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Title: Cobwebs to catch flies, or, Dialogues in short sentences adapted to children from the age of three to eight years
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003577/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cobwebs to catch flies, or, Dialogues in short sentences adapted to children from the age of three to eight years
Physical Description: 120 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Francis, Joseph H ( Publisher )
C.S. Francis & Co ( Publisher )
Childs & Jocelyn ( Engineer )
Publisher: C. S. Francis & Co.
J. H. Francis
Place of Publication: New York
Boston
Publication Date: 1851
Edition: New ed., -- rev. and illus.
 Subjects
Subject: Readers   ( lcsh )
Dialogues -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1851   ( local )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Dialogues   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003577
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4955
notis - ALK0848
oclc - 06439939
alephbibnum - 002249115

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Advertising
        Page v
        Page vi
    Foreword
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Main
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
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        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
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        Page 55
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        Page 77
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        Page 104
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        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
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        Page 120
Full Text




COBWEBS TO CATCfI FLIS,


Here is a pretty, new book, made to catch the attention
of my darling."










COB WRIB
TO


OR,


Dialoegtes in S ~ort Satitnitts
ADAPTED TO CHILDREN FROM THE AGE dF TEREG
Td EIGHT YEARJ.
A NZW MDtTIdf1 RBEVISpD AND ILLUSTRATEBD







NEW YORK:
C. S. FRANCIS & CO., 262 BROADWAY.
BOSTON:
L 1. a. r CU, 128 WASINOTOlf STRICT,
a 1851.


__ _ ___


(oA xD


P 2II









ADVERTISEMENT.

-

THE writer of these volumes was advised by a friend
to prefix an Advertisement to them, explaining their
design. Her answer to that friend was to this effect:
"Those for whom they are designed will not need an
explanation; and others will not regard it. The mother,
who is surrounded by smiling prattlers, will enter with
spirit into my first Dialogues: will declare that they
are such as she has wished for a thousand times; and
that she esteems herself obliged to me, for having con-
descended to march in shackles, for the sake of keeping
pace with her infant; she will be aware of some diffi-
culty in the task; she will (to pursue the metaphor)
allow that it is not easy to move gracefully, when we
shorten our steps to those of a child. She will, there-
fore, pardon such inaccuracies as arise from the neces.
sity of confining the language to short words.
"For the rest, I am pleaded (from experience and






ADVERTISEMENT.


the remarks of the most judicious mothers) that a book
of this kind will be acceptable.
The mother who herself watches the dawn of reason
in her babe; who teaches him the first rudiments of
knowledge; who infuses the first ideas in his mind;
will approve my COBWEBS. She will, if she be desirous
of bringing her little darling forward; (and where it can
be done with ease and satisfaction, who is not ?) she will
be aware of the consequence of the first lessons, where
nothing meets the eye of the learner but objects with
which he is already familiar; nothing arises to his mind,
but subjects with which he begins to be acquainted; sen-
timents level to his capacity, explained in words which
are suited to his progress.
"Such is the Cobwebs designed to be; if such it be,
it will meet the smile of Mothers. It was written to
please a set of children dear to the writer; and it did
please them; and in the hope that it may be agreeable
to other little people, it is given to the public,"

i, .


vi








TO MY LITTLE READERS.

MY DEARs:
Do not imagine that, like a great spider, I will
give you a hard gripe, and infuse venom to blow you
up. No; I mean to catch you gently, whisper in
your ear,
Be good, and you will be beloved,
Be good, and you will be happy,

and then release you, to frisk about in pursuit of your
innocent pastimes.
Dear little creatures I enjoy your sports; be as
merry as you will; but remember the old proverb,
Be merry and wise."
Your whole duty is contained in one short precept,
Obey readily and cheerfully.
Happy little creatures! you will never taste such
careless hours as you do now; when you grow up, you
will have many cares; you may have many sorrows;
yet assure yourselves, if you be good, you will be happy;
be happy for ever. Remember this, my dear little read-
rs, from Your Friend,
THE AUTHOR.













COBWEBS TO CATCH FLIES.

p


THE
IN WORDS OFN


RAT.
THERE LfTTrBS.


Frederick. I saw a rat; and I saw
the dog try to get it
Ann. And did he get it?
Frederick. No: but the cat did.
Ann. My cat ?
1*





COBWEBS


Frederick. No: it was the old cat.
Ann. How did she get it ? Did she
run for it ?
Frederick. No: it is not the way :-
she was hid-the rat ran out; and, pop I
she had him.
Ann. A dog can run.
Frederick. Yes; but a cat is sly.
Ann. The kit can not get a rat.
Frederick. No; she can not yet;
but she can get a fly. I saw her get a
fly.


10






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE


CAT.


IE WORDS OF THRl LITTfEU.

Boy. See our cat she can see a
rat. Can she get it and eat it up


11





COBWEBS


Mother. Yes, she can: but she was
bit by an old rat one day.
Boy. Ah my Kit I why did you try
to get the old rat One day the dog
bit our cat; he bit her jaw. Did the
cat get on my bed ?
Mother. Yes; but she is off now.
Boy. Why did she get on the bed 1
Mother. To lie on it, and purr.
Boy. Now, Puss, you are up. Why
do you say Mew ? Why do you say
purr ?
You may lie by me, Cat. See her
joy as I pat her ear.
Why do you get off the bed ? Why
do you beg to be let out ?


1s





TO CATCHf FLIES.


Mother.


So she may


go to her kit


Boy.


go to the
.other.


Has she


kit? I
Yes;


a kit?


Why do


a she to go ?


let her


go.


4-


MORNING


G.


IN WORDS OF THREE LETTER.


