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 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Old James: Part I
 Old James: Part II






Title: Old James, the Irish pedlar
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003574/00001
 Material Information
Title: Old James, the Irish pedlar
Alternate Title: Old James
Old James
Physical Description: 98, 2 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tuckey, Mary B.
American Sunday-School Union.
American Sunday School Union Committee of Publication
Publisher: American Sunday-School Union, 1122 Chestnut Street,
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
New York
Boston
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature.
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature.
Bldn -- 1851.
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia.
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia.
 Notes
Abstract: A pedlar travels through Ireland selling Bibles
General Note: In verse.
General Note: Last leaf blank.
General Note: "Old James" -- Upper board.
General Note: Electronic version available on the World Wide Web as part of the PALMM Project "Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00)".
Funding: Brittle Books Program
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003574
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238942
notis - AAA4952
notis - ALH9466
oclc - 14394052
oclc - 45462928
oclc - 50499439
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Old James: Part I
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Old James: Part II
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
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        Page 88
Full Text






dib sanme, ti Sri4 pfrtlar.













fr.0o nt i isp itt t.


OLD JAMES ON HIS TRAVELS.








OLD JAMES,




THE IRISH PEDLAR.


WRITTEN FOR THB AMERICAN SUNDAY-80HOOL UNIOW,
BT
MARY B. TUCKEY,
or l00E I~ULAN








PHILADELPHIA:
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 316 CRESTi n STsW.
NaI Yorx, No. 147 Nausau S* .....Bosro, No. 9 Crmi
LoUIsv.LU, No. 103 bwrth O Ared.


41





















Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1851, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAY-BOHOOL UNION,
in the Clerk's Ofice of the Distriet Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.








4o* No books are published by the AximmcA SmAT-scrL-aoo Unmo
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians, vi.
Baptst, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Re-
formed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the
same denomination, and no book can be published to which any mem*
ber of the Committee shall ohiect


4i














OLD JAMES.



THI school-hours had passed, and the sohoB
lars were found,
All seated in ranks, on the sunny play-ground;
For the teacher had promised, if all behaved
well,
That evening a tale about Ireland to tell.
See! now she is coming her word to fulfil-
The wildest among them is silent and still;
The rude and the gentle, the forward and shy,
All anxious to catch the first glance of hesrye;
As, smiling, she takes in the circle her piloe
And turns to the group her benevolent face.
S7





8 OLD JAMES,

I'm going to tell you (the lady began)
A story, dear children, about a great man.
You have heard about many called great upon
earth,
Sometimes from their riches, sometimes from
their birth;
Sometimes from the mighty exploits they have
done,
The battles they've fought, or the kingdoms
they've won;
Sometimes from their learning, their titles, or
power;
Sometimes from their beauty-that perishing
flower;
But though in a great many lands I have
been,
And many great people like these I have
seen,
The prize for true greatness I freely award.
To OLD JAMES, who was "great in-the sight
of the Lord."*
Luke i. 16.




THE IRMIH PEDLAR. *

And who was Old James? You of course
will inquire-
Now to answer that question is just my do*
sire:'
For he was a man 'twas a blessing to know,
As many a labour of kindness would show.
Old James was an Irishman born and bred,
And, like thousands beside him in Ireland, he
led
A wandering life; and, year after year,
He travelled the land from Coleraine to Cape
Clear-
Yet 'twas not to beg; for Old James had
enough,
As he said, of this world and its "perishtg_
stuff:"
So he sought not for raiment, nor shelter, nor
food,
But he, like his Lord, "went about doipg
good."*

Acts 88.
*i





OLD JAMBS,


They called him a pedlar: but truth, if 'twas
told,
Would say that he gave away more than he sold.
Wherever he wandered, he carried a pack,
Or rather a stout leather box, at his back.
And what was it filled with? Guess, children,
I pray:
With ribbons, and laces, and jewels, you say.-
No, no, you are wrong.-Says another, "Gold
rings,
Gold chains, and gold watches, and twenty
fine things."-
No, no.-" Well, fine gowns, caps and shawls,"
cries another;
"There's a pedlar that comes every year to
my mother,
And she buys a new gown, and a shawl from
him then,
That serves her for Sundays till he comes
again."
-"I know it! I know !" cries a fourth little
lad,


10





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 11

"'Twas gngerbread-nuts, figs and raisins he
had;
Bull's eyes and red comfits, and sugar-sticks
too,
Just such as we got, ma'am, last Christmas,
from you."
--" I'm sure," cries a fifth, "he had scissors
and knives,
Tapes, bodkins and pocket-books, fit for good
wives:
And buttons and needles and thimbles and
thread,
For tailors and work-women, earning their
bread."
--"I think," says great Tom,-looking won-
drously wise,
(And so he should be, if we judge from his
size,
But many a lesser and younger knows more,)
"I think it was toys in his box that he bore;
Girls value such things, and some boys per-
haps may,





OLD JAMEO,


But, indeed, I myself never cared much for
play."
Well, Tom, 'tis a marvellous pity that we
Can't get others to see us, as we ourselves see.
You're all wrong,-he might have knives,
scissors and toys,
S And gingerbread-cakes, for good girls and
boys;
But he carried a treasure through country and
town
Worth more than the jewels of England's
bright crown.
Ay,-gather the crowns of the earth all to-
gether,
They have not against it the weight of a
feather:
'Twould be cheap if exchanged for the mines
of Peru,-
You have it! you have it! my dear little
Sue,
I hear you myself,-but pray try to speak
out,--


12





THE IRISH PZDLAR.


iLrCI-----~ll------------------1
"Is think, ma'am, 'twas Bibles he carried
about."

