• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Alphabet
 Little Frank and other tales. Chiefly...
 To my little book
 The owl
 John Grant's return from sea
 Little Frank and the rat
 Frank and the field-mouse
 A true tale of a little girl who...
 The useful dog
 Charles Ross and the hawk
 George and Rose's long walk
 The glow-worm
 The reed-bird
 A tale of the north






Group Title: Children in the wood (Ballad)
Title: Frank and Maja's stories and rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003630/00001
 Material Information
Title: Frank and Maja's stories and rhymes for the amusement and instruction of good children : with numerous illustrations from new drawings
Uniform Title: Children in the wood (Ballad)
Alternate Title: Little Frank and other tales, chiefly in words of one syllable
Alphabets (A-Z) and rhymes
Physical Description: <12> leaves, 64, 63, 16 p., <8> leaves of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: C. G. Henderson & Co ( Publisher )
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: C.G. Henderson & Co.
D. Appleton & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
New York
Publication Date: 1853
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1853   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1853   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853   ( rbbin )
Children's stories -- 1853   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre: Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Leaves for alphabets B & C, and R & S torn, affecting text.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003630
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002229994
oclc - 46323378
notis - ALH0335

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Alphabet
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
        Page xix
        Page xx
        Page xxi
        Page xxii
        Page xxiii
        Page xxiv
        Page xxv
        Page xxvi
        Page xxvii
        Page xxviii
    Little Frank and other tales. Chiefly in words of one syllable
        Page 1
        Page 2
    To my little book
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The owl
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
    John Grant's return from sea
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Little Frank and the rat
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Frank and the field-mouse
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
    A true tale of a little girl who fell into a tan-pit
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The useful dog
        Page 34
        Page 34a
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Charles Ross and the hawk
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    George and Rose's long walk
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The glow-worm
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The reed-bird
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A tale of the north
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
Full Text



FRANK AND MAJA'S



STORIES AND RHYMES.

FOR THE

AMUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION


OP

GOOD CHILDREN.


Nitb Numrours flustrations tro Ntb readings.


PHILADELPHIA:
C. G. HENDERSON & CO..
N. W. CORNER FITRH AND ARBC 8MT8U8M
NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 200 BROADWAY.
1853.






















I















A is Ann, with milk from the cow.


or




























S08s one r
B is Benjamin, making a bow.


4.









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C is Charlotte, gathering flowers.



























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D is Dick, who is one of the mower.










h


E is Eliza, feeding a hen.






































F is Frank who is mending his pen.


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G is Georgiana, shooting an arrow.






































H is. Harry, wheeling a barrow.


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I is Isabella, gathering fruit.


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J is John, who is playing the flute.

















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K is Ka nursing her dolly..
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L is Lawrence, feeding poor Polly



































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M is Maja, learning to draw.


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N is Nicholas, with a jackdaw.


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0 is Octavius; riding a goat.


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P is Penelope, sailing a boat


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Q is Quintus, armed with a lance.


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Teddy, reading a book.







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T is Teddy, reading a book.


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SUr r




U is Urban, rolling the green.











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V is Victoria.


Britain's great Queen.


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W is Walter, flying his kite.



























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X is Xerxes; a boy of great might.


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Y is Miss Youthful, eating her bread.























and Z is Zachariab, going to bed.







LITTLE FRANK


AND


OTHER TALES.


CHIEFLY IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE








TO MY LITTLE BOOK.





MAY many a merry girl and boy
Prize thee, my book, above each toy.
May bat and ball aside be laid,
And dolly quite cast into shade.
Thy pages tell of the timid bird,
Whose voice by the sedgy stream is heard;
And of the hawk, who, with wings of speed,
Darts on the prey which his young ones need;
And of the glow-worm's fairy light,
Which shines like a gem through the summer night
(3)








TO MY LITTLE BOOK.