0,


Now
me I
Yes,


get


up;


it is six.


is it six ?


it is;


and the dew


Boy.


I see the sun.


Is it fit


for me


to go out


13


you


THE


Mother.


Boy.


Mother.


off.





14 COBWEBS










Mother. Now it is; but by ten it
may be hot. So get up now.
Boy. May I go to-day, and buy my
top ?
Mother. Yes, you may.
Boy. A peg-top ? Sam has a peg-
top. He has let me use his. One' day
he did.





TO CATCH FLIES.


I met Tom one day, and he had a
top so big I
I can hop as far as Torn can.
Tom has a bat too and Tom is but
of my age.
Let us buy a cup and a mug for Bet.
And let us get a gun for Sam.
And a pot and an urn for Bet.
An ant has bit my leg. See how red
it is! -
May I get a bag for Site ?
Mother. Can you pay for it 1
Boy. O, no but you can pay for
all. May the dog go ?
Mother. Yes, he may go.
'oy. I see him: may I'let him in?


16






COBWEBS


THE WINDOW.
IN WORDS OF THREE LETTERS
First Boy. I see a man The man
has a dog. The man has got in.
The dog has not got in: but the man
has got in.
Mother. Do not cry, dog; you will
see the man by-and-by. Dog why do
you cry?
Second Boy. I can not see.
First Boy. You are too low. Get
up.
Second Boy. I can not get up.
First Boy. Try ;-now you are up.


16"





TO CATCH FLIES.


Second Boy. I see the cow.
First Boy. I see two. I see the
red cow; and I see the dun cow.
Second Boy. I see a hog. Pig!
pig I pig! why do you run ?
First Boy. Now I see one, two, six-
yes, ten hogs. Why do you all run --
Now let us go off.
Second Boy. You can not see me.
First Boy. You are hid.
Second Boy. I see you. Can you
not see me ?
First Boy. 0, now I can get up.
Second Boy. No, I can, run; you
can not get me.


17





COBWEBS


First Boy.
Second Boy.
First Boy.
Second Boy.
First Boy.


Yes, I can.
Let us go to


Tom.


We must not go out.
I can get out.
So can I; but do not go


yet
Second


Boy.


Why


may


not we go


yet?
BFrst Boy.
do not ask why,


Bo


as you are


is the law for a


bid, and
boy.


18






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE DOG.


IN WORDS OF
I love the


FOUR LETTERS.


dog.


Do not you ?


Mother.


Yes, sure.


Boy.
Mother


Wag I


do you love me ?


You see he does;


he wags


his tail.


-When he


wags


his tail, he


says, I love you.


Boy.


19





COBWEBS


Boy.


Does his tail tell me so ?


Mother. Yes; it says, I love you; I
love you; pray love me.
Boy. When we go out, he wags his
tail: what does his tail say then ?
Mother. It says, Pray let me go; I
wish to go with you.
Boy. I love to have him go with me.
Mother. Here is a cake for you.


Boy. Nice cake! See
he wags his tail now!
wag your tail ? Why do
Why does he wag his tail


Mother.
tail says, I


the dog! how
Why do you
you look so ?
I so much ?


To beg for some cake. His
love you; you have a cake,


20





TO CATCH FLIES.


and I have none: will you not be good
to me ? Will you not give some of your
cake to your poor dog ?
Boy. Poor dog! do you want some
cake ? take a bit Here! I hold it to
him, but he does not take a bit.--Take
some; O, he has got it all I he was not
to take all. Fie, Wag to take all
Now I have none left. You are rude,
Wag.
Mother. He did stay some time.-
Here, I will give you a plum-cake.
Boy. Now you are to have none,
Wag. You' tre fb have, none of this
cake; you were rude.
Mother. He did not know that be


21


- -- R





COBWEBS


was not to take all.
all that you say.


He can not know


Boy. Well, you may have a bit of
this. I will take a bit off and give it to
him
Mother. Do so. You are a good
boy. We must be kind to all. We
must give to them who want
Boy. Why do you ask for more ?
Mother. Ife has not had a meal to-
day. He had not a bit till now. You
have had food.


Boy. I hope he will
noon. I will ask cook
bone; and he may have


I have meat at
to give him a
some milk, and


22





TO CATCH FLIES.


F]


he can have some bran. Cook will boil
them for him. Poor dog! he can not
ask as we can, so I will ask for him.
Wag, I wish you could talk. Why does
he bark at poor men ?
Mother. When he sees a man whom
he does not know, then he says, "Who
are you ?-who are you ?-why do you
come ?-what do you do here ?-I am
at home-I must tell the folks-I must
tell that you are here-I will call our
folks to look at you. Come out, man;
come out, maid-see who this is.-Bow,
wow, wow, wow I"
Boy. Does the dog say all that?





COBWEBS


Why does he stop as soon as the folks
come out ?
Mother. He is so wise as to know
that he need bark no more then. If he
means to call them out, he will stop
when they are come out.
Boy. Wag, why do you gape when
you are hot ? Can you tell me why he
does so ?
Mother. To cool his tongue.
.I


24





TO CATCH FLIES.


THE


F ARM-YARD.


IN WORDS OF FOUR LETTERS.


Boy.
Maid.


I do


A


not love pigs.


pig


is


not


so nice


fowl; yet we must feed the pigs.
4


as a
Pigs


25






COBWEBS


must eat as well as boys.
want food.
Boy. Do they cry for f
them cry,
Maid. They cry to me
the way they can call, they
feed me; pray feed me d
me nowI"
Boy. What do you give
Maid. This pail full of
you not like to see them 1
be so glad I
Boy. How they jump
run to the gate! why do thi
Maid. They are glad


Poor pigs


bod? I hear

for food; in
call-" Pray
lo pray feed

them?
milk. Will
They will


I how they
ey run so 1
to ee me.