Yes, 'TWAS BIBLES he carried-GOD'S MES-
SAGE OF LOVE
To rebels and sinners, sent down from above:
To tell them he would not that any should die,
But, turning from sin, to the Saviour should
fly.
Alas! that so many make light of his word,
Despising the blood of their crucified Lord,
Resisting his Spirit, refusing his grace,
Defying the Maker of all to his face,
Preferring the things that dishonour his name,
And bring on themselves disappointment and
shame.
And what will they do in the end ?-When the
sound
Of the trumpet shall summon their dust from
the ground,
And their guilty unsanctified souls then shall
meet


18





14 OLD JAMd :

The Saviour,-but not on his bright mercy-
seat!
'Tis the day of his wrath!-And where shall
they fly ?-
Can mountains and rocks hide their sins from
his eye?-
Ah! no;--He's no longer the Lamb that was
slain,*
But Judah's dread Lion,-all hope is now
vain.

Dear children! while yet in the season of
youth,
Remember your Maker, rejoice in his Truth.
Think much upon that which King Solomon
said,
The pathways of wisdom are pleasant to
tread.
In them you'll be safe from the wrath that's
to come,
And happy in thinking of heaven, your home,
SRev. v. 6, 6. t Prov. iii. 17





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


Aid, useful while walking like Jesus your
Lord,
And holy while taught by his Spirit and
word.
Now! NOW! do believe on the Saviour, and
then
You'll find his sweet promises yea and amen.*
Now! NOW! not TO-MORROW,t-I mean not to
say
You'll not find him to-morrow---but seek him
TO-DAY.
For why in a woyld like this should you choose
One hour of such solid enjoyment to lose ?
To him be the praise that there are not a few
Who have this enjoyment!-Dear children,
will you?

Now if to Old James and his pack we re-
turn,
What he thought ofie Bible perhaps we may
learn. *
1 Cor. i. 20. salm xcv. 7; 2 Cor. vi. 2.


1i





16 OLD JAMB,

There are many that sell it, and purchase ft
too,
Yet never inquire what it tells them to do;
And some who adorn the outside With pains,
Know nothing about what the inside contains.
Some like a gilt Bible to lay on their shelves,
Who never remember it speaks to themselves.
Nay some read it constantly, day after day,
Can repeat to you chapter on chapter, and
say
Where such a book, chapter, or verse can be
found,
Yet the gospel to them is no more than a
sound;-
A musical sound,* that is sweet to the ear,
But to conscience or heart it has never come
near.

Wherever James stopped, 'twas his work,
without fail,
To visit the hospital, poor-house, or jail.

Sizek. xxxfii. 82.





THE IBISH PBDLAR.


-* -*-- -- --- llp^
If suoh were not found in the place where he
went,
There was surely some school where an hour
might be spent.
It often would happen indeed that he'd see
The school was not such as he wished it
to be;
'Twould be plain, when the books and the les-
sons were shown,
That little was taught which was worth being
known.
"Well, well," he would think, "I'll not turn
away,
Some word for my Lord I'll be able to say;
The darker they are, the more need that I
should
Say something, as he gives me power, for their
good:
If no more I can do, these poor children shall
know
That there is such a book as the Bible. I'll
show
2*





18 OLD JAMES,
fC~----- ---------------------
They haven't got that which God meant for
their use;
Who knows what a blessing his word may pro-
duce ?

'Twas seldom, if ever, Old James gave of-
fence,
He spoke with such kindness as well as good
sense;
For he knew that whatever our passions may
say,
To scold men for error is not the right way.
We cling but the closer to errors we love,
When others with railing and harshness re-
prove.
There's many a tale, did the time but allow,
I could tell of Old James;-for instance, as,
how,
At a school where the Bible had never been
read,
When James brought it forth the stiff school
master said,















-"I

~~Itf~i, -.-


"When James brought it forth, the stiff schoolmaster

said-." p. 18.





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 21

That to read that book there was opposed to
their rule,
He never allowed it at all in his school.
"Dear me! sir," said James. "Well, I'm
sorry for that,
For I think it's the book of all books, sir, for
Pat;-
(He meant for the Irish.) Why, sir, I was
down,
Last week, in the County Tyrone, at Cooks-
town,
And I went to a school there,-a school, sir,
like yours,-
(The master's a cousin of Andy M'Clure's,)
Well, it happened I went on their great pub-
lie day,
When the gentry all round came their visits to
pay,
To see what the boys, through the past year,
had done,
And who would get prizes and who would get
none.





OLD JAMES,


There were boys (and two yellow-haired ur-
chins he eyed,
Who with faces all eagerness sat by his side,)
Scarce bigger, I'm sure, sir, than these little
friends,
And Euclid just hung at their young fingers'
ends.
Then, as for arithmetic, that was a joke,
And 'twas marvellous, too, the good grammar
they spoke;
And they'd read you the map of the world, sir,
off-hand,
With twenty things more that I don't under-
stand.
All northern boys, too, sir,-and every one
Knows
Our southern lads always are smarter than
those.
But the thing above all that my fancy most
took,
Was the knowledge they had about God's bles-
ed Book;


22





THE IRISH PBDLAR.


There seemed not a truth that its covers
contain,
But was writ on their memory, in letters" as
plain
As I read it here.-Not a question you'd
try,
But the boy that was asked had a ready
reply.
Oh, sir, my old heart felt 'twas doing me
good,
To find God's kind message so well under-
stood ;
And I thought, if these boys should grow up
to be men,
Yea, live to complete their three-score years
and ten,
Of such an unspeakable treasure possessed,
They'll live to be blessings, and die to be
blessed."
The school-master said not a word in reply,
But twirled round his rule, and looked sheepish
and shy.


28








Encouraged by silence, Old James just the
while
Laid his hand on his shoulder, and said with a
smile,
-"I think, sir, if every young lad in the
land
Had this volume of love and of peace in his
hand,
He'd have more of that love and that peace in
his heart,
And fighting and fears from old Ireland
would part.
Oh, sir, can it be that the story of grace,
Proclaiming God's pity to man's guilty race;
Revealing a Saviour almighty to save,
Who himself! his own self! as our sacrifice
gave,
Declaring him ready to pardon our sin,
And the Spirit, too, ready to cleanse us
within;
Can such things be known, sir, to any young
mind,


r 11


24S


OLD JAMES,





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 15

And not make it tender and loving and
kind?"

