County Officers ................ 265
Duval Medical Society ............... 274c
Ferries ..... ...................... 285
Fire Department ..................... 267
Florida Mechanics' and Workingmen's
Association..... .................... 274c
Fruit Exchange................... ... 277
G. A. R............................... 274b
Gas Companies. ...................... 278
0. U. O. F ............................. 274b
Hebrew Benevolent Society............ 274
Hospitals.... ...................... 277
Incorporated Companies ............... 279
Index to Advertisements............. 6
I. O. of G. T...................... ... 275
Irish Land League ................... 274c
Jacksonville City Government......... 266
Jacksonville, Sketch of ................ 15
Jacksonville Street Directory..........
Journals and Journalists of Jacksonville 12
Knights of Honor.................... 274;b
La Villa City Government............ 2!85
Masonic ................. ......... 274a
Masters and Pilots' Ass'n, No. 3........ 9,73
S Military ............... ............. 776
S Odd Fellows...... .................. 214a
Police Department ............... ... 266
Post Office.................... ....... 272
Public Schools......................... 1271
< Railroad Companies...... ............. 283
Societies................... ..... ...... 273
Sons of Temperance ................ 275
State Government................... 265
Street Railways ........... 284
Telegraph Companies. .............. 279
Telephone Company............. 279
Temperance Societies........... 274
Temple of Honor................. 275
The Florida Medical Association ... 1 274c
SThe Humane Society for the Preventic n
of Cruelty to Animals........... 273
The Jacksonville Library Association. 274
The Philharmonic Society........... 273
STypographical Union ......... ..... 274
U. S Engineer office.. ............ 278
U S. Internal Revenue. ............ .278
S UT. S. Signal Service .............. ....
W. C. T. U. of Jacksonville...... ... 27


4*AiT


PAGE
Webb's Jacksonville Business Directory 239
Webb's Jacksonville Directory......... 65
W harves ....................... ...... 11


St. Augustine General Directory....... 295
Street................... .... .. 294
Business..... ... ............... 328
Appendix....................... 332a
Sketch of......... ............. 289
Palatka General Directory............. 339
Street... .............. .... ... 337
Business......................... 372
Appendix ..................... 380
Sketch of ....................... 35
Gainesville General Directory.......... 393
Street.............. ............ 391
Business ........................ 423
Appendix ....................... 428
Sketch of..................... 389
Orlando General Directory............. 441
Street ............... ......... 439
Business ... .................... 470
Appendix ...................... 475
Sketch of....................... 437
Ocala General Directory .............. 489
Street......................... 487
Business ........................ 509
Appendix ...................... 513
Sketch of...................... 485
Tampa General Directory ............. 528
Street........ ......... ........ 521
Business ......... ............. 544
Appendix........................ 550
Sketchof ........ .............. 519
Fernandina General Directory......... 563
Street ................... .... 561
Business ....................... 576
Appendix ...................... 578
Sketch of ....................... 559
Sanford General Directory ............ 591
Street ................ ... 589
Business .............. ...... .. 606
Appendix ....................... 610
Sketch of .................... 585
Leesburg General Directory............ 619
Business ........................ 628
Appendix... ................... 632
Sketch of .................... 617
Kissimmee General Directory.......... 648
Street........ .................. 641
Business .. ........ ........... 651
Appendix..... .......... ..... 654
Sketch of. ......... ......... 637
Lakeland Business Directory... ...... 660
Sketch of... ........... 659
Plant City Business Directory.......... 664
Sketch of....................... 665
Seffner General Directory ............. 665
Sketch of..... ............... 665
Haines City Sketch of ............... 671


















INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.


PAGE
Acosta, D. C........... ............. 490
Adams & Smith...................... 66
Aderhold, J. W........................ 644
Allen, J. Edward..................... 442
Alien & W illiams ..................... 443
Ambler, Marvin & Stockton............
Outside front cover
Amrock, E. S .......................... 332
Anderson Church & Co.........front fly leaf
Andrew John P .................... .. 67
Andrews, C. W ................opp. p. 288
Anno, W. R.......................... 444
Arnold, Frank S..........inside back cover
Avery, S. G..................... ...... 68
A yres, C. L............................ 524
A. & G. C. C., and Okeechobee Land Co.
leaf, opp. back fly leaf
Bacon, Wm........................... 340
Baker J. W. .............inside front cover
Banes & Warrington............... .. 242
Bank of Ocala ................... pp. p. 481
Bank of Tampa .................opp. p 544
Banks & Cannon..................... 445
Barbour, C. C................... ..... 341
Barker, Charles W..............front fly leaf
Barnes & Boland ..................... 342
Barnes & Thompson................... 645
Barrett, Charles D............. ..... 592
Barrs, Clark & Tate.......outside back cover
Barrs, Hunter & Stockton..outside back cover
Bassett, Dwight H............... opp. p. 161
Bauer, Alex..... ..................... 343
Beach, J. S ........ ........... ..... 69
Bean, .E ........................... .. 70
Beebe, H. W...............inside front cover
Bell, J. S............................. 71
Bender, Joseph M...................... 525
Berlin & Co .... ...................... 446
Berry, H. H. ......................... 447
Berry, Horace......................... 72
Berry, W J................ .......... 526
Bettelini, F............................ 73
Bewan, P. .................... ... 448
Biddell, G. W. & Co.... ........ opp. p. 449
Binkley, J. L.............. ........... 528
Blair, L. P .................... .. .. 74
Blake, A M ........................ 298
Blitch, James M. & Co...........opp. p. 464
Bogue, F. E. &Co...............opp. p. 97
Boone, C. A. & Co ............. ..... 449
Boss House..........opp. Lakeland Bus. D'y
Boston & Savannah Steamship Co.,
opp. p 33


PAGE
Bourquardez, Joseph................. 529
Bourquin, F.... opp. commencement of
names in Fernandina Directory
Bours, William A ...................... 75
Boykin, L. M ......................... 450
Bradley Fertilizer Co......outside back cover
Britz, Charles J.... ................. 243
Brooks, Henry B.............. ..... 76
Brooks, Henry W...................... 77
Brown, George W. & Co.,..............
opp. sketch of Ocala
Brown, S. R. Mrs .................... 492
Brown, T. G.......................... 78
Brown & Fraser ..................... 530
Brush Louis J ....................... 79
Buchanan & Delaporte...........opp. p. 209
Buckheit J. J........ .. .......... 593
Buckman, E. H.................. .... 84
Bucky, Jacob D ..page 522 and opp. p. 81
Buesing, August ..................... 80
Burgert, S. P. ....................... 82
Burst, James H ...................... 81
Burt. M. & Son............inside back cover
Buser, E. P. & Co..................... 83
Byrd Chas. W ....................... 85
Byrne, William ................... 86
Calhoun & Braswell, opp. Lakeland Bus. D'y
Call & Jones.......................... 87
Campbell A. Jr........................ 88
Campbell. Chas. W. Jr.......... opp. p. 497
Cancio, J. P................... ..... 89
Canfield. Heth........... .......... 299
Canova, Louis C ... .................. 344
Carleton House ............. ..... opp. p. 192
Chl;llen. J. R........................ 90
Cha\mplin, A. E................. opp. p. 225
Chacons, E. T. .............. .... .. 91
ChriStopher & Livingston..inside back cover
Claiporne, T. C ....... ... ......... 92
Clarll John, Son & Co........... opp. p. 160
Clarle, William ............... front fly leaf
Clarklson, W B....... ..... ........... 95
Clayvborn. Charles .................. 301
Cleavnlalid & Son.................. 39
Coac man & Coachman.........opp. p. 400
Cochr me, F. C........ ............... 345
Cockr ell. W. & Son................. 94
Cody & Anderson, Mrs ................ 493
Coffin E. C. Mrs .................... 96
Cohen ros....... .... .............. 97
Cohen. lorris ...................... 98
Cole, S. & ',n................ ..... 99
Colee, L. ) .................... opp. p. 289










INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. I


PAGE
Collins, M. W.. ..................... 621
Comte, Madam .................... 100
Conoley, D. M....................... 101
Conoley, W.N....................... 531
Conyers, William C..... .............. 397
Cook, Thomas & Son........ opp. p. 32
Cook, William........................ 102
Cook & Libby........................ 302
Cooley, J. H......................... 103
Craddock, Jane E..................... 303
Crane, L. V. Mrs................. 346
Cromwell, J. D...................... 398
Cross, W B ........................ 347
Cullen, L. B........................ 670
Curry & Ingram................ opp. p. 481
Da Costa, C. W...................... 104
Dalton, P. B............ ............. 348
Dancy & Houston .................... 105
Darnes, A. H ............... ... ...... 106
Davis & Webster...................... 386
Dawkins, Crosby..................... 264
Day, S. A. Mrs....................... 107
Deaderick & Co ..................... 451
DeBary-Baya Merchant's Line... .opp. p. 48
DeLacy, William.......... ....... .... 108
De Land and St. Johns River Railway..
opp. p. 640
Delgado, E. M. & Co.................. 109
DeMedicis, E. E....................... 304
Devereux & Co ... .................. 349
DeWaal....... ....... ........... 452
Dillingham & Dawes.............opp. p. 561
Dixon, N............................ 532
Dobbins, A. N. & Bro...522 and opp. p 224
Dodge, J. P ................... ..... 309
Doggett & Buckman,.................. 110
Dorsey, C. H.................. ...... 111
Douglas. James ................ back fly leaf
Drew, George F. & Co.......leaf opp. p. 65
Drew, Hazeltine & Livingston......... 112
Drew, Horace... ..............opp, p. 225
Drtina, J. E......................... 113
Dubos, F. J. & Co ...................... 114
Duckworth. F. A. & Co................ 453
Duke, James K...................... 454
Dumas, H. B.......................... 305
Dzialynski, J. Mrs............ .... 115
Dzialynski, M. A... opp. sketch of Fernandina
Earman, J. A .................. opp. p 624
East Florida Bottling Co.......... ... 306
Elliott, Joseph......................... 307
Elliott & Des Rochers.. ............... 116
Ellis & McClure...................... 117
Ely & Owens ......................... 118
Endel M. & Bro........... ............. 399
Eppinger & Russell ................... 211
European Restaurant ........ opp. p 561
Evans, W. D.....opp. Lakeland Bus. D'y
Eye and Ear Institute ................ 541
Fairlie, James M ....................... 119
Farwell & Page........................ -120
Fernald, George H.. .... ...opp. p. 592
First National Bank of Palatka..opp. p. 321
Flake, W illiam ........ .............. 400
Fleming, S. P. Miss.................... 122
Fleming & Daniel. .................. 121
Fletcher & Wurts .................... 123
Florida House .................opp. p. 577


PAGE
Florida Land and Imp'm't Co....opp. p. 272
Florida Railway and Nay. Co....opp. p. 177
Florida Southern Railway ......opp. p. 513
Fontan, C. Mrs .............. ....... 124
Forbes, W. T. & Co,.....outside back cover
Foster, George R. & Co.......... opp. p. 144
Fox, Louis..................... ..... 495
Fox, Samuel W...................... 125
Frank, John, opp. St. Augustine title p.
and p. 224
Frederick, Sarah Mrs.................. 126
Freeland C. Mrs ................. opp. p. 81
Freeman, C. H.......................... 496
Frier & Pate .................. ...... 647
Fries, A. P. & Co.........inside front cover
Gadson, Frank P....................... 497
Gadson, O. J..... ............... 13
Gardiner Bros. ................... 308
Garrett, Chas. F ...................... 350
Garrett, L. O. & Bro .................. 455
Gary & Anderson..................... 498
Gauzens, F.......... .............. 309
Gay, C. S.......................... 127
Georgia House....................... 655
Gerard, W. B..... ................ ... 252
Gerow, D. T........... ............. 128
Gibbons, Wm. A......... ....... ..... 129
Gilbert W A......... .............. .. 130
Gillen, E. W ......................... 131
Given, E. B., Dr ..................... 648
Gleason, W. H. & Co...........back fly leaf
Gomez Bros ......................... 132
Gomez & Marteliz ............... .... 13
Gonzalez. Castillo & Co................ 533
Good, William C ..................... 622
Gore, Mahlon.................... ... 456
Graham J. M ......................... 401
Grand Central Hotel........... .opp. p. 624
Grammell, Perry S................... 402
Greeley, J. C.................... ..... 133
Green, H P....... ................. .. 134
Green, May R ................. 135
Green, A. W.........opp. Lakeland Bus. D'y
Greenleaf & Co..........outside back cover
Greeno, George A......... ......... 310
Gregory &Ponder, Misses ............. 136
Griffin & Parker..... opp. sketch of Palatka
Grooms, B. J..... ................ 351
Gumbinger, J...........inside back cover
Haas, George F......... ............. 137
Haas, Madame .......... ...... .
Hahn,F. W........................... 403
Haight & Dudley............. 386, 577, 642
Halliday & Rush .................... 404
Hallowes, W A...................... 138
Hamilton & Bro ..................... 534
Hampton & Hampton,................ 405
Hampton & Jordan .................. 406
Harris, George. ................. .. 139
Harrison, Zeph ...................... 140
Hartridge, M. L ...................... 142
Hartridge & Young.................... 141
Haughton, A. M. & Bro................... 352
Haynesworth,M. E..... ............. 535
Heath, Harry.... .................. 353
Heins & Green. .................. .... 143
Henry, George ........... .......... 144
Hernandez, J. E.................... .. 145









8 INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.


PAGE
Hernandez, J. V. Mrs ................. 311
Hernandez, Sarah Mrs................. 146
Hill, John P...................... ... 670
Hillsborough Co. Real Estate Agency
opp. p. 560
Hollinger, A. C ................ opp. p. 209
Holmes, R. D. & Co................... 147
Hooper, William P.................... 148
Hopkins & Son................... .... 149
Howard, Thomas H.................... 312
Hoyt, Fred. W. & Co..........opp. p. 576
Hubbard, S. B. & Co...........opp. p. 112
Huff, A. E .................. ........ 150
Hughes, George...................... 151
Hunter, Dexter......... .. .......... 152
Hyer, A. M..........opp. sketch of Orlando
Hygienic Hotel........................ 474
Industrial Machine Works...... opp. p, 275
Ingraham, W. Milford................ 313
Ingram Jos. J. ...................... 407
Ives & Ferguson................opp. p. 465
Jackson, James J...................... 536
Jackson & Jackson ................. 354
Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Ry.,
.... ...O............ ... .. op. p. 353
Jacqmain, Edward.................... 649
Johnson, Andrew.... opp. sketch of Orlando
Johnson. Matt G...... .............. 153
Johnston, C. P......... .............. 598
Jones, A. L ........................... 355
Jones, Peter. ...................... .. 154
Jones & Bowen........... .. opp. p. 80
Jordan, M. C...opp. title p. of St. Augustine
Justice W. N.... opp. commencement of
names in Sanford Directory
Kaminski & Emanuel...........opp. p. 496
Keene, O. L..... ..... .. ... 155
Keller, V. P.............. .......... 650
K ing, S. A ...................... 156
Kissimmee City Bank ... ........... 651
Kissimmee Land Agency (Wm. Cannon)
opp. p. 656 and front fly leaf
Kissimmee Land Company......opp. p. 656
Kissimmee Real Estate Agency...opp. p. 640
Kissimmee Sale and Livery Stable. .opp.
sketch of Lakeland
Kornahrens & Wedding.............. 157
Lackmann Fred....................... 158
Ladson, C. J............. .......... 159
Lake Shore Real Estate Agency...opp. p. 640
Lake & Livingston .. ..........opp. p. 225
Lane, E. T........................ 356
Le Baron, J. Francis...........front fly leaf
Ledwith & Sollee ................ .161
Lee, John M. ....................... 652
Leesburg Ice and Cold Storage Co...... 623
Leesburg Transfer Co., opp. p.......... 624
Lehr, F. W ......................... 162
L'Engle, C. S. & Co...........opp. p. 32
L'Engle, John C....................... 163
Leon, A. K............................ 164
Lilienthal, B. L.. ..... .......... .. 357
Littler, J. C...opp. commencement of
names in Gainesville Directory
Livingston, J. H ................... .499
Livingston, J. H. & Co. opp. sketch of Orlando
Llambias, Joseph F.................... 314
Lofton & Bedford, Mrs................. 653


PAGE
Louisville and Nashville R. R. Co. opp.p. 289
Maas, Isaac............... ..... ..... 500
Mac Donell, T. A. & B. B. ............. 165
Mac Farlane & Cleaveland...... opp. p. 544
Mackey, J. I......................... 166
Mackey & Co.......................... 315
Madsen & Lovengreen ................ 537
Magbee, James T...................... 538
Magnolia House .................opp. p. 385
Mallory, S. S. Co..............opp. p. 256
Malloy, George........................ 358
Mann. A W. & Co .................... 359
Marble, Gilbert W................ .... 410
Marcy, J. C. & Son ................... 167
Marks & Palmer........... outside back cover
Marvick & Gerke....................... 360
Marvin, Charles & Co.... outside front cover
Marvin, Lamar & Co.... outside front cover
Mason, Harry........................ 168
Mattair House .................. front fly leaf
McCallum, Archibald........... ...... 169
McClellan & Ellis...............opp. p, 400
McConihe, George L........... opp. p. 176
McCormick, R. D...................... 539
McCormick, William..... ........... 170
McCreary & White.................... 408
McGinnis, J. E........................ 171
McGinnis, J. H ...................... 172
McGuire & McDonald............ opp. p. 129
McKeever & Stillians ................ 409
McKenzie, A. B....................... 540
McLane, Reed A ........... ... ...... 656
McLaurin, E. J. E .................... 173
McMahan & Stancill.................. 411
McMillan & Miller.................... 412
McMurray, John & Co ............... 174
McMurray, P. E .... ................. 175
McMurray, Thomas........ ........... 176
MeQuaid. P........................... 177
Meek, Almond R... .................. 178
Melter, Theo. A....................... 179
Merrill, J. E. & Bro.................... 180
Meriwether, Henry B................. 625
Meyerson, M ......................... 182
Middleton, William A...........back fly leaf
Miller, Philip ............................ 413
M iller, Theo. J..... ............... .. 600
Miller & Jenkins ............... opp. p. 320
Mitchell, J. D. & Neal.................. 183
Mitchell, R. J. & Co .................. 459
Moody, James A........................ 42
Moore, M. L ...................... opp. p. 320
Morgan, A. Mrs....................... 184
Morrison & Packwood.........opp. p. 544
Moundford, J. C ..................... 185
Mulford, Mackenzie & Co............... 160
Mumby, Stockton & Knight...........
................. ......Inside front cover
Murphy. T............................ 186
Myers, Herman................... ... 181
Nash & Lucius......... opp. sketch of Ocala
Neubeck, Joseph A...................... 61
Newsom, L. M. Mrs........ ........ 362
Nichols, Rockwell & Co..........opp. p. 128
Nicholson & Johnson.................. 657
Nolan, E. M., M. D.................... 187
Nooney, Thos. & Sons......... ....... 188










INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS


PAGE
Norton, J. H.... opp. commencement of
names in Jacksonville
Oak, Byron E...opp. coi amencement of
names in Jacksonville
Oatley, H. G ........................ 549
O'Neil, John ........... ........... 189
O'Neill, Margaret............... back fly leaf
Orange House.......opp. sketch of Leesburg
Orlando, F. Prof,.. ......... ... 190
Orlando Lumber Co................... 460
Orlando Planing Mills.................. 461
O'Quinn. B. J.......opp. sketch of Lakeland
Owens, Albert W...... .............. 191
Palmetto Rooms.. .................. 594
Parker, J. A ......................... 420
Parkhur..t, E. C......opp. sketch of Sanford
Park Opera House..............opp. p. 145
Parson, J. B...... ..opp. sketch of Lakeland
Paine, E. T. .................. ....... 192
Pattison, H. A ......................... 193
Pearce, Hanson & Co.................. 626
Pearce & Hobbs .................. front fly leaf
Perkins, 0. S......................... 194
Petermann. Henis.................... 365
Peters C............................... 195
Peters John W ........................ 462
Peters & Davis........................ 195
Peterson, J. A....................opp. p. 193
Peterson, W. R .................opp. p. 193
Peterson & Davis ..................... 592
Pettingill & Co...................... 543
Phillips, L. B........opp. sketch of Lakeland
Pierce, Andrew L..................... 414
Pierce. R. W ................... opp. p. 529
Pike. E. C ....................... opp. p. 209
Pinkham, W. S. M .................... 318
Poetting. C. F. Jr..................... 196
Ponder, March & Son.. .............. 197
Post, J. H ......................opp. p 448
Powers, Edward N..................... 198
Powers. George A................opp. p. 465
Pratt, G. W .... ...................... 364
Preston & Ewart..................... 199
Price. Hector A ............ .......... 200
Puetz, Arnold .................back fly leaf
Purcell, I. L ........................... 366
Putnam House............ ......opp. p. 512
Quigley, J. B....... .................. 319
Radford, Haywood.................... 201
Randall, A. F... .....opp. sketch of Tampa
Randall, Walkers & Foster............. 202
Raulerson, John ..................pp. p. 641
Rawlins. L. K ...................opp. p. 320
Ray, Chester.......................... 545
Redmond, D............. ......... 203
Rehnberg, G........... ............ 320
Remington, J......................... 204
Rice, M C............ ...... ......... 205
Rich, William........ .......front fly leaf
Richardson, E. B. & Co................ 503
Riles, R. J ....... ................. 367
Riley, Alberta Miss.................... 206
Riley, Groover & Co .................. 207
Ritzewoller, S....opp. sketch of Jacksonville
Rivas & Koopman..................... 208
Roberts, B. F......................... 368
Roberts, W. D.....opp. sketch of Gainesville
Robinson, H. & Co .................... 209


PAGE
Roche, J. B. & Co...................... 210
Root, Wm..................... front fly leaf
Rose, Andrew J...opp. sketch of Kissimmee
Rose, Rufus E.....opp. sketch of Kissimmee
Rosenberger, H. L ..... opp. commencement
of names inGainesville
Roxburgh, J. J. C. ............ front fly leaf
Sabel Bros ............................ 212
Sanford Wagon Works......... ...... 601
Savannah, Florida & Western Railway,
opp. p. 16
Sanford Pub. Co.... opp. sketch of Sanford
Saratoga Hotel............ inside back cover
Scarratt, R. Mrs....................... 415
Schutz Bros .................... opp. p 449
Scofield, E. H............ inside front cover
Scruggs, R. K. Mrs ................... 213
Seeley, John ............... ... ...... 214
Seffner, Town of................ opp. p 528
Sharrard, R. E. & Co................. 627
Sherman, -- ................. 464
Simpkin, R. G. Sr, .................... 215
Sim onson, J.................. ....... 416
Simpson. M. Mrs ...................... 216
Sinclair & Mills,................opp. p. 480
Sirrine House..................... ... 599
Slager, Julius................... .... 217
Slone & Bro..................... ..... 629
Smith, B. M ..................... ... 417
Smith, Edwin C..... .............. 505
Smith, F. E ................. ....... 218
Smith, James F ... .......front fly leaf
Smith, J. S. Jr. & Co................... 219
Smith, Toney.......................... 285
Snow, H. M ........................ 322
Soundstrom's Cheese Works.......... 220
South Florida Railroad..........opp. p. 593
Spencer, C. E..................opp. p. 273
Spencer, C. H ......................... 667
Spencer & Scales...................... 546
Staples, O. G.................... opp. p 241
St. Augustine Hotel..............opp. p. 304
Steele, .......... ......... 221
Stewart, I. J.................... 418
Stickler, C. M. Mrs .................. 369
St. James Hotel Tampa...........opp. p. 545
St. Johns House.... ............. .... 238
St. Johns Railway of Florida.....opp. p. 401
St. Johns Weekly and Chronicle ..opp. p. 577
Stockton & Stribling................... 22
Stone, I. B ............................ 668
Streeper, R. F......................... 419
Sulzner, C. F ......................... 370
Sulzner & Phares. ..................... 323
Talbott, John T............... front fly leaf
Tampa Transfer Co ................... 527
Terry Show Case Co....... 512, 549, 577, 631
The Adams & Bacon Abstract Co.,
opp. p. 49
The Arlington House. ........... opp. p. 305
The Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal and
Okeechobee Land Co ... opp. back fly leaf
The Bank of Orlando........... .opp. p. 464
The Bowering Soap Mfg. Co........... 669
The Carleton House............ .opp. p. 384
The Church and Home................ 233
The Florida Herald............. opp. p. 368
The Florida News.. ............... 624









U1 INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.


PAGE
The Graham ...................opp. p. 384
The Grand View................opp. p. 369
The Industrial Recorder, opp. com-
mencement of names in Fernandina Direc'y
The Kissimmee Leader.... ........... 646
The Leesburg Real Estate Association,
.................. opp. sketch of Leesburg
The Leesburg Transfer Co.......opp. p. 624
The Mansion................... opp. p. 577
The New Hotel Tropical......... opp. p. 672
The Ocala Banner ..............opp. p. 481
The Ocala Free Press ....... ......... 10
The Orlando News Budget............ 469
The Oxford Hotel and Restaur't, opp. p. 113
The Palatka News................. ... 363
The People's Line of Steamers...opp. p. 17
The Sanford Journal Co. ............
Opp. sketch of Sanford
The Semi-Tropical. opp. commencement
of names in Ocala Directory
The Southern Sun Publishing Co., opp. p. 321
The South Florida Sentinel... ........ 609
The Spirit. .. .......................... 620
The St. Augustine Press..... ..opp. p. 577
The St. James Hotel............Back fly leaf
The Tampa Guardian....... .. opp. p. 561
The Times-Union..............opp. p. 240
The Tremont House ............opp. p. 257
The Tropical Land Co. outside back cover
The Windsor Hotel, Orlando....opp. p. 464
Thompson, Hill & Co................. 223
Thompson, William .................. 373
Tibbitts, S. L.opp. sketch of Jacksonville
Tischler, P .......................... 224
Tishler & Berg ....................... 467
Togin, John B........................ 225
Tourists' and Shippers' Fast Line..opp. p 352
Trumpeller, D. W..................... 226
Trunnell, Walter M.................. 630
Tyler O. Z. & Co ..............opp. p 49
Tysen & Smith ................. ..... 227
Union Hotel. Leesburg........opp. p. 625
Updike G. M ....................... 324
Vanderpool, Eugene............ ..... 228
Van Dorn, G. Mrs..................... 325


PAGE
Van Pelt, D. R. & Co.................. 506
Vaughan, L. C........... ............ ... 468
Verill,Leroy D.... opp. commencement
of name in Fernandina Directory
Vertrees & Co ....................... 371
Vincent, Enos & Vincent............. 374
Vogel, Leo. R. Mrs.................... 326
Wager, S. D ......................... 469'
Walker, W. & W. S.................. 229
Walker & Furman.............. opp. p. 289
W all, John P.... ..................... 547
Wall & Turman ..................... 548
Wallace & Cashen.................... 230
Ware, W. S........................... 231
Warrock & Co......... ....... opp. p.' 208
Waters & Carson..opp. sketch of Kissimmee
W ebb's Florida....................... 379
Webb & Nichols......................... 375
Webster I. E....................opp. p. 400
W ebster, N., M. D..................... 232
Weihe Bros ........................... 507
Weissbrod, Herman,.................. 549
Wesley House..................back fly leaf
Wethington & Bradley .............. 234
Whitfield, Jennie Mrs................. 508
Whittenburg, F. P.................... 421
Wigg & Son....... ................. 376
Williams, H. H ....................... 327
Williams, Mary ...................... 235
Wilson, Thos. Emmett opp. sketch of Sanford
Wilson & Gilbert..................... 236
Wilson & Hunting .................... 237
Windsor Hotel ................opp. p. 96
W oltz, W 0....................... 377
Woodall, S.............................. 327
World Travel Co ..................... 238
Worley, Samuel G. Dr...opp. sketch of
Kissimmee
W right, A. O....................... 240
Yonge Bros........................... 510
Young, E. T........ ............. .... 378
Younglove, C. D. & Son..opp. sketch of
Gainesville
Zacharias, A........................... 241


THE (CAL/I FEE sRESS,

[ WEEKLY INDEPENDENT.]


OCIAJLA~, FLIJI


Thomas W. Harris, Pub'r and Prop.


T'FLT*k


ID Ai LY 'PI rM.


Thomas W. Harris. Pub. and Prop.


Issued only during the winter season.


C-..3"= EBLOC2O:,


OCALA, FLA.

