They tell of the north, with its ice and snow,
Where roses and violets never will blow;
Where the rein-deer, fleet, doth lightly bound,
With its fur-lined sledge o'er the frozen ground.
Of the clever rat's skill thy pages show,
Who makes his snug home where the waters flow,
And when any dangerous foe is near,
He dives neathh the stream, and hides in fear.
But if each bright eye should more brightly shine,
When it reads these simple tales of thine,
I shall fondly hope that not all in vain
Have been the glad labours of my pen.







THE OWL.

"( OH, dear Tom!" said Grace, in a low
voice to her brother, "here we have sat
as still as mice for such a long time! I
am so tired!"
Let us go into the hall, then," said
Tom.
"c But will not mamma's friends think
us rude to leave the room?" said Grace.
cc Oh, I dare say not," said Tom; c( but
I will go and ask mamma."
(5)







THE OWL.


Mrs. Moore gave them leave to do as
they wished, and Tom and Grace were
soon in the hall.
Come, Grace," said her brother, as
he led her to the glass-door which looked
on to the lawn, what say you to a race
down the broad path, and back through
the nut-walk ?"
No, thank you," said she, as she drew
back; it is so dark in the nut.walk, I
do not wish to go near it."
i It will not be dark now," said Tom:
i see. how brightly the moon shines! why
I could see to read by its light."
Grace looked up, and saw that dark







THE OWL.


clouds were rising, and would soon pass
over the moon, and then all would be dark
again; but she.strove to hide her fears,
and said, as she took Tom's hand, Come,
then, let us go; but you will not run away
and leave me, will you ?"
Oh, no, dear Grace, that I will not,"
said Tom: "now then, one, two, three,
and away."
At the end of the broad walk, they
stood still to take breath. Grace cast her
eyes into the thick shade of the trees and
shrubs, and saw no cause for fear; but as
the wind blew through the leaves and
branches, she could fancy she heard voices,







THE OWL.


first on her right hand, and then on her
left. As she had feared, the moon was
now quite hid by clouds, and the pale
light of the stars could not shine through
the gloom of the nut-walk.
"Pray let us go now, Tom," said
Grace, as she clung to him. "( Why do
you stand so still.? Hark! what is that
noise? Oh, Tom, pray come home; there
it is again!"
Dear Grace," said Tom, do not fear,
it is only a bird; let us stay a short time,
and perhaps we may see it."
Oh," said Grace, u it must be a great







THE OWL.


ugly bird, to make such a noise as that,
and I do not wish to see it."
No, it is not very great or very ugly,"
said Torn; and I know you will want to
see it, when 1 tell you that it is an
owl; and I dare say it is the same that
Smith told me of, which has its nest in the
old oak."
Oh, is it ?" said Grace: c there it is
again, Hoot! hoot! hoot!"
Hush," said Tom; come a step or
two this way; now look, do you not see
him ?"
"Where? said Grace, on that bare
branch of the yew ? 0 dear! I.never saw







10


THE OWL.


such a bird before: what a large round
head he has!"
cI And look at his beak," said Tom, in
the shape of a book, that is for him to tear
his prey with. There, that cloud has
blown over, and we can see him well.
He is quite brisk now: I should like to
see him dart on a bird or a mouse."
,i I should not," said Grace; c for though
it is no worse than for us to eat cows and
sheep, yet his sharp claws must hurt them
so much, and I could not bear to hear them
squeak."
Nor I," said Tom. Well, the old







THE OWL.


11


man has flown away now, so we had better
go home."
",Did you ever see an owl before,
Tom ?" said Grace.
< Yes, once, a long while ago, when 1
was at play in the wood. I was going to
hide in the trunk of an old tree, but when
I put my head in, I heard such a noise,
and looking up, I saw a large owl: he
flapped his wings, and looked so fierce,
that I ran away; and mamma told me a
great deal about owls, when I got home."
We must not run over the lawn,
Tom," said Grace, for the dew is so
thick."







