• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Series title: Uncle Thomas's stories...
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Stories of the months
 About quadrupeds
 About birds that swim in the...
 What the sun says
 What the moon says
 Story of the two cocks
 About the three cakes
 Hymn of praise to God
 The chicken






Group Title: Uncle Thomas's stories for good children
Title: Stories of the months
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003553/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories of the months
Series Title: Uncle Thomas's stories for good children
Physical Description: 72 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hartwell, Alonzo, 1805-1873 ( Engraver )
Livermore, Edward ( Publisher )
Publisher: Edward Livermore
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1853, c1847
Copyright Date: 1847
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Months -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1853   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1853   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1853   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. Barbauld.
General Note: Ills. on the printed boards of front and back covers signed: Hartwell.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement: back cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003553
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002248388
oclc - 46323073
notis - ALK0104
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PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Series title: Uncle Thomas's stories for good children
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Stories of the months
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    About quadrupeds
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    About birds that swim in the water
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    What the sun says
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    What the moon says
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Story of the two cocks
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    About the three cakes
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Hymn of praise to God
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The chicken
        Page 71
        Page 72
Full Text






UMOILEl 7T2SBwSA


STORIEs



200D OMLDRN.


~s~i~Y~












~ti


'1


Little Harry and his Sisters. -p. 69.


[ INn









STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


BY MRS. BARBAULD.


BOSTON:
EDWARD-LIVERMORE,
No. 5 Cornhill,


1853.

























Entered accormng to Act of Congress, In. the year 14,
By EDWARD LvtRaBMoa ,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusett














MRS. Barbauld's tales have been read
by thousands, both in England and
America, and always with delight. No
books for children are more interesting,
or more instructive; and the publisher
is sure no book will be welcomed with
more pleasure by parent and child, than
" Stories of the Months."













PAGE
STORIES OF THE MONTHS, 9
ABOUT QUADRUPEDS, * 29
ABOUT BIRDS THAT SWIM IN THE VATER, 37
WHAT THE SuN SAYS, . 43
WHAT THE MOON SAYS, . 49
STORY OF THE TWO COCKs, . 51
ABOUT THE THREE CAKES, . 56
HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD, . 65
THE CHICKEN, . . 71






































SGood morrow, children! how do you do ? p. 9.












OOD morrow, children! how do
W 9you do? Come, sit down by
me, for I have a great deal to
tell you.
I hope you have all been good children,
and read all your pretty story-hooks. You
have, you say; you have read them till
you are tired, and you want some more
new stories. Come then, sit down.
Now you and I will tell stories.








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


What is to-day, Charles? To-day is
Sunday. And what is to-morrow, Mary ?
To-morrow will be Monday. And what
will the, next day be, Susan ? The next
day will be Tuesday. And what the next
day, John? Next day will be Wednres-
day. And what the text day ? Thurs-
day. And the next ? Friday. And the
next ? Saturday. And what will come
after Saturday ? Why then Sunday will
come again. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.
That makes seven days, and seven days
make -how much, Susan? A week.
And now do you know how much four
weeks make ? A month. And twelve
months make how much? A year.
Yes! John, that's right. Now what are


10








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


their names ? January, February, March,
April, May, June, July, August, Septem
her, October, November, December.
It is January. It is very cold. It snows.
It freezes. There are no leaves upon the
trees. The oil is frozen, and the milk
is frozen, and the river is frozen, and
every thing.
All the boys are sliding: you mus
learn to slide, Charles. There is a man
skating. how fast he skates! You shall
have a pair of skates, John. Take care!
there is a hole in the ice. Come in. It
is four o'clock. It is dark; light the can-
dles; and, Ralph, get some wood from
the wood-house, and make a very good
fire.
February is very cold too, but the days


































' .I."r


The Skaters. -p 11.


t








STORIES OF THE oWraik


are longer, and there are some white snow
drops peeping up their little heads; pretty
white snow drop, with a green stalk.
May I gather it ? Yes you may; but
you must always ask leave, before you
gather a flower. What a noise the crows
make, caw, caw, caw! and how busy
they are! They are going to build their
nests.
It is March. Now the wind blows.
It wilt blow such little folks as you away
almeosF There is a tree blown down.
Hee are some youag lamb PJo-
things How they creep under tht
hedge! What is this flower ? A pri
rose. There is a man ploughiag in te
field.
April is come, and the birds swig and
2