Now, children, while this conversation went
on,
Every boy in the school was as still as a
stone;
Devouring each word as Old James put it
forth,
And wishing their school was like those in the
north,
Till the school-master said, "Sir, I'm sorry,
indeed,
'Tis not in my power to permit you to read;
But I'd like to hear more of the schools you
have seen,
For I know that you have a great traveller
been.
As the nights are now bright, and the weather
is fine,
Perhaps you'd walk this way again, sir, at
nine.




6 OLD JAMES,

Our house is the first in the lane that you
see,
And my wife will be happy to give you your
tea."

'Twas just what James wished; so he pro-
mised to go,
And quitted the school-all the boys bowing
low.

Now some may suspect that the school-mas-
ter meant
I'o beat, or abuse poor Old James when he
went;
His money to take, or his pack to destroy,
Or burn up his Bible-his treasure-his joy.
Such things have been done-that is certainly
true-
But we'll not condemn all for the sins of a
few;
Or even of many.-The school-master's rhind
Was busy with thoughts of a different kind;





THE IBSH PBDLAR.


8m


For he longed to hear more of that Bible,
whose light
That morning had dawned on his wondering
sight.
Yet fearful lest any his wish should remark,
He appointed Old James to come to him at
dark.*

The moon was just rising in beauty and
pride,
As James took his seat at the master's fire-
side;
And she was just turning her course to the
West,
When he and the school-master thought of
their rest.
I can't tell you all, that at that meeting
passed,
But this I can tell you,-it was not the last.
For day after day James his journey delayed,
And night after night the same visit he paid;
John iii. 2.
3





W5 OLD JAMES,

And one and another each evening dropped in,
To hear the glad news of a Saviour from sin.
Untired-untiring, the story he told,
Till the school-master's room was as full as
wouldd hold;
And farther than this, every Bible he
brought,
In a week, by the people was eagerly bought;
Some English-some Irish-all did not suf-
fice,
So many now sought for the "pearl of great
price ;"*
And when in a fortnight he bade them good-
bye,
His heart and his pack seemed so light he
could fly.

I fear you would think that my story was
long,
If I told all that passed when the pedlar was
gone.
Matt. xiii. 46, 46.





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 29

We'll just take a glance at some things that
took place,
Then run after James:-so prepare for a race.
There were some in the village-(I can't tell
their names)-
Who loved not the Bible as well as Old
James,
Nor as those who with him had oft met to
inquire
The pathway of life, by the school-master's
fire.
And when they discovered the Bible had
spread,
And both by the master and children was
read,-
(For though he had strictly complied with the
rule
Forbidding God's Book to be read in the
school,
Yet often, at evening, long after sunset,
A group of the boys in his room would be
met,





OU OLD JAMBS,

To read of the things that will make for our
peace,
When the cares and the toils of this world
shall cease)-
Their anger was great,-and they threatened
him sore
If he read it, or let it be read, any more.
And they said of Old James, if he ever came
back,
They'd seize on and burn every book in his
pack.
So the school-master quietly told them he
knew
That for each one they burned, the Lord would
send two.
That as for himself, 'twas a thing very light
To be judged of man's judgment,*--od'8
word must be right;
He felt that to read it must always do good,
And if they forbade it, he'd go where he
could.
1 Cor. iv. 8.





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


Not long after this he received, by the post,
A letter from Achill, on Connaught's wild
coast:
Old James had made mention of him as a
friend,
And one he could safely, he thought, recom-
mend,
To take charge of a school:--so to Achill he
went,
Where he teaches the Bible, and so is content.

But many were sad in the village he left,
Which was now of his aid and instructions be-
reft,
And parents and children were sternly for-
bidden
To have such a book. But great part they
had hidden,
Where no one could burn it, or take it away,
Or even discover the place where it lay.
But perhaps you could guess it.-"'I think
'twas a chest,"
a*


81





WO OLD JAMES,

Cries one.-Says another, "A cupboard is
best,
Made fast in the corner by strong iron hooks."
"But," says Tom, "what's to hinder their
taking the books?"
Says another, "I think it was under the
bed."
"No,-under the roof-thatch," exclaims little
.Ned,
"'Tis there that my grandmother hides the
door-key,
When she goes to sell butter to Ballinatray,
And we're at the school."-Says Tom, "I am
sure
That under the hay-rick is much more secure,
Or under the turf-stack."-Says Dick, "In
our house
There's a hole in the wall, like the nest of a
mouse,
'Tis snug in the corner, close by the fireside,-
I saw father putting his purse there to
hide."





THE IRI8H PUDLAR. 88

'Ah, no! Dickey Wheeler, I guess it; I
guess!
'Twas not in a cupboard, a chest, or a press;"
Cries Johnny McNaughten, (a lad very young,
But knowing, and wondrously glib with the
tongue,)
"Nor under a roof-thatch, nor hay-rick, nor
wall,
But a place that was safer than one of them
all.
'Twas where David hid it while tending his
sheep,--
'Twas up in their heart,* ma'am, they put it
to keep!"
Yes, Johnny; you're right: it was up in their
heart,
And when it is there, none can bid it depart.
Is it hid within ours? Can we gratefully say
We meditate on it by night and by day?
Ah! often the Bible to those is most dear,
Who read it in secret, with trembling and fear;
*Psalm Oxix. 11.





84 OLD JAMaS,

While those who no caution nor secrecy need,
Having no one to make them afraid while they
read,
If they do not forget, or despise, or reject,
Yet pay the blest volume mere outward
respect.

But while we've been talking, where is
our old friend?
And where are his wanderings likely to end?
From the banks of the Shannon he skirted the
West,
Intending at Achill a season to rest,
But on his arrival his sorrow was stirred,
And his sympathy quickened by tidings he
heard.
So he paused but a night, and next morning
was gone,
And at evening had reached to the shores of
Lough Conn;
At the widow O'Reily's he rested the night,
Then off in the morning as soon as 'twas light.