BLOCKS A




Abbott's Block, Ocean c W Forsyth
Astor Block, 82 and 84 W Bay c Hogan
Atlantic Block, southwest c W Bay and Pine
Baldwin's Block, northwest c W Bay and
Pine
Baya's Block, northeast c Bay and Newnan
Bisbee's Block, 63 and 65 W Bay c Laura
Bostwick's Block, Bay southeast c Pine
Ely Block, Laura c Forsyth
Everett Hotel Block, Bay c Julia
Freidenberg Block, 15 W Bay
Fuller's Block, 69 and 71 W Bay
Gonzales Block, 31 and 33 E Bay
Grunthal's Block, northwest c Bay and Ho-
gan
Hartridge's Block, 12 and 14 E Bay
Hart's Block, 82 to 90 E Bay
Hazeltine Block, s. e. c W Bay and Laura
Herkimer Block, 24 E Bay
Hoeg's Block, 9 to 15 E Bay
Holmes Block, 99 to 105 W Bay
Holmes' H. E. Block, 52 E Bay
Hubbard's Block, 42 and 44 W Bay
John Clark's Block, southeast c E Bay and
Newnan
Ledwith Block, southeast c Bay and Pine
L'Engle Block, northeast c W Bay and Pine
L'Engle Block, Pine c Adams


ND HALLS.




L'Engle Block, 721 W Bay
Livingston Block, opp St. Johns House
Masonic Hall, northeast c Bay and Pine
Masonic Temple,* Julia c State
Masons Block, W Bay c Julia
McConihe Block, southwest c W Bay and
Laura
McCormick's Hall, head Washington
McQuaid's Block, 48 and 50 W Bay
Mitchell's Block, 35 to 41 E Bay
Mohawk Block, opp the Carleton
New Court House, Market c Forsyth
Odd Fellows Hall, 44 Market
Odd Fellows Hall,* Beaver c Ocean
Park Opera House, Laura c Duval
Parkhurst Block, s. e. c Forsyth and Newnan
Polk's Block, W Bay bet Laura and Pine
Reed's Block, southwest c W Bay and Ocean
Rivas & Koopman's Block, 17 and 19 W Bay
Robinson's Block, 75 and 77 W Bay
Root's Block, 16 W Bay
Santo's Block, 36 and 38 E Bay
Taylor's Block, northeast c Bay and Hogan
Thebaut's Block, southwest c Newnan and
Forsyth
Union Hall, Clay c Adams
Walsh's Block, southwest c Bay and Liberty
Witschen's Block, 59 and 61 W Bay


WHARVES.


Arctic Ice Co.'s wharf, B.
Astors's wharf, ft of Hogan, r of Astor Block
Atlantic wharf, r of Atlantic Block, ft of Pine
Central wharf, ft Ocean
Clark's wharf. ft Newnan
Drew, Hazeltine & Livingston's wharf, r of
Ice House, ft of Laura
Elliott's wharf, Brooklyn
Fernandina & Jacksonville R. R, wharf, at F.
& J. Depot
Florida Ry. & Nay. Co.'s R. R. wharf, ft of
Julia and Hogan
Foster's wharf, r 76 W Bay
Hartridge's wharf, r 14 E Bay
Hart's wharf, r 82 E Bay
Hazeltine's wharf, ft Laura, DeBary-Baya
Line of steamers lessees


Hubbard's wharf, r 38 and 40 W Bay
Industrial Machine Works wharf, ft B.
McConihe's wharf, r 42 W Bay
McQuaid's wharf, r 44 and 46 W Bay
Pier No. 1 r 24 E Bay
Reed's wharf, Tysen & Smith, r of Reed's
Block, ft Ocean
Root's wharf, r 16 W Bay
Ship Yard wharf, ft Catherine
Solary's wharf, ft of Pine
Tourists' & Shippers' Fast Line wharf, ft
Hogan
Walsh's wharf, ft Liberty
Wharf of Waycross Short Line, ft Bridge
Wightman & Christopher's wharf, ft Mar-
ket














JOURNALS AND JOURNALISTS OF JACKSONVILLE.

Opinion-Established December, 1885. Charles L. Fildes, editor and
proprietor. Issued every morning. 28 columns.
The Churchman-Published semi-monthly in the interest of the Epis-
copalChurch. Rev. R. H. Weller, D.D., and J. J. Daniel, Esq., editors;
Frank W. Mumby, business manager, 13 W Bay.
The Counting Room Magazine-Established October, 1855. William
H. Kane, editor; Charles W. DaCosta, publisher. Terms, $2.00 per year;
single copies, 20 cts. DaCosta's Printing House, 211 W Bay.
The Daily Florida Herald-32i W Bay. Established March, 1883.
Clark & Graves, proprietors and publishers; John T. Graves, editor in
chief; Harrison W. Clark, business manager; Ed. C. Campbell, ass't edi-
tor; William Wallace Douglass, City and State editor; Rufus A. Rus-
sell, foreman of composing and press room; William R. Carter, staff cor-
respondent- Democratic.
The Florida Dispatch-(Illustrated) 30 pages, 21 W Bay. D. Red-
mond and D. H. Elliott, editors. Established 1875. Weekly, $2.00 per
year. Charles W. DaCosta, publisher and proprietor.
Florida Grove and Garden-Monthly. John Frank, publisher and
proprietor. Terms, $1.00 per year. Magazine form. Devoted to agricul-
ture and horticulture. Office 30 E Bay. First number issued in Novem-
ber, 1885.
Florida Medical and Surgical Journal-Established November 1, 1885.
Thomas O. Summers, M.D., Charles II. Mallet. M.D., editors; Neal
Mitchell, M.D.,associate editor. Terms, $1.00 per year. Issued monthly
in magazine form. 60 pages. The organ of the Florida State Medical
Association. Office, Ely Block.
The Florida News-Published every Saturday. J. Willis Menard,*
editor ; Thomas V. Gibbs,* associate editor ; Willis T. Menard,* publisher.
30 E Bay. Independent in politics. Devoted to the interests of the col-
ored race in the South. Price, $2.00 per year.
The Florida Times- Union-Times-Union Building, W Bay c Laura.
Issued every da.y in the year, Times established November 29, 1881;
Union established 1875; Consolidated February 1, 1883. C. H. Jones &
Bro., proprietors and publishers; Charles H. Jones, editor in chief ; John
Ransom, managing editor; M. R. Bowden, city editor; Howard Little-
field, State and news editor; George W. Jones, business manager; F. W.
Dennis, foreman job office and bindery; H. W. Dennis, foreman news-
paper. Independent.
The Florida Weekly Times-Times-Union Building, W Bay c Laura.
Same as the Florida Times-Union. Independent.
The Illustrated Hotel News-Established October, 1885. The Hotel
News Co., publishers; Charles L. Pleasants, editor; Robert E. Pleasants,
business manager. Issued every Thursday. Terms, $2.00 per year; 5 cts.
per copy. Devoted to hotel news of the United States. Office, Park
Opera House. Daily edition during the winter season.







JOURNALS AND JOURNALISTS.


The Industrial Recorder-Ocean c Forsyth. Established April, 1885.
B. T. Allen & Co., proprietors and publishers; B. T. Allen. editor. Pub-
lished weekly, in the interest of the industrial classes. Price. 81.00 per
year. Independent.
The Peoples' .Journal-Established in Jacksonville September, 15, 1883,
as successor to the Progressive Age, of Columbus, Ga. The Peoples' Jour-
nal Publishing Co., proprietors and publishers : John W. Thompson,'"
editor; Douglas Y. Hill,* associate editor. Independent Republican.
Weekly. $1.00 per year.
The Semi-Tropical-Ex-Gov. Harrison Reid. editor; Semi-Tropical
Publishing Co., publishers. Office 21 WV Bay. Terms, 83.00 per year.
The Sunday Democrat-(Illustrated) 8 page, 64 columns. The Sunday
Democrat Publishing Co., proprietors and publishers; William D.
Hughes, business manager. First number issued October 25, 1885. Price,
4.00 per annum ; 10 cts. per copy. Weekly. Politics neutral. Office, 50
V Bay.
The Tropical Paradise-30 E Bay. John Frank, proprietor; Thomas
B. Oliver, editor. Established February 3, 1883. $2.00 per year, weekly.
Devoted to the interests of Florida.


GOMEZ & MARTELIZ,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

FINE HAVANA DOMESTIC CIGARS,

Smoking and Imported Articles.

133 West Bay St., near Bridge St., Jacksonville, Fla.


0. JD GADSON,
Plain and Decorative

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER,

Also Dealer in Paints, Oils, Varnishes,

ArmN VPATxrmRS' SuFrms.


175 East Bay Street,


Jacksonville, Fla.





ESTABLISHEDD 1865.-*K


S. RITZEWOLLER,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


Dry goods Carpets,
CLOTHING,

SHOES, HATS, NOTIONS,
73 W est Ba- Street,

JACKSONVILLE, 0 0 Fl1RIBA.

-_L\~ IS~~7 ~C/A'/ J~IAU -


PROPRIETOR
Blvarsie ~~hursiery
Storeroom, 27 East Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.















J:ACKSONVIILLe.

[THE METROPOLIS OF THE EMPIRE OF FLORIDA.]



WHERE Jacksonville now is, was unknown before the Patriot war, save
as the chief place of crossing the St. Johns. Its Indian name was Wacca
Pilatka. Its literal meaning, and the nearest that it can be rendered into
English, is the Cows Crossing Over." By all English-speaking people
who knew of it, it was abbreviated into the Cow Ford.
The English, while they possessed the country, constructed a road
leading from St. Augustine northwest to the great river at this place, and
hence, in the same direction, to the Georgia line, and far beyond. This
was before the Revolution. Spain had previously possessed the province,
but had never opened a road through any part of it worthy the name; nor
did she afterwards when she became repossessed of it. The road opened
was called the King's Road, and is so known to the present time. It
brought travel from the Southern States, and when the Patriot war began,
it led the Patriot army to the St. Johns. Here it lay encamped around
the Cow Ford for several weeks. This was in 1812. At that time a large
bold spring of the best water burst out from the hill above, on the west
side of the road, at the foot of what is now Liberty street, which supplied
the army. It became eventually filled with sand, and long years ago it
entirely disappeared. Over the place now stands the house of Walsh.
The army finally crossed the river, and advanced to St. Augustine. But
having no heavy guns it was impossible to capture the fort, and after
lying before it several months it drew off and retraced its steps, and re-
mained for a time after on the east side of the river, and finally recrossed
at the Cow Ford and disappeared, never to unite again.

THE FIRST SETTLER.
The next occurrence in the early history of Jacksonville was its settle-
ment by a permanent settler. This was Mr. Lewis Z. Hogans.
Upon the inland route of the water communication between Fernandina
and the St. Johns. Purnall Taylor, a Spanish subject, had been killed, in
a fight between a number of the people of that nation and a scouting party
of the Patriot army. Some years after, his widow, Dona Maria Suavez on
behalf of herself and children, petitioned the Spanish Government and
was granted 200 acres of land on the north side of the river St. John. lying
eastward of a grant previously made to John Jones, on the north side of
McCoy's Creek. Mr. Hogans soon after married the widow, and in the
latter part of the fall of 1816 he built upon the grant, and moved across to
it from the south side of the St. Johns, where he had before then lived.
His building stood principally in what is now Forsyth Street, between








16 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Hogan and Julia streets. There is a space of rising ground still easily
distinguishable, but hardly a hill. Upon this he built, and here he re-
sided principally to the end of his life. We say principally, for after set-
tling on the grant he had also other places where he spent some time, but
this was his home. He cleared up land around him and fenced it, and in
the following spring of 1817 he planted a crop of provisions, then in great
demand, and succeeded in gathering it in, in greatest abundance.

THE SECOND SETTLER.

Soon after Mr. Hogans commenced his settlement, another Spanish sub-
ject petitioned the Government for a grant of 100 acres of land on the
north side of the St. Johns opposite St. Nicholas. In December, 1816, it
was granted to him on the south side of Hogans' Creek and east of the
Taylor grant, and he at once entered upon his possession and began its
improvement. This was

JUAN MAESTRE,

who was the second settler. He was a native of St. Augustine, and this
was his name in Spanish. In English, he was called and is known as John
Masters. He alleged in his petition that he was a Skipper in the Boats
of the Royal Domain." He cleared up a space and built a residence upon
what is now the middle of the east end of Square No. 1, between Bay and
Forsyth streets. Large and spreading live-oaks stood around his dwell-
ing. They still stand at the place, but the owners of the land have now
built away to the southeast and northeast.
His grant was bounded on the west by that of Maria Taylor, on the
north and east by Hogans' Creek, and on the south by the St. Johns
River. When it was afterwards surveyed, the surveyor certified that it
contained only 50 acres. An additional 50 acres was in time granted him
at another place ; though it has been ascertained since that this tract at
Jacksonville contains nearly 80 acres-79 and a fraction. He cleared up
a field, and in the spring of 1817 planted it. He had a large family, and
as his crop grew it gave promise of an abundant yield; but he did not re-
main to gather it. The Carthagenians-they were then so called, and are
still so remembered-a brave and daring people, in the early part of the
summer of 1817 attacked and captured Fernandina. As soon as this be-
came known at St. Augustine,the Spanish garrison at Fort St.Nicholas,and
the "boats of the Royal Domain" on the St. Johns, were withdrawn to
that city. This was in July, 1817. Mr. Masters had to abandon his new
home, and with his family go also, leaving and losing his crop, and all his
property on his place. He never returned again. In June, 1820, nearly
three years after he left it, he sold and conveyed his land for $200 to

THE THIRD SETTLER, JOHN BRADY.

He at once moved on to it and put up other buildings, all well constructed
of the best timber. It had then never been cut off, and was superior to
any in the country at this day. He also kept the ferry, and entertained
travelers, who found his house a pleasant place. And it was














WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 17

THE FIRST HOTEL.
The travel in that day was almost wholly on horseback to and from St.
Augustine, to the border of Florida, and the adjoining States. His
manner was most pleasant and agreeable, and his name soon became
known beyond the province, as well as within, as a host who spared no
exertion to make for his guests a home where they could be at ease, and
enjoy the time they staid. His table was always bountifully supplied
with the best, and his care of his guests' horses was all that they could
wish. All this drew to the place many who else, perhaps, might never
have come. Among the first of these were William G. Dawson and
Stephen E. Buckles, two gentlemen from Middle Georgia. The first came
seeking relief from pulmonary troubles; the second cnme to accompany
his friend. They were pleased with the place, wiri its, dry and health-
giving atmosphere, the magnificent river; and determined to make the
place their home. There was not then, nor ever h;,d been, a store nearer
than St. Augustine, Fernandina and St. Mary's, in Georgia. The trade
on the river was carried on in small sailing vessels to Savannah, and back,
by the inland passage, almost entirely. The two gentlemen resolved to
purchase a stock of goods in New York and bring them to Florida, and
establish themselves in the mercantile business. This was done as soon
as they could find a vessel willing to come-not then very easy to do.

THE FIRST STORE.

They built a large log-house on what is now the middle lot of the north
side of Square No. 3, on the south side of Adams street, between Market
and Newnan streets. The news soon spread, and the people came to see,
from the Georgia line and all intermediate settlements. Dawson & Buckles
was the firm name. Their genial and obliging conduct, and fair and hon-
orable dealing, became known wherever one went who had once dealt
with them. They were the

FOURTH AND FIFTH SETTLERS.
All along the river, at that time, from the ferry, now Liberty Street,
westward to Mr. Hogans' eastern fence, where Laura Street now is, was
then a dense hammock growth, through which no man ever passed. East-
ward of the ferry, down to where Catherine Street now is, was open pine-
land; and open pine-land extended from the ferry north to Hogans'
Creek, and westward, north of where Forsyth now is, far beyond the
present city limits. The King's Road led up north from the river, east of
Mr. Brady's residence whence it turned northwestward, leading by on the
north of the store of Messrs. Dawson & Buckles. Mr. Hogans' and Mr.
Brady's were the only families then here. Both of these gentlemen had
their houses constantly filled with travelers, and often they could not find
room for all who came. When this was the case Messrs. Dawson & Buck-
les took into their store those who could not be accommodated, where they
had ample room up-stairs; and, when occasion required, they never hesi-
tated to cut open a bale of fine blankets for the use of the comers, who
had nowhere else to sleep. Thisunselfish and generous conduct brought
its reward. It was told everywhere, and drew custom from far and near.
They never failed, either, to sell the blankets. "They are not injured,"








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


the purchaser said, "by the use you put them to. I would put them to
the same use in my house, if necessary, and would not consider them in-
jured by it." Magnanimous conduct, wherever shown, is always appre-
ciated by the people. It never failed to win their regard, their esteem,
and favor.
THE FIRST BOARDING-HOUSE.
The reputation acquired by Mr. Brady as a host, and by Messrs. Daw-
son & Buckles as merchants, and it being also widely known that accom-
modation could not be found for all the travel there was then to the place,
prompted and induced Mr. I. D. Hart, then living with his family on the
St. Mary's River, near King's Ferry, to come and establish himself here,
in keeping a boarding-house. His father, William Hart, Esq., had been
long before living in the vicinity; had owned and sold Point Isabel, and
lived at Smithfield, a few miles north-east of here, and was living at the
mouth of Montcrief's Creek, where the Patriot war found him, and the
Patriot army ruined him. I. D. Hart, and his brother Daniel C. Hart,
were both in that army-as every able man, not over military age, was
obliged to be-and lay encamped at the Cow Ford with it, and with it
crossed the river and marched to the siege of St. Augustine. When it
retraced its steps and recrossed the river and dispersed, Daniel C. Hart
returned to his father's house, where he afterwards continued to live-
having himself no family--as much as he lived anywhere. I. D. Hart
went further, and some years after was married on the St. Mary's River,
and settled down near his father-in-law, and began there to make what he
termed "a livin'," and perhaps there would have remained, if he had not
heard the reports carried across the country of what was being done by
those who had settled and were living at the Cow's Ford. Conjecturing
then that there was a better opening here than anywhere else to make
money, by entertaining a part of the travel then going in large numbers
from the adjoining States to St. Augustine and returning, he came over,
and on the 12th day of May, 1821, purchased of Mr. Hogans 18 acres of
land in the south-east corner of the Taylor Grant, for $72, which he paid
for in cattle; and built him a large log-house on what is now the middle
lot of the north side of Square No. 2, on the south side of Forsyth street-
the lot east of Thomas McMurray's livery stable-between Market and
Newnan streets, to which he afterwards removed his family. He also in-
duced his brother, Daniel C. Hart, who still had no family, to come and
settle here, which he did, building and settling across on the north side of
one of the side-roads, which are not infrequently made by the travel on
each side of the main road, in places of deep sand, to find harder ground,
and at greater or less distances apart, all leading in the same direction.
These gentlemen were the
SIXTH AND SEVENTH SETTLERS.

When the town came to be partly laid out, this side-road became For-
syth Street, and Bay Street was located so as to make it so.
The treaty of cession of the Floridas by Spain to the United States of
February 22, 1819, caused a renewed impetus of immigration into the
country, and many valued citizens came to stay who otherwise might
never have come. Amongst these were Francis J. Ross, Benjamin Chaires,









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 19

and John Bellamy, from South Carolina, with their families and all their
property, of whom more will be said hereafter.
Messrs. Dawson & Buckles built a large frame house east of their store,
on what is now the northeast corner of Square No. 3, for a boarding-house,
and after it was completed Mrs. Sarah Waterman, a widow lady, then
living at the St. John's Bluff, came and kept it. She had three handsome
daughters grown, and one not grown, and two younger sons. Mr. Joseph
Andrews also, the brother-in-law of Mr. Hart, came afterwards, and built
him a large frame house on what is now the middle lot of the north side
of square No. 11, on the south side of Adams Street, for a boarding-house;
every house being then often filled, and not having capacity to accommo-
date perhaps half the travel to and through the place.
The transfer of the eastern part of Florida by Spain to the United States
under the treaty-the change of Flags, as it was termed-took place at
St. Augustine, July 10th, 1821, when the Spanish flag was lowered with a
salute, and the American flag went up. Afterwards, by Act of Congress,
approved March 30, 1822, the Territorial Government of Florida was or-
ganized, under which the Legislative Council of the Territory, as the leg-
islative assembly was named in the organic act, was required to meet at
Pensacola on the second Monday of June, 1822, where it met, and divided
the Territory into counties, Duval being one. Jacksonville was laid out
into a town in the same month. Francis J. Ross, Benjamin Chaires and
John Bellamy being the Commissioners. D. S. H. Miller was the sur-
veyor. Messrs. Brady. Hogans and Hart, owners on each side of the di-
viding line of the Taylor and Masters grants, were present, and agreed
upon the starting-point of the survey, the water's edge of the north bank
of the St. Johns, and agreed also that the line should run north to Ho-
gans' Creek. They agreed also that they would each give forty feet on
their respective sides of the line, for a street. This was the first street
run, and was eighty feet wide. It was named Market Street, though for
what reason is not now known. It was determined likewise that there
should be six lots, of 105 feet square each, in a square, two lots adjoining
north and south, being 210 feet, and three east and west, being 315 feet.
The next street, it was determined, should be the same width as Market
Street, and should be named Bay Street, having a margin on its south
side, between it and the river; and the other streets should be each 70 feet
wide.
The first square designated and numbered was east of Market and north
of Bay street-that on which the Burritt property now is-on which Mr.
Brady lived, and in compliment to him, as the first settler present of the
parts now to be surveyed, it was designated as Square No. 1. The next
square surveyed was that on which The Carleton House now stands, on
which Mr. Hart lived, and was designated as Square No. 2. The square
north of it was designated as Square No. 3; and that east of No. 3, across
Market street, was designated as Square No. 4. This last is north of
No. 1.
Mr. Brady's buildings, it was found when the survey was made, would
be in the street on the east of Square No. 1, if but three lots from west to
east were in it. To avoid this difficulty, another lot on the south side and
another on the north side of the square were added, from west to east,
making in that square eight lots, and 420 feet from west to east, which
saved Mr. Brady's buildings from living a life in the street. This neces-








20 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

sity made all that range of squares from south to north conform to this
survey, and each to contain eight instead of six lots.
The commissioners then surveyed Square No. 5, east of Square No. 1,
the King's Road leading from the river north being between, which they
named Liberty street. It was long known also as Ferry street. The
square north of No. 5 was designated as No. 6; north of that was No. 8 ;
west of that No. 7, and west of that No. 9. This was the surveyor's
wrong marking at the time, and it was never corrected.
From the survey of Square No. 9 they came back to Bay Street, west of
Market Street, and named the street west of Square No. 2 Newnan Street,
in honor of Colonel Daniel Newnan, one of the gallant men who came into
Florida from Georgia with the Patriot army. The Commissioners then
ran along the west side of Newnan Street to Forsyth Street, and desig-
nated the square west of Newnan Street as Square No. 10. The square
north of that they designated No. 11, and that north of the last as No. 12.
This square was thus brought west of Square No. 9.
Again they came back to Bay Street, but this time east of Liberty
Street. To the street east of Square No. 5 they gave the name of Wash-
ington, and proceeded to survey the range of squares east of Washington
Street, from Bay Street northward. The first or southernmost square
they designated as No. 13. North of that was No. 14; north of that, No.
15; and north of that, No. 16. They they then turned and surveyed and
numbered westward, No. 17, No. 18, No. 19 and No. 20; which last was
north of No. 12. Here, they stayed their work, and never afterwards re-
sumed it. All the other squares have been surveyed and numbered since,
which space will not permit here to be described.
The first street north of Bay they named Forsyth, in compliment to a
Georgia statesman whose name will be recalled by every intelligent
reader. The next they named Adams, the third Monroe, both Presidents,
and the last Duval, a compliment to the then Governor of the territory.
East of Market Street was Liberty, as before told, and east of that
Washington. West of Market was Newnan, as before stated, and west of
that Ocean. This last was so named because the waters covered the face
of the whole earth westward of the west half of Square No. 10, so far as
could then be seen. All over it was a dense growth of tall and stately
trees and impervious underbrush, vines and bush, through which no man
traveled; but through which the water from the river silently penetrated.
The last thing done by the Commissioners was to give to the place its
name, about which space forbids that more shall here be said.
It will be seen that the names given by the Commissioners to the streets
were names "as were names," and not the names of women and female
children. This bad taste was the action of the owners of the land after-
wards.
On the day the town was laid out a good many lots were sold by both
'Mr. Brady and Mr. Hart. Mr. Bellamy, one of the Commissioners,
bought of Mr. Brady lot No. 4 of Square No. 1, the same on which the
residence of S. B. Hubbard, Esq., now stands. The deed conveying it was
drawn by Abraham Bellamy a few days after the sale, but it was never re-
corded. The record of a deed in that day was regarded as almost useless.
It was a matter of public notoriety that the property claimed was sold and
bought, and that the purchaser had received a deed for it. His title was
therefore considered perfect, whether the deed was ever recorded or not..








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


It was perhaps laid away by the purchaser with much the same feeling as
an old letter would be that was thought worth preserving, to be referred
to if occasion should ever require, but with little probability that it ever
would. Hence, the original conveyances of many of the lots in Jackson-
ville do not appear on record, and most likely do not now exist.
On the same day also, D. S. H. Miller bought of Mr. Brady all of the
lots in square No. 5 east of the King's Road, named Liberty Street, and
north of Bay Street, the deed for which was never recorded. Mr. Miller
afterwards sold these out to different persons, and conveyed each, the
deeds for which are recorded.
Stephen J. Eubanks also, on the day the town was laid out, bought of Mr.
Brady a lot described in the deed as "A lotin the front street, running and
leading from the ferry to Hart's landing, third lot from the ferry, together
with the margin below said lot on the river side." To this deed Abraham
Bellamy and Stephen E. Buckles, Mr. Dawson's partner, were the sub-
scribing witnesses. The reason for the description in the deed was that
all the space from the ferry westward along what is now Bay Street, to the
east side of Mr. Hogan's field, was a dense hammock growth, through
which from east to west there was not even a trail. This dense growth
was not cut down for many years after. The lot described is the second
lot east from Market Street-one of the Burritt lots. The Margin below
said lot on the river side," is Water Lot No. 3, one of those on which is
Jones's boatyard. Hart's Landing" was at the foot of Market Street,
to which a pathway led down through the scrub from Forsyth Street.
The price then paid for the lot and the "Margin was 812.
Captain Francis J. Ross, one of the Commissioners also, on the day the
town was laid out bought of Mr. Hart. Water Lot No. 5, on the west side
of Market street; also Lot No. 1 of Square No. 2, where the Carleton
House now stands, and the lot north of it, all for 825. The deed was a
few days after made and executed, and delivered. Captain Ross after-
wards sold these lots back to Mr. Hart, and gave back the deed, and it
was destroyed, and does not therefore appear on record.
Shortly after Mr. Brady sold and conveyed to Benjamin Chaires and
Francis J. Ross Lot No. 1 of Square No. 4, but the deed made by him to
them for it was not recorded until October 10, 1840, more than eighteen
years after.
This lot, upon its purchase from Mr. Brady, was at once given by the
purchasers, Major Chaires and Captain Ross, to the county for a court-
house, though the deed for it was not made until July 13. 1825. It has
ever since its purchase from Mr. Brady been known as the Court-House
Lot ; is that upon which the first and only court-house in the county was
ever built, and upon which another is now nearly completed.
Mr. Brady sold also to Major Chaires for '", eight town lots, to wit:
Two water lots described in the deed as No. 4 and No. 6. A mistake was
here made as to Water Lot No. 6. That lot lies west of Water Lot No.
5, before sold by Mr. Hart to Captain Ross. It was on Mr. Hart's land;
purchased in the Taylor grant. It was never owned by Mr. Brady, and
was never claimed by him, and was never claimed by Major Chaires under
said deed to him or otherwise. The east half of it was sold by Mr. Hart
five and a half months after, and has ever since been held under the
deed then made by him for it. Water Lot No. 4 lies east of Market
street, that street bounding it on the west, and is the westernmost of
those known as Jones's Boatyard, and on which is the Yacht Club build-








22 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

ing. Water Lot No. 4 was Mr. Brady's; was on his land, and he had the
right to sell it. It has ever since been held under the deed he then made
for it, though this deed was not recorded until December 7, 1838-more
than sixteen years after. The deed describes also Six town lots known
by the numbers 1, 5, and 6, in Square No. 1, and 2, 3, and 4, in Square
No. 4," of which space forbids any further mention.
After making sales and conveyances of other lots to various persons, Mr.
Brady, January 29, 1823, sold and conveyed for $450 to John Bellamy, one
of the Commissioners, all that remained to him of his said tract of land,,
the Masters grant. Why he sold, it cannot here be stated. The deed
was drawn by Abraham Bellamy, was signed by Mr. Brady, and witnessed
by D. H. S. Miller and Abraham Bellamy, and in a week's time Mr. Brady
departed to make his home for the remainder of his life in Alabama. The
deed after being delivered, was put away by Mr. Bellamy, and was not put
upon record until August 10, 1833, more than 10 years and a half after it
was executed.
Mr. Bellamy did not buy the land because he wanted it. He never sold
a lot of it after he bought it, and the following year he sold the entire
tract for $600 to John L. Doggett, agreeing to convey it when the pur-
chase-money and interest should be paid. The interest was six per cent.,
and this and the principal was paid 12 years after. Mr. Bellamy had
long before removed to Middle Florida, and never after returned to the
East. What happened to him, and in what he was afterwards concerned,
would be interesting if told, but space forbids.
Among the many early comers to the country were William Bailey,
William J. Mills, John L. Doggett, and John Warren. The first of these
was from Georgia. He married Miss Elizabeth Bellamy, daughter of
the Commissioner, and afterwards followed the fortunes of that ex-
traordinary man. Mr. Bellamy's son, Abraham Bellamy, belonged to
the legal profession, and was

THE FIRST LAWYER
who was ever a resident of Jacksonville. He built him an office near Mr.
Brady's residence, where he did business for all comers, and being an up-
right man he pacified and settled all disputes and differences whenever it
was possible. He also went with his father to Middle Florida. His after-
history would be read with pleasure if it could be told, but space forbids.