14 STORIES OF T'HE MONTHS.

the trees are in blossom, and flowers are
coming out, and butterflies, and the sun
shines. Now it rains. It rains, and the
sun shines. There is a rainbow. 0,
what fine colors! Pretty bright rainbow.
No, you cannot catch it; it is in the sky








STORIES OF THE MONTHS


It is going away. It fades. It is quite
gone. I hear the robin. He sings sweet-
ly He is come to tell us it is spring.
It is May! O pleasant May! let us
walk in the fields. The hawthorn is in
blossom. Let us go and get some out
of the hedges. And here are daisies, and
cowslips, and crow flowers. We will
make a nosegay. Here is a bit of thread,
to tie it with. Smell! it is very sweet.
What has Billy got ? He has got a nest
of young birds. He has been climbing
a High tree for them. Poor little birds!
they have no feathers. Keep them warm
You must feed then with a quill; you
must give them bread and milk. They
are young robins. They will be very
pretty when they are grown, and have


15








16


got their red breast. Do not let them
die. The little birds' papa and mamma
will be very sorry if they come to die.
O, do not eat green gooseberries; they
will make you il.
June is come. Get up! you must not
lie so long in bed now; you must get up,
and walk before breakfast. What noise
is that ? It is the mower whetting his
scythe. He is going to cut down the


STORES OP THE WMOSTEM








STORES OF THE MONTHS.


grass. And will he cut down all the flow-
ers too? Yes, every thing. The scythe
is very sharp. Do not come near it;
you will have your legs cut off. Now
we must make hay. Where are your fork
and rake ? Spread the hay; now make it
up in cocks, now tumble on the haycock.


There, cover him up
sweet the hay smells!
No matter; you must
the sun shines. You
2*


with hay. How
O, it is very hot.
make hay while
must work well.


17








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


See, all the boys are at work. They
must have some milk, and bread, and
cheese. Now put the hay in the cart:
will you ride in the cart ? Huzza Huz-
za! Hay is for papa's horse to eat in
winter, when thereis no grass. Do you
love strawberries and cream ? Let us
go then and gather some strawberries.
They are ripe now. Here is a very large
one. It is almost too big to go into
your mouth. Get me a bunch of cur-
rants. Strip them from the stalk. The
birds have pecked all the cherries. Where
is Charles ? He is sitting under a rose-
bush.
July is very hot indeed, and the grass
and flowers are all burnt, for it has not
rained for a great while. You must wa-


18








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


ter your garden, else the plants will die.
Where is the watering pot ? Let us go
under the trees. It is shady there. It is
not so hot. Come into the arbor. There
is a bee upon the honeysuckle. He is get-
ting honey. He will carry it to the hive.
Will you go and bathe in the water?
Here is water. It is not deep. Pull off
your clothes; jump in. Do not be afraid;
pop your head in. Now you have been
in long enough. Come out and let me
dry you with this towel.


19






































Billy's Sail-boat.








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


It is August. Let us go into the fields
to see if the grain is almost ripe. Yes !
it is quite ripe. Farmer Diggony, you
must bring a sharp sickle and cut down








the grain. This is the grain of rye.
This is a head of rye. This stalk makes
straw. Now it must be tied up in bun-
dles. Now put a great many bundles
together, and put it in the cart, Farmer
Diggony. Carry it to your barn to make
bread. Sing harvest home! harvest
home.


21








STORIES OF THERE MONTHS.


It is September. Hark! somebody is
letting off a gun. They are shooting the
poor birds. Here is a bird dropped down
just at your feet. It is all bloody. Poor
thing, how it flutters! Its wing is broke.
It cannot fly any farther. It is going to
die What bird is it ? It is a partridge.
Are you not sorry, boys ? It was alive a
little while ago. Bring the ladder, and
set it against the tree. Now bring a bas-
ket; we must gather apples. No, you
cannot go up the ladder; you must have


22








STORIES O1 THE MONTHS.


a little basket, and pick up apples under
the tree. Shake the tree. Down they
come. How? many have you got ? We
will have an apple dumpling. Come, you
must help to carry the apples into the
apple-chamber: apples make cider. You
shall have pears and bread for supper.
Are these apples ? No! they are quinces.









October is come, children, and the
leaves are falling off the trees, and the








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


flowers are all gone. No, here is an Afri-
can marigold, and a china aster, arid a
daisy. Will you have any nuts ? Bring
the nut-crackers. Crack this walnut.
I will make you a little boat of the walnut
shell. We must get the grapes, or else
the birds will eat them all. Here is a
bunch of black grapes. Here is a bunch
of white ones. Which will you have?
Grapes make wine. What bird have you
got there ? It is dead, but it is very
pretty. It has a scarlet eye, and red,

,1 .-q


- ..