26





TO CATCH FLIES.


They know me; I feed them when they
want food; and you see they love me.
Boy. I like to see them so glad. I
like to see a pig fed; but I love a lamb;
may I not love a lamb more than I do a
pig ?
Maid. Yes; but you must be good
to all.
Boy. My aunt has a tame lamb, I
love to give him milk; once I saw a
fawn, I do not mean in a park, but I
saw a tame fawn; the old doe was dead,
so we fed the fawn at home. We kept
him a long time, but he bit off the buds.
Maid. Have yu seen a goat I
a


I"






28 COBWEBS

Boy. Yes; he has not wool; he has
hair.
Maid. Now you may go with me.
We will go and see the cows.
Boy. Why is one duck by itself?
Maid. The duck sits; she has a nest
just by. I must feed her: she will not
go far from her nest. The rest can get
food. You may give her some corn;
we will get some for her. Come.
Boy. I like to feed the poor duck.


mY~i~8~B






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE DOLL.
IN WORDS OF FOUR LETTERS.
Girl. What a nice doll I like this;
pray may I have this ? I wish to have a
wax doll.
Mother. You must then take care to
keep her cool, else you will melt her
face; and she must be kept dry, or this
nice pink on her face will be lost.
Girl. What a neat coat! I love a
blue silk. And her hat! I love a doll
in a hat What sort of a cap have
you, miles I but a poor one; but it is not
much seen. She has some soil on the
neck. I can rub it off, I see. No, that


S9






COBWEBS


will not do; I must
What sort of a foot
nice one; and a neat


not wet her skin.
have you ? 0O a
silk shoe: a blue


so





TO CATCH FLIES. 81

knot, too; well, that is what I like; to
suit her coat I am fond of blue, too.
Now, mis, when I have you home with
me, then I am to be your maid; to wait
on you. Will not that be nice I will
take care of you, and keep you so neat!
and I will work for you; you can not
sew, nor hem; and I will read to you in
my new book; and I will take you out
with me when you are good. You shall
sit by me near the tree, on a low seat,
fit for you. I wish you to walk. Can
not I make you walk? so--step on-
see how my new doll can walk!
Mother. You will pull off her legs,
my dear,






32 COBWE BS

Girl. Now if I had a pin to pin this
sash back. Stay, I can tie it. O meI
see! here is a bag for her work I who
has seen the like ? a bag for her work I
I must have this doll-if you like it, I
mean.
Mother. You must then work for her.
You will have much to do. To make
and mend all that your doll will want to
wear. Will not you wish her in the
shop ? I fear that you will; you who
are so fond of play.
Girl. Work for my doll will not tire


me.


9lother. Take it, then.
Girl. You are so good! pray let me





TO CATCH FLIES.


kiss you. I must kiss you too, my dear
doll, for joy.


THE


TOILET.


IN WORDS OF FOUR LETTERS.


Girl.
not keep
Maid.
Girl.
Maid.
miss.
Girl.
it on.


I
on
I
It


like this frock; but it
. Why will it not keep
t is too big for you, miss.
is off: it will fall off.


You had


best


will
on ?


lay it down,


I like to have it; I will put


S3






COBWEBS


Mother. My dear! lay it down when
you are bid to do so; do not wait to be
made to do well.
Girl. I will not, mamma. Jane, I
will be good. Pray may I look in this
box ?
Mother. You see it is shut now;
you may see it by-and-by.
Girl. I will not hurt the lock.
Mother. You must not try.
Girl. May I play with your muff?
Mother. You may.
Girl. What is this made of ?
Mother. Fur; and fur is skin with
the hair on.


34





TO CATCH FLIES.


Girl It is like puss; how soft it is!
How warm it is when I hold it to my
nose I it is like wool.


Mother. Now come and
am sure you will be good to
and play with him.
Girl. Do you stay all da;
stay till John is in bed ?
Mother. Yes; till you a
bed. Now go.


kiss me; I
John; go

y? do you

re both in


Girl. Pray let me get my work-bag
first. May I get my work-bag ?
Mother. Why do you want it ?
Girl. I want some silk out of it, that
I may work a bll for John.


35






COBWEBS


THE


F


AN.


IN WORDS OF FOUR LETTERS.


Lady.


What


does


the baby want


what


does that mean ?


Girl.
Lady.


Girl.


It is his way


to say please.


And what does he


To have your


fan :


wish ?


but he will


tear it.


Lady.


Can you take care of it ?


Girl.
Lady.
Girl.
down by


0


yes;


Take it;
Now sit I


me.


Look!


can show it
and let him


y me.


to him.
see it.


Pray sit him


no, you


must not


3F





TO CATCH FLIES. 87

have it. I must keep it in my hand.
You can not hold it. Here is a boy.
See, he runs to get that bird. 0 fie-1 do
not get the bird. No! you must not
put the bird in a cage. Let the bird fly;
let him sing; and let him help to make
a nest. Do not hurt the poor bird.
You must be good and kind. You must
not vex the bird. Here is a girl. Look
at her pink coat Here is her foot.
She has a blue shoe. She is at play
with the boy, Miss! you must be good.
You must tell the boy to be good, that
we may love him. All good folks will
love him, if he be good, not else. Now
let us turn the fan. Now we will look






COBWEBS


at this side. Here is a nice pink.
is a rose, That is a fly.


Mother
the bell.
Girl.
Mother
Girl.
says with
go then;
Mother


This


Now John will walk. Ring
Go and walk with the maids
Im I to go ?