TIE FIRST MAYOR.

William J. Mills was of an English family that had long resided on
the island of Amelia. He was one of the most accomplished business men
who ever lived in the place, and after its incorporation as a town was its
first Mayor.
Judge John L. Doggett was the son of a minister of the Episcopal church
in Massachusetts, and of course received a finished education. But, as in
a great many other cases, his father's calling had no attraction for him,
and he emigrated to Florida. Here he became a merchant, and afterwards
bought out a live-oak camp, the property and appurtenances necessary in
cutting live-oak, and for some time cut and shipped that valuable timber.
He succeeded in it, of course, for he possessed intelligence and energy in
its management; but to continue it successfully required not intellectual








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


cultivation, but qualifications known as rough, rude, and strong. Finally
satisfied of this, and for another reason which will be continued hereafter,
on the 26th of July, 1826, he sold out the property and the appurtenances
of the business to John Price. He then turned his attention to the law ;
was admitted to practice; became Presiding Justice of the County Court;
was a member of the Legislative Council of the Territory, and its presi-
dent ; and after the designation of Presiding Justice was afterwards
changed was sole Judge of the County Court, which position he held to
the time of his death, January 8, 1844. Eminent in every excellence he
lived and died beloved, and without an enemy.
John Warren was a native of Virginia, and one of a large number of
sons. He left his home several years before he was of age and went to
Tennessee, where he became a volunteer in General Jackson's army. then
about to march for the country of the Creek Indians in Alabama. For
this service he possessed the utmost fondness, and served through the war
with great delight. He followed his great commander to New Orleans,
and was in that last battle between America and England. Three years
later, in 1817, he was one of the Carthagenians that attacked and cap-
tured Fernandina. His roving life ended at that place. He was there
married, and there settled down and lived in contentment until after the
change of flags, when he moved to the Cow-Ford of the St. John's. which
thenceforward he made his home. He was one of the early merchants of
the place. He built a large building of the best materials in the best man-
ner at the northwest corner of Bay and Newnan streets, opposite the post-
office, with stories as high as any in the place at the present day, the
eastern end of the lower story being used as a store, and the western, for
a time, as a dwelling. The upper part being one large room was used as a
court-room until the court-house was sufficiently completed, and for
preaching and theatrical representations, and also, when occasions pre-
sented, for a ball-room. This building he rented to other parties. He
built for himself a commodious one and a half story building for a store
with a wide piazza on the south side, on Lot No. 1 of Square No. 11, the
northeast corner of Forsyth and Ocean streets, where the present Sander-
son House now stands, where he did a fine business until 1827, when he
sold it out and went into the country, and engaged in planting and cutting
and shipping ranging timber-pine timber hewn on four sides-pursuits
more congenial to his bold and active temperament.
These are a few of the large number of estimable men who came to the
place after the transfer of the country to the United States, of whom
space forbids further particular mention here.
THE FIRST COURT HOUSE

in the place was built by Judge John L. Doggett, under an agreement
and contract with the county made in October. 1823. It stood upon the
Court House lot, where another is now being erected. It was a structure
40 feet square, two stories high, with a basement of 10 feet in height, and
each story as high as the highest in the place at present. It was framed
by Seymour Pickett, an immigrant from the middle of the State of New
York. He had come to Florida during the Spanish occupancy, and had
engaged in his business as a ship carpenter south of St. Augustine, and
as a builder in Fernandina, where, in 1811, he married a wife 40 years
younger than himself. He had also built a water-mill for Charles F.








Y4 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Sibbald on Six Mile Creek in 1819, and afterwards settled higher up on
the same creek, where he continued to live through the remainder of his
lonilife.
W hen he had completed the laying out and framing the court-house,
the people of the county voluntarily gathered, and, under Mr. Pickett's
able direction, in two days raised it. This was in the summer of 1825. No
other such building was ever put up in Jacksonville before; nor has any
ever been since. It was at first supported by large hewn timbers, built up
in squares; but this arrangement was only temporary. Brick pillars of
great size and strength were then built, and the building was correctly
leveled and the timber under it removed. It was afterwards completed,
and mainly by Mr. Pickett and by Daniel S. Gardner, another immigrant
from the State of New York, and one of the most finished workmen that
has ever been in this country. The front was to the south. A long and
broad portico, supported also by brick pillars, was before the building,
to which broad steps led up from the ground on the east and west. A
broad double door, perhaps ten feet high, led in, and broad steps inside
led up, on the east and west, to the upper story. The windows were
numerous and of a size corresponding with the size of the building, being
perhaps seven feet high and four broad. To these double shutters open-
ing to the right and left, of panel work, were made of white pine, and
closed out the rain and the wind, and also the light. They were after-
wards replaced by sash, when these could be obtained.
For several years after the building was completed the hammock growth
still stood between it and the river, all across where the Burritt property
now is, from the south side of Forsyth Street to the water. It was cut
down by Stephen J. Eubanks, before mentioned, who had come into the
place with about a hundred hands, from the road opening between Black
Creek and Jacksonville.

THE FIRST FAILURE.
The county failed to pay for the building at the time it had agreed to
do. It renewed the engagement in 1827; and having failed to pay under
this last agreement, it again, on the 10th of August, 1829, gave Judge
Doggett a certificate of indebtedness of $3,805,payab]e with interest at six
per cent. in the year 1835. It was all he could get. This failure to pay
him for the work, after he had completed his contract, ruined him. In
that day there were no banks here, nor any men having money who could
have taken the security, and so relieve him. He would not sue the county,
as many another has since had to do, and he waited and had to do with-
out his just due. When the last date fixed for its payment was reached
it was not paid, nor was it for several years after. Yet all this time the
building was used by the county as if nothing was owed for it. The debt
was eventually paid, and the building was afterwards burned down and
destroyed by the United States troops in the late war.
The next public building erected was a jail. It was built by Captain
Francis J. Ross, one of the Commissioners, a year or two after the court-
house was erected, and stood upon the lot now occupied by Dr C. J. Ken-
worthy's former residence. It was burned some years after it was built.
The lot had not been purchased by the county. It lay vacant for upwards
of 20 years, when James W. Bryant bought it and built upon it. In the
meantime, the county had built a two-roomed structure for a jail on the








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


court-house lot, ample, and more than ample, for the wants of that time,
but not sufficient for the days that came, 'after freedom "-after the
close of the war. Necessity at length forced the county authorities to
build a larger and better one. which they did. It has never been empty
since.
There was in early days a post office also. The mail was then carried
on horseback, to St. Mary's and back, once a week : and to St. Augustine
and back as often. The arrival of the mail had then its interest for the
citizens, as it still has. After having been kept in a store, as is usual at
the first, and perhaps in one or two other places, the post office was re-
moved to a room built under the court house, where it long remained.
The mail was carried also to Tallahassee. and, of course, on horseback.
The mail-rider who left here for the capital of the Territory would return
hither two weeks after.
There was once upon a time, while the mail was yet on horseback, that
it was carried to St. Mary's and back by Green Bush. This was his name
-a little old citizen of about twenty years, a notable coon and squirrel
hunter, and one of the best ritie shots in the county. He came in one
Sunday afternoon, and seeing a much larger number of persons awaiting
his coming than usual, he was at once impressed with his importance. He
rode up and greeted the assembled company in his blandest tone: "Good
evening, gentle-men.'" There was amongst the number a stranger from
New Hampshire, who responded : How do you do, my boy ? Mr. Bush
dismounted from his horse, took his mail-bag upon his arm, and for a
moment regarding the stranger with a look of lofty scorn,
"Returned him not a single word,
But to the house went in."

Of all possible forms of speech, that addressed to him was the most offen-
sive. "Boy !" He was then an older and a greater man than any of
those then present; and he knew it. His own father-though upwards of
six feet high, and faultlessly built ; one of the most genial and estimable
of men-was, in his estimation, in information and knowledge almost no-
where. "Boy!" He never forgave the designation. It may be inter-
esting to add here, that the stranger, failing to accumulate much wealth
by small merchandising, eventually became an Episcopalian minister, for
which he was much better fitted than for a grapple and struggle with
" this vain world," and "received a call," and left the country, and has
never since returned to make it his home ; while Mr. Bush went on tempt-
ing Providence by too long and continuous riding of the mail, and was at
last exposed to a dreadful storm of cold wind and long and drenching
rain, from which he took a cold, that in this day would be denominated
pneumonia, though it was not called so then, which in the end proved the
master, and carried him to realms where
The wicked cease from troubling
And the weary are at rest."

THE FIRST COUNTY COURT,

for the transaction of county:bis sP,'-.tQhat ever convened in this county
was held on Monday,.thl ,l'.Xlr.djy'f e40em *' 1822. George Gibbs, Esq.,
was the Clerk, a oehettei'aih of the old sch'oql .;:tp.soul of integrity and
*.. .
** :








26 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

honor ; the model of modesty and good breeding ; able, intelligent, accom
polished, and courteous, he moulded the business into form. The Justices
were Thomas Reynolds, William G. Dawson, who the reader will remem-
ber, Rigdon Brown, and Britton Knight; four more able or better men
for the position could not have been found. They were all old citizens, and
knew the county and people well. Thomas Reynolds was the Presiding
Justice. It was a meeting similar to that of our present Board of County
Commissioners, vested with like powers, and had met for a like purpose.
They proceeded to lay off the county into road districts, apportion the
hands to work the roads, and did other business of importance.
There was also at the first a Judge of the County Court, authorized by
the act of the Territorial Legislature, as all the other officers were; and
Major Benjamin Chaires was appointed to this position. But Congress
refused to sanction the act under which the appointment had been made,
and declared it null and void ; and for many years thereafter the chief
judicial officer of the County Court was the presiding justice.
James Dell had been appointed Sheriff of the county "during the
pleasure of the Governor," but some time over a year and a half after he
emigrated to the county of Alachua, and turned his attention to planting
in that fine county. He had early appointed Daniel C. Hart his deputy,
who thenceforward performed most of the duties of Sheriff, and on the
30th day of December, 1824, he was appointed Sheriff for two years from
that date. He was afterwards appointed U. S. Deputy Marshal, and con-
tinued to hold these positions to the time of his death, December 16,
1831, in the forty-first year of his age.
Mr. Gibbs, the Clerk, also left the county some time after his appoint-
ment, and went to reside in St. Augustine, where he was appointed Clerk
of the United States Court, then perhaps the best position in the Terri-
tory, as lie was the best officer. After his departure the county of Duval
had no clerk, and John Bellamy, one of the Commissioners, was appointed
to fill the vacancy. He entered upon the discharge of his duties shortly
after ; his first official act being to issue marriage licenses, for which the
parties had waited some time.
James Hughes was appointed Clerk December 30, 1824, when Daniel C.
Hart was appointed Sheriff, and for the same time, two years. He was ap-
pointed also Clerk of the United States Court, but he left the county about
the time his term as Clerk of the County Court expired, when both of
these positions became vacant. To that of Clerk of the County Court, I.
D. Hart was appointed in December, 1826; and at the following spring
term of the United States Court he was appointed its Clerk. Both of
these positions he continued to hold until the admission of the Territory
into the Union as a State in 1845, under its Constitution, which provided
for other courts.
Thefirst regular court ever held in the county was on Monday, Decem-
ber 1, 1823. The Hon. Joseph L. Smith was Judge. The first Grand Jury
that was ever impaneled in the county was on the second day of Decem-
ber, 1823. These grand jurors were John Bellamy (foreman), Stephen J.
Eubanks, John Houston, Isaac Tucker, Charles Broward, Seymour Pick-
ett, John Broward, John Price, James Dell, William Matthews, Cotton
Rawls, A. G. Soper, Lewellen Williams, Charles Seton, John D. Brad-
dock, John C. Houston, NatlianjeJ W7i]d; -apd. Stephen Vanzant-all good
men and true, of the countieS of.Bt'vaYa ti:X Aad a for which said court
was holden. :. '. :*' *

*..'*.* .. :*.
.. ** : *** .* : : : :..
:.. .* ...* **"*....









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 27

Thefirst civil case ever called to be tried in the county was the follow-
ing, and it was disposed of as follows :
Ephraim Harrison vs. John D. Vaughan. [In case.]-This day came
the parties aforesaid by their attorneys, and thereupon came a jury, to
wit: F. D. McDonnell, Lewis Christopher, Britton Knight, James Rouse,
William Sparkman, John Higginbotham, David Turner, Matthew H. Phil-
lips, John G. Brown, John G. Rushing, William G. Dawson, and Levis
Thigpen, who were sworn well and truly to try the issue joined between
the parties ; and on motion of the plaintiff by his attorney, and for rea-
sons appearing satisfactory to the court, it is ordered, that the jury be
discharged from rendering a verdict herein, and that this cause be con-
tinued until the next term, upon the plaintiff paying all the costs of the
defendant, herein expended."
How strangely all this would have appeared to a native of Spain, if one
had been present. Until after the change of flags, a court, in the sense
understood under the common law, adopted and obtaining in the United
States, and a jury, was unheard of in Florida.
It is not possible to follow and produce here the interesting proceedings
of the court, or anything like all the reminiscences of the time, further
than to state that the jurors above mentioned, and all others present, were
from both of the counties of Duval and Nassau, and were as good men as
could be found in any country. None of these were from that part of
Duval now known as Clay. It then had within its limits but few inhabi-
tants.
Five years later, a proceeding was begun which will appear strange to
those who will read of it to-day. It was as follows:
Territory of Florida, Duval County: Personally appeared in open court William Parker,
who being duly sworn, deposes and says, that he has reason to believe and does verily believe,
that one Thomas R. Tucker is guilty of feloniously stealing, taking and leading away three
horses, the property of certain Creek or Seminole Indians. That said horses were stolen near
the northern line of Florida, and that one of said horses is, as this affiant has been informed
and believes, at one Isaac Auger's; and one at the steam sawmill in Duval County, and one
in St. Augustine; and that said Thomas R. Tucker is now lurking about in Nassau County;
and prays that process may issue, and also to take into custody the said horses, that they may
be kept and returned for the benefit of the Indians.
" Subscribed and sworn to in open court before me, this 13th day of December, 1828.
WILLIAM PARKER,
"ISAIAH D. HART, Clerk.
Let a warrant in due form issue in the premises.
JOSEPH L. SMITH, Judge."

It was a strange proceeding, because it was perhaps the only one to be
found of record in any country in which a white man voluntarily appeared
in court to ask that process might issue against another white man for
stealing horses from Indians,-a people never before considered as having
any rights, and from whom to steal horses, and cattle also, had ever been
regarded as smart, if not really m-ritorious.
Jacksonville improved as time passed. Men came from every direction,
and of women not a few. The sons and other relatives of wealthy men
in the Northern States, and other people of all kinds who were affected
with pulmonary troubles, came to spend the winter. Some staid and
entered into business, and others left. Amongst those who did a large
mercantile business was the firm of S. L. & W. H. Burritt. They were
citizens of Connecticut. There were four brothers, John, Samuel L.,
William Henry, and Jim, in the order named. They were all extraordi-








28 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

nary men intellectually, and had all been finely educated except Jim, the
youngest, and he had been also, to the extent his nature was capable of
receiving. Pursuits lying nearer his heart had to a considerable extent
prevented, which will be told. They were gifted with all attractive graces,
and constituted by nature and fitted by culture to adorn any place or sta-
tion. Four brothers on whom Providence seemed to have lavished its
favors to a greater extent can rarely be found. They were possessed of
means when they came to this country. John Burritt, the oldest, was in
every sense the first. But alas a follower of Tom Paine, he was an avowed
unbeliever. He did not live long, though long enough to impress all who
knew him with the conviction that on him had been bestowed the choicest
blessings. He became a victim of that dread adversary consumption.
The next two brothers were the merchants, and possessed extraordinary
enterprise and energy. They brought to the place the first large cargo of
sugar ever brought to it from Cuba, and greatly overstocked the market
in all this part of the country. This they obtained in return for lumber,
barreled fish, and other produce shipped thither. They continued to
ship and to bring back coffee, ruin, molasses, salt, cigars, fruit, and other
things wanted here. For many years they were by long odds the leaders
in mercantile business in this country ; but the health of the junior part-
ner, Henry Burritt, as he was called, giving way, he became unable to
give the business the attention it required, and they had to close it.
Jim, the youngest, was a poet, "'wild," and in all kinds of messes
where sport and frolic were to be sought and often found. He was his
brothers' clerk, drudge, servant, and almost dog. It all came right to
him, and notwithstanding all that they could do, they could not keep
him out of mischief-making. At last, like all other men, he fell in love.
It was with a Miss H., living a distance from Jacksonville, and like all
other men, he had a rival, whose name was Wood, and who afterwards
married her. One fine morning at breakfast time, he (Burritt) called upon
a staid citizen and presented a letter. It was opened in his presence, and
read through. It contained three pages of poetry written by himself upon
the marriage of Mr. Wood and Mrs. Wood, and ended with :

Farewell to Mr. Wood and Mrs. Wood
And all the little black-jacks:
I hope their growth will servi them both,
And flourish on their bacl-tracks."
This ought never to have been done, and was inexcusable. No man should
write or speak in that way of a woman he had ever professed to love. He
now lies buried by the side of his two older brothers, John and Henry
Burritt, at the Brick-Yard Branch.
Years passed. Each was filled with interesting occurrence, but they
cannot here be told. This is a day of railroads, of telegraphs, of electrici-
ty, and can be compared most fittingly only to blooded race-horses-
"fast." The good is now passed by in a whirl and left behind unnoticed.
We must, then, like the wind that touches only the tree-tops in passing,
leap from point to point in our history, leaving all the space between
blank, because the space here forbids to tell all.
Jacksonville continued to increase in population, and this was then of
the order denominated "good." Settlements almost everywhere multi-
plied, and these had to be supplied with merchandise of all kinds needed
in a new and improving locality. The most of this was received through








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 29

Jacksonville. The productions of the country were sent out, and mostly
through the same port, and these continued to increase with the increasing
number and extent of new settlements constantly being made upon the
vast expanse of fertile lands of the interior. Amongst the number of mer-
chants most notable for enterprise, intelligence and integrity in that de-
sirable region were John Lewis, of Georgia, and the firm of Peden, McRae
& Co., of North Carolina. who did a large and profitable business until the
outbreak of the first Indian war in 1835 put an end to all civilized pulsnits
and compelled the people everywhere to abandon their homes and property,
and gather and build forts for protection. Below Newnansville, in the
county of Alachua, a few months after the outbreak, there was not even a
fort maintained. The Indians swarmed through the country, and that post
was in time alone held and occupied. Many of the people came away
to Black Creek and to Jacksonville. Forts were built in every direction
north and west of Newnansville. A block-house was built also in Jack-
sonville, on the site where the residence of Mr. Barnett, president of the
Bank of Jacksonville, now stands, around which the writer has done duty
as a sentinel on post many a night. All north and west of that renowned
fortress was then unimproved-was then a barren waste, and of course the
frontier. Many an amusing scene could he relate, caused by the electric
imagination of the weak-nerved, when it came to their turn to go upon
post, did space permit.
Their homes abandoned by the people everywhere through the interior,
everything went to wreck.
While Jacksonville was never the scene of attack, the trade and business
with the interior was destroyed with the abandonment of their homes by
the people, and every interest suffered; and when in 1842 the war was
declared ended, the place through the seven years of its continuance had
improved but little. When, however, that blessing was attained, the
people no longer felt any danger in going back to and remaining at their
loved homes.
Pursuits of every kind again sprang into existence, and the country
everywhere was soon the scene of renewed industry. Improvements fol-
lowed, and Jacksonville became blessed with the development of a busi-
ness that had always existed since the change of flags to a limited extent,
but which during the war had wholly ceased. This was the cutting and
sawing and shipping pine timber. Mills of a large size and fine build
were numerously erected, and almost everybody who had settled upon
the then scarcely touched pine lands began the cutting and furnishing the
timber. In all its branches it was a most profitable pursuit, and soon
drew to the place a largely increased number of persons, who came, of
course, to take advantage of the impetus given to almost all employment.
Fine crops also were made, and ten years after the close of the first Indian
war there was more money possessed by the great body of the people,
which they had made, than ever had been before or has ever been since.
This unprecedented prosperity continued until the commencement of
the last and greatest calamity-the late disastrous war. It destroyed
everything. Jacksonville was abandoned by its inhabitants, by all who
could get away, many of them lost all, a large number carrying away
nothing. They went mostly into the interior, where for four years they
struggled with privation and hardships unknown before. When the war
had ended and they returned, it was to find in many cases the'r homes and
buildings destroyed, and themselves without a shelter and unable to re-








30 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

cognize the places where they had lived. The United States army had
held possession-though at the first not continuously-and while here,
had put the torch to and burned down every building in the outer edge of
the town, and had thrown up breastworks in almost every quarter, as if
there was any danger of attack upon the place. Except the surprise and
killing of a picket-guard at the Brickyard Branch, soon after the com-
mencement of the war, the place never was attacked by the Confederate
forces, because it was well known to the leaders that if taken it could not
be held as long as the river was open to the United States gunboats.
Jacksonville at the close of the war was a gloomy looking place, and re-
minded the returning citizens of the great historian's description of Prussia
at the close of the ever-memorable Seven-Years' War.
Amongst the other buildings burned down and destroyed by the United
States forces was the court-house and the Episcopal and Catholic churches
in the center of the place. It was not, however, every one that lost. The
homes of a great many were spared, and were in good order and well pre-
served when the owners returned. In many instances the returning citizen,
if his home had been spared, found it in possession of negroes or of whites
who had come in with the United States army. To their credit, however,
they moved out upon request and gave the owners no trouble. Business,
at the first, there was none. The only railroad then in existence ran to
and connected with Tallahassee, the capital, and with Quincy twenty miles
beyond; and this road wanted every kind of repairs and improvements.
Connection by steamer with any place was of the past. It had so long
ceased, and the means which had created it had been so completely de-
stroyed, as to lead to the fear that it would be many a day before it could
be revived. But, to the astonishment of all, all these gloomy appearances
and apprehensions were unexpectedly dissipated. There was in the inte-
rior an article of commerce, which had been kept and stored for four
years because of the impossibility of its being disposed of, which, as soon
as peace was declared, as it were, forced itself to the seaboard and thence
away, and brought back money in abundance, and gave men a new start
in life ; renewed business, and imparted to the country renewed industry
and enterprise which proved its salvation. This famous article was
"cotton," and it will ever be held as heaven's greatest boon to the South.
Almost all kinds of business carried on before the war were revived, and
some to a greater extent than ever before. The genial climate, and curi-
osity to see Florida, brought many from abroad, who, when they came,
were often so agreeably surprised and so pleased that the accounts they
gave created an influence which brought in foreign capital, which, in-
creasing with the general prosperity of the country, has produced here
what in an earlier day would have been considered wonders rather than a
reality.
LOCATION.

The exact location of Jacksonville is latitude 30 deg. 24 min., longitude
80 deg. 40 min. It is finely situated on a bend of "the beautiful St.
Johns," by the circuitous and picturesque windings of which it is 25 miles
from the ocean, although in a direct line the distance is only 15 miles. On
a line due east across the country also, the Atlantic ocean is 15 miles dis-
tant. The city is well laid out with spacious streets, bordered with stately
"live-oaks," which, with their moss drapery, comprise in a scenic sense









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY 31

one of its finest features. The land upon which the city is built is mostly
high and rolling; the major portion of the water-front is also elevated
ground. Jacksonville has long been a popular winter resort, and in view
of the crowds which flock to this city, it has come to be considered the
Florida Mecca of tourists.
The city was incorporated in 1833, and named in honor of General An-
drew Jackson who had command of the United States troops during the
Indian War, and who was the first Territorial Governor of Florida after
its cession from Spain.
DISTANCES.

The distance, by rail, in miles of the following named cities from Jack-
sonville is given as follows:
Atlanta, Ga............................ 363 New York, N. Y...................... 1075
Augusta, Ga ... ..... ..... ..... .. 304 Ocala, Fla............................. 106
Baltimore, Md............. ........... 887 Orlando, Fla................... ...... 147
Boston, Mass..................... 1302 Palatka,Fla. (by river ................ 75
Charleston, S. C. .................... 287 l -by rail................ 56
Chicago, Ill.......................... 1136 Philadelphia. Pa....................... 985
Cincinnati, O. .................... ... 836 Plant City, Fla...................... 218
Fernandina, Fla .................... 27 Richmond, Va................. ...... 731
Gainesville, Fla. ............. ........ 75 St. Augustine, Fla ................... 36
Green Cove Springs, Fla............. 30 St. Louis, Mo.......................... .. 1031
Haines City, Fla.................... 185 Sanford, Fla. by river.............. 204
Kissimmee, Fla................... ... 165 by rail............... 125
Lakeland, Fla........................ 208 Savannah, Ga .................... 172
Leesburg, Fla.. ..... ...... .......... 1611, Tallahassee, Fla ...................... 168
Louisville, Ky......................... 915 Tampa, Fla........ .................... 240
Macon, Ga........................... 260 Tocoi, Fla ............................ 49
Magnolia, Fla........................ 28 Washington, D. C..................... 847
Mandarin, Fla................ ........ 15 Wilmington, N. C.................... 482
New Orleans, La....................... 746
POPULATION.

During the three years preceding the year 1878 no account was taken
of the increase from year to year of the population of Jacksonville and
suburbs in Webb's Directory." Since the year 1878 inclusive, we have
found the population as follows :

1878............... .............. 12,170
1880................................ 13,470 Increase............................... 1,300
1882........................... ... 15,904 .. ................. .......... 2,434
1884 ............................... 18,740 .................... ... ....... 2,836
1886................................ 20,712 .... .. ......... ......... 1,982
CLIMATE.

Concerning the climate and health of Jacksonville, general assertion
and argument are unnecessary, as we have abundant official statistics to
show in detail the exact facts, from which all who are interested may draw
their own conclusions.
The climate of Jacksonville partakes of the mildness and equability
common to the State. The city has the broad river upon two sides of it,
and the Atlantic Ocean is but fifteen miles away. During nearly the en-
tire year brisk breezes prevail. The city sits upon high land and is
abundantly shaded by beautiful water oaks. The tide, which is felt for
nearly a hundred miles up the river, at Jacksonville causes a regular rise
and fall of about three feet.










32 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


HEALTH.