12 THE OWL.

Well, here we are at the door, quite
safe," said Tom: ( now you will not be
afraid when you hear an owl hoot again."
Oh, no," said Grace, 6c I shall not, in,
deed."







JOHN GRANT'S RETURN FROM
SEA.

AT a small farm-house, a long way
from any large town, lived an old man,
and his wife, whose names were James
and Kate Grant. They had had five sons,
who were now all grown up, and had left
their home to earn their own bread. One
had gone to sea, but had not been heard
of for four or five years, so that it was
thought he must be dead.
(13)







JOHN GRANT'S


It was a cold bleak night; the wind
was high, and the snow beat against the
front of the old house. As James and his
wife sat by their snug and warm fire-side,
they thought how glad they ought to be
for such a nice home, and that they should
thank their good God for His care of them
in their old age.
I am not so strong as I was," said
James, for I feel that a little work tires
me now; and though Ned Brown is a
good boy, yet he is too young to be of
much use to me."
Ah," said Kate, with a deep sigh, it
seems hard that we, who have had five


14







RETURN FROM SEA.


boys, should now be left all alone with none
to help us: if one of them would but come
and live here, I should feel quite young
once more."
Where is our poor John?" said the
old man, as tears rose in his eyes. Oh
that I had not let him go to sea! What
a night is this for those on shipboard
May they be kept from harm! Put a
fresh log on the fire, good wife, for it is
very cold."
Oh, my poor boy!" said Kate, "shall
I ever see him again ? He was the best
child of them all: how could I let him go
from home I"


15







.JOHN GRANT'S


( We did it for the best at the time,"
said James, ( and it will not bring him
back to mourn over him now. Dear me!
what can make the dog bark in that strange
way ~"
I dare say," said Kate, c he does not
like to hear the wind howl in the old trees:
hark how the boughs creak! When first
you and I came to live here, those trees
were young and in their prime, but now
I think they will not stand much longer
than we shall."
"( Oh, yes," said the old man, they -are
not quite so near their end as we are, my
dear; but I do not like to hear Lion keep


16







RETURN FROM SEA.


17


up such a noise; it cannot be all right, I
am sure."
James Grant got up from his armchair,
and went to the door; but he could hear
no noise, nor could he see anything, for
the snow beat right in his face. Just as
he came back, he heard his wife call out,
that she saw a man look through the win-
dow at her; and in great fear she begged
James not to go out.
Why should I care V" said he; "I have
done no harm, and it may be some one
who has lost his way in the dark, and who
is in want of help."
2







JOHN GRANT'S


With these words he put on his hat, and
with a stout stick in his hand, to use in
case of need, he went out.
He had not gone far, ere the man he
was in search of came up to him, and
begged a place to sleep in that night, as
it was a long way to the next town.
*" You must speak to my wife," said
James; "( and if she likes to do so, I dare
say she can give you a bed. Come in,
for you are cold and wet."
The man did as he was bid, took off his
thick coat, which was quite white with
snow, and went to the ire. As Kate set


18







RETURN FROM SEA.


a chair for him, she saw that he had on a
short blue jacket, such as her John wore
when he came home from his first trip to
sea. The sight of this, and the man's
honest face, quite won her heart; and she
soon set before him some bread and cheese,
and a mug of warm beer.
Come," said James, when he was once
more in his seat, I am glad to see you
here, for this is a lone place, and it does
one good to see a new face now and then.
Wife, have you not got any meat to give
our friend ?"
"I do not want more, thank you," said


19







JOHN GRANT'S


the man: you have lived in this old
house a long while, have you not ?"
c" Why, yes, we have," said James; "t it
is near fifty years since we first came.
Pray have you been here before 1"
"( How can you ask ?" said Kate; such
an out of-the-way place as it is."
i I used to know it quite well, when I
was a boy: I lived not far from here then,"
said the seaman.
There, now, wife !" said James.
"t Lived near here!" said Kate: "< why,
when you were a boy, there could not
have been a house within three miles of
this: pray what was your name ?"