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


In most of his journeys old James preferred
walking,
It gave him such ready occasion for talking
On the subject he loved, with whomever he
met-
But all his old ways he seemed now to forget;
And glad to avoid every needless delay,
He mounted a cart when 'twas going his way,
Till, finding a coach, he was quickly set down,
At the end of Kildare street, in Dublin's fair
town.

Well-leaving his pack in an office behind,
He darts through the city as fleet as the
wind.
Gay streets and rich squares I behold him
pass through,
Intent on some object that's not within view,
Till he comes to a building all gloomy and
grim,
Where the sunshine itself almost seems to
look dim.


85





86 OLD JAMES,

Now, Old James is a person whom every one
knows,
To whom each one kindness and courtesy
shows.
The porter has just for an order to wait,-
It comes,-and he instantly opens the gate;
How warmly he shakes the old man by the
hands,
While all are delighted to wait his commands.

And yet James's poor heart it is sad, very sad,
As he asks for O'Reily, the poor Connaught
lad;-
He follows his guide to the door of the cell,
And no ope his sorrowful feelings can tell,--
As he stands for some moments, and hears
from within
The wailing lament of this victim of sin.
"Oh, mother! Where are you? Where are
you?" he cries.
"Oh! if you could see your poor Dan, where
he lies!





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


It's you that would grieve, mother darling, to
see
The sorrowful end of your trouble with me.
But I know I have broken your heart, mother
dear,
Else through fire or water you'd surely be here."

The door is unclosed, and O'Reily is found,
Extended in hopeless despair on the ground;
But hearing their footsteps, he starts to his
feet,
Then silent and sullen sinks down on his seat,
Till casting his eyes to the door, he exclaims,
His hands on his face-" Mr. James! Mr.
James!"

Poor Daniel O'Reily!-Old James knew
him long,
A light hearted lad, full of frolic and song,
Too careless and wilful to heed as he ought
.The lessons of wisdom his friends would have
taught.


87





38 OLD JAMES,

His mother-" and she was a widow"-(the
same
At whose cottage the pedlar had stopped as he
came)-
Had found in the Bible her comfort and joy,
And longed till the blessing was shared by
her boy.
With grief she remembered his childhood, for
then
Her faith she received from the teaching of
men,
And hard had she strove from his earliest
youth,
To teach him what then she believed to be
truth:
But now she was taught by another, and
knew
No faith but the faith of the Bible is true;
And she found it was easy enough to sow
seeds,
That soon would spring up into poisonous
weeds.
























































" Yet still did she labour, and still did she pray,

Assisted by James when he travelled her way." p. 41.


~Y~~~~__ ~?/





"


~I~Cli
sc





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


But, oh! 'twas anxiety, watching and toil,
To clear them away, root and branch, from
the soil.

Yet still did she labour, and still did she
pray,
Assisted by James, when he travelled her way,
Though hitherto both had acknowledged with
pain,
That all had appeared to be labour in vain.
It was not that Dan cared the worth of a song
Which faith might be right, or which faith
might be wrong,
Nor was it the object pursued by his mother,
To turn him away from one to the other.
"'Twill matter but little," she often would
say,
"What name we may bear at the great judg-
ment day;
If we are not the Saviour's disciples in heart,
We'll be among those he'll command to de-
part.


41





42 OLD JAMEs,

My prayer for you, Dan, bgh by day and, by
night,
Is that you may be turned from darkness to
light,
Be washed in the Saviour's rich fountain of
blood,
And led by the Spirit to every thing good:
The Bible itself, Dan, will teaoh you the
rest,
You must try things that differ,* and cleave to
the best.

Now sometimes her son would seem touched
as she spoke,
And sometimes he'd turn every word to a
joke;
And when good Old James at the cottage was
resting,
His heart would be pained at his lightness and
jesting.
*Phil i 10. See marginal reading, compared with
1 Thess. v 21.





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 48

Twas the pride o Dan's spirit that led him to
try
To seem worse than he was, when the pedlar
was by,
And rather than let him perceive he could
feel,
He'd let him believe he was hardened like
steel:
"Now do, Mr. James, leave alone a young
man,
And let him be merry as long as he can;-
And, mother, do you put away your new
light,
Don't you know that the ancient religion is
right?
I can't but remember it, mother, I know,
For often enough you have told me 'twas
so;
And that wasn'tt for-people, like me and like
you,-
Poor ignorant creatures,-to judge what was
true."





OLD JAMBS,


"Yes, Dan, avourneen,* I confess it this
day;
Forgive your poor mother that led you astray.
I said it, indeed, and my heart it is sore,
To think 'twas the teaching I gave you,
asthore.f
I might have known, surely, that He that's
above,
That's blessing us daily with tokens of love,
Would never have left us a groping for light,
Or trusting to man to be told what was right.
I might have known, surely, the book that he
sent
For every man, woman, and child must be
meant:
For it's there that we'll find, if we read as we
ought,
The ancient religion by man never taught.
'Twas given to Adam just after the fall,
Then sure 'tis the oldest religion of all.


44


* My darling.


t My dear.





THE IBISH PEDLAR.


Not of "virgin," nor "saint" as a Saviour, we
read,
But the Lord of all creatures, the virgin's
great Seed.
O, Dan! read the Bible, avourneen, you'll see
'Twill bring you a blessing-the same it
brought me."

"0, yes, mother! yes, when I'm weary and
old,
And my hand it is weak, and my heart it is
cold,
But never till Ireland, my country, is free,
And my mother's a lady, as she ought to be!
And the name of O'Reily is honoured, as
when
They reigned over mountain and forest and
glen!
While the stranger's now trampling our sod
with his feet,
Whose iron hoof-prints at each turning we meet,
While a tyrant's degrading our emerald soil,
4*


45





46 OLD JAMES,

And our children are worn with bondage and
toil,
While they're slaves! abject slaves I in the land
that's their own,
To please the usurper that sits on the throne !-
While the deep bleeding wounds of my country
are fresh,
As when first the grim vultures came tearing
her flesh,
And while I'ye a hand in her service to use,
And while I've a life in her service to lose,
It shall never be said that O'Reily stood by,
And gazed on her wrongs with unpitying eye !
No! No! whether living or dying, I'll prove
Still faithful and true to the land of my love!"