The best evidence concerning the salubrity of a certain climate is, per-
haps, the record of deaths in that locality.
The official report of the City Physician of Jacksonville, for the year
1884, shows that there were, during that year, 208 deaths in the city, 147
of which were residents-those who had lived in the city six months or
more-and 61 were non-residents; 56 were under 5 years of age and 45
were over 40.
This record is for the city proper, and does not include the suburbs.
Taking the population within the city limits as 9,000, a minimum estimate,
the record of 147 deaths during the year shows the death rate to be 16.3
to each thousand of population.
If, however, we wish to judge fairly of the healthfulness of the climate,
we should deduct from the death list the twenty-four who died of con-
sumption, a disease not contracted in this climate, thereby reducing the
number of deaths to 123, or 13.6 deaths to each 1,000 population.
As a basis for comparison, the following table is given of the mortality
of various cities in the United States :


CITIES. RATE PER 1,000
New York, N. Y ...................... 24.93
Brooklyn, N. Y ....................... 20.15
Buffalo, N. Y....................... 14.19
Rochester, N. Y...................... 16.24
Yonkers, N. Y........................ 14.16
Plattsburgh, N. Y.. .................. 25.00
Newburgh, N. Y..................... 17.30
Boston, Mass ......................... 21.53
Worcester, Mass .................. 19.25
Cambridge, Mass .................... 19 67
Lynn, Mass ......................... 18.63
Newburyport, Mass ................. 17.11
Concord, N. H.............. .......... 13.20
Hudson County, N. J................. 20.08
New Haven, Conn .................... 17.99
Hartford, Conn ...................... 16.67
Providence, R. I...................... 19.89
Philadelphia. Pa ..................... 17.96
Pittsburgh, Pa ....................... 21.16


CITIES. RATE PER 1,000
Wilmington, Del ................. 21.02
District of Columbia ................ 26 58
Richmond, Va....................... 18.40
Norfolk, Va ......................... 21.19
Milwaukee, Wis..................... 14.35
Cincinnati, O0......................... 17.23
Cleveland, O.... ............... .... 16.72
Baltimore, Md ....................... 21.53
Evansville, Ind....................... 19.52
Chicago, Ill. ................. ....... 16.50
St. Louis, Mo ........................ 12.00
Salt Lake City ....................... 14.00
San Francisco, Cal,.................. 15.80
New Orleans, La.................. ..50.17
Mobile, Ala .................... ..... 23.05
Savannah, Ga ......................... 30.25
Charleston, S. C.... .............. 29.16
Nashville, Tenn...... .......... 23.11
Jacksonville, Fla....... .................. 13.66


SANITARY IMPROVEMENTS.

In the year 1877 a fatal disease, closely verging upon an epidemic, was
generated from a stagnant morass at the west end of town, and from the
city garbage which had not been properly deposited, an event which
forced the citizens to adopt measures for the perfect drainage, sew-
erage and other necessary sanitation of the city, and to secure a needed
system of water supply. A fund of $250,000 was at once provided by an
issue of bonds, and a Board of Trustees appointed to direct the work.
The plan of public works to which the proceeds of the Sanitary Bonds
were to be applied, embraced:
1. The drainage and filling of the low grounds at the west end of the
city, and at the head of Newnan Street.
2. The improvement of Hogan and McCoy's Creeks.
3. The erection of Water Works.
4. The sewerage of the city.














WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 33

This plan was submitted to the Trustees for their guidance in the latter
part of January, 1878.
The morass was immediately drained and filled, and the garbage, which
had been recklessly dumped in the low grounds at the head of Newnan
Street, was thoroughly disinfected and covered with sand to the depth of
from three to five feet.
Hogan's Creek, a winding stream with an outlying border of marsh,
was, by extensive cutting and dredging, converted into an attractive
canal, and the bordering marsh-land was reclaimed from overflow.
McCoy's Creek was also cleared of obstructions, and such small dredg-
ing as it demanded was done upon it.
The City Water Works were begun in June, 187i. and completed in
July, 1880.
The pumping machinery consists of two Worthington Duplex Engines,
each of a capacity to pump 1,500,000 gallons in twenty-four hours. One
is a compound-condensing and the other a high-pressure.
Handsome buildings, abundant mains, and every necessary convenience
for obtaining and distributing the water were provided, together with a
fire-alarm telegraph having six miles of wire.
Excellent water has been obtained from a great well, sunk near the en-
gine house, which in quality and quantity is all that can be desired.
In a communication to the Compiler. dated December 21st, 1885, Dr. A.
S. Baldwin, Chairman of the Board of Trustees in charge of the Public
Water Works, said:
In December, 1884, an experimental Artesian Well was commenced and
sunk five hundred feet to a free supply of water, which was reached in
July. Size of pipe three inches, discharging about 260,000 gallons per
day, with a pressure of twenty-five pounds to the square inch. In August
a contract was made with Mr. O. H. Wade to sink a six inch well five
hundred feet, which was continued on down to six hundred and thirty-six
feet, and a flow of seven hundred gallons per minute obtained, or over
one million gallons daily. The water of both wells is now turned into the
reservoirs, which is sufficient for all ordinary purposes. The water is re-
markably clear, transparent, and at first slightly tinctured with sulphur,
but by a process of spraying this taste entirely disappears, and the result
is a delightfully clear, limpid, and sweet tasting water, not so well suited
for laundry purposes as rain water, but for general use it is equal if not
superior to any water supplied by public water works in the whole country.
Another well six hundred and fifty feet deep has been contracted for and
commenced, and when completed will furnish, with the others, a supply
sufficient for a city twice the size of Jacksonville, and for all emergencies
in the case of possible fires, etc. It has been ascertained that beneath the
city there is an inexhaustible supply of pure and wholesome water to be
found in any quantity and with a pressure of twenty-five pounds to the
inch.
THE SEWERS

of Jacksonville have proved one of the most effective agents in preserving
the cleanliness of the city. The work of laying them was begun in Novem-
ber, 1879, and was accepted by the Trustees in April, 1881.
The sewers are constructed of vitrified terra-cotta pipe, ranging in size









34 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

from eight to twenty-four inches, carefully laid to grade and alignment,
and jointed with Portland cement.

CITY FINANCES.
The good faith of the city in discharging its obligations, entitles it to
exceptional financial confidence. Previous to the war, a bonded debt of
$50,000 was incurred, to aid in the construction of the Florida, Atlantic
& Gulf Central Railroad, leading westward into the interior of the State.
During the war, and the few years of intense depression immediately fol-
lowing, the interest accumulated largely on these bonds. Jacksonville
had been occupied almost continuously as a military post by one or the
other of the contending forces, and when the war closed nearly all the pub-
lic buildings were in ashes, and the town was a mere waste. Under these
circumstances, it would not have been strange had the people of Jackson-
ville followed the example of other cities and towns similarly situated,
and either wholly repudiated or scaled their corporate debt. Not only
was this not done, however, but repudiation of the whole or any part of
the debt was not even suggested.
With commendable energy the old citizens, uniting with men of enter-
prise and capital from all parts of the country, took hold vigorously of
the problem of rebuilding the city and re establishing its prosperity on a
solvent and permanent basis. The city was without a government and
without a dollar in the treasury; the people were without homes and had
no money from which to contribute to its support; churches and school-
houses were to be restored ; shattered dwellings were to be repaired or
new ones erected; saw mills were to be built on the site of the mills that
had been burned; hotels were to be put up and furnished; places of busi-
ness were to be provided and stocked; side-walks to be put down, and the
city renovated and purified.
All of this was done and every dollar of the old debt, principal and in-
terest, provided for. More than this, in January of 1878, the city issued
$250,000 of new bonds known as Sanitary Improvement Bonds of the
City of Jacksonville," bearing 8 per cent. interest, and payable twenty
years from their date, or at any time after two years on notice to the
holders. These bonds were designed for and applied to the construction
of a system of public works for the city, including water works, sewers.
and sanitary drainage. The interest on the new bonds has been paid
promptly as it fell due, and $30,000 of the principal has already been
called in. These facts speak well for the good faith, energy and solvency
of Jacksonville and its business men.

CITY TAXATION.
Assessed valuation, 1885, real estate...................................... ...... $2.366,450
Assessed valuation, 1885, personal property...................................... 905,460
Total valuation ................................. ........................ $3,271,910
Upon this is made a levy of 20 mills, or 2 per cent. total city tax.
The assessed valuation represents only about 40 per cent. of the estimated true valuation.

SOCIETY.
Society is cosmopolitan here to a marked degree, and is derived from all








WEBB'S JACKSONNILLE DIRECTORY. Zi;

quarters of this and foreign countries. Perhaps there is no Southern city,
with the single exception of New Orleans, that presents this feature in a
greater degree than Jacksonville, and it is greatly owing to this fact that it
possesses such attractions for strangers. Churches of all the various de-
nominations, and the various shades of religious sentiment, open their
doors for the benefit of the devoutly disposed.
As a place of sojourn for the tourist, the wealthy, and the fashionable
classes, it is fast taking rank with Saratoga. Newport and Long Branch.
With these elements, it is becoming a necessity to pass a portion of each
winter in Jacksonville. Here they meet the same associates that they
found during the summer at the most noted Northern resorts and there has
simply been a change of climate and scenery. From the first of December
to the middle of April, the city is crowded to overflowing with guests
from every State in the Union, and from the leading foreign countries.
Here they find all the conditions requisite for an existence of ease, luxury
and pleasure, and can set at defiance the bleak hills and icy breezes of
their homes in the higher latitudes. It is a great relief to these people to
be able to take out-door exercise in midwinter, unincumbered by furs and
heavy clothing, and to have their eyes and ears greeted by green shrub-
bery, beautiful flowers, and the notes of birds, at a season when their
homes near the granite hills of New England, the great Northern Lakes,
and the open prairies of the West, are cheerless and uninviting.
Every pleasant day they can be seen by hundreds,lounging upon the broad
piazzas of the hotels, indulging in the luxury of a sun bath, sauntering
through Bay street and inspecting the myriads of odd and rare things in
the curiosity stores, or taking the air in the elegant carriages for which the
city is famous. At night the parlors present a gay appearance. Each
hotel has its band of musicians, and hops are frequent. The handsomely
dressed guests, attired in diamonds and costly fabrics, indulge in the mazy
dance, or betake themselves to a social game of cards.
There are daily excursions to St. Augustine, Palatka, Fernandina, Pablo
Beach, Mayport, Green Cove, and other favorite resorts, allowing an
abundance of time to inspect these localities. Herein consists another of
the attractions of this city. Its proximity to the points above mentioned
permits frequent visits, that consume little time, and cost but a trifle.
The broad and noble St. Johns affords pastime for those fond of sailing
or rowing. Safe and staunch boats are to be had in abundance, and fur-
nish diversion to those fond of such amusements. Steam ferry boats ply
regularly to the opposite side of the river, where handsome residences and
thriving orange groves await inspection.
THE NEWSPAPERS.
Jacksonville has three daily, eight weekly and five monthly journals.
The Florida Times- Union, C. H. Jones, editor, is the largest and most
widely circulated newspaper in Florida and the Every Day Bible of the
people. In four years it has won its way to the front rank of Southern
journalism and is recognized as one of the few great dailies of the South.
Its weekly edition has a circulation in every State of the Union and its
annual trade edition of 50,000 copies goes to all parts of the civilized world.
The principal afternoon daily in the State is The Daily Florida Herald,
John Temple Graves, editor. It is characterized by its terse, sharp and
pithy editorials and the energy displayed in extending its circulation








36 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

through Florida. In Jacksonville it has the largest circulation as com-
pared with the State and is the inseparable companion at the tea table of
every intelligent family.
Then there are three journals devoted to agriculture and horticulture,
one to the interests of Florida, two to the colored race, an illustrated
weekly, an illustrated hotel journal, a counting room magazine, a medical
and surgical journal, a journal devoted to the interests of the laboring
classes, and a monthly to the interests of the Episcopal church.
For the personnelle of these publications the reader is referred to another
page headed "Journals and Journalists of Jacksonville," for which see-
Contents.

JACKSONVILLE'S HOTELS.
While Jacksonville, with her busy railways, steamboats, ocean port
and extensive mercantile establishments, finds her chiefest source of pride
and satisfaction in being the Commercial Metropolis, it is as a cosmopol-
itan Winter City that she is most widely known. Beginning years before
the war as a health resort for the nervous and consumptive, Jacksonville
has become a fashionable place of refuge from the inclemencies of iNorthern
winters, and this result is due, first, to the attractions and benefits of the
climate, and secondly, to the capacity, elegance and extent (f Jackson-
ville's hotels. There are other causes, but these are the principal ones.
It is a fact to be duly considered, in estimating the value of Jacksonville
as a home, that during several months of the year it is thronged with
people from all parts of America and Europe-chiefly wealthy people,
but including persons of nearly every degree, from Austrian Princes,
English Dukes and American Presidents, to the sturdy mechanic and
strolling artist. It is impossible that society in such a town can become
provincial or exclusive.
There are in Jacksonville sixteen hotels, several of which rank with the
fashionable first-class hotels of the country.
Following is a list of those which are advertised in Webb's Publications.
The St. James Hotel is the pioneer fashionable tourist's hotel in Florida.
It was built in 1868, opened January 1, 1869, and has been variously re-
modeled and enlarged, until now it occupies, with its grounds, an entire
block, surrounded by four of the public streets, and can accommodate
500 guests. It is, in the open season, a little village under a single roof.
Within its spacious corridors are telegraph, ticket, and baggage-checking
offices ; curiosity, news, book, picture, cigar and flower stands ; with bar-
ber shop, billiard-room, wine-room, bath-room, reading room, passenger
elevator, steam heat, laundry, electric lights, sumptuous parlors, private
supper rooms, spacious verandas, a band and orchestra of musicians, and
plenty of agreeable society. The St. James faces the City Park, is near
the Street Railways, Churches, and opposite the Park Opera House. Its
cuisine is famous for its excellence.
The Everett Hotel, ten years old, suffered for a while from ill manage-
ment, until, in 1881, it was purchased by its present proprietor and re-
furnished at an expense of more than $80,000. It is four stories high and
surmounted by a great clock tower, the dial of which is illuminated at
night. During the summer of 1885, it was extensively remodeled and en-
larged. Originally it consisted of two wings, each 200 feet in length, four
stories high. The extension is six stories high, and runs back 200 feet to









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 67

Forysth street, thence east 157 feet connecting with the eastern wing, en-
tirely inclosing the hotel property. The remodeled building has a total
outside extension of 735 feet, over half of which is six stories in height,
with about 3,000 running feet of c.r)"r:Jors, from 12 to 15 feet wide, and
accommodations for 700 guests. The Everett has all the approved re-
quirements for comfort, an excellent cuisine, and during the season of
1884-5 had a greater number of individual guests than any other hotel in
Florida.
The Windsor Hotel is smaller than either of the two first named, but
takes the very highest rank for excellence. It was built in 1875, and had
accommodations for 200 guests. but during the summer of 1885 it was,
like the Everett, extensively enlarged. As completed, the Windsor has
a frontage on Monroe street, of 210 feet; on Hogan street of 210, and on
Duval street of 105 feet, making a total street frontage of 525 feet, three
stories high, besides three inside wings. It has accommodations for 450
guests. The Windsor is near the St. James, faces the City Park and
Park Opera House, and has all the conveniences of hotel life.
The Carleton House was built in 1876, enjoys a fine location and large
patronage. It stands at the corner of two busy streets near the river,
,opposite the Post Office, the Yacht Club House and near the new Court
House ; is of brick, has 105 sleeping rooms and all modern improvements
and conveniences. It cost $125,000.
The Grand View was erected in 1883, and has since been enlarged to
triple its former capacity. It is built of wood, in the Gothic style of
architecture, with spacious verandas, from which an extended view of
St. Johns river can be had. It aims to give the same accommodations to
its guests that other fashionable hotels do, and at a less price, and has all
the modern conveniences.
The Tremont, Pine corner Forsyth street, was erected in 1871. In
1875 a brick addition was added. It is a large brick structure, fronting
on two streets. Extending across the front are 500 feet of wide veran-
das. The house was enlarged and reconstructed in 1883, is newly fur-
nished, and has all the conveniences which go to make a complete modern
hotel. This house is kept open throughout the year, and boasts of a pat-
ronage of over 15,000 guests during the year just closed.
Hotel Togni.-This hotel was named after a well known citizen of Jack-
sonville, who purchased it in 1885, and entirely remodeled and refur-
nished it. It is a three story brick structure, situated near the business
center, courts, post office, steamboat landings and horse cars. The
hotel was erected in 1870 by its present owner, who afterwards sold it and
repurchased it, as above stated. It is kept open the year around.
The Glenada, 118 West Church street. A select family hotel, recently
enlarged, newly and luxuriously furnished. Baths, gas. electric bells, etc.
Situated in the highest part of the city. Hotel stage connects with all
trains.
Hotel Oxford, situated directly opposite the St. James Hotel and City
Park and Park Opera House, in the highest part of the city. Erected in
1883. Is three stories in height, surrounded with spacious verandas,
which were added this season. It is elegantly furnished, kept on the
American or European plan, and specially arranged for the demands of
fashionable society. A first-class restaurant for ladies and gentlemen
is a part of the establishment.









38 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

The St. Johns, Mattair, Bettelini's, Pennsylvania, Warner and Oak-
land Grove are also excellent hotels.
An elaborate table, compiled by M. R. Bowden, Esq., city editor of the
Times- Union, shows a total of 60,000 guests for 15 hotels of Jacksonville,
for the seven months that comprised the full season of 1884-5; but this
number represents not more than two-thirds of the winter travel, so many
private families and boarding houses take lodgers and boarders.

JACKSONVILLE'S WHOLESALE TRADE.

The magnitude of Jacksonville's wholesale trade establishes beyond
the possibility of competition the city's claim to be the commercial me-
tropolis of Florida. A few years ago the retail trade of Florida was sup-
plied by the wholesalers of Savannah, New York and Western cities,
through the medium of a legion of traveling salesmen.
Since then, however, a revolution has been effected by the establishment
of extensive wholesale houses in Jacksonville, and the effective occupation
of the greater part of the State by commercial travelers from this city.
By the establishment of the through freight rates to Jacksonville, as
the basis of through rates to the interior of the State, the city is given an
equal opportunity with other cities to reach that field which properly be-
longs to her, and with this she has the important advantage of greater
proximity. Another consideration is not without weight in encouraging
the wholesale trade of Jacksonville, viz. : the fact that Florida purchasers
in buying here, in effect, transfer the item of "profit" from another
State to their own, thereby almost directly increasing the taxable prop-
erty of the State, and decreasing their own public burdens.
There are now in Jacksonville at least 100 wholesale dealers, thirty or
more of whom do an exclusively wholesale business. The trade embraces
the following lines, viz:
Grain. Drugs, Cigars,
Groceries, Flour, Fish and Oysters,
Provisions, Hay, Seeds,
Dry Goods, Furniture, Fertilizers,
Hardware, Doors, Sash and Blinds, Lime and Cement,
Lumber, Books and Stationery, Ice,
Fruit, Paints and Oils, Paper,
Produce, Jewelry, Coffee and Spices,
Building Materials, Crockery, China & Glassware, Fancy Goods,
Boots and Shoes. Wines and Liquors, Curiosities,
Carpets, Leather.
Sufficiently complete statistics of the wholesale trade have not been
obtained. It may be stated, however, that the hardware business of the
city, during the year 1884, amounted to over $600,000, and was done by
three houses, a fourth hardware house not having been established till
January, 1885.
No finer opportunities exist anywhere in the South for the establishment
of wholesale houses than in Jacksonville.

JACKSONVILLE'S RETAIL TRADE.
Jacksonville has a large and flourishing retail business, embracing all
the usual branches of trade. There are 347 houses, some of which carry
large stocks and do an extensive business. Collections have been general-










WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


ly good, and the summer trade has, within the past few years, very great-
ly improved.
MANUFACTURES AND TRADE PROSPECTS.

Jacksonville is advantageously situated, commercially and geographi-
cally, to become a manufacturing center, though Florida has heretofore
been content to develop her agricultural resources and import in great
measure her manufactured wares. But this wasteful method cannot long
continue in a State grown as populous and wealthy as Florida. The jux-
taposition of railways, river and ocean port at Jacksonville; the great
quantities of raw material produced in the State; the cheapness and dis-
patch with which other raw material may be imported from abroad, and
the field presented for the sale of goods manufactured, combine to make
it more than probable that manufactures at Jacksonville will soon spring
into new life and grow as the wholesale trade, the hotel-keeping industry
and the transportation business have grown.
Ten years ago, when Jacksonville was comparatively in an embryo state,
Gen. William M. Ledwith said to the compiler: "The avenues of sup-
port which will make this city double and multiply in population in the
next one or two decades are several. The local manufacturing establish-
ments; the immense forests in this State, of southern pine and live-oak-
the latter more particularly for ship-building-which still remain in their
virgin solitude; the trade of northern Florida and southern Georgia which
is centering here; the trade of the St. Johns, Ocklawaha and Indian rivers;
the tourists' trade; these, with the immense agricultural and fruit produc-
tions of the State, of which this city is the principal mart, afford an un-
equaled opportunity for Jacksonville to increase and multiply."
The year 1886 sees this prophecy fulfilled : New railroads, new steam-
ers, new manufacturing establishments, new enterprises are in successful
operation, everywhere is business life and activity, the account of which
reads like a fairy tale.
We enumerate what is manufactured here:


Alligator Teeth Jewelry.
Baking Powders.
oats.
Boilers for Steamboats, e
gooks.
Boots and Shoes.
Brass Castings.
Bread and Pastry.
Brick.
Brushes, from the pal
fibre.
Cameos.
Canes and Carved Work.
Carriages.
Chemicals.
Cigarettes.
Cigars.
Clothing.
Coffees and Spices.
Wagons.


Confectionery.
Crates.
Drays.
tc. Feed and Grits.
Fertilizers.
Fish Scale Work.
Flavoring Extracts.
Florida Curiosities.
Fuel.
mettoFurniture.
Harness.
Ice.
Iron Castings.
Iron Railing.
Jewelry.
Ladders.
Laths.
Lumber.
Machinery.
Yachts.


Meal.
Mouldings.
Oil Paintings.
Orange and Vegetable Crates.
Paints.
Palmetto Work and Fibre.
Patent Medicines.
Pearl Hominy.
Preserved Fruits.
Scroll Work.
Shells, artistically painted.
Shingles.
Ships.
Soap.
Soda Water.
Stairs.
Steam Engines.
Stone, Artificial.
Terra Cotta Pipe.


JACKSONVILLE LUMBER MILLS.

There are at Jacksonville five large steam saw and planing mills, each
with complete outfits of lath and shingle machines, and other accessories









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


of first-class, complete lumber manufactories. Besides supplying the
local demand, they furnish a large part of the lumber shipped from the
port to foreign and American cities.
These five mills employ from 370 to 410 men, according to the season,
and they produced during the year 1884, manufactured lumber of the ag-
gregate value of $498,371.80. The aggregate capital employed, partly
ascertained and partly estimated, is $465,000.

BRICK MANUFACTURE.
There are at Jacksonville two brick yards. They employ a total of 66
hands, and produced during the year 1884, 8,100,000 bricks, valued at
$72,900.
CIGAR MANUFACTURE.
The cigar-making business in Jacksonville has enjoyed periods of great
prosperity, and it has also suffered at times from those attacks of general
depression which seem, periodically, to afflict that industry everywhere.
There are at Jacksonville fourteen factories. During the year 1884
they manufactured 4,417,400 cigars, consumed 110,400 pounds of tobacco,
and paid $13,152 in stamp taxes. The estimated value of the goods man-
ufactured is about $200,000.

ORANGE SHIPMENTS.
The orange crop of Florida for the season of 1884-5 is estimated at 900,
000 bushels, and for the present season at a million and a quarter bushels.
Of the last crop of 900,000 bushel crates, over one-half was shipped via
Jacksonville, as follows:

By the Savannah, Florida and Western Ry ..................................380,621' boxes.
By the Florida Ry and Navigation Co.'s roads................................ 12,536
By the Florida Steamship Co.'s vessels......... ................... ....... 67,255
Total................. .. ..... .... ................... 460,412 boxes.

JACKSONVILLE'S RAILWAY FACILITIES.

Jacksonville is the chief railway center of Florida, connected by direct
lines of railroad with all parts of Florida and the United States.
Six railways now begin, or end, at Jacksonville. Those in operation
are the following, viz.:
1. A line of road from Jacksonville westward, through the northern
section of Florida to Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, Texas, and San
Francisco; connecting at Baldwin, for Cumberland Sound on the Atlantic,
Cedar Key on the Gulf of Mexico, and for South Florida; at Live Oak,
for Georgia and the North, and also for South Florida; at Drifton, for
Monticello ; at Tallahassee, for St. Marks on the Gulf ; at Chattahoochee,
for Georgia and the North, and at Pensacola for the North.
2. A line of road from Jacksonville northward, to Savannah and Charles-
ton; connecting, at Callahan, for Cumberland Sound, on the Atlantic,
Cedar Key on the Gulf of Mexico, and for South Florida; at Waycross,
for Brunswick harbor ; also for Albany, Macon, and the North and West ;
also, for Chattahoochee, Pensacola, New Orleans, Texas and San Francis-
co; and at Jesup, for Macon and the Northwest.









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY 41

3. A line of road from Jacksonville northward, to Fernandina on
Cumberland Sound, direct, where connection is made with New York
steamers.
4. A line of road from Jacksonville southward to Palatka on the St.
Johns river, where it connects with a road for the interior of the penin-
sula, and on to Sanford, where it connects with a road to Tampa. The
same road will be running to Titusville in a few months.
5. A line of road from Jacksonville southward to St. Augustine, from
which city another railroad departs to Tocoi, on the St. Johns river, and
one to Palatka.
6. A line of road from Jacksonville eastward to Pablo Beach, on the
Atlantic Ocean.
RAILWAY SYSTEMS.

The largest railway system wholly within the State of Florida is the
Florida Railway & Navigation Company's system of roads, made up
by a process of consolidating various smaller roads. The railways forming
this aggregation are:
(a) The Florida Central Railway, or Western Division, from Jackson-
ville to the Apalachicola River, 208 miles, with the St. Marks branch, of
21 miles, and the Monticello branch, 4 miles.
(b) Florida Transit Railway, or Central Division, from Fernandina, on
the Atlantic, to Cedar Key, on the Gulf, 155 miles, crossing the Western
Division at Baldwin.
(c) The Fernandina and Jacksonville Railway, from Jacksonville to
Hart's Road, on the Central Division, 22 miles.
(d) The Peninsular and Tropical Railways, forming the Southern Di-
vision, from Waldo on the Central Division, to the Withlacoochee River,
105 miles.
(e) The Leesburg and Indian River Railway, from Wildwood, on the
Southern Division, to Tavares, 22 miles.
(f) Tavares, Orlando and Atlantic Railroad, from Tavares to Orlando,
32 miles.
There are thus shown to be 569 miles of railway controlled by this sys-
tem, extending through sixteen counties of the State, having termini at
two Gulf and two Ocean ports, crossing, or reaching to four great naviga-
ble rivers, penetrating the short-staple cotton, Sea Island cotton, orange,
timber, naval store, garden truck, tobacco, wine, fish and sponge districts
of the State, the entire system practically centering at Jacksonville.
2. The Plant system of railways and steamboats, one of the most effi-
cient and most prosperous transportation systems in the South, laid all
with steel rails and equipped with passenger cars intended to surpass the
very finest upon the great routes of the North. The roads forming this
system are,
(a) The Charleston and Savannah Railway, from Charleston, S. C., to
Savannah, Ga., 115 miles.
(b) The Savannah, Florida and Western Railway, from Savannah, Ga.,
to Jacksonville, Fla., 172 miles, with numerous branches, as follows, viz:
From Waycross to Bainbridge, on the Flint River, 140 miles; Bainbridge
Junction to Chattahoochee, 23 miles; Thomasville to Albany, 58 miles;
DuPont to Gainesville, 119 miles ; total 512 miles.
(c) The South Florida Railway, from Sanford on the St. Johns River,








42 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

in Orange county, to Tampa, on the Gulf of Mexico, 115 miles, with a
branch from Bartow Junction to Bartow, 17 miles, and from Sanford to
Lake Jesup, 6 miles, and another from Lakeland to Pemberton Ferry, 44
miles ; total 182 miles.
There are thus shown to be 809 miles of railway belonging to the Plant
system, about 424 miles, or about one-half, of which are in the State of
Florida. The Peoples Lines of Steamers on the Apalachicola, Suwanee
and St. Johns Rivers belong to this system.
3. The great Louisville and Nashville system, from Cincinnati, Louis-
ville and St. Louis to Mobile and New Orleans, sends an important branch
line through West Florida to connect with both the Plant and the F. R.
& N. systems at Chattahoochee. This branch extends from Pensacola
Junction to Pensacola,44 miles, and from Pensacola to Chattahoochee,161
miles, or 205 miles in all.
4. The Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway,from Jacksonville,
along the St. Johns River southward, to Palatka, 56 miles, where it con-
nects with the Florida Southern Railway. The J., T. & K. W. Ry. has
recently been extended to Sanford, where it connects with the South
Florida Railroad, making it practically a link in the great Plant system.
5. The Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway, from
South Jacksonville to St. Augustine, 35 miles. This road is to be extended
to Daytona, Titusville and Eau Gallie.
6. The Florida Southern Railway from Palatka to Pemberton's Ferry,
on the Withlacoochee, 135 miles, with the following branches, viz:
Rochelle to Gainesville, 9 miles; Leesburg to Astor, on the St. Johns
River, 38 miles; Fort Mason to Lane Park, 10 miles; total, 192 miles.
This road is chiefly tributary to the Plant system. It connects with the
Plant and F. R. & N. systems at Gainesville; with the F. R. & N. system
at Hawthorne; with the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West system at
Palatka, and with the St.Johns River at Palatka and Astor. It lies through
a rich and populous country.
7. The St. Augustine & Palatka Railway, from a point on the St. Johns
Railway, 6 miles west of St. Augustine, to Palatka, distance about 24
miles.
8. The St. Johns Railway, from St. Augustine to Tocoi,on the St.Johns
River, 14 miles, where it connects with steamboats, and by ferry with the
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway.
9. The Green Cove Springs and Melrose Railroad, from Green Cove
Springs, on the St. Johns, to Sharon, 10 miles.
10. The Jacksonville & Atlantic Railroad, from South Jacksonville to
Pablo Beach, on the Atlantic Ocean, 17 miles.
11. The Pensacola and Perdido Railroad, from Pensacola to Millview,
on the Perdido River, 9 miles.
12. The DeLand Railway, 5 miles.