20







RETURN FROM SEA.


21


( I will tell you by and by," said the
man: u but can you tell me where Charles
and Ned Grant are gone ? I used to play
with them when we were young, and I
love them very much."
Charles and Ned Grant!" said both
the old folks at once: why, who should
they be but our own boys! they have left
us a long while now. Charles went a long
way off, where he could get more work
than in this land; and Ned lives at a
farm of his own, and has a wife and
child."
"You had a son John, who went to
sea, had you not ?" said the man.







JOHN GRANT'S


Oh, yes, and a dear son he was: when
you came in you put me so in mind of
him," said Kate; "but we fear he must
be dead now, for he never writes to us or
comes to see us."
As she said this, she looked in the
man's face, and saw that his eyes were
full of tears.
My mother! my dear mother!" said
he, as he got up and threw his arms round
her neck. And now your lost son
has come home, and will not leave you,
but will take care of you, and work for
you all his life."


22







RETURN FROM SEA. 23
Poor James and his wife were so full
of joy, that they could not speak for some
time; but they thanked God in their
hearts, for having brought their dear son
home to them to cheer their old age.







LITTLE FRANK AND THE RAT.

ON fine spring day Mrs. Dean set out
for a walk. She crossed the lawn at the
back of the house, and chose a long path,
which had thick shrubs on each side, and
led her to the gate of a field.
At one end of this field there was a
small pond of clear water; on its banks
grew long grass and rushes, and the little
birds sang their sweet songs in the lime.
trees that hung over the water.
(24)







LI-TTLE FRANK AND THE RAT. 25
As Mrs. Dean came near to the spot,
she saw her little boy there. He sat
quite still on the edge of the pond.
Frank, my dear," said she, ", why do
you sit there ? it is too damp a place."
Oh, mamma," said Frank, do come
and see this droll sight! Look on the other
side; just by that old stump of a tree is
a large water-rat. I have seen him a
long time, and I think he wants to dig a
hole in the bank: if I go near to look at
him, he jumps into the pond. Is he going
to make a place to live in ?"
i" Yes, my dear," said Mrs. Dean, "he
will dig a deep place in the earth, to serve







LITTLE FRANK


him for a nest; and I dare say he will
make two holes to creep in and out of,
one higher than the other, in case the water
should rise above one of them."
Does the rat eat the small fishes or
worms, mamma ?" said Frank.
,No, my dear, it feeds on the soft
roots of plants, which it finds in the water,
or in the damp parts of the fields. It is
not so fierce as the land-rat, and its fur is
more soft and close. When it hears
a noise, it leaps into the water, and
dives down in fear; but it cannot stay
long there for want of air, so it rises
.gain, and just puts its nose above the


26







AND THE RAT.


water, that it may be able to breathe and
yet not be seen."
What a droll thing!" said Frank: ( I
shall like to watch you all the more now
I know something.about you. Good-bye,
little busy rat, for to-day."


27







FRANK AND A FIELD-MOUSE.

A FEW days after Frank had seen the
rat at work on the bank of the pond, he
was at play in the fields wjth his pet dog.
He saw Dash scratch up the ground and
smell about.
"Here, Dash! Dash!" said Frank;
What are you doing T"
Just then a small brown mouse came
out of his hole, and ran away very fast.
Frank was a kind boy, and would not let
(28)







THE FIELD-MOUSE.


Dash run after it and kill it, as he wished.
He held his dog tight, and sat down near
the spot, to see if the mouse would come
back; but as it, did not, he ran in-doors
to tell his mamma what he had seen.
It was such a nice little mouse, mamma,
with a'very long tail; and it ran away
at a great rate."
Yes, my dear," said Mrs. Dean, the
field-mouse is very quick and can leap
well. It does much harm in the fields
and gardens, and to the ricks of corn, and
is often found in farm-yards. Owls, kites,
dogs, and cats make war against the poor
field-mouse, and I fear that men do so too."