As you like,


I like best to stay; but John
his hand, "pray go." I will
dear boy I I will go with you.
.Good girl


Girl. John I you must
wish to stay here, and you
may stay.
Mother, Take hold of I


love me; I
hear that I


lim and lead


Ws


C

2





TO CATCH FLIES.


him out.
the door,


You


will


meet


the maid at


T
IN


Boy.
have on


HE B OOK-SHOP.
WORDS OF POUR AND FIV LETTERS.
I will have a book. I will
e with a dog in it. May I not?


a





COBWEBS


Mother. Yes, you may.
Boy. Let me see, here is a goat,
Do look at his face; how like it is to a
goat! Here is a ball, and a lamb with
wool on it, just like my lamb that I feed
at home. And here is a cock. Can you
crow ? Crow and tell us that it is time
to rise. Can you not ? What a tail he
has la fine tail! No, I will not have
that, for his tail will soon be off. Some
part of it is come off now.
Mother. You must not pull; you do
harm.
Boy. I did not pull hard.
Mother. You are a long time.


40





TO CATCH FLIES.


Boy. O, here is a fine horse I I like
this horse. I like his long tail You
shall not have your tail cut-no, nor
your ears: but you can not feel. Come,
sir, walk and trot. Do you move well?
I will rub you down, and give you oats
and hay, and chop straw foi yoi. I will
be good to you, not whip you much--
No more than just to say-Now go on;
-nor spur you, nor gall your poor skin;
no, nor let the hair rub off. So-you
set your tail well; but if you did not,
Tom must not nick you; no, nor yet
dock your poor tail; you will want it to
keep the flies from you when it is hot,
u q-. '. .I '





COBWEBS


I see poor Crop toss his head all day;
he does it to keep the flies from him;
but it is all in vain, he can not keep them
off. I will be good to you; I will tend
and feed you; and I will not ride too
hard, and hurt your feet; nor trot on
hard road, so as to make you fall and
cut your knees; but I will pat your neck
when I get up, and I will make you
know me: so that you will turn your
head, and seem to like to have me get
on your back. At night, you must have
a warm bed. When I have rode you in
the day, I will see that you have good
corn, and hay, and straw; and Tom


42





TO CATCH FLIES.


must wash the hot band out of your poor
feet, so that they may not ache, and
make you grow lame.
Mother. I can not but give you the
horse, as you seem to plan so well for
him; I hope you will be good and kind
to all things.
Boy. I do not care now for the lamb,
nor for the-
Mother. My dear, I would have you
know your own mind; if you get the
trick to like now this, now that, and now
you know not what, it will do you harm
all your life.-So it is that boys and men
spend too much; so it is that they act
like fools. I would give you all the


43





COBWEBS


toys in the shop, if it were for your good
to have them: the horse you have;
now take something else; take the book,
do you like the book ?
Boy. I do; I thank you, mamma. I
will keep the horse, and I will give the
book to Jack. 0! my dear horse, how
I love you!


44






TO CATCH PLIES.


THE WALK.
IN WORDS OF FIVE AND BIS LETTERS.
Father. Shall we take a walk, my
son ?


45





COBWEBS


Boy. Yes, sir, where shall we go?
Father. Let us go by the farm yard
into the fields.
Boy. See! a horse and a cow stand
by the fence in the yard. Now we are
in the field. Is it full of nettles ?
Father. No, not so, it is hemp.
Boy. What is that for, papa ?
Father. To make cloth of; the stalk
has a tough peel on it, and that peel is
what they make thread of The thread
they weave, and make strong cloth.
Boy. I want to know all the trees:
pray what leaf is this ?
Father. That is an oak; that bush


46





TO CATCH FLIES.


is May; we call it too White-thorn; it
blooms late in May; its fruit are called
Haws; so we call it Haw-thorn. The
birds eat the fruit. That is Black-thorn;
that blooms soon in Spring; it has a
white bloom, and has then few or no
leaves. The fruit is a sloe. They are
like a small blue plum; but so sour
that you can not eat them.
Boy. What is this ?
Father. Wild rose; its fruit are
Hips; they are kept, and we take them
for coughs. That is broom; it has a
bloom like a pea in shape, but it is
yellow.


47





$8 COBWEBS
Boy. There is a bush of it in bloom.
Father. No: that is Furze, such as
you see on heaths. Feel this; Broom
does not prick like this.
Boy. I will keep a leaf of each to
show to James.
Father. You may put them in a
book, and write what I have told you.
Boy. I will get all sorts of plants;
and I will mark by each the name, the
place, the bloom, the time when it blows,
and the use which is made of it.





TO CATCH FLIES.


THE


BABY


HOUSE.


IN WORDS OF SIX LETTERS&


First Girl. My doll's quilt is of
chintz. What is this ?
Second Girl. French Print.
First Girl. Let us take the doll up.
Second Girl. With all my heart.
First Girl. Where are her clothes ?
Second Girl. Here they are; some
in this trunk, and some hang in the
press.
First Girl. Bless me I what a nice
press II have a trunk at home, in my
doll's houe; but I have no prea.
? ^ t


4






COBWEBS


& nd Gir!. Here or
coat; those shoes are h
put them on; take these.
First Girl What g4
put on ?


e
er


her linen and
best, do not


Iwnf


does ahe


Second Girl. Her white one. I will.
take it out, whilst you lace her stays.
First Girl. What is her best cloak ?
Second Girl White; with a neat


blond-lace round it.
First Girl. Mine
your doll a muff?
Second Girl. No,
aunt says she will te
stitch; and then. I an


has a muff; has


she has
tch me to
Sto work


not; my
do chain
one.