RECAPITULATION.
Florida Railway and Navigation Co.'s System and Connections........... 569 Miles.
Plant System (in Florida) ............... .......... .. ... ......... 424
Louisville and Nashville Railway (in Florida) ........................... 205
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway............................ 125
Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway ............... 35 "
Florida Southern Railway...... ............. ......... ....... 192
St. Johns Railway ....... ......................... .... ..... ....... 14
St. Augustine and Palatka Railway .................................... 24









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Jacksonville and Atlantic Railway ...................................... 17 Miles.
Green Cove Springs and Melrose Railroad.................. .......... 10 "
Pensacola and Perdido Railroad ..................................... 9 "
DeLand Railroad...................... .... .... ...................... 5
Total...... .................................................... 1649 Miles.

THE ST. JOHNS RIVER.

Herodotus has said, with fine felicity, that Egypt is a gift of the Nile.
In a somewhat similar sense it may be said that Jacksonville is a gift of
the commerce-bearing St. Johns.
This splendid stream, like the Nile and the Red River of Dakota, flows
northward. From its source to its outlet the distance, in a straight line,
is about 180 miles, but so winding is the course of the stream that although
it follows, with no great variation, its general direction of north north-
west, yet by its channel it is more than four hundred miles in length.
The beginning of the St. Johns River is first traceable in the so-called
Big Cypress Swamp, that lies in the western part of Brevard County, but
the chief sources of the great stream are the innumerable lakes that lie
all along the valley of the eastern water-shed of the peninsula. These
lakes are commonly many miles in circumference and are surrounded by
extensive prairies, over which roam thousands of cattle.
Owing to the evenness of altitude of the peninsula, and the presence of
these numerous great lakes that, with their margins of sloping prairie
land,form natural reservoirs for the receipt of the immediate rainfall and
the drainage of the surrounding country, the rise and fall of the river is
regulated by nature, and dwellers along the habitable banks of the stream
have nothing to fear from disastrous overflows.
In a mountainous country spring freshets, or an unusual rainfall, cause
great volumes of water to be precipitated down the declivities of the land,
forming a torrent which the river banks cannot anywhere confine. On
the peninsula of Florida, however, there are no mountains, consequently
no torrents. The drainage of the land goes on more slowly, because the
fall is less abrupt. The water gathers in the lakes, which rise and ex-
pand in their natural basins and are drained off gradually by the over-
flowing river.
The St. Johns River has been called a chain of lakes," and this is true
of it from its first definite beginning in Bonnet Lake to as far north as
Lake George,but from thence to its mouth the river does not vary enough
in width to answer that description. Not only does the river flow
through innumerable lakes, but along its course other lakes empty into it.
Commercially, the St. Johns River may be divided into three sections,
known respectively as the Port of St. Johns, the St. Johns River proper,
and the Upper St. Johns.
The Port of St. Johns is that part of the river used by sea-going vessels,
and extends from the ocean to Jacksonville, a distance, in a straight line,
of fifteen miles, or, by the river channel, of twenty-five miles.
The second division, or St. Johns River proper, extends from Jackson-
ville southward to Lake Monroe, a distance in a straight line of 100 miles,
or, by the river, of 200 miles. This part of the river lies through a most
fertile, salubrious and populous country, and is that part of the river de-
voted to palace steamers, rapid transit, fast mails, fashionable travel and
an extensive commerce.








44 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

The Upper St. Johns, or, as some call it, "the crooked river above Lake
Monroe," is used chiefly as an outlet for the fertile Indian River section.
Back of the famous Rockledge hammock, on the Indian River, lies Lake
Florence, opening through Lake Poinsett into the Upper St. Johns.
From the Indian River to Lake Florence the distance is but two and a
half miles, and across this narrow divide is carried the commerce of the
Indian River country.
The distance from Lake Monroe to Lake Florence, in a straight line, is
less than 50 miles, but by the river it is 150 miles. A number of small
steamers are employed upon this upper river and find business not only
at each end of the line but at Salt Lake, opposite Titusville, at Lake
Harney, Lake Jesup, and elsewhere along the route.
Above or south of Lake Poinsett are other lakes and many miles of
river, but the country along the route is mostly adapted to grazing and
is not thickly enough settled to be of present interest to commerce.

RIVER COMMERCE.
Accurate statistics of the commerce of the St. John's River cannot be
given, because of the reticence maintained by the managers of steamboat
lines concerning their business. It is, however, very large.
An immense amount of freight passes annually through Lake Monroe.
First, there is the Indian River and Lake Jesup business already men-
tioned. The South Florida Railroad begins at Sanford and runs to
Tampa, on the Gulf of Mexico, where it connects with New Orleans,
coastwise and Havana steamships. It has also a branch to Bartow. It
lies through three of the richest counties in Florida, a number of impor-
tant towns and extensive orange groves. It has an immense future in the
results of the great drainage operations now going forward along the Kis-
simniee River, which important stream it connects with at Kissimmee
City, on Lake Tohopekaliga. The immediate vicinity of Sanford, and of
Enterprise on the opposite side of Lake Monroe, are thickly settled and
famed for their orange groves.
During the winter season not fewer than five large steamboats depart
each day from Lake Monroe for Palatka and Jacksonville.
Below the lake are important towns, and at Astor a railway extends
to the great lake country near the borders of Sumter, Marion and Orange
Counties.
Between Lake George and Palatka the country, which is one of unusual
fertility and beauty, is quite densely populated and contains innumerable
little towns.
At Palatka the Florida Southern Railway begins, extending westward
to Gainesville, Orange Lake, Ocala, etc., and connecting with the two
great railway systems of the State, the.Savannah, Florida & Western and
the Florida Railway & Navigation Company's roads. Other railways pro-
jected or partly built will soon add greatly to the river's commerce.
Near Palatka, the St. Johns receives the famed Ocklawaha, a long, cir-
cuitous river, coming up from the heart of Marion, Sumter and Orange
Counties, rich in groves. A daily line of steamers is employed nearly all
the year upon the Ocklawaha.
Farther down the St. Johns occurs the entrance to Crescent Lake, a
large body of water in the midst of a fruitful land. Four small steamers
are kept busy by the commerce of Crescent Lake alone.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Bordering upon the St. Johns river are the counties of Duval, Clay, St.
Johns, Putnam, Marion, Volusia, Orange and Brevard, with an aggregate
area of 13,060 square miles, or more than eight million acres, and a popu-
lation of 89,467.
To these adjoining, or river counties, may be added, as contributing in
large degree to the commerce of St. Johns, the counties of Polk, Hills-
borough and Sumter, having an aggregate area of 4,740 square miles and
a population of 18,000 ; and also, as in a less though considerable degree
tributary to the river trade, the five counties of Dade, Monroe, Manatee,
Hernando and Alachua, having an aggregate area of 19,908 square miles,
and a population of 38,305.
The river fleet, great and small, consists of about seventy steamers, vary-
ing in size, of course, from the small craft that follow the shallow ways of
the tributaries, up to the splendid palace steamers that make swift time
between Jacksonville and Lake Monroe.
A line of ocean steamships runs regularly between Charleston, S. C.,
and this port, doing a profitable business, in spite of Jacksonville's supe-
rior railway connections northward, also a line to Nassau, in the Bahama
Islands, and with the further progress of the work upon the jetties at the
mouth of the St. Johns, a New York line of steamships is expected to run
direct to Jacksonville.

THE PORT OF ST. JOHNS.
The St. Johns River, from Jacksonville to the ocean, forms a convenient
harbor, known to commerce as the Port of St. Johns. Heretofore it has
been used chiefly by lumber vessels, but the State's recent increase in
wealth, population and production, gives this port a new and greater im-
portance.
RIVER AND HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS.
Operations for the improvement of the channel over the bar at the
mouth of the St. Johns River, by means of converging low-water jetties,
have been going forward since the year 1879.
The plan of improvement essentially consists in the construction of two
low jetties built of riprap stone, supported by a foundation mattress or
platform of logs, with a mattress hearing wherever found practicable, to
reduce the cost of the work.
Of two plans discussed the more comprehensive one was adopted. This
plan provides for the construction of two long jetties, starting from the
opposite shores of the entrance and extending seaward across the bar. It
is intended thereby to establish a mid-channel depth of 15 feet at mean
low water. The usual available low-water depth over the bar in its unim-
proved condition was 6 feet, more or less, with a mean rise and fall of
tide of about 5 feet. The cost of this project is estimated at $1,306,409.
In order to secure the full benefit of an increased low water depth on
the bar, as contemplated by the project, it will be necessary to improve
some defective reaches of river between the bar and the city of Jackson-
ville, at a cost of about $120,000.
Since the adoption of the existing plan of improvements of June 30,
1879, four appropriations have been made by Congress for thi- work, ag-
gregating $525,000, the last appropriation of $150,000 being yet unex-
pended. Previously a total sum of $57,476.28 was expended in dredging









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


for the temporary improvement of the bar-channel since the close of the
late civil war.
The appropriations of Congress have been made in small sums of from
$100,000 to $150,000, at intervals so wide that actual operations have been
at several times suspended and great damage has been caused thereby to
the work. Much of each new appropriation has been expended in repair-
ing the injuries done by washouts and the sinking and wrecking of incom-
plete jetties. The work is at present, however, in good condition.
The ship channel does not at present follow between the lines of the two
jetties, but crosses the South jetty at an angle of about 45 degrees, some
700 yards or more from the shore end of that jetty. A channel has opened,
however, running straight out to sea between the lines of the jetties, in
the place intended for it by the engineers,and vessels of moderate draught
have come into port by that channel. It is intended, when the work is in
a proper stage of advancement, to entirely close the gap in the South jetty
where the main ship channel now crosses it, and thereby turn the entire
current into the new channel. The total of the appropriations for the St.
Johns bar is $525,000. The total expenditure to June 30, 1885, was $494,-
074.35. The bar is in better condition for navigation than it has been for
many years.

JACKSONVILLE BUSINESS BLOCKS AND RESIDENCES.
Each year increases the number of fine business blocks and private resi-
dences which add to the appearance of the city. In addition to the hotels
may be mentioned the Astor Block, New Court House, Baldwin's or Pal-
metto, Bostwick's, Mason's, Reed's, Bisbee's, Freidenberg's, Gonzales',
Grunthal's, Hazeltine's, Holmes's, Hubbard's, L'Engle, Masonic Hall,
McConihe, McQuade's, Mitchell's, Polk's, Post-office, Rivas & Koopman's,
Robinson's, Root's, Taylor's, Thebaut's, Walsh's, Witschen's, Ely's,
First National Bank, Ambler, Marvin & Stockton's Banking House,
Hughes's Hotel Oxford, Park Opera House, Mohawk, etc, etc. There
are several fine residences, among which are the homes of S. B. Hubbard,
Mrs. E. C. Coffin, Daniel G. Ambler, William B. Barnett, William D. Bar-
nett, Cyrus Bisbee, John Clark, Jacob D. Bucky, Joshua L. Birch, Mrs.
Sarah A. Day, Mrs. Celia Freeland, John G. Christopher, Jonathan C.
Greely, Edward M. L'Engle, Joseph D. Mitchell, M. D., Mrs. Gilbert
Hunter, Sigmund Ritzewoller, John T. Talbott, General Francis E. Spin-
ner, Mrs. Averill, James Y. Wilson, Paran Moody, William S. Wight-
man, H. R. Stout, M. D., James P. Taliaferro, and others.
THE PROMENADES.

Cities, like men, have their customs. With some the natives, with others
the tourists, make them. Saratoga, Newport, Long Branch each have
their characteristics, and so with Jacksonville. Up to the hour of ten in
the morning the occupants of the large hotels are scarcely seen. Break-
fast over, they turn towards Bay Street for shopping and a promenade
from the Everett House to the Carleton, nearly a mile. During these
morning hours one meets the representative of every Northern and West-
ern State and many Southerners, while representatives of foreign climes
are found quite generally. The many bazars, curiosity shops and stores
are thronged with well-dressed tourists on pleasure bent. The represent-









WEBB's JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 47

atives of New York and London clubs, titled personages, money kings,
literary celebrities, dowagers and their handsome daughters, bridal couples
and Bohemians jostle each other in their round of pleasure. From 3 to 5
p. m. this scene is repeated, the height of the season being in March. In
the evening life on the street, like Saratoga, is unknown. The guests of
the St. James, Everett, Windsor, The Carleton, The Grand View, Tremont,
enjoy themselves in their respective caravansaries, where good music by
the bands invite the dance. During the season several select hops are giv-
en at the hotels and the Florida Yacht Club, where the youth, beauty,
.and fashion of the several States mingle in the waltz. Take it all in all,
life at the large hotels in Jacksonville is one round of pleasure aud excite-
ment, as every facility is afforded by the proprietors for one's enjoyment.

THE SUBURBS.
The suburbs of Jacksonville are La Villa on the west, which has a
separate government with a mayor, council, etc., and Fairfield, a locality
on the east. These together with the city proper, Springfield, East Jackson-
ville, Brooklyn, Riverside, Hansontown, make up in a comprehensive way
Jacksonville.

EXCURSIONS AND DRIVES.
Extended excursions are made to Fernandina, St. Augustine, Palatka,
Green Cove Springs, Magnolia, Mandarin (the home of Mrs. H. B. Stowe),
Orange Park, Fort George, Mayport, the Bar, and intermediate points
which can be made in a day or less. Arlington, Arlington Creek, St.
Nicholas, South Jacksonville, and McCoy's Creek can all be reached by
water within an hour. The drives through some of the city streets, out
the shell road through Fairfield and back through Springfield, thence to
Riverside and Brooklyn, are worthy of mention.
Jacksonville has been built up in size far surpassing the most sanguine
expectations of early days. The buildings, too, are of a most superior order,
evidencing culture and good taste, excelled by the people of no other
place. Lines of communications also, by telegraph, by railroad, and by
steamers, have been established, which in the brief time that has elapsed
since their commencement are simply wonders. The occurrences of the
most distant places can be known now in a few minutes; while there is
connection by railroad with Fernandina and to Pablo Beach, also with
Savannah direct, by a line hence to Waycross, on Savannah's great line
of communication. Also from Jacksonville direct to St. Augustine; also
from Jacksonville direct to Palatka and Sanford, on the west side of the
River St. Johns. The former line of railroad to Tallahassee and Quincy
is renewed and improved, and extended westward to Chattahoochee, and
thence on to Pensacola. and onward to Mobile. New Orleans, Texas and
San Francisco. These improvements, if they had been predicted before
the war, would have obtained for the author the distinguished appellation
of enthusiast and visionary the wildest and most extraordinary.
Business on the River St. Johns has increased also, and kept pace with
that on the land. There are now more large and fine steamers running
daily from Jacksonville up the river to the head of navigation than for-
merly was ever supposed would be seen upon any waters in Florida.
There is also a line of steamers running direct to Charleston, S. C., and to








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Nassau in the Bahamas. The astonishing number of passengers they
constantly carry show the great interest felt by the outside world in the
South land, where once, and no great time since, the Indian roamed un-
hindered as lord of the country; where the wild birds sang unnoticed and
unappreciated in the tree-tops, and the wild deer fed undisturbed upon
the prairies, and on the borders of the unnumbered clear-water lakes scat-
tered through all the land; and where the white man, when in long inter-
vals seen, was regarded as of another and superior order of creation.
The quantity and amount of freight also daily carried and distributed
along the river, or sent beyond its shores to other and more distant places,
is incredible ; while the passenger can find small steamers almost every-
where upon the great river, and railroads which lead almost everywhere
through Florida's vast southern interior.
Travelers from the great North, Northwest, and West, can now reach
Jacksonville by land and by water as they may prefer, in quickness of
time and with an ease, convenience and comfort equal to that found in
the most favored places; and will here, in places of accommodation of
superior attraction, receive an attention which will impart a satisfaction,
in this balmy clime, unsurpassed in any other place; and can go hence,
in almost any direction, by steamer or by rail, with speed and certainty,
and find in those whom he meets and with whom he mingles a welcome, a
hospitality and generosity of intercourse free from cant, hypocrisy and
falsehood, ever known and characteristic of this sunny land.

JACKSONVILLE'S MAYORS.
During the war the official records of the city were buried, for preserva-
tion, but were suffered to lie so long. in the earth that they wholly de-
cayed and were lost. The following is a list of the Mayors of the city since
the war:
MAYORS OF JACKSONVILLE SINCE THE WAR.
H. H. Hoeg................................................... 1865
Holmes Steele................................................ 1866
John Clark.................................................... 1867
Edward Hopkins .............. ................................ 1868
Edward Hopkins .............. .. .......... ..................... 1869
Peter Jones ........................................... April 5, 1870
Peter Jones ....................................... April 4, 1871
Peter Jones ................... ........................ April 4, 1872
John C. Greeley ................................. ..... April 1, 1873
Peter Jones ........................................... April 4, 1874
Peter Jones .......................................... April 5, 1875
Luther McConihe.................................... April 3, 1876
W Stokes Boyd ...................................... April 2, 1877
Luther McConihe...................................... April 1, 1878
Peter Jones........................................... July 17, 1879
J. Ramsey Dey........................... ........ April 5, 1880
M. A. Dzialynski ..................................... April 4, 1881
M. A. Dzialynski .................................... April 3, 1882
W. McL. Dancy....................................... April 2, 1883
W. McL. Dancy ...................................... April 7, 1884
Marshal C. Rice....................................... April 7, 1885




















VWEBB'S



JACKSONVILLE STREET DIRECTORY.

1886


The streets of Jacksonville are straight and cross each other at right
angles. Those running parallel with the river and nearly East and West
are the following, named in their order : Bay, Forsyth, Adams, Monroe,
Duval, Church, Ashley, Beaver, Union and State.
Ocean Street, which runs north from the river, is the dividing line,
dividing the streets above mentioned into East and West; those run-
ning east of and from Ocean. being prefixed by the name East, as East
Bay, East Forsyth, etc., and those running West of and from Ocean, as
West Bay, West Forsyth, etc.
The streets which start from the river and extend northward, crossing
those above first mentioned and commencing on the west, are Clay, Cedar,
Julia, Hogan, Laura, Pine, Ocean, Neewnan, Market, Liberty, Washing-
ton, Catherine, and Marsh, in the order mentioned.


LA VILLA STREET DIRECTORY.
The dividing line between Jacksonville and La Villa is Clay Street,
which runs north from Bay Street.
The next streets running north and south, going west from Clay Street,
are Bridge, Hawk, First, Second Third, Fourth, Fifth, Division lane, and
Myrtle avenue. The latter named avenue begins at Adams Street and
runs north to Church.
Those streets running east and west, beginning on the south, are Bay,
Forsyth, Ward, Adams, Monroe, Duval, Church, Ashley, Beaver, Union
and State.






E. BRANNAH.


Florida Fruit, Flowers and Scenery Painted from Nature to Order. on Canvas, Shells or
Satin. Florida Shells and Novelties.


EniESCO0


I1\T OILj,


In Queen Anne, Japanese and Eastlake. New and Novel Designs.

Newspaper and Magazine IllustratinnB a Specialty.
Bridge Street, Corner Beaver, L. V., Jacksoville, Fla.
Reference: WANTON S WEBB.


MADAME HAAS,


DANCING


ACADEMY.


Hart's Block, East Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.

Classes --Mornina, Afternoon 3 to 5 P. IM., Evening 8 to 10.

TERMS Per Quarter of Twenty Lessons, $10.00.


Forzmzerly of New Yorks City-


LOU.


-7 R T- I


's=r,









WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 51


THE FLORIDA LAND & IMPROVEMENT CO.

Twenty-three miles from Ocala and less than three miles from the cele-
brated Wekiva and Blue Springs, and the same distance from the Silver
Springs, Ocala Gulf Railroad, the above named company have 2,000
acres of high rolling pine land which they are selling to actual settlers
at very reasonable prices and on easy terms. The Parkersburg Land Co.
adjoins the land of this company, where fortunes are being made in pur-
chasing land now. Either company will send circulars describing the
attractions and advantages of this favored locality, and both are trust-
worthy and reliable, and have offices in Jacksonville.



ELLEN N.

During the past year, in the South, there has been no occurring event
occasioning more surprise to the interested public-and to railroad men
particularly-than the elasticity and wonderful recuperative powers dis-
played by that great Trunk Line, the Old Reliable Ellen N." (Louis-
ville & Nashville R. R.)
From the ruins of a Wall street disaster she has emerged financially
stronger and in better condition than ever. This tb o, during the period
of extreme tension and traffic depression, a depression which is, even yet,
shaking to their very foundations other large and heretofore profitable
corpora tions.
Without any cutting of salaries, the L. & N. has paid off millions of
indebtedness, improved her property, brought to completion the largest
steel bridge, which spans the Ohio River at Henderson, Ky., thereby
making herself by seven hours the Short Line" from Florida and
southwestern points to St. Louis, Chicago and all the great country that
is tributary to these cities.
This grand result is attributable to a liberal and practical policy pur-
sued by the management, who are a liberal and practical set of officials,
and who from President Milton H. Smith down, learned the ropes" by
long years of practical service in railroad harness."
It was the L. & N.'s general passenger agent, Mr. C. P. Atmore, who
put on the first round-trip tickets at lowest rates to Florida, an act which
has proved an important factor in the bringing into prominence the merits
of our sunny clime.
With through sleepers between St. Louis, Louisville and other cities to
Jacksonville and way down into South Florida. this Acme" of railroads
robs travel of its tediousness and puts former days of vexation into fleet-
ing hours of delight.
Passengers for Florida can obtain all needed information by addressing
Mr. C. P. Atmore, Louisville. Ky.; John W. Mard, St. Louis; 8. S.
Parker, Cincinnati; John Kilkeny. New Orleans, and George L. Cross,
Chicago. Going from Florida, write or call on L. R. Tuttle, passenger
agent, No. 90 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
















WEBB'S FLORIDA.


Historical, Industrial andBiograp4ical


By WANTON S. WEBB.



Contains a general review of the State, a detailed account
of each County, its boundary, water courses, railroads, to-
pography, soil, productions, prices of lands, climate, health,
natural fertilizers, fish, game, stock raising, lumber, natural
springs; how, when and where to settle; a description of
each city, village and country post office in Florida, down to
1885. The work is 8x12 inches in size, contains over two
hundred large double column pages of solid printed matter,
and over one hundred illustrations of Florida scenery,
some full page, the whole printed on toned paper, with an
elegant illustrated cover, designed by Brannan. The weight
of the book is one and a half pounds, and it will be sent to
any part of the world postpaid, on the receipt of ONE DOL-
LAR, addressed
WEBB'S FLORIDA,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


READ WHAT IS SAID ABOUT IT.
"Certainly the best work of its kind on Florida that I have ever seen.."-H. B.
PLANT, President Savanna/, Plor ida, and Western Railway Co., Southern Express
Comnianyy, and Charleston and Sava',nnak Railway Co.
It is, beyond any comparison, the most thorough, complete, and satisfactory pic-
forial and descriptive work on Florida that has yet appeared."-The Florida Despatch.
"We conscientiously recommend it to our readers."-T/e Indian River Sun.
Of all ws.ks on Florida it is tle most excellent and the most accurate."-Ocala
Bannerr.
"Yesterday about midday, W i.n's, FLORIDA, mounted on about twenty drays, was
brought from the Fernandina Railway Depot."--Florida Journal.
"As a compendium, accurate, fresh, and complete, we know of nothing that comntares
with it."-Floriir Ba rtist.
Without a rival."--r 7ama GCuadian.
Throughout the work is a triumph of typographical art."-Tropical Paradise.
"Altogether it is the most comprehensive book on Florida as yet published, and
fine engravings make its pages tie more attractive."-Th/e Floridian.
"Notices the most insignificant places."--The Pensacolian.


f--















ADDITIONS, ALTERATIONS AND CORRECTIONS.


JACKSONVILLE.

Allworden Augustus S. (Sidgreaves & Allworden), Bay c Liberty, h do
Andreu John P., clothing, 25 E Bay
Avet L., cameo cutter, 72k W Bay

BAILEY J. D., prop the Victoria House, 94 W Adams, h do
BANES (Nathan H.) & WARRINGTON (David), prop Jackson-
ville Turning and Scroll Sawing shop, mfrs of cherry, cedar and
cypress work and hand rail twists, plain and fancy mantles, mouldings
and stair builders, 142 E Bay, h at E. J.
Baur Augustus, civil engineer, 8 W Bay, b 41 Pine
Beach George W., bookkeeper 50 W Bay, h Duval n First, L. V.
BENNETT & MULROY, wines and liquors, retail, 79 W Bay
B LENUS THOMAS H. REV., pastor Christian Church, h 63 Pine
Borum Martha A. Miss, artist, 41- Ocean, b Hogan c Ashley
Brown John H.,* baker, h 154 Julia

CENTER, see also SENTER

CHRISTIE JOSEPH B., lawyer and chief law department, Florida
Real Estate Exchange, h 58 Market
Clark Henry R., business department of Florida Daily Herald, b 95 W
Beaver
CLOUD J. A., civil engineer, Pine n Hogan's Creek, h New York city
CLOUGH DANA B., prop commercial school, 721 W Bay, h at S.
DAVIES W. W., gen'l agt Associated Lines of Railway and Atlantic
Coast Line, 72 W Bay
DUBOS F. J. & CO., manager superphosphate and maize-oleine fer-
tilizers, ft Newnan

LLIS & HUSSEY, grocers and commission merchants, 14 West
SBay








ADDITIONS, ALTERATIONS AND CORRECTIONS.


FILDES CHARLES L., editor and prop Opinion, Bay
Fletcher ---, (Zimmerman & Fletcher), h at S.
FLORIDA IMMIGRATION COMPANY, Wilson R. Hunter, man-
tager, 49 West Bay


HALLOWS WILLIAM A., grocer and commission merchant, 14
East Bay, h 89 East Monroe


McCLOED KENNETH, carpenter, h Duval c Cedar



ORRIS WILLIAM F., Windsor Hotel, h do


DEED HARRISON, editor Semi- Tropical, 21- West Bay, h at South
SJacksonville


SEMI-TROPICAL PUBLISHING CO., 214 West Bay
SMITH TONY,* wheelwright and blacksmith, stoves, and wood
dealer, foot East Adams, h do
Souveille M., physician and surgeon, 90 West Adams, h do
SPENCER CLINTON E., prop town of Tema, on F. R. & N. Ry, n
SLake Panasopkee, in Sumter Co., and real estate dealer, Grand View
Hotel, b do


TUCKER J. E., land commissioner F. R. & N. Co., 108 West Bay


ELLER REGINALD H. REV. D. D., rector St. John's Episco-
pal Church, head Market c Duval, h 51 East Duval



BANDS.
Union Cornet Band.*

John E. Spearing, Leader; J. J. Forbes, Captain; Reger Graham,
Second Leader; Lancaster Hall, Secretary. Fifteen members. Meets at
City Hall, La Villa, every Thursday evening.










ADDITIONS, ALTERATIONS AND CORlECTIONS.