29







30


THE FIELD-MOUSE.


Poor thing !" said Frank; I am sure
I would not kill one, for I like to see them
run in and out of their holes."
In its nest in the ground," said Mrs.
Dean, ( or under a bunch of moss, it hoards
up its store of food before the cold days
come: sometimes it finds out the holes
which the mole has left, and lives in them."
How sly," said Frank, not to make
a place of his own! Thank you, dear
mamma, for this tale about him."








A TRUE TALE


OF A
LITTLE GIRL WHO FELL INTO A TAN-PIT.

Now I will tell you a tale about a little
girl, whom we will call Anne Grey, though
that was not her real name. Anne was
very fond of her doll, for-she had no little
boys or girls of her own age to play with.
Like some other dolls, I know, (and
some little girls too,) its clothes were apt
to get dirty, and Anne thought it would
(31)







82 THE LITTLE GIRL;
be great fun to put Miss Dolly to bed for
the day, while she washed them up. Well,
once, when the maids were busy in the
wash-house, Anne thought it just the right
time for her to begin, so she set to work
in great glee. When all the clothes were
nice and clean, she went to the garden to
look for a place where she could hang
them up to dry. She soon found one to
suit her; tied up a line, and went back to
the house for the things.
Her way to and from the garden led
through a tan-yard, and the busy little
girl, in her haste to push by the edge of
one of the pits, fell splash in,. with all her







A TRUE TALE.


doll's clean clothes in her hand. What
was to be done now ? there she was, up
to her chin in the nasty brown water,
and she could not get out. Old Mrs. Bigg,
who was at work just by, heard the poor
child cry, and ran to help her.
"( Oh, do pray take me out," said she;
I will not do so any more!"
So she was soon pulled out, and put
into a tub of warm water, for which, you
may be sure, there was much need. It
was a long time ere poor Anne ran so fast
through the tan-yard again.


88







THE USEFUL DOG.

ONE day, as Tom Price was on his way
to school, with his bag of books at his
back, he stood still to look at a fine large
dog which lay in the sun before the door
of a poor man's house.
Take care how you go near that fierce
dog," said the gruff voice of a man who
passed by just then.
I do not think he will hurt me," said
(S4)







THE USEFUL DOG.


Tom, "if I do no harm: see, he lets me
pat his head."
The dog got up, and seemed to like
Tom to stroke him; but as soon as he
saw the man, he gave a low growl, and
looked quite fierce.
There, you see I told you right," said
the man, as he made haste away. Just
then the master of the dog came out, and
sat on a bench by the door.
"( If you please," said Tom, what makes
the dog growl at that man who went by,
while he seems so fond of me ?"
I will tell you," said he; c( he knows
that that is a bad man; for one day he got


35







THE USEFUL DOG.


over my hedge and stole some fruit; but
the dog caught him, and would not let
him go till I went out to him."
What a good guard he must be !" said
Tom.
6 Yes," said the man, and I can tell
you more than that; for one day a little
girl who was at play near the mill-stream,
fell in, and might have been drowned, had
not I and my dog been near and heard
her screams."
Did the dog jump in ?" said Tom.
Yes; and he swam down the stream
after her, and brought her safe to land.
She was soon quite well; and the dog


36







THE USEFUL DOG.


87


and she are now such great friends, it is
quite droll to see them."
I must run away now," said Tom,
"for it is my school-time. When I am a
man I hope I shall have such a dog of my
OWn,"







CHARLES ROSS AND THE HAWK.

WHAT does make little Charles Ross
run so fast across that long field he
looks as though he had a great deal to
tell. Yes, see, there is his aunt Lucy,
not far off; he will soon catch her, I
think. There, now he has got-up to her;
but he is so out of breath he cannot
speak just yet. Aunt Lucy says some-
thing to him, let us go near and hear what
it is.
(38)







THE HAWK.