M






TO CATCH FLItE. $5

First Girl. What is her best dress?
Second Girl. You shall see them all;
there is the dress which I like best.
First Girl. Why do you like it best
Second Girl. It is my dear mother's
work; see how neat it is; and there is
a green silk.
First Girl. My doll's best dress is
brown with a stripe of blue; and she
has a white, wrought with a moss rose,
a pink, and a large bunch of leaves:
that was her best, but it is just worn out
now; she must leave it off soon,
Second Gir!. Why does she wear it
so long I






COB WEBB


First Girl. I had a half-dollar to
buy her a piece of silk; as I went in the
coach with my aunt to buy it, we met a
poor child who had no clothes, but the
worst rags which you can think.
Second Girl. And you gave it to
her. My doll should wear her old gown
for a long time, for the sake of such a
use to put my half-dollar to.
First Girl. I had more joy in that,
than I could have had in my doll's new
dress. Dolls can not feel the want of
clothes.
Second Girl. Now let us go down
stairs.


52





TO CATCH FLIES.


THE COTTAGE
First Boy. I see no
you pass your time ?


GARDEN.
toys-How do


63


14




M


COBWEBS


Second Boy. I feed the hens, and
the ducks; I see the calf fed.
First Boy. And what do you do
else ?
Second Boy. I go out and see the
men plough; I see them sow; and when
I am good, they give me some corn.
First Boy. And what do you do
with it ?
Secondly. I sow it; I love to see
it come up.ji I have some oats of my
own; they are just come up; I wish
they were ripe, we would cut them.
First Boy. What is done with oats?
Second Boy. Horses eat them.





FLIES.


PEsf Boy. We eat wheat
says the bread is made of wheat.


condod a Sy.
rake and a fork;
I rode last year.


N


JMn


I make hay; I have a
and I ride in the ert.


First Boy. I ride in papa's coach;
and I walk when it is fair and warm;
but I have no tools to work with; I
wish I had. I love a toy when it is new,
just the first day I love it; the next day
I do not care for it.
Second y. I have a spade and a
hoe, and a rake; and I can work with
them; and am never tired of them.
When I am a man I will have a scythe,


To CAOTCO





.COBWEB S


and mow in the fields. I have a bit of
ground of my own to work in.


First Boy.
it to me.


Where is it? pray show


Second Boy. Here; come this way.
There; you see I have a rose bush; I
wish I could find a bud. Here is a
white pink: they blow in the spring.
Do you like pinks ?


First Boy.
at home; but
thank you.-I E
own.
Second Boy.
slips in June;


We have fine large pinks
these are as sweet--I
should like pinks of my


I will give you some
and show you how to


bf8





TO CATCH FLIES.


plant them; and I can give you some
seeds which I took care of last year.
First Boy. jou are good to me I
am sure; when you come to see me, I
will ask for some fruit to give to you.
Second Boy. I have a pear tree;
that tree is mine, and we get nuts from it.
First Boy. We have grapes, and figs,
and plums; but I love a peach best, it
is so full of juice.
Second Boy. We have none of them;
I shall like to taste them. Now I will
show you our bees; the hives stand just
by. When we take them up, you shall
have some comb.
3*


&5






COBWEB S


THE

Miss.
come to
leave to
you.


COUNTRY VISIT.

How do you do, nurse ? I am
see you. Mamma gave me
come and spend the day with


Woman. I am glad to see you here,
Miss.


58


~-?c~------cn~~






TO CATCH FLIES.


Miss. Pray call me as you did when
I came to you to stay; you were so good
to me! you soon made me well. I like
you should say, My dear. I love you.-
I ought to love those who are kind to
me, and nurse me.
Woman. I did not think you would
have me say so. But, my dear, if you
are so good, I think I cannot but love
you.
Miss. Where is Betsy ? I want to
see her.
Woman. She shall come; she longs
to see you; I see her; she is just by.
Little Girl. How do you do; I am
glad to see you here, Miss.


59






COBWEBS


Miss. Ah, Betsy! how you are
grown! I should scarce know you.
Little Girl. You are as much grown,
Miss; you were but so tall when you
were here.
Miss. Let us run and jump; and I
want to see all your things.
Little Girl. Will you like to see the
cows ? or shall we go and see the lambs ?
Miss. O, yes let us go.
Little Girl. They are just by. I
have a tame lamb; I reared it with
milk, warm from the cow.
Miss. I like sheep, they look so
mild; when I went home I had a great


60






TO CATCH FLIES.


deal to tell my sister. She did not
know that a lamb was a young sheep.

Woman. How could she, my dear,
till she was told ?-you would not have
known, if you had not been told.
Miss. I told her that we cut the
wool off the backs of the sheep, and
wore it. I told her how I had seen the
lambs frisk and jump. I told her that I
had seen you milk, and make cheese;-
she did not know that cream came off
the milk!
Woman. Did you know when you
came to me ?


Miss. No.-I did not.


61





62 COBWEBS
Woman. You cannot know what
you are not taught.
Miss. Tell me more, and when I go
home I will tell my sister.
Woman. Come with me and we
will talk; and I will show you the cow
and her calf.




LEk






TO CATCH FLIES,


THE KIND BROTHER.
Boy. Where is James.
Lady. He is in the house; you may
go to him there.






COBWEBS


Boy. If you please, I like to stay
here.
Lady. What shall we do?
Boy. I wish to have my knife and a
stick; then with this small piece of
board I will make a chair for Jane's doll.
Lady. That will please Miss Jane;
that piece will do for a couch; you
might stuff it with wool.
Boy. I wish I could; pray will you
teach me how to do it ?
Lady. If you make the frame well,
I will stuff it for you.
Boy. Thank you; I think Jane will
dance for joy.


64






TO CATCH FLIES.