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


and green, and purple feathers. It is
very large. It is a pheasant. He is very
good to eat. We will pull off his feathers,
and tell Betty Cook to roast him. Here
is a hare, too. Poor puss, the hounds
will catch her!







Hark, dismal November is come. No
more flowers! no more pleasant sunshine !
no more hay-making! The sky is very
black; the rain pours down. Well, never
mind it; we will sit-by the fire, and read,
and tell stories, and look at pictures.


26








STORIES OF THE MONTHS.


Where are Charles, and John, and Mary,
and little Susan ? Now tell me who can
spell best. Good boy! There is a clever
fellow! Now you shall have some cake.


It is December, and Christmas is com
ing, and Betty is very busy. What is
she doing ? She is paring apples, and
chopping meat, and beating spice. What
for, I wonder? It is for making mince








'W STORE IES OF THE MONTHS.

pies. Do you love mince pies? 0, they
are very good. Look! The ground is
covered with snow. Hark! hear the
merry sleigh bells! jingle jingle You
shall ride in a sleigh. You must wrap.
up warm, for it is very cold. Well, spring
will come again sometime.










--*------

YOU know how many legs a horse
has ? Yes: a horse has four
legs. And do you know what an
animal is called that has four
legs ? It is called a quadruped. The
cow is a quadruped, and the dog, and the
lion, and all the beasts. But birds are not
quadrupeds, for they have only two legs.
Some quadrupeds have hoofs. The horse
has hoofs. So has. the ox, and so has
the cow. But the dog has no hoofs.
3*








ABOUT QUADRUPEDS.


The dog hoofs! the dog has toes and
claws. So the dog is not hoofed, but
digitated; and the cat, and the squirrel,
and a great many more are digitated.
The hoof of the horse is whole. It is all










in one piece; but the hoof of the cow is
parted, as if it were two hoofs. That is
being cloven footed; the hoof is cloven.
The cow, and the sheep, and the hog,


30








ABOUT QUADRUPEDS.


and the stag are all cloven footed; but the
horse has whole hoofs.


The ass says, I am a quadruped; I am
a very patient good creature. I have
very long ears, and hoofs. I bray very
loud. The horse is frightened when I
bray, and starts back; but I am very
meek, and never hurt any thing. My
young ones are colts. I suckle them.


31








ABOUT QUADRUPEDS.


I am not so swift as a horse, and cannot
gallop fast, but I work very hard. Some-
times I carry little boys on my back, two
or three at a time, and they whip me
and prick my sides to make me go faster.
I carry greens to market, and turnips,
and potatoes, and sometimes I carry a
great load of pans, and mugs, and pots,
with which my back is almost broke; and
I get nothing for my dinner but a few
prickly thistles, and some coarse grass,
from off the common; and I have no sta-
ble to go into as a horse has; I always
lie out in the fields, in the snow, and in
the rain; but I am very contented. I
give milk as well as the cow; and my
milk is very good for people that are sick,
to make them well again.








ABOUT QUADRUPEDS.


Ha! what is there amongst the furze ?
I can see only its eyes. It has very large
full eyes. It is a hare. It is in its form,
squatting down amongst the bushes to
hide itself, for it is very fearful. The
hare is very innocent, and gentle. Its
color is brown, but in countries which
are very cold, it turns white as snow.
It has a short bushy tail; its lip is parted,
and very hairy, and it always moves its
lips. Its hind legs are very long, that it
may run the better. The hare feeds
upon herbs, and roots, and the bark of
young trees, and green corn; and some-
times it will creep through the hedge, and
steal into the gardens, to eat pinks and a
little parsley; and it loves to play and
skip about by moonlight, and to bite the


33








ABOUT QtADRUDPES.


tender blades of grass when the dew is
upon them; but in the day time it sleeps
in its form. It sleeps with its eyes open,
because it is very fearful and timid, and
when it hears the least noise, it starts
and pricks up its large ears, and when
the huntsman sounds his horn, and the
poor hare hears the dogs coming, then it
runs away very swiftly, straight forward,
stretching its legs, and leaves them all
behind.
But the dogs pursue her, and she grows
tired, and cannot run so fast as at first.
Then she doubles and turns, and runs
back to her form, that the hounds may
not find her; but they run with their
noses to the ground, smelling till they
have found her out. So when she has


24








ABOUT QUADRUPEDS.


run five or six miles, at last she stops and
pants for breath, and can run no farther.
Then the hounds come, up, and tear her,
and kill her. Then, when she is dead
her little limbs, which moved so fast,
grow quite stiff, and cannot move at all.
A snail could go faster than a hare when
it is dead; and its poor little heart, that
beat so quick, is quite still and cold; and
its round, full eyes are dull and dim; and
its soft, pussy skin is all torn and bloody.
It is good for nothing now but to be
roasted.