My dear boy, you should not run so
fast this hot day. Pray where have you
been all this time, and what have you
seen ?"
Oh, aunt!" says Charles, "as soon as
I came from school, I went to the farm.
yard to feed my fowls; and it was very
well I did, for what should I see but a
cruel hawk pounce down in the midst of
my poor chicks: the old hen flew at him,
and pecked him well with her beak, and
shook her wings at him, but he was too
bold to care for that; so I gave a loud
shout, and flung my cap at him, just as
he flew off with the white chick in his







40


CHARLES ROSS


claws. I aimed so well, that the cap
struck him, and made him drop his prey:
I then ran to it, but the poor thing was
quite dead, and its nice white down was
all dyed with blood. Do you know,
dear aunt, I felt so vexed that the tears
came into my eyes; but then I thought
I must not be angry with the hawk,
for God made it, and had taught it what
sort of food to take home to its young
ones."
Now see how pleased Aunt Lucy looks,
and how she kisses Charles, and says, ( I
am very glad to hear you speak so, my
own dear boy, and to see that you thought







AND THE HAWK. 41
of what I told you a day or two ago, that
the wise and good God has made all
things well, and that He cannot err in any
of His works."







GEORGE AND ROSE'S LONG
WALK.

( COME," said George King, a boy of
five years old, to his sister Rose, c( come
and play on the grass-plat with me. I will
lend you my new ball."
,"Oh, yes," said Rose, as she put down
her doll, that I will."
In a short time they were tired of play;
and Rose said to George, ( Let us go and
see Aunt Jane, we both know the way
quite well."
(42)







THE LONG WALK.


It is such a long walk," said George,
"i and I think there will not be time before
it grows dark."
Oh, yes, there will," said Rose; and
I dare say Aunt Jane will send us home in
the chaise." So she took George's hand,
and led him into the lane, for though she
was not so old as he was, she often made
him do as she pleased.
Now the way was long, and the sun
was low in the sky, but George and Rose
thought no more of that. They went on
over two or three fields, till they came to
a high gate.
"Now, then," said George, "we must


43







GEORGE AND ROSE'S


climb this, for I find it will not open;" so
he was soon on the other side. But Rose
was so short she could not even get to the
top rail.
( Oh, what are we to do cried she.
Why, if you cannot get over, Rose,"
said George, we must go back, for there
is no way but this to reach Aunt Jane's
house."
Oh dear, oh dear !" said Rose, why
we are so near to it, I can see the roof
through the trees."
"( I cannot help it," said George; we
must not stay here, for it will soon be
dark."


44







LONG WALK. 45
I am so tired!" said poor Rose, with
a sigh.
Do not think of that now," said
George, as he got off the top of the gate
on which he had sat to rest, for we have
a long way to go back, and must make
haste;" so, hand-in-hand, they set off.
In a short time they met a man that
knew them well: A Ah, go home, go home,"
said he, as he shook his stick at them;
i they are all in a great fright about you."
Poor George and Rose ran as fast as
they could, for they now thought they had
done wrong to leave home.
As soon as they got to the door, Rose







46


THE LONG WALK.


ran up to her grandmamma, and said, as
tears ran down her cheeks, c( It was all
my fault, that it was; for George did not
wish to go, but I led him out."
1 No," said George, it was my fault too,
for I knew it was wrong, and Rose did not."
"c Well," said their kind grandmamma,
as she kissed them and dried their eyes,
6t you will not do so any more, I dare say,
now that you feel that you are too young
to go out alone. But it is high time you
were in bed, so run up stairs to Ann, like
a good boy and girl."







THE GLOW-WORM.

As John and Mary Green were on
their way home from their aunt's house,
where they had spent the day, they saw
something bright in the grass by the road-
side.
"( Look, look! what is that ?" said John
to the maid.
,"Oh, I dare say it is a drop of dew
which shines in the light of the moon,"
said she.
(47)







48


THE GLOW-WORM.