Lady. She does not dream of such a
nice chair; stay, this is the right way to
cut it; you must not notch it so.
Boy. I think I hear Jane's voice; I
would not have her come till it is done.
Will she thank me ?
Lady. Yes, sure; she ought to
thank you.
Boy. Why does she sleep in the day?
Lady. She is a babe-you slept at
noon, when you were so young.
Boy. Now I do not sleep till night.
I hear my ducks; what do you quagk
for ?-May I fetch them some bread?
Here is a crust which I left; pray may
I give it to them ?


65





COBWEBS


Lady. If it be clean, some poor child
would be glad of it; that is a large
piece-We will give chaff to the ducks.
Boy. This bread is made of wheat;
wheat grows in the earth; wheat is a
grain. I am to see Tom bind a sheaf:
and when Tom goes home to shear his
sheep, I am to see him. He will throw
them in a pond: plunge them in! Our
cloth is made of wool; how can they
weave cloth, and how can they stain it?
How light this chair will be! it will not
weigh much.
Lady. Who heard the clock; I
meant to count it. I left my watch in
my room.


66






TO CATCH FLIES.


Boy. Why did you leave it?
Lady. The chain was broken last
night.
Boy. I like to have my couch of
green. Jane loves green. What do you
call this ?
Lady. A blush, or faint bloom;
some call it bloom of peach; it is near
white. That is quite white.
Boy. May I sit on the grass? I
love to sit in the shade, and read my
book.
Lady. The earth is as dry as a floor
now.
Boy. If I could reach those sweet


67





COBWEB S


peas I would get some seed; they are
such nice round balls. Jane likes them
to play with.
Lady. You may go now and fetch a
quill for me; do not put it in your
mouth. While you go, I shall go on
with the work.



THE BEES.

A little girl was eating her supper;
it was bread and milk, with some honey.
" Pray," said the little girl, "who makes
honey for my supper ?"
Mother. The bees collect it.


68






TO CATCH FLIES.


Girl. Where do they find it ?
Mother. In the flowers.
Girl. Where do the bees live?
Mother. Those which supply us with
honey, live in a hive.
Girl. What is it made of?
Mother. Ours are made of straw.
Girl. Pray, mamma, tell me a great
deal about the bees, whilst I eat my
milk.
Mother. In the night, and when the
weather is cold, they keep in the hive.
When the sun shines, and the days are
warm, they fly abroad. They search
far and near for such flowers as supply


69






70 COBWEBS
them with honey or wax. Of the wax
they make cells which we call comb.
In some of the cells they lay up stores
of honey to support them in the winter,
when they can not venture out to seek
for food. In some of the cells they
nurse their young ones, who have no
wings. They are very neat creatures;
they keep the hive quite clean. They
carry out the dead bees.






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE FLIES.
The next morning this same little girl
was eating her breakfast. It chanced
that the maid had let fall a drop of hon-
ey as she mixed her milk; and a fly
came and stood on the edge of her basin
to suck it.
The good child laid aside her spoon
to avoid frightening the poor fly.
What is the matter, Sarah ? are you
not hungry ?
Yes, mamma; but I would not hinder
this little fly from getting his breakfast.
Good child! said her mother, rising
from her tea; we will look at him as he


7i





COBWEBS


eats. See how he sucks through his
long tube. How pleased he is!
Mother, can not flies make honey?
said the little girl.
No," said her father, "they are like
you, they can not make honey, but they
are very fond of eating it."
What do flies do, father ?
Father. They are as idle as any lit-
tle girl of you all; they frisk and buzz
about all the summer, feeding upon what
is made by others.
Girl. And in winter what do they do
Father. Creep into some snug corner.
Girl. But what do they eat then?
Father. They sleep,and want nofood.






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE SPIDER.
A little boy saw a spider; its legs
were all packed close to its body; the
boy thought it was a bit of dirt, and was
going to pick it up.
His father stopped him, lest he should
chance to hurt the spider; he told him
that the poor creature had rolled himself
up from fear; that if he stood still he
would soon see the spider move.
The little boy kept close and quiet
some time, watching the spider; he saw
it unfold one leg, then another, till at last
they were all loose, and away it ran.
Then the little boy ren after his father,
and heard the history qf spiders.
4 "


78






COBWEBS


He told him a great deal about them.
Then he talked to him of other insects,
which disguise themselves to escape the
dangers which they meet with.
He picked up a wood-louse, and laid it
gently in his little hand. There, said
he, you see the wood-louse roll itself into
a little ball, like a pea: let it lie awhile
and when it thinks that you do not ob-
serve it-
Boy. Ah! it unrolls.--O! it will run
away: shall I not hold it ?
Father. No, my dear, you would
hurt it.
Boy. I would not hurt any creature.
Father. No! surely-He who made
you, made all creatures to be happy.


74


J






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE BIRD.
A boy was walking with his mother;
he saw a bi. I fly past, with some food
in its mouth.
Boy. Is not that bird hungry ? for I


75






COBWEBS


see that he carries his meat fast in his
mouth.
Mother. She is a mother bird, and
has young ones in her nest.
Boy. Who makes the nest ?
Mother. The old birds.
Boy. How do they make the nests ?
Mother. Some make their nests of
sticks; some of dry leaves; some use
clay; some straw: they use all sorts of
things; each kind of bird knows what
is fit for its use.
Boy. What do they make nests for 1
Mother. To nurse their young in.
Boy. And are they warm ?


76






TO CATCH FLIES.


Mother. The old birds line them
with moss, with wool, or with feathers,
to make them warm and soft.
Boy. Where do they get all these
things ?
Mother. They fly a great way to
fetch them; and sometimes they pluck
their own breasts to supply down for
their young to lie upon.
Boy. How kind they are!
Mother. So kind are good parents to
their children.
Boy. Pray why do the birds sing?
Mother. One old bird sings whilst
one sits on the eggs.
Boy. Why do they sit on the eggs ?