Agents-Real Esiate.
WILLIAMS & SWANN, (Sell their own
lands), 24 W Bay
Artists.
Borum Martha A. Miss, 4112 Ocean
Blacksmiths.
SMITH TONY,* foot E Adams (for ad. see
index)
Boarding.
PAYNE H. P., 122 E Bay
Bronzes and Brass Goods.
L'ENGLE C. S. & CO., 76 and 78 W Bay (for
ad. see index)
Carpenters and Builders.
THOMPSON J. J., Campbell's Addition.
Civil Engineers.
CLOUD J. A., Pine n Hogan's Creek
Dancing.
HAAS MADAME, Harts Block, E Bay
Hotels.
THE VICTORIA HOUSE (formerly Parisian


House), J. D. Bailey, proprietor, 94 W
Adams
House Fnrnishing Goods.
L'ENGLE C. S. & CO., 76 and 78 W Bay (for
ad. see index)
Japanese Ware.
L'ENGLE C. S. & CO., 76 and 78 W Bay (for
ad. see index)
Music Teachers.
Carlisle Joseph, Forsyth c Lama
Painters-House and Sign.
GADSON O. J., 175 E Bay
RICH WILLIAM, Forsyth c Division, L. V.
Physicians.
Souveille M., 90 W Adams
Poultry and Game.
VERILL & CO., 23 Laura
Tobacconists-Retail.
GOMEZ & MARTELIZ 113 W Bay
Tobacconists-Wholesale.
GOMEZ & MARTELIZ, 113 W Bay








EAGLE PRINTING HOUSE
12 LIBERTY STREET



@ur facifi1fye are Setter tftar tFobe of any otKer
office on Wte MuRbaon Rpiver, aib tfe 6eot juLagef
a3y our wore k nor eseeffec4 anymbere, cofife
our price are very foco . .


HAIGHT & DUDLEY

PRINTERS

POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK

allt ipBgratplic Abuertiser (P1Iiabelplia) saqz:
10o prifniy office i tie i t an rui'Lrnjf
ouat tefter coYod.



EIGHT STEAM PRESSES
OVER 5oo FONTS OF TYPE





















-VWE B B 'S



JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


1886.

ABBREVIATIONS.-*, African; ab., above; agt., agent; av. or ave., avenue; B., Brooklyn;
b. or bds., boards ; bel., below; bet., between; bldg., building; com., commission ; c. or cor.,
corner; do., ditto; E., east; E. J., East Jacksonville; ex., express; F., Fairfield; F. & J.
R. R., Fernandina & Jacksonville Railway; F. R. & N. Co., Florida Railway & Navigation
Company; h, house; H., Hansontown; ins., insurance; J., St. A. & H. R. Ry., Jacksonville,
St. Augustine & Halifax River Railway; J., T. & K. W. R. R., Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railroad; J. & A. R. R., Jacksonville & Atlantic Railroad; L. V., La Villa; n., near;
n. e., north east; n. w., north west; N., north; O., Oakland; opp., opposite; prop., proprie-
tor; R.. Riverside; r., rear; R. R., railroad; S., Springfield; S., F. & W. R. R., Savannah,
Florida & Western Railroad; s. e., south east ; s. w., south west, sq., square; st., street; W.,
West.

ABBOTT MOSES S. G. Rev., pastor Shiloh Baptist Church, L. V., hFor-
syth cor First.
Abell Harry F., delivery clerk P. 0., b 58 Market
Abell Henry F. Mrs., h 58 Market
Abercromba Mitchell,* porter, h 159 Ocean
Abrahams Elizabeth R. Mrs., h Ocean cor W Forsyth
Ackerly Gilbert D., General Freight and Passenger Agt. J. St. A. & H.
R. Ry, ft Newnan, h 99 E Forsyth
Acosta Alfred,* laborer, h E State n Market
Acosta George F., clerk City Market, h opp Water Works, S
Acosta Isadore M. (Hellen & Acosta), h 112 Pine
Adams Belle,* h 74 Catherine
ADAMS CHARLES F., agt., Fla Land and Imp. Co., Kissimmee Land
Co., and The A. & G. C. C. & O. L. Co. Pine, c W Forsyth
Adams Edward,* laborer, h Adams bey, Hawk, L. V.
Adams James,* h E Union c Newnan
Adams John M., bookkeeper, 34 E Bay, h plank road, L. V.
Adams Mitchell D., laborer, h Church n Hawk, L. V.
ADAMS NANNIE MISS,* laundress, h 4 W State
DAMS THOMAS J., (The Bacon & Adams Abstract Co.), b 41
W Forsyth
Adams William, florist, b at Springfield
Adams William J., telegraph clerk, 21j W Bay, b at E. Jacksonville








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


ADAMS (Willoughby) & SMITH (Charles E.), wholesale and retail
meat dealers, city market, h 34 E Church
Adkins Ephraim,* laborer, h at Fairfield
Aghear Betty,* cook, h 106 Washington
Aghear David,* laborer, b 106 Washington
Aghear John,* laborer, b 106 Washington
Aghear Mary,* b 106 Washington
AGNEW THOMAS J., Gen Supt at Florida Steam Saw Mills, h do F.
Aiken John W.,* porter F. R. & N. Co., h at Hansontown
Aird Emma Mrs., h 16 W Duval
Aird Henry G., druggist, 23 W Bay, b 16 W Duval
AIRD WILLIAM, prop Everett House Pharmacy, W Bay c Julia, h
at E Jacksonville
Albert Jane Mrs.,* h 46 Clay
Alcanters Jasper, cigar maker, h 110 Liberty
Alexander agent, b 112 W Union
Alexander Alfred,* laborer, h Beaver c Clay, H.
Alexander Ann, wid Reuben, b Oak n Duval, B.
Alexander Augustus,* laborer, h Washington, O.
Alexander George,* laborer, h 156 Hogan
Alexander Hamlet, laborer, h Market cor Union
Alexander Isam,* laborer, h at Oakland
Alexander James S., carpenter, h Nellie n Brough
Alexander Julius,* laborer, h at Oakland
Alexander Lee,* carpenter, h at Oakland
Alexander Samuel,* carpenter, h at Oakland
Alexander Samuel,* laborer, h Magnolia, O
Alexander Sarah,* confectionery, 98 E Bay, h do
Alexander Scott,* carpenter, b at Oakland
Alexander Thomas,* laborer, bds 211 W. Bay, L. V.
Alexander William B.,* laborer, h 410 Bay, L. V.
Alexander William H.,* mason, h at Oakland
ALEXANDER WILLIAM M.,* driver, h at Brooklyn
Alger Charles D., b 107 W Ashley

Willoughby Adams. Chas. E. Smith

__ADAMS & SMITH,
SUCCESSORS TO W. ADAMS,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Fine Northern



Stall No., 8, City Market,

JACKSONVILLE, Fla,








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 67

Alger Julia A., Mrs., boarding, 107 W. Ashley, h do
Allen Amanda, wid. John B., h Commercial, R.
ALLEN BENJAMIN T. & CO., Pubs. Industrial Recorder,
Ocean c E Forsyth, b 123 W Forsyth
Allen Catharine L. Mrs., h 37 E Monroe
Allen Edward,* carpenter, h Magnolia, n R. R., O.
Allen George W., engineer, h Bridge cor W. Bay, L. V.
Allen Hannah, Mrs.* h n Shell Road, E. J.
Allen Hattie M., wid Alonzo, b Commercial, B.
Allen Henry,* laborer, hat Hansontown
Allen James,* cabinet maker, h W Beaver, n Hawk, L. V.
Allen J. Edward, lawyer at Orlando, Fla.
Allen John,* truckman, h Adams, bey 3d, L. V.
Allen John E,* Adams cor Third, L. V.
Allen John H.,* carpenter, h 56 E Ashley
Allen John H. Jr., clerk J. T. & K. W. Ry Co., Astor Block.
Allen Martha, Mrs.* h at E Jacksonville.
Allen Mary Mrs.,* h 7 W Ashley
Allen Milton,* fireman, h R. R. ave, L. V.
Allen Sarah E. Mrs., dressmaker, h 67 E Forsyth
Allen Scott,* laborer, h at Fairfield
Allerson John,* blacksmith, h Ashley c 1st, L. V.
Alling Horatio T., deputy sheriff, h Brough n Maggie, E Jacksonville
Allison A. K., baggage master, b 38 W Adams
Allmon James A., h 65 W State
Allston Hermion Miss, teacher, b 34 W Union
ALLSTON T. D.,* head waiter Carleton House, b do
Allworden Gustavus (Sidegraves & Allworden) Liberty c E Bay
Alsover George S., plumber, h 69 Orange, bet Laura and Hogan
Alsover Malvina A. Mrs., dressmaker, h 69 W Orange
Amazeene John L., capt. steamer Florida, h Mitchell's Block, E Bay
Ambers John,* h Forsvth, n Division, L. V.
AMBLER DANIEL G., president National Bank of the State of
Florida, 16 W Bay and AMBLER (Daniel G.), MARVIN
(John L.) & STOCKTON, (John N. C.), bankers, 16 E Bay, and
Ambler & Taliaferro (James P.), lumber dealers and railroad con-
tractors, 4 W Bay, h W Adams c Hogan

CJon8 r 1P. N^DEr,
VARIETY STORE.
WVE-OLESr.ALE 8iD RA -rT ETAIL D E .ALER B I

CLOTHING, HATS AND CAPS,
Sewoerfy, Senit' Uurnisf$ing ooRl, Winware,
C0RO OEEK:ERY s G6-ZL1SS-WAEREE
Perfumery, Stationery, Toys, Etc., Etc.
25 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, Fla.







68 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Ambrose George,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Ambrouse Newton,* cook, h Forsyth, L. V.
Ames Charles L. paperhanger, W Forsyth c Laura, b St. John's House
Amons Asa, engineer, h Bay cor Bridge, L. V.
AMROCK EDWARD S., hairdresser, Carleton House, b do
Amy Alfred J., removed to Gainesville, Fla.
Anderson A., carpenter and builder, b St. John's House
Anderson Archibald, laborer, h 212 Hogan
Anderson Charlotte Mrs., h Magnolia, O.
ANDERSON, CHURCH & CO., (Alonzo M. Sewell), fruit and pro-
duce commission, 44 E Bay, h 48 W Beaver
Anderson Hannah,* cook, h North n Cedar
Anderson Isaiah, marketman, h at Lewisville, R.
Anderson James,* laborer, h Forsyth, n Bridge, L. V.
Anderson John, machinist, b 60 Washington
Anderson John, orange packer and fertilizers, 99 W Bay
Anderson Jordan,* laborer, h North n Cedar
Anderson June,* porter, h Hogan c Orange
Anderson Louisa Miss,* h Magnolia n Stonewall, B.
ANDERSON LOUISA P. MRS., h r Brough, E. J., n graded
A school
Anderson Lucy Mrs.,* cook, h 169 Julia
NDERSON PAUL REV., Baptist missionary, Sweetwater, h at E
Jacksonville
Anderson Peter, ship carpenter, h at E Jacksonville
Anderson Richard,* b 109 North
Anderson Thomas N., contractor and builder, 34 E Bay, b do
Anderson) Zachariah T.) & Townsend (James F. Mrs.), wood yard and
mfrs of cypress shingles, 142 E Bay, h 144 do
Anderson William J., clk. 63 W Bay, h Hogan n Orange
ANDREU DENNIS A., variety store, 13 E Bay, h 73Newnan
Andreu Jerome C., printer, h 16 E Ashley
ANDREU JOHN P., variety store, 25 E Bay, h 88 E Ashley. [See
adv. p. 67].
Andreu Lawrence M., merchant tailor, 13 E Bay, h Ashley n Washington
Andreu Mary M. Miss., h 72 W Church


S. G. AYERY,

NATIONAL LIYERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES,

No. Io9 Pine St., Jacksonville, Fla.

BEST SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS ALWAYS ON HAND.
-ALSO-
BUGGIES, HARNESS, ETC., ETC., FOR SALE.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 69

ANDREU RAPHAEL P., clerk, b 7 W Church
Andrews Elizabeth, wid, b n Commercial, B.
Andrews Frances Miss, h at Oakland
Andrews Mary Mrs.,* h 27 Cedar
Andrews Charles M.,* steward, h n Adams, L. V.
Andrews Geo. W., butcher, city market, h Ward n 5th, L. V.
Andrews John,* laborer, h 4th n Adams, L. V.
Andrews Mary Miss,* h 27 Cedar
Andrews Peter, junk dealer, Winter n Duval, h do, B.
Andrews Robert, fisherman, h at Oakland
Andrus Ida M., physician, 291 Laura, b do
Andy Edward H. Rev.,* h at Hansontown
Appleyard John, clerk, Mohawk Block, bds 37j E Bay
Appleyard Thomas J., Publisher Southern Sun, Palatka, Florida
Archibald James W., lawyer, 8 WV Bay, h at Springfield
Archibald Robert B., lawyer, 8- W Bay, h 121 W Church
ARCTIC ICE COMPANY, John H. Gillen, Supt., Arctic Ice Com-
pany's Wharf, B.
Argrett Joseph M.,* laborer, h at Brooklyn
Armour & Co., Patrick McCloskey, agt, provisions wholesale, W. Bay n
Julia
Armstrong George,* carpenter, h 127 E Duval
Armstrong Hamilton, bookbinder, Times- Union office, h at Brooklyn.
Armstrong John M, h 1 E Forsyth
Armstrong Mary Mrs., h Brough n Victoria, E. J.
Armstrong Moses,* h Adams n Clay, L. V.
Armstrong R. DeLacey, clerk, 9 W. Bay, b Adams n Market
Arnold tinsmith, b Cedar c W Church
Arnow Charles,* driver, h 94 Orange
RPEN HENRY IV., grocer, Ward c Second, h do, L. V.
RTRELL WILLIAM M., Prin. Stanton Grammar School, h 14
W Union
Ash Emily, h at Oakland
Ash James,* carpenter, h Magnolia, O.
Ashley Allen, saw filer, h Nellie n Brough, E. J.
Ashley Columbus,* carpenter, h Adams cor Fourth, L. V.


J. S- BE-AOI,

FLORIDA CANE MANUFACTORY,
Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer and Curiosity Store,
No. 28 LAURA STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
--~---------E------
THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH ORANGE, PALMETTO, COCOANUT,
ROYAL PALM AND OTHER CANES.
Live Alligators, from 10 inches to 12 feet long, shipped to all parts of the United States.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Ashley Frederick G., butter, cheese and preserves, City Market
Ashley Squire,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Ashmead Clarence H., removed to Philadelphia, Pa.
ASHMEAD WILLIAM H., entomologist, h 77 E Forsyth
Ashton Josephine,* h Eagle n Cedar
Aspinwall Franklin E., commercial traveler, h 122 Julia
ASTOR WILLIAM, h Hogan c W Monroe
Atkins William G., printer, h 127 Pine
Atkinson Edgar C., clerk, 30 W Bay, b 226 E Bay
Atkinson George, h Maggie n the railroad, E. J.
Atkinson Marion R., machinist, h at E Jacksonville
Atkinson Richard W., bookkeeper, 92 E Bay, h at Gladysville, Fla.
Atwood George H., painter, h 68 Church, L. V.
Augusta Jane Miss,* h r 14 W State
Augustus Jane,* cook, h Cedar n North
Aukeny James F., (Cole Lumber Dryer Co.), 90 W Bay, b Tremont House
Austin Dominick,* laborer, h at Fairfield
Austin Grant,* laborer, h Leilla n the marsh, B.
AUSTIN HENRIETTA,* laundress, h 93 Orange
Austin James,* laborer, h Hickory n Hosp, O.
Austin Mary,* h 66 E Ashley
Austin Mary Mrs., h Forsyth cor 4th, L. V.
Austin Robert,* laborer, h Division ave n Monroe, L. V.
Austin Thomas,* carpenter, h 163 Hogan
ESTABLISHED 1875.

E. BEAN,

COMMISSION MERCHANT AND FORWARDER,
Waycross Railroad Wharf, Jacksonville, Fla.
WAYCROSS RAILROAD DEPOT, CAINESVILLE, FLA.
Oranges, Lemons, and Other Fruits and Vegetables Packed, Shipped
and Sold.
RELIABLE CORRESPONDENTS IN ALL THE PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES.
GREEN LEMONS RIPENED,
AND PUT IN GOOD, MERCHANTABLE SHAPE.
G-ROWVE: RS' STT:PP LITES
Have a Full Stock of Growers' Supplies, Consisting of Cottonwood, Thin Wood for Orange Boxes,
which makes the Whitest, Lightest, Strongest and Cheapest Box in Use. Beach (Bangor) Thin Wood,
Dressed Pine Heading, Hoops, Manilla Orange Wraps, Ladders for Gathering Fruit, &c., &c.
AGENT FOR THE SALE OF THE STEYENS SIZER AND THE DAYTON TRAMWAY FRUIT CAR.
SEND FOR CIRCULAR AND STENCILS.


";' 70








WEBB'S JACKS(*VILLE DIRECTORY.


Austin Willis,* waiter, h 44 Clay
Avery Louisa Mrs., h 114 W Union
AVERY S. G., livery and sale stable, 109 Pine h Pine, cor W Church
[See adv. p. 68].
Avet Josephine Miss, private school, 111 Laura, b do
Avet Louis, cameo cutter and carver, 13J W Bay, h do
Aylworth G. H. & Co., grocers' shelf goods, 53 W Forsyth, h s e cor
Liberty and Adams
Aylworth Gilbert D., clerk, b Liberty cor E Adams

BABBIT FLOYD L., traveling salesman, h 132 Newnan
Babbitt Harry L., agt Florida Fruit Exchange, b 132 Newnan
BABCOCK WILLIAM H., journalist and sup't public instruction,
Duval Co., 21J W Bay, h 90 E Duval
Bachmann Renatus, removed to Mineola, Fla.
Backenstoe George A., railroad contractor and builder, Springfield, h do
Bacon Dempsey,* laborer, h Bay, L. V.
Bacon George T., b 95 W Forsyth
BACON HENRY, physician and surgeon, 721 W Bay, h do

BACON MARK R., lawyer and (The Bacon and Adams Abstract
Co.), b 41 W Forsyth
Baer Barnet M., clerk 17 W Bay, b 40 W Monroe
Baer Bernhard M., h 93 W Ashley
Baer Moses, h 38 E Monroe
Bagley Henry,* porter 28 E Bay, h n Forsyth cor 3d, L. V.
Bagley James,* laborer, h 150 W Church
Bagley Rosa,* h Forsyth cor 3d, L. V.
BAGWELL BENJAMIN, blacksmith, 164 Ocean, h do
Bailey Bernice A. Mrs., h 32 W Adams
Bailey Elizabeth Mrs., b 89 E Church
Bailey John V., carpenter, h 5th n Adams, L. V.
Bailey Walter G., clerk, b 89 E Church
Bailey Wayland, ass't U. S. Signal officer, Astor Block, b Union c
Hogan
Bailey W. C., agt., b 99 W Adams
Baird Irving E., clerk, h Mattie n Brough, E. J.

JACKSONVILLE AND PANAMA PARK

REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.
Suburban Property a Specialty.
Groves, Truck Farms and Building Lots Near the City for Rent or Sale. Improve-
ments Made for Non-Residents. Orange Trees for Sale.
MONE' TO LOA.T-
J. S. BELL, NOTARY PUBLIC
Office Hours At No. 1, Reed's Block, Bay Street, City, from 9 to 11 A. M. At Panama
Park, from 2 to 6 P. M.








72 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Baker Alfred,* carpenter, h E State n Newnan
Baker Augustus S., laborer, h 102 Hawk, L. V.
Baker Caroline Mrs.,* h Ashley, L. V.
Baker Celia,* laundress, h 169 Julia
Baker Edward Q., compositor, b Commercial c Middleburg Road, R.
Baker Henry,* tinner, h Caroline n Julia
Baker James B., (Hillyard & Baker), Hartridge's Wharf, b Hogan c
W Forsyth
Baker James B.,* steward, h Ward n First, L. V.
Baker John E., (MclIver & Baker), Forsyth cor Hogan, b do
BAKER JOHN W., dealer in and forwarder of oranges and lemons,
and (Baker & Woodhall), grocers, Commercial c M. R., h do, R.
Baker Mary Ann, laundress, b Union n Liberty
AKER WILLIAM,* blacksmith and wheelwright, n R. R., h at
Oakland
AKER WILLIAM N., cashier State Bank of Florida, 24 W Bay,
b Pine c Duval
BALDWIN ABEL S., trustee Sanitary Imp. Fund, 39 W Bay, h 56
Laura c W Adams
Baldwin Gardner,* fireman, h at E. Jacksonville
Baldwin George M., mason, h 41 Catherine
Baldwin James C., mason, h E Adams c Catherine
Baldwin Mary E. Mrs., groceries, E Adams c Catherine, h do
Baldwin Peter M. W., clerk, 10 W Bay, h Victoria n Nellie, E J
Baldwin William,* carpenter, h E Jacksonville
BALDWIN WILLIAM L., physician and surgeon, 39 W Bay, h
111 W Beaver. Office hours 12 to 2 and 7 to 8 p. M.
Baldwin William S., laborer, h 112 Ward, L. V.
Balem Charles,* laborer, h at Oakland
Ball Daniel,* h 89 E Ashley
Ball Theodore, patternmaker, h 24 W Monroe
Ballard ,* waiter, b 126 Newnan
Ballou Carrie B. Mrs.,* teacher, h Beaver n Bridge, L. V.
Ballou John H., lawyer, 24 Ocean, h 203 W Beaver
Banes Nathan H., wood-turner, 142 E Bay, E J
Bank of Jacksonville, (William B. Barnett, Bion H. Barnett, and Wil-
liam D. Barnett,) Pine s w c W Forsyth
Banks Adam H.,* polisher, h at E Jacksonville
Banks George E.,* tailor, Cedar c Adams, h do


CITY PHARMACY.
9 East Bay Street, Jacksnnville, Fla.




FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, PERFUMERY, &C.


Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Prepared.


HORACE BERRY.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 73

Banks James L., clerk, ft Laura, h at E Jacksonville
Banks John,* b Caroline n Cedar
Baratier Jules, merchant tailor, 27 Laura, h do
Baratta Vincent, musician, b 27 E Bay
Barbee Joseph A., carpenter and builder, h 81 E Forsyth c Liberty
BARBER ASBBEL W., asst. U. S. engineer, Astor blk, hCommer-
cial, B.
Barber Caroline Miss,* h Orange c Julia
Barber George W., shoemaker, Hogan c W Church, h outside city limits
Barber Sarah Mrs., dressmaker, Bay, h Forsyth n Hawk, L. V.
Barberie Lewis, clerk, b 79 Julia
Barbour Frank L., h 110 Ward, L. V.
ARBOUR JAMES, h W Forsyth c Cedar
Barclay Frank T.. clerk, 64- W Bay, b Laura n W Bay
B ARKER CHARLES WV., fruits and produce (wholesale) 24 Ocean
and fruit, 27 E Bay, Brooklyn n the Bridge, and Brough n St. Johns,
E. J., h 41 Pine
Barker Henry, agt L. Bucki & Son, F. R. & N. Co's. Whf, h 2d c Du-
val, L. V.
Barker Louis E., auditor J. T. & K. W. Ry. Co, Astor blk, b 127 Cedar
Barker Richard F., engineer, h Shell road, F.
BARLOiW JOHN T., harness, 21 Pine, h 145 W Bay
Barnaby George A., b 74 E Adams
Barnes Daniel,* laborer, h 414 Forsyth, L. V.
Barnes Edward,* machinist, b 201 Julia
Barnes Ivery Rev.,* h E Beaver n Market
Barnes Jackson, laborer, h Ward n Hawk, L. V.
Barnes James, cigarmaker, b 79 Julia
Barnes Jesse,* grocer, n R. R., h do, O.
Barnes Seaborn,* laborer, h n R. R. ave., L. V.
Barnes William,* fireman, b Magnolia n Stonewall, B.
Barnes William D. Jr., bookkeeper National Bank of the State of Florida,
16 E Bay
Barnett Bion H., (Vice President of the Bank of Jacksonville), h 59 Wash-
ington
Barnett William B., (President of the Bank of Jacksonville), h 69 Ocean


-B4ETTEMLAIaTS HO[TEL.o-

4 4 4 E-TTROP-EL. .T P-L. T.S N Q S
16 East Bay Street Between Newnan and Ocean Streets *- Jacksonville, Fla.
STREET CARS FROM DEPOTS AND STEAMERS STOP AT THE DOOR.
Rooms 50 cents per day and upwards. Rooms for Two, 75 cents per day and upwards, according to size
and location of room.

FRTEST- ASS RESi AJRAIBTM SSe$m![ as &I ei
F LCrNC COTNTER, NEBW YOE PRICES OR
JEO BETTLEV J.ttjliJ' A PRIIEOPR~JIJE T O








74 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Barnett William D., (Cashier of the Bank of Jacksonville), h Hogan c W
Union
Barnum Mary A. Mrs., h 66 Julia
Barrington Matthew,* h 615 Bay, L. V.
Barrs Abigail Mrs., h Bay n Bridge, L. V.
BARRS (Amander W)., HUNTER (Wilson R.), & STOCKTON,
(Telfair) real estate, land, loan and investing agts, 49 W Bay, and
Barrs, Clark (Henry E.) & Tate (Robert H.), books, stationery, news-
dealers and toys, 77 W Bay, h W Bay cor Bridge
ARRS CARRINGTON C., dentist, 59} W Bay, h W Bay n
Bridge
Barrs James,* carpenter, h n Hospital, 0.
ARRS JOHN M., lawyer, Forsyth cor Market, and sec. J. & A.
Railroad Co., h 43 W Ashley
BARTHEL JOSEPH, saloon, 26 Newnan, h 31 E Forsyth
Bartholomew Laura A. Mrs., boarding, 123 W Forsyth, h do
ARTHOLOMEW MARTIN B., carriage m'fr, 123 W Forsyth,
] h do
Bartoll Joseph, fruit, h Spearing n the Hospital, E. Jacksonville
Barton Margaret,* h 45 W Duval
Barton Martha,* laundress, h 45 W Duval
Basham Aaron K., machinist, h Brough n Virginia, E. J.
SA SNETT ARTHUR D., lawyer and resident manager Fla. Land
and Mortgage Co., 82 W Bay, h E Bay c Market
BASSETT DWIGHT H., carpenter and builder, 183 E Bay, h do
Bassett James E., h 511 Bridge, L. V.
Bassett Robert W., printer, h 55 Clay
Batcheller Charles, printer, b 71 E Forsyth
Baugh John S., flagman, b 73 W Forsyth
Baur August, civil engineer and draughtsman, 81 W Bay, h 156 Pine
Bauskett William T., draughtsman, 50 W Bay, b 175 Julia
Baxter George L., carpenter, h Maggie n the R. R., E. J.
Baxter Thomas,* saloon and billiards, 112 Ocean, h Union n Laura
BAYA HANARO T., grocer, 2 E Bay, and General Manager De Bary-
Baya Merchants Line of Steamers, b Bigelow House
Baya Joseph B., clerk, 79 W Bay, b Taylor's

DR I:. L P BI3LAI-B,

IRE-tIDENT' DI&NTqTg'P
ROOMS ELEGANTLY FURNISHED.
All the modern improvements for ease and comfort of patients.
OFFICE, 63 LAURA STREET,
Next St. James Park. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
OFFICE HOURS, 8 A. M. TO 1 P. M., AND 2 TO 5 P. M.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 75

Baya Louis Z., clerk Geo. R. Foster & Co., 721 W Bay, b 15 E Adams
Baya William, merchandise broker, 24 Newnan, h 15 E Adams
Baynard Lucinda,* h E Union n Market
BEACH JOSEPH S., cane and furniture manufacturer, upholsterer,
and Florida curiosities, 28 Laura, h 95 Julia. [See ad. p. 69.]
Beal Samuel,* laborer, h Beaver c Grant
JEAN EBEN, shipping, forwarding, and commission merchant, and
dealer in Florida oranges and lemons, Waycross R. R. Wharf, h
109 W Beaver. [See ad. p. 70.]
Bear Barney, clerk, b 40 W Monroe
Beardsley John W., musician, h E Bay n Brough, E. J.
Beasley Elijah,* laborer, b n Commercial, R.
Beausang Stanislaus, h 111 Ocean
BECK ALFRED M., passenger, ticket, and real estate agent, 90 W
Bay
BECK ROBERT M., press and treas Industrial Machine Works,
1 Commercial, B, h at Chambersburg, Pa.
Becker Augustus, carpenter, b at Oakland
Beckham Melvin,* laborer, h Monroe c 3d, L. V.
Beckwith John P., Fla Freight Agt Ga Associated Traffic Lines 50 W Bay,
b 1 E Forsyth
Bee Ellen,* h 89 Hogan
Bee Richard B., clerk, 44 E Bay, b at La Villa
BEEBE HENRY B., architect, 52J W Bay, h do
Beech George, bookkeeper, h 206 Forsyth, L. V.
EERBOWER CASPER S., passenger and ticket agent F Ry &
Nav Co., 86 W Bay
Belisario Edward E., clerk foot Julia, h 155 W Forsyth
Belisario Moses M., justice of the peace and real estate, 24 Ocean, up-
stairs, h St. Johns Mill
Bell Cyrus,* h 62 Catherine
ELL JAMES S., notary and prop. Jacksonville & Panama Park,
Real Est. Exchange, 10 W Bay, h at Panama Park. [See ad. p. 71].
Bell Joseph, music teacher, Cedar c Orange, h do
Bell Mary,* washerwoman, h Caroline n Cedar
Bell Sarah Mrs.,* h at Hansontown
Bellamy Benjamin,* mason, h n Commercial, R.
Belling Daniel S. D.,* carpenter, h r 99 Washington


WILLIAM


A. BOURS,


(SUCCESSOR TO J. E. HART),
The Oldest Seed House in the City. Established 1875.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
CG A. 3E33 T S3 EE3 3 3 .
I handle none but the Best and most Reliable Seeds. My new Catalogue is now ready and will be mailed free on
application. Also Wholesale Dealer in
HAY, CORN, OATS, FLOUR, GRITS, MEAL, BRAN, GROUND FEED, WHEAT SCREENINGS,
COTTON SEED, MEAL, ETC., ETC.
State Agent for J. E. Tygert & Co's Star Brand Fertilizers.
Guaranteed Analysis.-Comprising Orange Tree and Vegetable Fertilizer, Pure Ground Bone, Muriate of Potash,
Sulphate Potash, Nitrate Soda, Kainit, Etc. Of-PRICES ON APPLICATION.