Oh, no," said Mary, the moon does
not shine through that thick hedge at all:
let me try to pick it up."
Here it is," cried John, c I have got
hold of it; but it does not shine now: this
cannot be it."
Do not drop it," said Mary; but take
it home to mamma, and she will tell us
what it is."
They now made all the haste they
could: they found their mamma at the
hall-door, who was looking out for them,
and told her what they had brought.
Oh, I dare say it is a glow-worm,"







THE GLOW-WORM.


49


said she: let me look at it: yes, that
it is."
A glow-worm! mamma," said John
and Mary, "s what is that ?"
", It is a small worm, which is able to
send forth a light from its body, which
shines in the dark, as you saw it. This
is the only insect of the kind which is
found in our isle, but there are many in
other lands, and some of them give far
more light then this does. There is the
fire-fly, which, as it flits in and out of the
dark bushes in the night with its star-like
light, must look very pretty."
4







THE GLOW-WORM.


c" Oh, how I wish I could see it!" said
John.
"( The men who live where the fire-flies
are, sometimes use them as a lamp, to
guide them from place to place."
c How droll!" said Mary; "when you
want a light, just to run into the woods
and catch one "
How many things there are in the
world," said- John, which I have not
heard of!"
"Yes," said his mamma, "that is
quite true; and though you should live
to be an old man, you will still have to


50







THE. GLOW-WORM. 51
say the same, for the earth and the sea
are full of the works of the Lord, and
no life is too long in which to learn
them all."







THE REED-BIRD.

JAMES, James, where are you gone V"
said Jessy Wright.
,, Hush, Jessy, here I am, quite safe,"
said James. 6 Pray do not make such a
noise."
What have you found there?" said
Jessy, as she spied him out deep in the
thick rushes. c Shall I come to you ."
"( No, no," said James, "( that you must
not; I shall soon get out, and then I will
tell you what I have seen."
(52)







THE REED-BIRD.


53


", What can it be 1" thought Jessy.
While James is making his way out,
let me tell you what sort of a place it
was where he and Jessy were. There was
a flat field, or marsh, through the midst of
which ran a shall clear brook; tall grass
and rushes grew thick and close over this
marsh, and many trees marked the course
of the stream. Jessy was on the edge
of the marsh when first she lost sight of
James, who had heard the chirp of a bird
which was new to him, and had crawled
into the sedge to look from whence it came.
Well," said Jessy, so here you are
at last. What a mess you are in!"







64


THE REED-BIRD.


"I do not care for that," said James,
cc for I have seen something worth a sight,
and it was the first of the kind I ever saw."
"t Make haste and say what it was," said
Jessy: ", was it alive ?"
Oh, yes, to be sure," said he.
cc I thought," said Jessy, that only froga
and toads lived in the marsh."
"t Then you thought wrong," said James:
< but if you can be still, I will tell you
what it was. While I stood here with
you I heard such a strange chirp, and as
I did not know what bird's note it was,
I thought I would try and find the nest,
(not to touch it or take the eggs, of course,







THE REED-BIRD.


but just to have a look at it.) So I crept
in very still, and went to the place from
whence the sound came. In a short time
I was close to it, and there I saw such a
sweet little nest! it was made of the dead
leaves of the rush and sedge, and a few
pieces of dry grass, and lined with the
soft tops of the reed. And, oh, Jessy! I
wish you could have seen the eggs; there
were six of them, white, with small red
spots all over; such tiny things! On the
stem of a reed, close by the nest, was the
hen-bird, and her mate was not far off;
but the noise you made drove them away."
I did not mean to do harm, dear


55







THE REED-BIRD.