77






COBWEB S


Mother. To keep them warm, so that
they may hatch.
Boy. What do you mean by that,
pray, mother ?
Mother. The young birds break the
shells and come out.
Boy. What do they do then ? do they
fly?
Mother. Not at first: babes, you
know, cannot walk.
Boy. But what do young birds do ?
Mother. They lie in the nests, and
gape for food.
Boy. And do they get it?
Mother. The old birds fly far and


78






TO CATCH FLIES.


near to fetch it. You saw one with some
in its bill.
Boy. I see a bird now with some in
its mouth.
Mother. Do not make a noise, lest
you fright the poor thing.-Hush hush I
-let us creep gently, and see the bird
go to her nest.

They saw the bird alight on a bush
just by: she hopped from twig to twig
till she got to the nest : she gave the little
worm which she had in her beak to her
young, and then flew away in search of
more.
Boy. Now may I talk?


79






80 COBWEBS

Mother. Yes, my dear;-are you not
pleased to see the birds ?
Boy. Yes, mother.-When will the
little ones fly ?
Mother. When they have got all
their feathers.
Boy. How will they learn ?
Mother. The old birds will teach
them to fly as I taught you to walk.
Boy. I hope the little birds will
always love their mothers. I shall al-
ways love you; mother, pray kiss me.






TO CATCH FLIES.


T 'F E HAP TT A1 ILY.
There were eight boys and girls of
the name ofFreelove; their kind parents
taught them to do as they were bid in
all things. They were the happiest
children in the world; for, being used to
control, they thought it no hardship to
obey their friends. Whie one of them
4*


81


ti~






COBWEBS


had a mind to do anything, and was not
sure whether it would be right, he went
in to inquire, and was always content
with the answer. If it was proper, he
was certain to have leave: and if it was
not proper, he had no longer a wish to
do it, but was glad that he had asked.
Mr. and Mrs. Freelove took great pains
with their children, and taught them, as
soon as they could learn, all that was
proper for their age; and they took
delight in learning, so that it was a
pleasure to teach them.
Such a family is the most pleasing
scene upon earth.
The children were all very fond of


82





TO CATCH FLIES.


each other. No one had an idea of
feeling joy in which the rest did not
share. If one child had an apple, or a
cake, he always parted it into eight
pieces; and the owner kept the smallest
for himself; and when any little treasure
was given which could not be so divided,
the rest were summoned to see it, to
play with it, and to receive all the plea-
sure which it could afford.
The little folks were fond of books:
the elder ones would often lay aside their
own, to read aloud to the younger ones
in such as were suited to them. In
short, they were a family of perfect love.
Each boy had a little piece of ground


83






COBWEBS


for a garden, in which he might work to
amuse himself. It would have made you
smile to see how earnest they were at
their work-digging, planting, weeding,
and sometimes they had leave to water.
Each was ready to lend any of his tools
to his brother. Each was happy to as-
sist in any plan, if his brother needed
help.
The boys did the chief work in their
sisters' gardens; and their greatest joy
was to present little nosegays to their
mother and sisters.
There were sheep kept upon the lawn;
the pretty creatures were so tmne thaQf
they would eat out of a person's hand.


84-





TO CATCH FLIES.


You may believe that the children were
very fond of feeding them; they often
gave them their little barrow full of
greens. There was no danger of the
little folks not thinking to perform so
pleasing a task as this. One day George
was reading-aloud to a younger brother,
wh6se name was William-' Do as you
would be done by.'

William. Pray what does that mean?
George. I will show you now; you
hear the sheep bleat.

So he ran and got some greens, and
gave to the sheep.

George. You see what it is to do as


85






COBWEBS


we would be done by; the poor sheep
are hungry and I feed them.

William. I should like to feed them;
but I have no greens.
George. Here are some of mine:
take some, and give to them.

William. I thank you, brother; now
you do to me as you would wish to be
done by.

The next day, William saw a poor
woman standing on the outside of the
iron gates. She looked pensive; and
the child said:

What do you want, poor woman ?


86





TO CATCH FLIES.


Woman. A piece of bread; for I
have had none to eat.
William had a bit in his hand; he
had just begun to eat it. He stopped,
and thought to himself-If I had no-
thing to eat, and I saw a person who
had a great piece of bread, what should
I wish ?-that he should give me some.
So the good child broke off all but a very
little bit, (for he was very hungry) and
said,
You shall have this bread which the
maid gave me just now. We should
'do as we would be done by.'
Good boy! said his mother, who
chanced to pass that way, come and


87





COBWEB S


kiss me. William ran to his dear
mother, and hugged her; saying, I am
never so happy as when you say, good
boy.
Mother. I was seeking for Mary to
tell her that Mrs. Lovechild has sent to
have you all go with us: but for your
reward, you shall carry the message to
the rest. Go; I know it will give you
great pleasure to rejoice your brothers
and sisters.



Sk


88






TO CATCH FLIES.


THE FAIR.

James and Edward Franklin, with
their Sisters, had leave to walk about,
and amuse themselves in a fair. They
saw a great many people who seemed
very happy, many children merry and
joyous, jumping about, and boasting of
their toys. They went to all the stalls
and bought little presents for those who
were at home. They saw wild beasts;
peeped in show-boxes; heard drums,
trumpets, fiddles, and were as much
pleased with the bustle around them, as
you, my little reader, would have been,
had you been there.