76 WEBB'S ,JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

BELOTE CHARLES E., grocer, meats and vegetables, Washington,
c E Duval, b 96 E Duval
Bemelmans Annie Mrs., boarding, 13 E Church, h do
Bemelmans John, barkeeper, h 13 E Church
BEN SAMUEL, merchant tailor, 29 Newnan, h do
Benachi Paul N., bookkeeper, 44 W Bay, h 36 W Ashley
Benedee Frank,* h 90 Catherine
BENEDICT CHARLES, (Kohn, Furchgott, Benedict & Co.), 26 &
28 W Bay, h 37 W Monroe
Benedict Charles B., h Adams c Washington
Benedict Walter N., exchange clk Ambler, Marvin & Stockton, b Newnan
c Monroe
BENJAMIN BRISTOW,* 108 years old, waited on Gen. Washing-
ington, h at Hansontown
Benjamin George,* h at Oakland
Benjamin Margaret Mrs.,* h Bridge, L. V.
Benjamin Rachel Mrs.,* h 502 Forsyth, L. V.
Benjamin Richard,* fireman, h at E Jacksonville
Benjamin Richard H., physician, Shell road, h do, F
Benjamin Jacob,* drayman, h North n Hogan
Benjamin Stephen R. Mrs.,* h at E Jacksonville
BENNETT (Byron), & MULROY, (Richard), h Monroe bey Hawk,
B L. V.
BENNETT C0ESAR,* music teacher, h 33 W Union
BENNETT GEORGE R., land agt, 24 E Bay, h 408 Adams
Bennett George S., shooting gallery, 80 W Bay, h 130 E Adams
Bennett Harry,* laborer, h Magnolia, n McCoy, B.
Bennett James,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Bennett James G., car inspector, b Forsyth n Hawk
Bennett James G., carpenter, h Adams n Bridge, L. V.
Bennett John J., paperhanger, b 122 E Bay
Bennett John P., h 114 E Adams
Bennett Solomon,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Bensemer C. F. Rev., pastor Lutheran church, b 31 E Bay
Bentley Albert,* laborer, h n Union, H.

PROF. HENRY B. BROOKS,

TEACEIER OF

V OCJrL FND INSTRUMENTAL J MUSIC.

TERMIES RESOH L. V.,vllE.

Monroe cor. Hawk, L. Y., Jacksonville,








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 77

BENTLEY GEORGE W., general manager J. T. & K. W. Ry, 7
Astor Block, b The Oxford
Benton James M,* grocer, h at E Jacksonville
Berg John E., clerk, b 46 W Beaver
Bergman Charles A., saloon, ft Ocean, h 129 VW Duval
Berlack Harris, corn mer and auctioneer, E Bay c Newnan, h 46 Beaver
Berlack Lewis & Co., (Richard Walzer), clothing, E Bay c Newnan
Bernard Henry H., ticket clerk, ft Julia, b Monroe cor 2d, L. V.
Bernard Holland H., agt F. R. & N.Co., h Monroe c 2d, L. V.
Bernard Jennie A., h Monroe c 2d, L. V.
Bernreuter Charles J., printer, h 97 W Beaver
Berry Harriet Mrs.,* h n hospital, O
ERRY HORACE, physician and druggist, 9 E Bay, h Pine c W
Forsyth. [See ad. p. 72.]
Berry Wesley,* laborer, h at Brooklyn
Bessinger Samuel S., meat, Julia c Duval, h do
Beswick Robert,* carpenter, h at Hansontown
Bett Arthur E. G., clerk, Newnan c Forsyth, b Carleton House
ETTELINI FRED., prop Bettelini's European Hotel, 16 E Bay, h
27 Laura. [See ad. p. 73.]
Bettelini Josephine Mrs., h 35 Newnan
Bettelini Peter, h 35 Newnan
Bettes Charles C., drug clerk, b 39 Newnan
Bettes Jerome N., physician, 51 E Bay, h 39 Newnan
Betts William S., b Hunter's Hall, Brough, E J
Bibb Beverly R., printer, Times Union office, b Virginia, E J
Bibbins Thomas,* cook, h 31 State
BICAISE FRANK A., fancy and variety goods, 39 W Bay, h 89 E
SChurch
Bicknell Jesse R. Rev., pastor Good Shepherd Chapel, B. and St. Stephens
Chapel, L V, h Commercial, B
Biggs Redding W. Mrs., h 121 W Forsyth
Bilbo Emily Miss, h 72 W Forsyth
Billings Frank, plumber, b 38 WV Adams
Birch Robert,* vender, h 159 Marsh
BIRD, (see also BYRD)
Bird Charles W., undertaker, h 72 E Beaver
Bird Isaac, butcher, h 77 Catherine
Bird William,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville


HENRY W. BROOKS,

Grain, Hay & Commission,
STATE AGENT FOR
E. 0. Stanard & Co., St. Louis, Mo., Celebrated Roller Process Flours.
ROYAL PATENT and EAGLE STEAM.
WOOD, MADE MILLING CO,, ST. LOUIS, MO., GRITS, MEAL AND HOMINY,
78 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


IRD WILLIAM C., Marshal U. S. Courts, Mohawk block, h 56 W
Monroe
BISBEE (Charles R.) & MARVIN (Robert S.) draymen, 721 WBay,
h Laura c Adams
Bisbee Cyrus, wharfinger, Geo. R. Foster & Co., 721 W Bay, h Laura c
Adams
Bisbee Cyrus C., clk, 26 W Bay, b Laura c Adams
BISBEE HORATIO, lawyer and ex-Member of Congress, 44 E For-
syth, b Tremont House
BISBEE WILLIAM A., accounts, rents, &c. collected, 171 W Bay
b Laura c Adams
Bischoff Fred., clerk, b Bettelini's Hotel
Bishop Herbert A., asst mailing clerk, P O, b 32 W Ashley
Bishop Thomas H., clk, 60 W Bay, b E Adams n Ocean
Black Stephen,* h Spearing c King, E J
Blackstone Henderson,* laborer, h Leilla n Winter, B.
Blackwell Eugenia Mrs., dressmaker, b 44 E Forsyth
BLAIR LEMUEL P., dentist, 63 Laura, h do. [See ad. p. 74.]

Blair Milton Conolly, foreman, b at Springfield
Blair Robert, blacksmith, b 9 Washington
Blair Zina H., h 63 Laura
Blaisdell Willis A., boarding, Bridge n W Bay, h do, L. V.
Blake Emma,* h at Fairfield
Blake John D., harness shop, Cedar n W Adams, b 185 Bay
Blake Joseph,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Blalock Allen B., carpenter, h Spearing c St. John, E. J.
Blanck Annie F. Mrs., h 120 W Church
Blanck John H. Mrs., h 120 W Church
Blenus Thomas H. Rev., b 63 Pine
Bliss Emmor R., clerk St. Johns House, b do
Bliss Thomas E., carpenter, h Oak n Leilla, B.
Block --, carpenter, b Mechanics' House
Blue Alexander,* porter 60 W Bay, h at Brooklyn
Blue James,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Blue John,* h at Hansontown
Blue Mento,* laborer, h at Fairfield
Blum Charles, clerk, b 80 W Bay

PENNSYLVANIA RESTAURANT,
T. G. BROWN, Prop.

Hart's New Block, 84 East Bay Street,
JACIKSONVILLE, FLCA.-
The furniture and fittings are entirely new and everything homelike and comfortable. The cuisine
will be found to surpass that of any restaurant in the city, and the servants polite and attentive.
The Proprietor will spare no pains to make the Restaurant first-class in every respect.
S ---I---SPECI ---. I- -
tWThe best rooms in the city can be had at the HARVARD, (same building) either single or
en suite, furnished or unfurnished, bath, gas, water and every convenience.








WEBB'S JACKS0INVILLE DIRECTORY.


Blunt Daniel, express messenger, b 92 WV Beaver
Blunt George,* laborer, h Adams bey 3d, L. V.
Blunt William J., cigarmaker, b 92 W Beaver
Boag John 0., bookbinder, b 75 WV Bay
Boag William,* painter, h 202 Hogan
BOARDMAN CHARLES A., railroad lands, Ely's Block, b 132
U- Laura cor Beaver
Boatright Thomas,* laborer, b at Oakland
Boden Anthony, polisher alligator teeth, Duval n Hawk, h do
Boden James H., architect, carpenter and builder, 64j W Bay, b do
Bodenhamer Joshua A., printer, h 92 Liberty
B OGUE (Francis E.) & CO., furniture, bedding and housefurnishing
goods, 26- and 28 Ocean, h Adams c Hawk, L. V.
Bogue Henry T., bookkeeper, b 216 Adams, L. V.
Bohlen John C. H., h 103 Ocean
Bohlen Samuel,* laborer, h r 9 W State
Bolden Georgianna,* h Caroline cor Hogan
Bolden William,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Bolding Randolph,* huckster City Market, h 89 Liberty
Boler Robert,* lineman, h Julia cor North
Bolles Anna Miss,* laundress, h 56 E Ashley
Bolton Stephen,* carpenter, h n eastern limits, H.
Bolton Stephen Mrs.,* dressmaker, h at Hansontown
Bond John S. Mrs., h E Adams n Market
Bonnell John L., (Hudson & Bonnell), St. Johns n Mill av, hdo, E. J.
Bonner John, h 10 E Bay
Booker Gary, painter, h at Oakland
Booth James Jr., laborer, h Ashley c First, L. V.
Booth James M., clerk fr't dep. J. T. & K. W. Ry Co.
Booth James R., carpenter, h Ashley c First, L. V.
Booth Simon,* laborer, h 715 Forsyth, L. V.
Boozer D. Tolbert, clerk, 73 W Bay, b 36 W Adams
Bostwick ( William M.) & Peete (Joseph W.), dentists, Bostwick bldg W
Bay c Pine, h 103 E Forsyth
Bosworth Thomas, printer, b 17 E Church
BOUNETHEAU HENRY D., chief clerk Fla Land & Mortg Co, b
SSt. Johns House
Bourquin Abram,* waiter, h at Oakland
Bours Caroline G. Mrs., h 87 E Adams

THE CENTRAL LAND AGENCY OF FLORIDA.

L-OTTIS J~- BIRTTSI-
No. 10 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
IS CONNECTED WITH AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THE STATE.
South, East, Middle and West Florida.
FARMING, ORANGE, PEAR, GRAPE AND TIMBER LANDS.
The Choicest "Sea Island Cotton" Lands.
Representing the Florida Land and Mortgage Co. The Florida Coast Line Canal and Transportation Co. A. D. Bas-
nett, (P. & G. R. Lands) and other large holders.
Timnber Selection-s ab Speoialtby








80 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Bours James B., clerk, 20 W Bay, b 87 E Adams
OURS WILLIAM A., notary, wholesale grain, garden seeds and
State Agt J. E. Tygert & Co's Fertilizers, 20 W Bay, h 66 Liberty
[See ad. p. 75.]
BOWDEN (James E. T.) & ROSENTHAL (Alexander), dry goods,
11 W Bay, h Adams c Clay, L. V.
BOWDEN MARTIN R., city editor Times- Union, h 2d n Monroe,
1 L. V.
Bowen stenographer, b 13 E Church
Bowen h 159 E Monroe
BOWEN DANIEL, (Jones & Bowen), 30 W Bay, h at Riverside

BOWEN JAMES COLEMAN, (Geo. F. Drew & Co.) 54 and 56 W
Bay, h at Riverside
Bowes Margaret Miss, dressmaker, 107 Ocean, h do
Bowman Philip,* laborer, h at Oakland
Bowman William G., engineer, b Brough n St. Johns, E. J.
Boyce Albert F., gardener, h at Springfield
Boyce A. Park, prop hotel, Julia c W Forsyth, h do.
Boyd Robert, caulker, b 122 E Bay
BOYD THOMAS J., confectionery, 30 Laura, h King's Road, L. V.
Boyde Thomas A., painter, h McCoy n Commercial, B.
Boyer John H.,* fisherman, h Oak n Jackson, B.
Braddock Rufus,* laborer, h at Brooklyn
Braden Eliza J. Mrs.,* teacher, h Ashley c Bridge, L. V.
Bradden Robert, dep city tax coll., W Bay c Cedar, b 87 E Forsyth
Braiden Robert J.,* clerk city P O, h 54 E Ashley
Bradfield Louis,* cook, hl Monroe c 1st, L. V.
Bradford Frank M., engineer, h Shell road, F.
Bradford Roberta H. Mrs., prin E. J. pub school, h St. Johns c Franklin,
E. J.
BRADFORD WILLIAM A., Florida souvenirs, shells, etc., St.
James Hotel, h do.
Bradley Frank B.,* grocer, at E. J., h Leach do.
Bradley Jefferson,* laborer, h at Brooklyn
Bradley John, chief clerk People's Line Steamers, Waycross Wharf,
(Wethington & Bradley), W Bay n Julia, b 87 E Adams
Bradley John, clerk, b 87 E Adams
-------ESTABLISHED IN 1867. ---
T5 T3'( TJ S r 1B EJ TA I TK-N C N*
NOTARY PUBLIC,
"v r.olesale an:d- Metail :Dealer3- i
GROCERIES & PRO ISIONS,
Hay, Gorn, Xaaricare, @Vooilcoare, ineare,
CROCKERY, LAMPS, GLASSWARE, GARDEN SEEDS, BOOTS AND SHOES,
Hats, Clothing, Dry Goods, Kerosene Oil, Drugs, Confectioneries, Fancy Goods, Tobacco and Cigars, Toys. etc., etc.
ORDERS BY MAIL WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
COMAEBRCIALYN, cor-er LEILLA STREET,
BROOKLYN, JACKSONVILLE, Fla.






R. H. JONES. DAN'L BOWEN.

,EIS & ~O iWEN

Imoorters and Wholesale Dealers
IN i


IMPORTED AND


FANCY GROCERIES.
----------4---+
WE CARRY THE

tngPfst stockod o t umoeMiO
-IN THE STATE.- i
-----4------

Prices about N. Y. Cnst, Freight added.
SEND FOR WHOLESALE PRICE LIST.
+-
-------i-------
1 e se ^tate Agentz s a ^O, ii ucxt 30 WEST BAT STREET,
J:CKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.







LOOK FOR THE ELEGANT BRASS SHOW CASE.


JACOB D. BUCKY,
ONE PRICE
Men's and Boys' Custom and Ready-Made

CLOTHING,
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS,
IEats, Caps, Tr'ul s, Talises, Etto-
5 West Bay Street,
NEW YORK OFFICE,
670 Broadway. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

MRS. C. FREELAND,
Cor. State and Laura Streets,
PRIVATE BIARD. JacksonvillE, Florida.

Table supplied with all the luxuries of the season.
Strangers visiting Jacksonville will find this a most com-
fortable house, where every effort is made for the comfort
of guests.
HOT AND COLD WATER BATHS.

RatEs, $2 Per Day, $10 tn $15 Per Week.
Special Rates by the Iontha








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 81

B RADLEY SAMUEL J., chief clerk and cashier S. F. & W. Ry
I, ( Wethington & Bradley), W Bay n Julia
Bradley Samuel, bds 87 E Adams
Bradley Th omas,* printer, hHunter's Cottage, n Bay, E. J.
BRADLEY SILAS A., lawyer, 1j W Bay, h 39 W Beaver
Bradwell Joseph, engineer, h Leilla n Commercial, B.
Bradwell Susan Mrs.,* h 94 Ocean
Brady Silas, brick mason, h at Riverside
Braker Gib.,* laborer, h Winter n Leilla, B.
Bram Anthony,* mason, h Union n Liberty
Bram Margaret, Mrs.,* h 2 Forsyth, L. V.
Bram Sylvia Miss,* h n Hospital at Oakland
Brandock Pembroke W. Rev.,* pastor A. M. E. Church, E. J. hWard,
L. V.
Brannan John W., carpenter, h Bridge cor Beaver, L. V.
B RANNAN LOU E., artist and decorator, h Bridge c Beaver, L. V.
Brannen Morris,* engineer, h 31 State
Brannon George W., bricklayer, h 108 Pine
Bravo Stephen S. A., captain, h Louisa cor Maggie, E. J.
Brazil William A., h Adams n Third, L. V.
Bregnard Joseph U., clerk, h 84 E Church
Brennan Thomas M., plasterer, St. Johns n Spearing, h do, E. J.
Brenner Thomas W., printer, b 74 E Adams
Bretzman Francis, driver, h 81 Catherine
Brewster George, farmer, h Oak, n Stonewall, B.
BRICKWEDEL CONRAD, grocer, E Church c Ocean, h do
Bridges William,* porter, h 91 Catherine
Brittain George M., livery, h 47 Washington
Britton John, commercial traveler, h 30 W Beaver
RITZ CHARLES J., restaurant and New York Chop House, 27 E
Bay, h do
Broad Georgie Miss,* dressmaker, b Leilla n Magnolia, B.
Brock Charles H., captain, h 134 E Forsyth
Brock Mary L., Mrs., h W Church c Julia
ROGLIE CHARLES, New York dairy, 34 E Bay, and bakery,
B 36 E Bay, h do

Ja.VI:ME S E-_ :BETI:RST,
REPRESENTING
C. A. Gambrill Manufacturing Co.'s Patapsco
Flouring Mills, Baltimore.
Rohe & Brother's Meats, New York.
E. B. Mallory's Canned Goods, Baltimore.

Office, No. 20 WEST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, Fla.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Brooks Alexander,* laborer, h at Hansontown
Brooks C. W., engineer, h at E Jacksonville
Brooks Edward F., cashier, 78 W Bay, b 122 Cedar
ROOKS HENRY B., music teacher, Hawk c Monroe, h do, L. V.
[See ad. p. 76].
BROOKS HENRY W., grain, flour, grits and meal, commission, 78
W Bay, h 122 Cedar. [See ad. p. 77].
Brooks Hiram N., clerk, 39 W Bay, h Adams, L. V.
Brooks Joseph,* b at Fairfield
Brooks Lucinda Miss,* h 110 E Church
Brooks Martha Mrs., h n 2d, H.
Brooks Peggy Mrs.,* h 513 Forsyth, L. V.
Brooks Robert W., engineer, h Spearing n the Hospital, E. J.
BROOKS WILLIAM A., pilot, h n R. R., 0.
Brough James C., h 161 Pine
Brough Theresa B. Miss, b 161 Pine
Broward Montcalm, captain, b Louisa c Mattie
BROWN THADDEUS L., restaurant, 78 E Bay, h at E Jackson-
ville
Brown Annie J.,* laundress, h Caroline n Cedar
Brown Augustus H., harnessmaker, b 67 Pine
Brown Benjamin,* h Union c Ocean
Brown Bristow,* laborer, h Washington ft E. Ashley
Brown Charles,* porter, h Forsyth n 2d, L. V.
Brown Clark B.,* drayman, h 124 W State
Brown David," h at Springfield
Brown Edward, cigarmaker, h Orange c Julia
Brown Elizabeth A. Mrs., furnished rooms, 67 Pine, h do
Brown Ely, laborer,* h at E. Jacksonville
Brown Evelina* laundress, h Julia c North
Brown Francis I. W., bookkeeper, b 171 E Bay
Brown George,* h Julia c Caroline
Brown George,* laborer, h at Midway
Brown George F.,* h at Hansontown
Brown George M., soliciting agent Western Atlantic Railway, 58 W Bay,
b The Everett
Brown George W, barber, 39 W Bay, b 126 Newnan


S. P. BURGER,


PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST,

7 1-2 W. Bay St., Jacksonville Fla.

Old Pictures Copied and Enlarged to any size, and finished in Crayon, India Ink, Water and
Oil Colors.

A Fine Assortment of Frames, Mats, Passe Partouts, etc., always in stock.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 83

Brown George Weed, harnessmaker, 131 W Bay, h 67 Pine
Brown Green G., messenger U. S. Engineer Office, Astor Block, h 8 W
Church
Brown Henry,* laborer, bE Union n Ocean
Brown Henry,* laborer, b 64 Catherine
Brown Hester h 103 North
Brown Ida Mrs., h 99 W Adams
Brown Isaac T.,* cigarmaker, h at Oakland
Brown James,* carpenter, h Ward n 2d, L. V.
BROWN JAMES, carpenter, h at Oakland
Brown John H., pile driver, h n Duval, B.
Brown Joseph,* plasterer, h Washington ab Church
Brown Kate B. Mrs., h King n Brough, E. J.
Brown Kate Mrs., h 78 E Bay
Brown Kelley,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Brown Luchin,* h Ashley, L. V.
Brown Margaret,* h at E Jacksonville
Brown Margaret,* h at Oakland
Brown Minnie L. Miss, stenographer, J. H. Norton, b La Villa
Brown Moses J., tax collector Duval Co., 8 W Bay, h at Mandarin
Brown Nancy Mrs., h 506 Forsyth, L. V.
Brown Oscar, carpenter, b Monroe House
Brown Patsy Mrs.,* h n Division Lane, L. V.
Brown Peter J., engineer, h n R R, O.
Brown Richard L., h at Oakland
Brown Robert,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
BROWN ROBERT A.,* grocer, Leach c Prevard, E. J., h at Fair-
field
Brown Sarah A. Mrs., h 132 Adams, L. V.
Brown Susan Mrs.,* h 80 E Church
BROWN THADDEUS G.,* prop Pennsylvania restaurant, 84 E
Bay, h at E Jacksonville. [See ad. p. 78].
Brown Tobe,* h 801 Forsyth, L. V.
Brown William,* h Forsyth n Division la, L. V.
Brown William E., clerk, b 91 W Ashley
Brown William M., clerk, J. St. A. & H. R. Ry, b 126 W Ashley
Browne William H., lawyer, h Shell road bey fair grounds, F.
Bruce Robert,* laborer, h Caroline n Hogan

E. P. BUSER & CO.,


Tourist Ticket, and Real Estate Agents,

71 WEST BAY STREET,

Tickets to all Points, North, East, South and West.


NO TROUBLE TO GIVE INFORMATION.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Brucker Frederick W., laborer, b Winter n Jackson, B.
Brundage Jacob F. Rev., b 143 Laura
Brundage Joseph, caretaker Warner House, b do
BRUNDAGE LAWRENCE F., steward Carleton House, b do
Brush Charles H. Mrs., h 18 E Ashley
BRUSH LOUIS J., real estate agent, 8 W Bay, h at Riverside.
[See ad. p. 79].
Brush Mary T. Mrs., h 128 E Forsyth
Bryan Helen,* h Forsyth n 3d, L. V.
Bryan Samuel F., laborer, h Ward n 2d, L. V.
Bryan William L., clerk, 73 W Bay, h 43 W Ashley
Bryant Castello,* laborer, h 231 Hogan
Bryant Green,* hostler, h Union n Liberty
Bryant Margaret.* laundress, h North n Cedar
Bryant Walter,* porter, h 210 Julia
Buchanan ( Amy iMrs.) & Roberts (Anna M. Mrs.), boarding, 9 Washing-
ton, h do
Buchanan Emma Mrs.,* h at Oakland
BUCHANAN (William A.) & DELAPORTE (William T.), mfg
bakers, confectioners, jobbers in crackers, cigars, paper, paper bags
and agent for show cases, 75 W Bay, and Julia c Beaver, h 99 W
Beaver
Buck Patience,* h 110 Ocean
Bucki Charles L., (L. Bucki & Son), h at Ellaville. Fla.
Bucki Louis & Son (Charles L.), lumber, foot Julia, and Ellaville, Fla., h
at N.Y.
Buckman Courtland, deputy county clerk, b 145 E Bay
BUCKMAN ELLWOOD H.,real estate and notary public, Mohawk
block opp The Carleton, b 145 E Bay
BUCKMAN HENRY H., (Doggett & Buckman), Mohawk block, h
131 Catherine
Buckman Robert L., clerk, Mohawk block, b 145 E Bay
BUCKMAN THOMAS E., county clerk and clerk circuit court,
Market c Forsyth, h 145 E Bay
Buckner Emily Miss,* h Pine
BUCKY JACOB D., clothing, gents' furnisher, hats and caps, 5 W
Bay, h 35 W Monroe
Budd Benjamin C., bookkeeper, 11 W Bay, b 59 W Adams

LiA-lNTD Oi-FIFIC:E
ELLWOOD H. BUCKMAN.
THE BEST SELECTED IMPROVED AND UNIMPROVED

F9M 1.C. O X. IX- A. I > 163 8.
Parties wishing to invest in Florida Lands will benefit themselves to call on me.
Office: 17 1-2 Mohawk Block, East Bay Street,


JACKSONVILLE, Fla.


Opposite the Carleton,








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Budd Ella Mrs.,* h Cedar n Orange
Budd Isabella H. Mrs., h 59 W Adams
UESING AUGUST, notary public, and wholesale and retail dealer
in dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes and clothing, Commercial c
Leilla, h do, B.
Buggs William,* blacksmith, h 226 Adams, L. V.
Bulmer Ella E.,* dressmaker, h 226 Hogan
Bulmer Rebecca,* h 22,6 Hogan
Bundy Charles,* h Orange n Pine
BURCH JOSHUA L., brick manufacturer, 4 W Bay, h west end
Adams, L. V.
Burbridge George V., (Burbridge Grocery Co.), Ocean c Forsyth, i.
TURBRIDGE GROCERY COMPANY, wholesale and retail
dealers in fancy and staple groceries, Ocean c Forsyth
Burbridge James D., (Burbridge Grocery Co.), b Tremont House
BURBRIDGE JOHN Q., (Burbridge Grocery Co.), Ocean c Forsyth,
Sb outside limits
BURGE ROBERT A., grocer, Commercial n McCoy, h do, B.
BURGERT SAMUEL P., photographer and crayon artist 711 W
Bay, h 145 do
Bunkley John H., painter, h 107 Ocean
Burgess Charles,* laborer, b Winter n Stonewall, B.
Burgess David B.,* laborer, h n Duval, B.
Burgess Jane Mrs.,* h at Oakland
BURGESS SAMUEL,* waiter, h at Hansontown
Burkheim Jacob, h 71 W Beaver
Burkhim Samuel A., clerk, 26 W Bay, b 71 W Beaver
BURLEIGH CHARLES H., prop Palmetto Works, 1st n Pine, S.
BURLEIGH JOHN R., grocer, Cedar c North, h do.
Burleigh Sylvester, mason, h 78 E Forsyth
BURNE, see also BYRNE
BURNE EDWARD D., supt Jacksonville Electric Light Company,
7 Bridge, b 80 W Bay
Burnett Edward S., clerk, b 38 W Adams
Burnett William A., clerk, 18 W Bay, b Liberty c Bay

CHARLES W. BYRD,


-- 1 W As b n Pe a O S.,--

No. 13 W. Ashley, between Pine and Ocean Sts.,


OILC~8INSOIL~LE E' ILPA








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Burney Abraham,* laborer, b 169 Julia
Burney Peter,* carpenter, h 15 E State
Burnham Alonzo, clerk, 4 W Bay, h Cedar ab North
Burnham John R., laborer, h 211 Church, L. V.
Burnham Mary J., h Church c Myrtle, L. V.
Burnham Sarah, dressmaker, h Church c Myrtle, L. V.
Burns Henry, painter, h 1 Union, L. V.
Burns Henrietta Mrs.,* h at Oakland
Burns James, upholsterer, h 112 E Adams
Burns M. C., head porter Grand View House, b do.
Burns Thomas,* driver, h at Oakland
Burrell Samuel,* laborer, h at Oakland
Burrett Robert C., stage manager and master of properties, Park Opera
House, h at Brooklyn
Burroughs Abraham,* clerk 4 W Bay, b 73 W Ashley c Hogan
Burroughs Charles H., conductor J. T. & K. W. Ry.
BURROUGHS CHARLES J., physician, 111 W Bay, h 119 W
Church
Burroughs Flora,* cook, h 15 W Beaver
Burroughs Joseph B., baggage agent S. F. & W. R. Co., h 125 Laura
Burroughs Joseph H., traveling auditor F. R. & N. Co., 1 & 2 Astor
Block, h Julia c Ashley
Burroughs Richard Berrien, physician, Julia c W Ashley,h do. Office
hours. 8 to 9 a. m., 1 to 2 and 8 to 9 p. m.
Burrows Charles H., freight agt. J. T. & K. W. Ry Co., Way Cross
Wharf, h 123 Cedar
Burrows Fred,* h at Oakland
Burrows John, clerk, b 63 Pine
Burrows John I., clerk 42 W. Bay, b Pine cor Monroe
Burst Frank M., bookkeeper Dexter Hunter, E. J., h Brough, E. J.
BURST JAMES H., merchandise broker, 20 W Bay, h Brough, E. J.