36







37


&DWUT MaD12i@ InTUT I'Tu in
jTiu WATE20


A LL birds that swim in the wa-
ter are web-footed. Their toes
are joined together by a skin
that grows between them; that
is being web-footed; and it helps the
4








ABOUT BIRDS.


birds to swim well,
are like the fins of a


for then their feet
fish.


The swan says, "' My name is Swan; I
am a large bird, larger than a goose.
My bill is red, bat the sides of it are black,
and I have black about my eyes. My


388








ABOUT BIRDS. 39

legs are dusky, but my feet are red, ane
I am web-footed. My body is all white,
as white as snow, and very beautiful.
I have a very long nec.k. I live in rivers
and lakes. I eat plants that grow in the
water, and seeds, and little insects and
snails. I do not look pretty when I walk








ABOUT BIRDS.


upon the ground, for I cannot walk well
at all; but when I am in the water,
swimming smoothly along, arching my
long neck, and dipping my-white breast,
with which I make way through the
water, I am the most graceful of all birds.
I build my nest in a little island amongst
the reeds and rushes. I make it of sticks
and long grass; it is very large and high.
Then I lay my eggs, which are white,
and very large, larger a great deal than a
goose's egg; and I sit upon them for two.
months; then they are hatched, and my
young ones come out. They are called
cygnets. They are not white at first,
but grayish. If any body was to come
near me, when I am in my nest sitting
upon my eggs, or when I have my young


40








ABOUT BIRDS.


ones, I should fly at him; for I am very
fierce to defend my young; and if you
were to come to take them away, I should
beat you down with my strong pinions,
and perhaps break your arm. I live a
very great while."


4*


41












THE sun says, "My name is Sun.
I am very bright. I rise in the
east; and when I rise, then it is
day. I look in at your window
with my bright golden eye, and tell you
when it is time to get up. And I say to
the sluggard, Get up! I do not shine
for you to lie in bed and sleep, but 1
shine for you to get up and work, and
read, and walk about.' I am a great trav-
eller; I travel all over the sky; I never








WHAIT THE SUN SAYS,


stop, and I am never tired. I have a
crown upon my head of light beams,
and I send forth my rays every where.
1 shine upon the trees, the houses, and
the waters; and every thing looks spar-
kling and beautiful when 1 shine upon it.
I give you light, and 1 give you heat, for
I make it warm. I make the fruit ripen,
and the corn ripen. If I did not shine
upon the fields and upon the gardens,


44








WHAT THE SUN SAYS. 45

nothing would grow. I am up very high
in the sky, higher than all the trees, high-
er than the Mlouds, higher than every
thing; I am a great way off. If I were to
come nearer you, I should scorch you to
death, and I should burn up the grass, for








WHAT THE SUN SAYS.


I am all made of hot glowing fire. I have
been in the sky a great while,
"A few years ago, you were not alive;
but I lived; there was a sun then. I was
in the sky before your papa and mamma
were alive, a great many years ago. I
am not grown old yet. Sometimes 1
take off my crown of bright rays, and
wrap up my head in thin silver clouds,
and then you may look at me. But
wheh there are no clouds, and I shine
with all my brightness at noonday, you
cannot look at me, for I should dazzle
your eyes and make you blind. Only
the eagle can look at me then; the eagle,
with his strong, piercing eye, can gaze
upon me always; and when I am going
to rise in the morning and make it day,








WHAT THE SUN SAYS.


the lark flies up in the sky to meet me,
and sings sweetly in the air; and the
cock crows loud to tell every body that I
am coming; but the owl and the bat
fly away when they see me, and hide
themselves in old walls and hollow trees,
and the lion and the tiger go tnto their
dens and caves, where they sleep all the
day. I shine in all places. I shine in
the United States, in England and in
France, and all over the world. I am
the most beautiful and glorious creature
that can be seen in the whole world."