Was not that very fine? Dan thought that
it was,
But his breath it was spent, and he came to a
pause.
Or perhaps he remembered no more of the
speech





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 47

His new-found companions were striving to
teach.
For this was all talk that O'Reily was
learning
From men, who with visions his senses' were
turning.
What its meaning might be the poor lad never
thought,
Or whether it had any meaning or not,
Or whether its meaning were wrong or were
right,
But it sounded' so fine-it enchanted him quite.

The pedlar said nothing, but stared all the
time,
While O'Reily poured forth his oration sub-
lime;
His mother, with wonder nailed down where
she sat,
Cried, "Why, Dan, alanna,* who taught you
all that?"
My child.





48 OLD JAMES,

Dan looked rather foolish, and said not a
word:
So his mother went on,-" 'Tis the first time
I heard,
As long as I've lived, the O'Reilys were
kings;
But time brings to light many wonderful
things.
Just look at your mother, now, Dan, avour-
neen,
What a lady she'd make-let alone being
queen !"

Oh, Mrs. O'Reily," the pedlar began,
(For he thought it was wiser to laugh at pooi
Dan,
Than by reason to show him that sorrow and
ruin
Must follow the course that he now was
pursuing,)
"Oh, Mrs. O'Reily," he said-" don't you
know





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


The Irish were all kings and queens long
ago ?
And if we shall live long enough, you and I
May see them again kings and queens, by and
by!"
-"Well, well," said the widow, "I trust
we'll be given,
Afore that time comes, a bright kingdom in
heaven."

Alas! poor O'Reily-at present 'twas plain
That reasoning and ridicule both were in vain.
His artful companions had flattered his pride,
And drawn him from duty and reason aside,
Until, at their word he was ready to stand,
A rebel avowed to the law of the land.
So onward and onward, by vanity led,
Before many months had passed over his
head,
In a gay uniform, Dan O'Reily was seen
Engaged in a fight with the troops of the
queen.


49





OLD JAMES,


The skirmish was short, for his friends took
to flight,
While Dan,-shouting loud for Ould Ireland
and right !"
Refusing, when ordered his weapon to yield,-,
Was struck with a musket, and felled on the
field.
To a neighboring guard-house he then was
consigned,
Here soon with rough irons his hands were
confined;
From thence to the city of Dublin conveyed,
In a cell at Kilmainham the prisoner was laid,
In a week or ten days to be tried for his
life.-
How fearful an end of vainglorious strife!


50















PART II

You guess now the tidings Old James came
to know,
When he stopped at Achill, as we heard long
ago;
And you guess why he went to Lough Conn,
on his way,
Some comforting words to the widow to
say;
And you guess wly he journeyed to Dublin in
haste,
And carefully tried not a moment to waste;
For he thought, "The poor fellow is sorely
distressed,
'Tis surely the time for God's word to be
blessed."
61





52 OLD JAMES,

Now, children,-(of course you remember
it well,)
We left him just entering O'Reily's lone cell:
The lock grated harshly behind him, and then
The culprit burst out with his wailing again.
Beside him, in silence, Old James took his
seat,
For he saw that his grief was indeed very


great,
And his own tender
its pain
In the pitying tears
rain.

In a few minutes
speak,
And Old James thus
break;
"Well, Dan, this is
been worse,
At least, you have
course.


heart found relief from

that fell from him, like



more, they were able to

proceeded the silence to

bad; but it might have

time to repent of your













































































"The lock grated harshly behind him, and then


The culprit burst out with his wailing again." p. 52.


--~ --~ ---
--------~
---- ------L-
-------------- _---






"I+. -







THE IRISH PEDLAR.


You might have been shot to the heart, as you
stood
Red-hot, in rebellion, and ready for blood,
But now, Dan"-" Ay, now, sir, what time
may be mine?
The trial comes on in the morning at nine!
And then, sir, who knows what the ending
will be,
And how little of time may be given to me?"

The shorter your time, the more need you
have, Dan,
To take refuge in Jesus as soon as you can;
The portion of life left to you may be brief,
But how few were the hours of the penitent
thief?
Yet they were enough for that heart-spoken
word
Addressed to the Saviour, 'Remember me,
Lord,'
And they were enough for the Saviour to say,
'Thou shalt be in paradise with me to-day.' "--
6


55





56 OLD JAMES,

--"Oh, sir, I'd want time, sure, to make
myself fit."-
-"No, Dan, he'll do that, if you'll only
SUBMIT.
\That time had the thief, who came there in sin,
A rebel to Jesus, unholy, unclean ?
But his conscience was touched by the scenes
of that hour,-
He gave himself up to the Lord and his
power,
And Christ, by his Spirit, created him new,-
And he's willing to show the same mercy to
you."

Dan paused for a minute, then groaned in
reply,-
"Oh, sir, with what swiftness the time's
going by,
The day, it is hardly begun when 'tis past,
In my happiest time it went never so fast.
I can't think;-for my mind is swayed upward
and down,





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


Like a ship on the sea, when by tempests 'tis
blown,
And what can I do, sir?"-"Do just what I
say:
Come to Christ as you are, not a moment delay.
Suppose now the queen,-(and I'm told she is
kind,
And to merciful acts is by nature inclined)-'
Suppose she was sitting beside you, like me,
And addressing you thus,-' Now, Daniel,
achree,*
I am ready your wrongs against me to forgive,
And though you've rebelled, I'll permit you to
live,
If you'll only acknowledge how ill you have
done,
And submit to the laws of my kingdom and
crown ?'
Would it take any time for your spirit to burn
With a sense of her love, and to love in re-
turn,
My love.


a6





W58 OLD JAM3I,

And to promise and vow from the depth of
your heart,
From loyalty never again to depart ?
'Tie true that your wrongs against Heaven have
been
Far greater than those you have done to the
queen;
For you've been a rebel to God all your
days,
And broken his laws in ten millions of ways;
But 'twill take no more time for your heart
just to melt
In His love,-not so much !-For no queen ever
felt
Such tender compassion for rebels to her,
As our Father in heaven delights to confer !-
But if you had ages of time at command,
All the fitness that God will accept at your
hand
Is the fitness a beggar must have, to receive
The alms that a prince might be willing to
g-7e.