James," said Jessy. I wish I had been
with you, I would have been very still then.
But what is the name of the bird ?"
,, Why, it must be the reed.bird," said
James, for I have seen a print of one,
and this was just like it; and I have read
of it too. It eats the seeds of the reed,
and young snails, and flies."
How large is it, James ?" said Jessy.
c It is quite a small bird; but from its
thick coat, and long tail and legs, looks
as large as a red-breast. Its bill is very
small."
"Oh dear," said Jessy, did you feel
that ? was it not a drop of rain ?"


56







THE REED-BIRD.


c" Yes, that it was," said James, "( and
a large drop,. too: I think it will soon
pour. Come, we must run home fast, or
that dark cloud will catch us." So they
set off, and just reached their papa's door
in time.


57







A TALE OF THE NORTH.

SSHUT the door, Hugh, and bring your
stool to the fireside, and I will tell you a
tale. What sort of a one must it be ?'"
said Mrs. Stone.
Thank you, dear mamma; a tale of
the north, if you please; that cold place,
where there is so much snow and ice. I
like to hear of that, when I am snug and
warm by the fire; and I feel so glad I do
not live there."
,, And perhaps those whose home is in
(58)







A TALE OF THE NORTH.


that cold land, would not change their lot
with yours. They love their close, round
huts, their rough benches, their furs and
sledges, as much as we do our nice house
and fireside, our chairs and rugs."
"< Do tell me more of them!" said Hugh.
",They are a small race of men, not
more than four or five feet high, with dark
faces, deep-sunk eyes, and straight black
hair. In the warm days they live on the
fruits of the chase, in the winter on the
dried flesh of the rein-deer, salt-fish, and
cheese. You know I once told you what
a long, dark winter theirs is, when the
sun is not seen for many days."


59







60 A TALE OF THE NORTH.
"Yes, mamma," said Hugh, and it
must be very dull for them, poor things.
But will you tell me about the rein-deer '"
Ah, I do not know what they would
do if they had not such a friend as the
rein-deer proves to them: from it they
get both milk, food, and warm clothes.
It feeds on a moss, of which there is a
great deal there; and though the snow
may lie very thick upon the ground, the
rein-deer can tell where his food grows,
and with his fore-feet and broad horns he
digs through the snow to get a meal."
i" Oh, mamma, how can he find it out ?"
said Hugh.







A TALE OF THE NORTH.


61


The quick sense of smell with which
the rein-deer is gifted, leads him to the
right spot, and he is never known to search
in vain. The men yoke them to their
sledges, which glide over the smooth, hard
snow at a great rate."
What sort of a thing is a sledge,
mamma ." said Hugh.
6It is made of birch wood, something
in the shape of a boat, about six feet long,
with a high back; and here, wrapt up in
his thick furs, the man sits as snug as can
be. They drive with a cord tied to the
horns of the rein-deer, which flies over the
ground at great speed, with his light load.







62


A TALE OF THE NORTH.


If you will bring me that large book from
the shelf, I can show you the print of
one."
Oh, I see it," said Hugh, as his mamma
turned over the leaves; "that is a nice
thing to ride in. But look at that man;
he is so wrapt up in furs, I can only see
his eyes. What a droll cap he wears!
and see, mamma, the reindeer has such
a gay thing round his neck, with a bell
hung in front; pray is that for use, or
show ."
I have read," said Mrs. Stone, that
the rein-deer likes the sound of a bell;
and also, when four or five sledges travel







A TALE OF THE NORTH.


at once, in the dark, or in a snow-storm,
it helps to keep them all in one track."
c It is of no use to make roads there,
for the snow would quite hide them, would
it not, mamma ?" said Hugh.
Yes, my dear, the sun and the stars
guide them in the way they wish to go;
but I cannot talk to you more now, for I
must write a note to your aunt, before
post-time. You may try to draw the
sledge and rein-deer in your new book,
if you please; but you must take great
pains."
Oh, yes, that I will, for I should
like to draw that much, to show papa


68







A TALE OF THE NORTH.


when he comes home," said Hugh, as
he took his stool to his mamma's side,
that she might look at his work now and
then.


THE E ZZN Do


64




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