89






COBWEBS


Mrs. Franklin had desired them not
to ride in a Merry-go-round, lest they
should fall and hurt themselves.
Did you ever see a Merry-go-round ?
If you never passed through a country
fair, I dare say you never did.
As they passed by, the children who
were riding called, "will you ride ? will
you ride ?"
James. No, I thank you, we may
not.
Edward. I should like it, if I might.
One girl called, See how we ride !"
One said, "0! how charming this is!"
One boy said, You see we do not fall!"


90






TO CATCH FLIES.


James. I am not fearful; but my
mother forbade us to ride.
One boy shouted aloud, Come, come,
you must ride; it will not be known at
home. I was bid not to ride, but you
see I do."
Just as he spoke, the part upon which
he sat broke, and down he fell.
In another part of the fair, the boys
saw some children tossed about in a
Toss-about.
They were singing merrily the old
nurse's ditty:
"Now we go up, up, up,
"Now we go down, down, down,
"Now we go backward and forward,
Now we go round, round, round."


91





COBWEBS


The voices sounded pleasantly to
Ned's ear; his heart danced to the notes;
jumping, he called to his brother James,
"Dear James! look! if I thought our
mother would like it, I would ride so."

James. My dear Ned! I am sure
that mother would object to our riding
in that.
Ned. Did you ever hear her name
the Toss-about ?
James. I am certain that if she had
known of it, she would have given us the
same caution as she did about the Merry-
go-round.
Ned paused a moment; then said,


92





TO CATCH FLIES.


4' How happy am I to have an elder bro-
ther who is so prudent!"
James replied-" I am not less happy
that you are willing to be advised."
When they returned home, each was
eager to relate his brother's good conduct;
each was happy to hear his parents com-
mend them both.



THE STUBBORN CHILD.

Mr. Steady was walking out with his
little son, when he met a boy with a
satchel on his shoulder, crying and sob-
bing dismally. Mr. Steady accosted


93






COBWE B S


him, kindly inquiring what was the
matter.
Mr. Steady. Why do you cry ?
Boy. They send me to school: and
I do not like it.
Mr. Steady. You are a silly boy!
what! would you play all day ?
Boy. Yes, I would.
Mr. Steady. None but babies do
that; your friends are very kind to you.
-If they have not time to teach you
themselves, then it is their duty to send
you where you may be taught; but you
must take pains yourself, else you will
be a dunce.


94






TO CATCH FLIES.


Little Steady. Pray, may I give him
my book of fables out of my pocket ?
Mr. Steady. Do, my dear.
Little Steady. Here it is-it will
teach you to do as you are bid-I am
never happy when I have been naughty-
are you happy ?
Boy. I cannot be happy; no person
loves me.

Little Steady. Why ?

Mr. Steady. I can tell you why;
because he is not good.
Boy. I wish I was good.
Mr. Steady. Then try to be so; it


95






COBWEBS


is easy; you have only to do as your
parents and friends desire you.
Boy. But why should I go to school?
Mr. Steady. Good children ask for
no reasons; a wise child knows that his
parents can best judge what is proper;
and unless they choose to explain the
reason of their orders, he trusts that they
have a good one; and he obeys without
inquiry.
Little Steady. I will not say why
again, when I am told what to do; but
will always do as I am bid immediately.
Pray, sir, tell the story of Miss Wilful.
Mr. Steady. Miss Wilful came to


96






TO CATCH FLIES.


stay a few days with me; now she knew
that I always would have children obey
me: so she did as I bade her; but she
did not always do a thing as soon as she
was spoken to; and would often whine
out why ?-that always seems to me like
saying-I think lam as wise as you are;
and I would disobey you if I durst.

One day I saw Miss Wilful going to
play with a dog, with which I knew it
was not proper for her to meddle; and I
said. Let that dog alone.

Why? said Miss-I play with Wag,
and I play with Phillis, and why may I
.not play with Pompey.


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I made her no answer-but thought
she might feel the reason soon.

Now the dog had been ill-used by a
girl, who was so naughty as to make a
sport of holding meat to his mouth and
snatching it away again; which made
him take meat roughly, and always be
surly to girls.

Soon after Miss stole to the dog, held
out her hand as if she had meat for him,
and then snatched it away again. The
creature resented this treatment, and
snapped at her fingers. When I met her
crying, with her hand wrapped in a nap-
kin. "So," said I, "you have been






TO CATCH FLIES.


meddling with the dog! Now you know
why I bade you let Pompey alone."
Little Steady. Did she not think you
were unkind not to pity her? I thought--
do not be displeased, father--but I
thought it was strange that you did not
comfort her.
Mr. Steady. You know that her
hand was not very much hurt, and the
wound had been dressed when I met
her.
Little Steady. Yes, father, but she
was so sorry!
Mr. Steady. She was not so sorry
for her fault, as for its consequences.


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Little Steady. What, father ?

Mr. Steady. Her concern was for
the pain which she felt in her fingers;
not for the fault which had occasioned it.

Little Steady. She was very naugh-
ty, I know; for she said that she would
get a pair of thick gloves, and then she
would tease Pompey.

Mr. Steady. Naughty girl! how ill-
disposed then my lecture was lost upon
her. I bade her while she felt the
smart, resolve to profit by Pompey's
lesson; and learn to believe that her
friends might have good reasons for
their *orders; though they did not think


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TO CATCH FLIES.


it proper always to acquaint her with
them.
Little Steady. I once cut myself
with a knife which I had not leave to
take; and when I see the scar, I al-
ways consider that I ought not to have
taken the knife.
Mr. Steady. That, I think, is the
school-house; now go in, and be good.




THE PICTURES.
Mrs. Lovechild had one room in her
house fitted up with books, suited to
little people of different ages.-She had


101




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