THE IRISH PBDLAR.


Besides, you can't make yourself fit if you
would ;
And more than that, Daniel, you wouldn't if
you could.
You want to be saved in another way quite .
From what God appoints, though his way must
be right.
He beseeches you now from rebellion to cease,
And accept of his offered conditions of peace.
'No, no,' you reply, 'I've a way of my own,
In that way I'll be saved, and in that way
alone.'
What good can it do you to struggle and fret
Against him,-just like a wild bull in a net.
He is mighty to save, and he's mighty to kill,-
And what can you gain by resisting his will?"

"Oh, yes, Mr. James; I'll be maddened
outright,
'Tis that same that haunts me by day and by
night;
I know I'm a sinner,-I cannot deny
S 6*


59








I was born, sir, in sin,-and in sin I will die;
And what can I say against God in that day
When he'll give every sinner the fruit of his
way ?
Oh, yes, sir! I know he is mighty to kill;
I feel that he can, and I fear that he will.
And then, sir, my mother! I've broken her
heart,
And unblessed, unforgiven by her, I'll depart.
They say the true faith will give all that I
want,
And I try to find comfort in that, but I
can't;-
If I have it one minute, the next 'tis away,
And my heart is just tossed like the waves of
the sea.
Sweet Virgin! Blest mother! Oh, grant me
relief!
Oh, saints, in your glory! look down on my
grief!
Oh, pitying angels! afford me your grace,
And visit my soul in this desolate place "--


60


OLD JAMEW!,





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 61

"Ah, Dan!" said the pedlar, all gentle and
mild,
"Don't look to the Virgin, but look to her
Child.
Why, what can she do for your sina to atone,
When Christ is her Saviour as much as your
own?
Yes! yes!-you may look as you will, but 'tis
true,
She needed a Saviour no less, Dan, than you:
Just look at it here in God's own blessed
Book,
In' verse forty-seventh-first chapter of Luke;
She was blessed among w9men, we all will
allow,
But the CROWN must be set on IMMANUEL'S
brow.
There's no other 'twill fit, in heaven or on
earth.
For what are the saints but poor sinners by
birth ?
And what are the angels but servants above,





62 OLD JAMES,

Sent down to our world on errands of love?
And why should we go to the servants for
grace,
When the Master himself bids us look on his
face ?''

"But, sir, the good works of the saints, I
am told,
Are more precious in heaven than mountains
of gold,
And what they don't want will be reckoned to
those"-

-"Who have not enough of their own, I
suppose,"-
Interrupted Old James. "Well, I think, if
'twas true,
The Bible would say something of it,-don't
you?-
But no,-not one word does that volume
contain
Of any such method salvation to gain.





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


It says, 'There's none righteous on earth, no,
not one'-
'Not a just man on earth that no evil has
done;'
'They're all gone like sheep from.the shepherd
astray,
Each turning himself to his own wicked way.'
'All have sinned and come short of God's
glory;' then where
Have they any good works among others to
share ?
If they've nothing but poor 'filthy rags' of
their own,
They have no coat for you, as a gift, or a
loan."

"Oh! now, Mr. James," Daniel said, "it's
not right
Of the saints and their righteousness so to
make light."-
-"'I'm not making light of them, Dan; I
revere


68





64 OLD JAMBS,

The memory of saints; they were blessings
while here.
If I call their good works 'filthy rags,' 'tis no
more
Than the Prophet Isaiah has called them,
before.
They have finished their course and to heaven
are gone,
Not to boast before God of good works they
have done,
Or how many they left to poor souls to be
given,
That others may climb, by their merits, to
heaven.
No! this the beginning and end of their song,
Praise, blessing, and glory, to JESUS belong!
He ONLY a righteousness has to bestow,
Sufficient to clothe every sinner below.
'Tis not parcelled out like a wealthy man's
dole,
But each of mankind may lay claim to the
whole.





THE IRISH PBDLAR. 85

'Tis not giv'n to make up what we want of our
own,-
Christ works all the works of redemption
alone.
'Tis a righteousness free from the shadow of
sin,
All perfect without, and all holy within.

"But, Daniel, the Bible says Ohrist diedfor
all:
Now surely those saints on whose mercy you
call,
If they can save others by dint of their
works,
They can't want a Saviour-like heathens and
Turks.
But let us examine how some of them speak,-
Their account of themselves I suppose we may
take.
Paul calls himself "less than the least of all
saints"
Is one place-and then in another he paints,





66 OLD JAMES,

In the darkest of colours, the works he had
wrought,
When against Jesus Christ and his gospel he
fought.
If any should say that it might be so then,
But he afterwards proved the most holy of
men;
I tell them he'd want more than that to
atone
For the guilt of the deeds he had formerly
done;
So, instead of a surplus to offer to you,
He'd want something else to be added thereto;
For the picture he gives of himself, though 'tis
brief,
Is striking,-' Of sinners,' he says, 'I am
chief.'

And then there's Saint Peter, the saint of
your choice,
I know that you can't but attend to hii
voice.





THE IRISH PBDLAR.


I'm sure you remember yourself what he said,
In the tenth of "The Acts" the account may
be read,
When Cornelius went forth the apostle to
meet,
And thinking to worship him, fell at his
feet,-
You know in what words he accosted him,
Dan,
He bid him 'stand up, he himself was a man,'
'A sinful man,' too, was the phrase that he
took,
Himself to describe,-(see fifth of Saint Luke.)
Now if Peter and Paul had no goodness to
spare
Who else can have any with others to share?"