BURT HENRY A., furnished rooms, 111 W Bay, (M. Burt & Son),
and 31 W Bay, h 111 do
BURT MERRITT & SON (Harry A.), watchmakers and jewelers,
31 W Bay
Burton Jesse W., sales stables, 52 V Forsyth, b 73 W Forsyth


WILLIAIM BYRRNE,

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN

Groceries, Wines, Liquors, Tobaccos and Cigars,

]0 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
--Hannis Distilling Co's Acme Whiskeys.T-
Hannis Distilling Co.'s Acme Whiskeys.


Reed's Gilt Edge Tonic.


Dow's Jamaica Ginger Ale and Cordial.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 87

BURTON JOHN H., gents furnishing goods, 51 W Bay, h 111
Market
Burton William H.,* h 126 Newnan
USER J. P. & CO., (Fonte S. Grimes), tourists' ticket and real
estate agents, 71 W Bay, h at Astor, Fla.
Bush Isaac,* laborer, h Bay c 5th, L. V.
BUSH JAMES,* restaurant, 150 E Bay, h Pine c Union
Bush William, drayman, h Bay, L. V.
Bushey Abraham S., caulker, h Maggie n Brough, E. J.
Bushey Alfred, caulker, h Maggie n Brough, E. J.
Bushey Modesty, caulker, h Maggie n Brough, E. J.
Butcher Robert S., grocer and prop. of St. Lawrence Hotel, Broad c
9th. h do. S.
Butler Alexander,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Butler Allen,* cook. h 277 Cedar
Butler Allen Mrs.,* h E Beaver n Market
Butler Charles.* h Forsyth cor 2d, L. V.
Butler Frank,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Butler Henry B.,* shoemaker, 100 E Bay, h do
Butler Jack,* carpenter, h n limits, L. V.
Butler Lewis,* laborer, h Forsyth cor 2d, L. V.
Butler Mary,* laundress, h North n Cedar
Butler Simpson F. Mrs.,* h 114 E Church
Butler Thomas," drug clerk, 23 W Bay, h Forsyth cor 2d, L. V.
Buttes Julius.* laborer, b R. R. ave cor First, L. V.
Buttes Wilts,* carpenter, h North n Hogan
Byrd Charles H., bds 69 Newnan
BYRD CHARLES W.,* undertaker, 13 W Ashley bet Pine and
Ocean, h 72 E Beaver. [See ad. p. 85].
Byrd Eugene, grocer, h 69 Newnan
Byrd Jacob., h 161 Marsh
BYRD ROBERT E., (J. B. Roche & Co.), 8 W Bay, h 69 Newnan
Byrne Thomas J., clerk, 10 W Bay, b Church c Newnan
BYRNE THOMAS J., purser steamer Sylvester, ft Hogan. b As-
tor Block

R. M. CALL. LOTON M. JONES.

CALL & JONES,



Attorneys and Counselors at Law,

:Bost-wrioks's B-uildic g,


West Bay Street, cor. Pine,


- Jacksonville, Fla.








88 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

YRNE WILLIAM, wholesale and retail groceries, wines and
liquors, 10 W Bay, h Newnan c E Church. [See ad. p. 86].
Byron Emma J. Mrs., rooms r of 136 Ocean
BYRNE, see BURNE.
CABLE GEORGE, carpenter, b 129 Cedar
Cadwallader Joseph Rev., h Mattie next Episcopal Chapel, E. J.
Cadzow William M., bookkeeper, 38 W Bay, b Newnan n Monroe
Cainard Senia,* widow, h 19 W Beaver
Caldwell Leonard H., h n Shell road, F.
Caldwell Sim S., drug clerk, 75 W Bay, b do
Cale Rosa Mrs.,* washerwoman, h 12 E Union
Calhoun Evelyn Miss, dressmaker, 29 W Church, b do
CALL (Rhydon M.) & JONES (Loton M.), lawyers, Bostwick's
Bldg, W Bay c Pine, b Ely Bik, Laura c Forsyth. [See ad. p. 87].
Call Wilkinson, United States Senator, h at Riverside
Calvert George H., carpenter, b 80 W Bay
Cambride Nathaniel J.,* carpenter, h W Union n Hogan
Cameron Amelia M. Miss, b 114 W Union
Cameron Donald, h 114 W Union
Cameron John P., printer, b 114 W Union
Cameron Lindy, carpenter, h Bridge n W Bay, L. V.
Cameron Mary Miss, b 114 W Union
CAMPBELL ABRAHAM, JR.,* meat, City Market, h Ward c 4th,
L. V.
Campbell Alexander,* h Forsyth n 3d, L. V.
CAMPBELL ALEXANDER B., music store and printer. Chick-
ering, Mathushek and Arion pianos, Mason and Hamlin, Packard,
and Bay State Organs. Agent Buttrick's Patterns. Secretary
Jacksonville & Suburban Ry. Secretary Jacksonville Cemetery
Association. Secretary and Treasurer Philharmonic Society, and
Secretary and Manager Park Opera House Co., 7 W Bay, h 48
Newnan
Campbell Belle,* h 19 W Union
Campbell Claude, plumber, b 73 W Forsyth
CAMPBELL EDWIN C., assistant editor Florida Daily Herald,
32- W Bay, b 91 W Union
Campbell Emma,* b 221 Hogan cor Caroline



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN


Northern Beetf utton, Veal, Port, Sasae, Vnison an Game.

Stall No. 37, City Market,

JC-A.KSONTVTILTLE, FTLOI:D.A.-







WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Campbell Howard* Rev., pastor St. Paul's Bap. Church, B., h at B.
C AMPBELL J. ROCKWELL, prop. St. James Hotel, Laura, W
Duval, Hogan and W Church, and President and Treasurer Jack-
sonville Electric Light Co., h St. James Hotel
V AMPBELL SAMPSON,* drayman, h at Hansontown
Camplejohn Alfred B., removed to Key West, Fla.
Canary John, laborer, h n fair ground, F.
C ANCIO JOSEPH P., cigar manufacturer, 521 W Bay, h 101 E Duval
Candlish William G., bookkeeper, 18 W Bay, h Newnan cor Adams
Canepa Frank, grocer, St. Johns c Mill ave, h do, E. J.
Cannon Lela,* h 75 W State
Canova Andrew B., h 79 E Adams
Canova Bartola C., guardsman, h 134 E Adams
Canova Bartola J. Sr., mason, h 130 E Adams
Canova Camilla Miss, music teacher, 93 E Duval, b do
CANOVA CHARLES C.,* dairy, n Commercial, h do, R.
Canova Hannah,* h Ward n Second, L.V.
Canova Ignacia Mrs., h 93 E Duval
Canova Lawrence A., h 75 E Adams
Canova Mamie Miss, fruit, 130 E Adams, b do
Cant A., b Broad cor Ninth, S.
Capers Walter W.,* teacher, h r 136 Ocean
Capoe Joseph, mason, h Louisa cor Leach. E. J.
CARD CHARLES H., steward Grand View, b do
' ARKHUFF ISAAC, carpenter and builder, four blocks from Com-
C mercial, h do, R.
Carleton Rosalie,* bds 209 Hogan cor Ninth
Carlisle Joseph, teacher banjo and guitar, 90 W Ashley, b do
Carlson Hannah Miss, nurse, St. Luke's Hospital, b do, E. J.
Carlson Johanna Mrs., h St. Johns n Franklin, E. J.
Carmichael James D., carpenter, h at Brooklyn
Carpenter John H., h n Shell road, F.
Carpenter Marcus,* steward, h 96 Orange
Carr William,* carpenter, h Cedar c State


J. P. GAXCPITO,



CIGAR MANUFACTURER,


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


C4ARR WILLIAM P., proprietor Mattair House, 11 W Forsyth bet
U Ocean and Pine, h do
Carradice Catherine E. Miss, h 291 Laura, b do
Carroll Josephine,* h r 136 Ocean
Carroll Mattie E. Mrs., dressmaker, h 70 W Ashley
Carroll Rachel Miss,* h at E Jacksonville
Carroll Washington,* clerk, h foot of E Ashley
Carter Isaac, laborer, h at Fairfield
Carter Jesse, stonecutter, b n Commercial, B.
Carter Milton,* laborer, h foot Market
Carter Samuel B., chief engineer J. T. & K. W. R. R., Astor block, h
Church n Bridge, L. V.
Carter Susan A. Mrs., h off Commercial, B.
Carter Thomas L., engineer, h 113 E Adams
Carter William H., carpenter and builder, n Commercial, h do, R.
ARTER WILLIAM R., staff correspondent Florida Daily Herald,
b Pine cor Duval
Cary James,* laborer, h n R. R., O.
CASEY PETER F., restaurant, 1 Bridge, h do, L. V.
Cash Allen,* bartender, h at Oakland
Cashen Simon, foreman, (Wallace & Cashen), b Shell road, E. J.
Cashen Thomas V., (Wallace & Cashen), Mill ave, h St. Johns, E. J.
Cassidey Frank A. L., contractor, h 87 E Ashley
Cassidey Philip D., clerk F. C. & W. R. R., 1 & 2 Astor block, b 124
Julia
Cassidy Henry C., b 87 E Church
Castell William G., candy manufacturer, 35 E Bay, h Adams, E. J.
Castellan Edwin A., lawyer, 31 E Adams
Castello Marsilina,* cigarmaker, h 43 E Ashley
Castle Mark C, bookkeeper, 61 W. Bay, b 68 W Beaver
Castro Joseph, cigarmaker, h Hogan c State
Caswell Anderson M. C.,* laborer, h E Jacksonville
Caswell James W., laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Catlett (Benjamin), Waterman (Henry), & Davis (Samuel I.), sale stable,
Clay c Adams, b 123 W Forsyth, L. V.
ATLOW HENRY J., florist, h Broad c 3d, S.


JAMES R. CHALLEN,






39 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
IN-TVESTING- -A-GE-BN-T.
Investments made in Florida Lands. improved and unimproved, Bonds and Mortgages. Titles examined and cleared.
References in every principal city in the U. S., and in London, Eng.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 91

CECIL GEORGE JR., assistant manager DeBary-Baya Merchants'
Line Steamers, foot Laura
Center Dora Mrs., h W Duval c Ocean
CENTER GEORGE F., physician and surgeon, 1 E Forsyth, h at
Springfield
Certain Edward.* hackman, h Julia n North
Certain James,* waiter, h Julia c W Orange
Certain Jerry,* cigarmaker, h 211 Julia
Certain John, waiter, h North n Julia
Certain William, *carpenter, h at Oakland
Cessar Thomas B, moulder, h 120 E Forsyth
Chace Aquilla, printer, Florida Herald, h at Oakland
CHALLEN JAMES R., lawyer and investing agent, 39 W Bay, h
123 W Ashley. [See ad. p. 90].
Challen James R. Jr., jeweler, b 123 W Ashley
Chambers Edward W.,* laborer, h at Hansontown
Chambers George,* laborer, h at Oakland
Chambers Madeline,* h Union, L. V.
Chambers William H., bookkeeper, 78 W Bay, b Forsyth c Julia
Chapman Bristo,* laborer, h at Oakland
CHAPMAN SAMUEL B.,* watchman, h n R. R., O.
Chappell Adelaide M. Mrs., h 41 E Church
Chappell Louis.* carpenter, h Bay c 3d, L. V.
Charles Green,* h E Church c Catherine
Charlton Armstead,* laborer, h Caroline c Cedar
Chase Frances H. Mrs., b at Oakland
Chase Gabriel,* laborer, b 76 Catherine
CHASE GEORGE E., shipyard, ship chandler, ladder manufacturer,
Hart's blk, 90 E Bay, and junk, E Adams n Catherine, h 41 E Church
CHAVOUS EDWARD T., grocer, Bay n 2d, h do, L. V.
Checkeni Frederick J., polisher, h 56 Washington
CHENEY EDWARD M., lawyer and U. S. attorney, Mohawk block,
h at Philips
Chesley Edward G., surveyor, Florida Real Estate Exchange
CHESS-CARLEY CO., D. T. Gerow, manager, oils and naval stores,
641 W Bay


EDWARD T. CHAVOUS,



Groceries and Provisions,

CIGARS AND TOBACCO,


Bay near Second Street,


L. V.








92 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Chestnut John H.* sanitary inspector, h 100 State
Chiconie Lewis Mrs., dressmaker, h 163 Julia
Childes Henry,* drayman, h at E Jacksonville
CHILSON CHARLES A., plumber, 140 W Ashley, h do
Chong Sing, laundry, 56 Forsyth, h do
HRISTIAN BENJAMIN F., fruit, 23 E Bay, and (Riley, Groover
& Co.) 6 W Bay, h Adams n Hawk
Christian David,* laborer, h Bay bey 3d, L. V.
CHRISTIE JOSEPH B., lawyer and chief law deputy, Florida
real estate examiner, h 58 Market
Christopher John F.,* cook, b St. John opp Spearing, E. J.
Christopher John G. (Wightman & Christopher), Secretary Jacksonville
Electric Light Co., h at Riverside
Christopher Layer,* b Julia c North
Christopher Leo,* h 206 Julia c North
CHRISTOPHER (Milton J.)* & CO., (L. W. Livingston)* produce
Commission, City Market, h Julia c North
Christopher William, clerk, b Commercial, R.
Christy William H., h 92 E Forsyth
Chung Duk, Chinese laundry, 23 Cedar, h do
Church Charles K., delivery clerk Southern Exp. Co., b Caroline c Julia
HITRCHOUSE FRANK W., manager Wheeler & Wilson Mfg. Co.,
31 W Bay, h King opp the Hospital, E. J.
Churchwell Mary Miss,* h Oak n Leilla, B.
Clachar George B., h at Springfield
CLAIBORNE THOMAS C.,* furniture and junk dealer, Adams
Sc First, h do, L. V.
Clair Samuel,* h Fifth, n Adams, L. V.
Clark Alexander,* carpenter, h 104 Liberty
Clark Anna M. Mrs., h 95 W Beaver
Clark B. S., (Williams, Clark & Co.) Commercial, B., h at N. Y. city
Clark Charles T. F.,* restaurant, Adams c Bridge, h do, L. V.
Clark Edward, laborer, b Shell road, n fair grounds, F.
Clark Edward A.,* cigarmaker, h 126 W State
CLARK EDWARD F., furniture, stoves, clocks, pictures, etc., 4and
5 L'Engle blk, Pine c Adams, b Monroe Iouse
Clark Edward F., bookkeeper, b Commercial, R.


T. C. CLAIBORNE,
DEALER IN

Furniture, Junk, Metal, Iron, Rope, Sail, Bottles,

.A.MND IRA.G-S,

W. ADAMS, Cor. 1st STREET,


Jacksonville, Fla.


P. 0. Box 263.








WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY. 93

Clark Etheldred D., carpenter, h Brough c King, E. J.
Clark (Francis M.), Fairhead (John S.) & Co. (Benjamin R. Powell),
cypress shingle mills at Register and Clarksville, on J. St. A & H. R.
R., h at Register
Clark George,* laborer, h at E Jacksonville
Clark George W., clerk, 25 Laura h do
Clark Harold W., clerk, b E Forsyth
CLARK HARRISON W., notary, secretary and treasurer Jackson-
ville Building and Loan Association, postmaster at Jacksonville, bus-
iness manager, and Clark & Graves (John T.) publishers and proprie-
tors The Daily Florida Herald, 321 W Bay, h 95 W Beaver
Clark Henry, lumber manufacturer, 180 E Bay, h do
CLARK HENRY E., (Barrs, Clark & Tate) 77 W Bay, b 63 Pine
Clark Henry R., F. & J. R. R. depot, h 95 W Beaver
Clark James F., steward St. Luke's Hospital, b do
CLARK JOHN, pres. First National Bank, and JOHN CLARK,
SSON (John E.) & CO., (William R. Cox) grocers, wholesale and
retail, and agents for New Smyrna and Halifax River packets, Str.
"Captain Miller," for Green Cove Springs; agents for Dupont Pow-
der Co. and Kirk's soaps, and dealers in coal and hotel supplies, 28
and 30 E Bay, h 132 E Forsyth
Clark John A., h 90 W Beaver
CLARK JOHN E., (John Clark, Son & Co.) 28 E Bay, b 132 E
SForsyth
Clark Kate Mrs., h Shell road, F.
Clark Kittie Mrs., b 75 Julia
Clark M. Ella Mrs., millinery and fancy goods, 31 E Bay, h 29 E Bay
Clark Morris,* laborer, h 123 E Duval
Clark Samuel,* mason, h 800 W Ward, L. V.
Clark Sarah F. Mrs., b Shell road, F.
Clark Sophia Mrs., b 84 Washington
Clark Squire,* restaurant, 112 Ocean, h E Ashley c Newnan
Clark William,* carpenter, h 123 E Duval
CLARK WILLIAM, plumber, gas and steam fitter, roofer, pumps
Sand plumbers' materials, 50 W Bay, h 68 Cedar c Monroe
Clark William B., carpenter, h at Springfield
Clark William Gordon, clerk, 21 W Bay, b 131 E Forsyth
Clark William I., h 59 E Church
E. E. CLEAVELAND. W. W. CLEAVELAND.

CLEAVELAND & SON,
Manufacturers and Dealers in


FURNITURE, BEDDING, ETC.
Prices and Goods Guaranteed.


- Jacksonville, Fla.


64 & 66 West Bay Street,








94 WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.

Clarkson Albert L., commercial traveler, h n Commercial, R.
Clarkson B. Frank, commercial traveler, h n Commercial, R.
Clarkson Gerardus, clerk, h Maggie n Brough. E. J.
Clarkson J. Poulton, clerk, 72J W Bay, b 87 E Forsyth
CLARKSON WALTER B., notary, real estate and general manager
Parkersburg Land Co., 72} W Bay
Clay Frank,* steward, h E Union n Market
Clayton Florida Miss,* h Spearing n Victoria, E. J.
Cleary tinner, b 104 E Bay
CLEAVELAND (Edward E.) & SON (Waldo W.), furniture, 64
S& 66 W Bay, h 85 W Adams [See ad. p. 93].
C LEAVELAND WALDO W., (Cleaveland & Son), h W Forsyth
n Cedar
Cleeland John R., engineer, b 115 Forsyth c Washington
Clemmens Alice,* h Catherine c E Monroe
Clemmens Stephen,* fireman, h 17 E Beaver
Clinch Joseph,* assistant janitor Astor Block, b do.
Clinton (John) and Town, (T. R.) fruit and produce, 98 E Bay, h do.
Clough Waynal G., carpenter and builder, 124 Cedar, b do.
Coachman Hattie,* servant, b Orange c Julia
Coaltrain William,* laborer, hat E Jacksonville
Coates Charles J., paving contractor, Maggie n Spearing, h do, E J.
Cobb Gardner N., boarding, Shell road, h do, F.
Cobb Nellie E. Miss., music teacher, b Shell road F.
Cobb Phoebe,* h at Hansontown
OCKRELL AUGUSTUS W. & SON., (A. Wmn. Cockrell Jr.,)
Lawyers, rooms 3, 4 and 5 Mohawk Block, h 95 W Church c Hogan
OCKRELL A. WM. Jr., (A. W. Cockrell & Son), b 95 W Church c
V Hogan
Coffee Annie C.,* tailoress, h 165 Julia
COFFIN EDWARD C. MRS., millinery, dress goods and fancy
Goods, 57 W Bay, h Laura c W Church. [See ad. p. 93].
COGHLAN JAMES P., contractor and dock builder, n Commercial, h
' do, R.
Cohen Alfred E., stenographer, Randall, Walkers and Foster, b 73 New-
nan
COHEN BROTHERS, (Morris and Samuel) dry goods, 41 and 43
SW Bay [See ad. p. 97].

AUGUSTUS W. COCKRELL. A. WM. COCKRELL, Jr.

A. W. COCKRELL & SON,


Attorneys and Counselors

ROOMS 3, 4 and 5 MOHAWK BLOCK,


East Bay St., cor. Market,- Jacksonville, Fla.









OWN A HOME IN FLORIDA.


secure a Kbot at preAentt 1Toco priceeL.
PARKERSBURG, MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA.


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Lots 50 feet front, facing on 60-foot Avenue, and 125 feet deep, run-
ning back to a 20-foot Alley.
No wet land at Parkersburg-every lot high and dry.
Buy a Home in the Highlands of Marion County.
No marshes or swamps near to cause sickness.
Health, the greatest boon of existence, promoted by residence amid the
balsamic odors of the pine forests at Parkersburg.
Choice Lots at Popular Prices, $15, $30 and $75.
Twenty-five per cent. of all sales devoted to town improvements-thus
one-fourth of all money you pay the Company goes back toward im-
proving your neighborhood.
Parkersburg has Five Parks-a fine lot facing on a Park for Fifty Dol-
lars.
Corner Lots having a total frontage of 175 feet for Twenty Dollars.
Popular Prices for Inside Lots-Fifteen Dollars.
Full Warranty Deeds for all Lots Purchased.
Titles Perfect, coming direct from the United States Government to
our President as Trustee.
Present Prices only temporary-now is the time to buy.
Taxes will not be due until December, 1886, and then will only be a
few cents on a Lot.
The new City of Parkersburg is owned by THE PARKERSBURG FLORIDA
LAND COMPANY, incorporated under the Laws of Florida. Business men
of Jacksonville, Fla.. and.Parkersburg, W. Va., compose the Company,
and all their business will be conducted strictly on the square; any devia-
tion from this will not be tolerated by the management. Any lot proving
to be not as represented will be at once taken back and money refunded.
Real Estate is the most solid of investments-banks may break, trusted
agents may prove false, panics may prevail-but every dollar judiciously
invested in Real Estate is safe.
A present of a Parkersburg Lot to your son or your daughter may
prove a strong incentive to thrift, and be the foundation of a snug little
fortune. Try it.
A Parkersburg Lot as a birth-day present is a fine idea-it is sure to be
acceptable.
Send your money for a Lot in Parkersburg to your local agent, or to
the Head Office in Jacksonville, Fla.
Maps and Full Information on Application.
Choice Orange Grove Land in 5 and 10 acre tracts, close by Parkers-
burg, may be purchased from the Company.
ADDRESS, W. B. CLARKSON, General Manager,
I Office, 72%2 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


SOVYOER 125 LOTS SOLD THE FIRST TWO MONTHS.


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WEBB'S JACKSONVILLE DIRECTORY.


Cohen Isaac Newton, cigars, b 73 Newnan
Cohen Jacob E., clerk 41 W Bay, b Tremont House
Cohen Julius, manager Cohen Brothers, 41 W Bay, b Tremont House
COHEN MORRIS, dry goods and clothing 218 Bay, h do, L. V.
[See ad. p. 98].
COHEN MORRIS, (Cohen Bros.) h Nottingham, England
Cohen N., cigars, 29 E Bay, h 79 Newnan
COHEN SAMUEL, (Cohen Bros.), h at New York
Cohen Sarah Mrs.,* teacher, h Beaver c Hawk, L. V.
COLE CARROLL W., (S. W. Cole & Son) Warner House, 144 Laura
c Union, h do
Cole Charles S., real estate agent, h Forsyth c 3d, L. V.
Cole Eliza Mrs., dressmaker, h Ward c 3d, L. V.
Cole Lumber Dryer Co. (James F. Anceny & Geo. I. Lombard), owners
and builders Cole's Patent Lumber Kiln Dryer, 90 W Bay
Cole Margaret Mrs., h 67 W Adams
COLE (Samuel W.) & SON (Carroll W.), proprietors Warner House,
143 Laura c W Union, b do [See ad. p. 99].
Coleman David,* h 159 Market
Coleman Fannie,* h W Orange c Julia
Coleman James C.,* (L. H. Coleman & Bro.), b 16 W Ashley
Coleman Joseph M., clerk, 26 W Bay, b Adams n Pine
Coleman (Louis H.*) & Bro. (James C.*) hairdressers, 27 Pine, h 16 W
Ashley
Coleman Oscar,* barber, b 16 W Ashley
Coleman Robert H., h Market s w c E Duval
OLEMAN WALTER G., general traveling agent Florida Ry. and
SNay. Co. 86 W Bay, rooms 99 E Forsyth
Coleman William Mrs., h Market s w c E Duval
Coley Nettie.* h 812 W Ward
Colleen Charles G., lumberman, h St. John n Mill av, E. J.
Colley Hamilton G.,* h at Hansontown
Collie Georgianna,* h at Oakland
Collie Sarah,* h at Oakland
Collins Amelia,* h n School, 0.
Collins Canada C., real estate, 22 Hogan, h W Bay n Bridge, L. V.







FANCY GOODS, WORSTEDS,

Fine Silk Umbrellas, Parasols, Gloves, Hosiery, &c.


- JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


No. 57 West Bay St.,










- -- -- --
L*f^


- : :- = C F L A'A "


The Windsor is one of the most elegant and perfect hotels in the United
States. Its location, facing east on the City Park, and south on Monroe
Street, is the finest in Jacksonville. It has been enlarged, doubling its size
for the season of 1885-86. Elevator, rooms with bath, gas, &c.

-' E-. OR-VIS.




Equinox HouSe, lanchestep, Vermoqt,

SUMMER RESORT.

Situated among the Green Mountains, two hundred miles north of New
York, fifty miles north of Troy, forty-eight miles north-east of Saratoga, and
thirty miles south of Rutland, on the Bennington and Rutland Railway, mid-
way between New York and Montreal. The time from New York, via Hud-
son River Railroad, six and a half hours.
Extensive additions and improvements have been made to the Equinox
House, and it now has a lawn frontage of over four hundred feet.
The Taconic Hotel, adjoining, has been purchased, refitted, refurnished
and connected with the main House. The Equinox has several.Cottages and
Suites of Rooms with Parlors. Manchester is a thousand feet above the level
of the sea, in one of the most healthy regions in the world.

F- I _- OIRVIS.

SPECIAL NOTICE.-Tourists are respectfully notified that the rule DOGS
NOT ALLOWED IN THE HOUSE" will be strictly adhered to at all of the
above hotels.


_ ___ __ I I_







F. E. BOGUE & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

FPU-R-N-I-T-U-R-B,

Baby Carriages,

Bedding, Mantels,

Mirrors, Toys, &c.
We make a Specialty of
BEBROOM ANB PARLOR SuITES,
CHAIRS, TABLES, MATTRESSES, AND

FURnISi0 rOcEL$ 0omPLCTE,
IN ANY PART OF THE STATE.
WE LEAD IN
IIEWI OTYLEO
__ AL\l --
INEW OODn.
( Sole Agents for the AROMATIC BEDDING
"'P MATERIAL, composed of equal parts of Pine Leaf
f and Palmetto, and considered by physicians to be the
4- healthiest material for bedding in use.
F. E. BoGUE, formerly Manager
fr E. l Livingston.

261 and 28 Ocean St., Jacksonville, Florida.




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