Still Daniel objected; "I think, sir, you
see,
It is not for a double-dyed sinner, like me,
To go straight before God, and have no one
between,-





tb OLD JAMES,

I could not do that if I went to the queen;
If I asked for her pardon this minute, you
know
I'd want some one before in her presence to
go,
And she but a woman!-Then sure 'tis a
thing
I'd want, sir, when going to Heaven's great
King."

To this Old James answered, "You're right,
Dan, you're right,
I see it myself in the very same light;
And isn't it wonderful now"-(he went on,
His face, with delight, shining bright as the
sun)-
"That God should provide what we never
could find,
And give us an Advocate* just to our mind ?
Why, tell me for what did Christ Jesus come
down,
S1 John ii. 1.





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


And veil his bright glory in flesh like our own,
For what did the Maker of all condescend
Three-and-thirty long years among rebels to
spend,
For what did he bear their unkindness and
scorn,
Give his blood to be shed, and his flesh to be
torn ?
But just that he might in our own nature be
A sure Mediator* for you, Dan, and me?
Just that we might know there was one on the
throne
Who felt for our sorrows and made them his
own.
Oh, Dan, never think that we want any other!
He's a friend that sticks closer by far than a
brother.t
"- sins he will cleanse, and our cause he will
plead,
iVho on Calvary's cross suffered once in our
stead !"


69


*1 Tim. ii 5.


t Prov. xviii. 24.





70 OLD JAMES,

Dear children, if I was a painter I'd draw
As striking a picture as ever you saw,
And the figure, upon the foreground, should be
Dan,
With looks half bewildered, as first he began
To see that the work of redemption was
done,
Alone and for ever, by God's only Son;
The Father well pleased with the Son's
sacrifice,
And giving his grace "without money and
price."-
-"Oh, sir! Mr. James! Is it true? Can it
be
That God, for Christ's sake, will have pity on
me?"-
-" Will have pity! Why, Dan, it already is
done;
God showed he had pity by giving his Son!
He gave the best gift that he had to be-
stow,
He gave him for every transgressor below.





THE IRISH PEDLAR.

God so loved the world,'-now doesn't that
prove
Each sinner on earth may partake of his
love ?-
'Tisn't God that refuses the sinner his grace,
But the sinner that flies from his offered em-
brace.
He's able and willing to save us, but still
He'll not save us, Daniel, against our own
will;
If his Spirit is striving with men, and they
choose
His Spirit to quench, and his grace to re-
fuse,
It would not become his pure nature, you
know,
To take them to heaven, when they don't wish
to go.
Oh, come to the Saviour!-In him you'll be
blest,
Submit to his will, and he'll work all the
rest;
6*







'Him that cometh to me I'll in no wise cast
out.'*
With a promise so plain, can you linger' or
doubt ?"

"Oh, sir, I don't doubt,-I am willing,
indeed,
I see he's exactly the Saviour I need;
But, the depth of my sin no one living can
know,
I didn't, myself, know it a short time ago,
And how can I think he'll be willing to give
Such blessings to one that's unworthy to live?"

"Oh, Dan," said the pedlar, "take heed
what you say;
Put every hard thought of the Saviour away.
Do you think it is possible now, when you
would
Be willing to come, he's not wiping you
should I
John vi. 87.


72


OLD JAMES,





THE IRISH PBDLAR. 76

That you would be longing his love to possess,
And he not be willing to pardon and bless ?
'Tis wickedness, Daniel, to think such a
thought,-
'Tis despising the blood with which sinners
are bought.
You see, 'tis to earn his free mercy you want,
And again and again, I repeat it, YOU CAN'T.
The sin that destroys us is all that's our own,
And every thing good is the Saviour's alone.
'Tis no merit in us to his mercy to fly,
When we know that we must,-or eternally
Sdie,
Any more than for him that is toss'd on- the
wave,
To strive for the life-boat that's coming to
save.

"Nor think that it makes any difference at
all
That some sins are called great and some are
called small:-





74 OLD JAMES,

That's human invention;-a sin is a sin,-
Whether stealing a diamond, or stealing a
pin.
A lie while at play, and the perjurer's oath,
God hates and condemns, and will punish them
both;
The spite in the heart, or the blood on the
hand,
Alike are opposed to his will and command.
The holiest man that on earth ever stood
Must be washed and made white in the Lamb's
precious blood."*


There are, who immured in dark dungeons
have lain,
Till sunshine and moonlight to them seemed
vain,
Who, after long years of drear solitude past,
Have welcomed the footsteps of freedom at
last;

*Rev. vii. 14.





THE IRISH PEDLAR. T5

But when from their prison led forward to
greet
The daylight they never expected to meet,
Have found that its beams were too vividly
bright,
And shut them, in hasty amaze, from their
sight.
Thus, Dan, long in error's dark dungeons
confined,
Found the light of the gospel too much for his
mind;
Again, and again, shut its beams from his
view,
Rejecting the promise he longed to find true.

But Jesus, the great Sun of righteousness,
brings
True "healing," as well as "true light," on
his wings:*
The longer, intent on his glories, we gaze,
The more we can "bear" of his heavenly rays,t
SCompare Malachi iv. 2; John i. 9. t Jolln. xvi. 12.





76 OLD JAMES,

Converting the soul, making simple men wise,
Rejoicing the heart and enlightening the eyes.


Old James raised his spirit to Heaven, and
sought
For grace and direction to speak as he
ought,
To trust to no wisdom or power of his own,
But leave all the glory with Jesus alone.
He opened his Bible, and prayed that the
word
Might be made in his hands as a "two-edged
sword,"*
To pierce and destroy every error that stood,
Keeping back the poor lad from the fountain
of good.

Well, children, he read,-and the portion
he took
Commenced at the two-and-twentieth chapter
of Luke;
.. \ ~~ ~


;' i .-


* IIob. iv. 12.





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 77T

And great was the joy he experienced that
hour,
When he saw that the gospel was mighty in
power;
Not only convincing the sinner of sin,
But planting new hopes and affections within.
He watched its effect and observed, as he
read,
That Dan by degrees dropped his hand from
his head,
Then darkness and gloom from his brow seemed
to fly,
And something like hope brightened up in his
eye.
James read of the Saviour's deep agony
borne,
That man, to the God he had left, might re-
turn:-
He read about Judas, -who basely be-
trayed
The Lord, at whose bidding the worlds were
all made.





OLD JAMES,


He read about Peter,-denying the friend
He had promised to follow and own to the end,
How the Lord turned around at the moment
and "looked,"
And thus meekly his guilty disciple rebuked.
He read of the deed on Mount Calvary done,
When men to a cross nailed God's well-belov'd
Son.
He read how Christ prayed to his Father in
heaven,
That the sin of his murderers might be for-
given.
Then paused,-for Dan suddenly started up-
right,
And clasping together his hands with delight,
Cried,-" Stop, sir! No, no, sir! Don't stop!
Let me hear
Those tidings of joy, every day, for a year!-
Every hour, every minute:-they come on my
heart,
Bringing comfort and joy nothing else can un-
part


78





THE IRISH PEDLAR.


To think of his leaving his kingdom on high,
For hard-hearted rebels to suffer and die!
To think of his spending the last of his breath
In praying for those that were seeking his
death!
Oh, yes, Mr. James, now, at last, I can see
There's room in his heart for a rebel like me;
Though sure in his journeys the sun never
shone
On a sinner so hardened as I am,-not one.
He said of his murderers, that they did'nt know
The thing they were doing;-with me 'twas
not so;-
For often I felt, when my mother and you
Were reading the Bible,-' THAT BOOK MUST
BE TRUE;
And as sure as it is,-by its law I'll be tried,
At the great judgment day.-And how can 1
abide
The eye of the Judge ?-What excuse can I
give
Why I would not his offers of mercy receive,
7


79





bU OLD JAMES,

Why I turned from his gracious and holy
commands,
To trust in poor creatures, the work of his
hands ?'
But now, sir, I cast them for ever away,
In Jesus, my Lord, is my hope and my stay.
Let him do with me now what he sees to be
best,
I've come at his bidding,-in him to find
rest !"

Poor Daniel! he wept in his fulness of heart,
And Old James in his feelings took no little
part;
But the hours of the evening were fast wearing
on,
And, unwilling, he rose from his seat to be
gone.
Then Dan grasped his hand, and said, "Sir,
ere you go,
Say what of my mother? Oh! pray, let me
know."-





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 81

-"Your mother is better now, Dan. She
was ill,
But I think you will soon see her here, if God
will."
-" One word more, Mr. James,-it is hard-
but I'll try
To say what I want-do you think, sir,-I'll
die?"
-"Leave that to the Lord, Dan, we know He
has power
The soul to sustain in the heaviest hour."-
-" 'Tisn't that, sir,-not that;-though sure
life is sweet,
And bitter the death I'm expecting to meet:
But, sir, is it wrong ?-Though I would not be
proud,
Yet I wouldn't like to have any say I was
cowed:
And I think, if I should be for death, that
the sight
Of her love and her grief would unman me,
sir, quite,





OLD JAMES,


And some might mistake me, and think that
the Lord
Was unable to help, or was false to his
word."-
--"Leave all with himself," said Old James,
and be sure
Whatever he sends he'll give grace to endure.
He only the end of the matter can tell;
And now,-till to-morrow,-I bid you fare-
well."

Concerning Dan's trial I've little to say,
It came on, as appointed, the very next day;
Fine speeches both for and against him were
made,
Where flashy young lawyers their talents
displayed.
I only need say that the case was so plain,
'Twas clear every hope of acquittal was vain,
And when for their verdict the jury retired,
'Twas whispered, "consulting was hardly re-
quired."


82











































"And now,-till to-morrow,-I bid you farewell." p. 82.


z
R
\I
12







THE IRISH PEDLAR. 85

Yet think not that they were unfeeling.-In
truth,
All pitied poor Dan when they noticed his
youth;
Nay, some said his looks were so gentle and
mild,
They'd as soon charge with treason an inno-
cent child.

In an hour, when the jury returned to their
places,
The verdict seemed written on each of their
faces;
To hear it Old James did his breathing sus-
pend,
'Twas-" GUILTY! but yet we to mercy com-
mend."-
-" Commended to mercy," gasped James, and
looked round
To where Dan was seated-his eyes on the
groaud.





OLD JAMES,


One moment the blood his pale countenance
flushed,
Then back to his heart just as quickly it
rushed,
And he moved not a muscle till ordered to
stand,
To await in that posture the judge's demand-
"If the prisoner has reason to give at the
last,
Why sentence against him ought not to be
past."

"My lord," he replied, "I have nothing to
say,-
My own folly and vanity led me astray.
My counsel have said there were others in
fault;
But I don't say that-I don't think that I
ought.
I know 'tis not likely I'll live very long,
And I would not, when dying, charge any with
wrong.


86





THE IRISH PEDLAR. 87

If it's God's will, and yours, and the queen's,
that I die,
In peace with all men in my grave I would lie;
I hope that my God my transgressions for-
gives,
Through the merits of Him that was dead
and now lives;
But, I say, all young men to my warning
attend,
Avoid what brings me to so bitter an end."

Some minutes the judge was unable to
speak,
And those who were near saw a tear on his
cheek,
And though many a hardened old sinner was
by,
There were few, at that moment, whose eye-
lids were dry.
When at last the judge placed the black cap
on his head,
The house was as still as if all had been dead.





Z1 OLD JAMES,

The sentence was passed,-it was DEATH!
At the sound,
A thrill of deep feeling and sorrow went
round:
But when the good judge had declared his
intent,
Without any delay, the appeal to present,
That mercy might be to the prisoner ex-
tended,
All feeling, but that of delight, was sus-
pended.
Old James shouted loudly,-" God bless you,
my lord!"
'The crowd who were present re-echoed the
word,)
SThe blessing of her that is ready to perish,
Be with you till death, and then may you
flourish
A plant of the Lord in his garden of light,
And that is my prayer for your lordship this
night."




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