47


































The Moon says, Sleep on, little children ;


I will not disturb you."-.p. 50.












rHE moon says, "My name is
Moon. I shine to give you light
in the night when the sun is set.
I am very beautiful and white
like silver. You may look at me al-
ways, for I am not so bright as to daz-
zle your eyes, and I never scorch you.
1 am mild and gentle. I let even the
little glowworms shine, which are quite
dark by day. The stars shine all around
me, but I am larger and brighter than the








WHAT THE MOON SAYS.


stars, and I look like a large pearl
amongst a great many sparkling diamonds.
When you are asleep, I shine through
your curtains with my gentle beams, and
say, 'Sleep on, little children ; I will not
disturb you.' The nightingale sings to
me, who sings better than all the birds
of the air. She sits upon a thorn, and
sings Inelodiously all night long, and while
the dew lies upon the grass, and every
thing is still and silent all around."


5*


60












ERE are more stories. Now you
shall have a story about two
foolish cocks, that were always
quarrelling, which is very naugh-
ty. You do not quarrel ? No, I am glad
of it; but if you see any little boys that
quarrel, you may tell them the story of
The Cocks. This is it:-
There was once a hen who lived in a
farm-yard, and she had a large brood of








STORY OF THE TWO COCKS.


chickens. She took a great deal of care
of them, and gathered them under her
wings every night, and fed them, and
nursed them very well; and they were
all very good, except two cocks, that
were always quarrelling with one another.
They were hardly out of the shell before
they began to peck at each other; and
when they grew bigger they fought till
they were all bloody. If one picked up
a barley-corn, the other always wanted to
have it. They never looked pretty, be-


52








STORY OF THE TWO COCKS.


cause their feathers were pulled off in
fighting till they were quite bare, and they
picked at one another's eyes till they were
both almost blind. The old hen very of-
ten told them how naughty it was to quar-
rel so, but they did not mind her. So,
one day, these two cocks had been fight
ing, as they always did; and the biggest
cock, whose name was Chanticleer, beat


5*


53








STORY OF THE TWO COCKS.


the other, and crowed over him, and
drove him quite out of the yard. The
cock that had been beat slunk away and
hid himself; for he was vexed he had
been conquered, and he wanted sadly to
be revenged ; but he did not know how to
manage it, for he was not strong enough
himself. So, after thinking a great deal,
he went to an old sly fox that lived near,
and said to him, Fox, if you will come
with me, I will show you where there is
a large fat cock in a farim-yard, and you
may eat him up if you will." The fox
was very glad, for he was hungry enough;
and he said, "Yes, I will come, with all
my heart, and I will not leave a feather
of himI" So they went together, and the
cock showed Reynard the way into the








STORY OF THE TWO COCKS.


55


farm-yard; and there was poor Chanti-
cleer asleep upon the perch. And th6
fox seized him by the neck, and ate him
up; and the other cock stood by and
crowed for joy. But when the fox had
done, he said, Chanticleer was very
good, but I have not had enough." And
so he flew upon the other cock, and ate
him up too in a moment.










--*---

T HERE was a little boy whose
name was Harry, and his papa
and mamma sent him to school.,
Now Harry was a clever fel-
low, and loved his book, and he got
to be the first in his class. So his
mamma got up one morning very early,
and called Betty the maid, and said,
" Betty, I think we must bake a cake for
Harry, for he has learned his book very








ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


well." And Betty said, "Yes, with all
my heart." So they made a nice cake. It
was very large, and stuffed full of plums
and sweetmeats, orange and citron; and
it was iced all over with sugar: it was
white and smooth on the top, like snow.
So this cake was sent to school. When
little Harry saw it, he was very glad, and
jumped about for joy; and he hardly
staid for a knife to cut a piece, but
gnawed it like a little dog. So he ate
till the bell rang for school, and after


57








ABOUT THE THBEE CAKES.


school he ate again, and ate till he went
to bed; nay, his bed-fellow told me that
he laid his cake under his pillow, and
sat up in the night to eat some. So he
ate till it was all gone; but presently
after, this little boy was very sick and ill,
and every body said, "I wonder what is
the matter with Harry ? He used to be
so brisk, and play about more nimbly
than any of the boys; and now he looks
pale, and is very ill." And somebody said,
" Harry has had a rich cake, and ate it all
up very soon, and that has made him ill."
So they sent for Dr. Camomile, and he
gave him I do not know how much bitter
stuff. Poor Harry did not like it at all;
but he was forced to take it, or else he
would have died, you know So at last








ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


he got well again; but his mamma said
she would send him no more cakes.
Now there was another boy, who was
one of Harry's school-fellows: his name
was Peter; the boys used to call him
Peter Careful. And Peter had written his
mamma a very neat pretty letter there
was not one blot in it all. So his mamma
sent him a cake. Now Peter thought with
himself, I will not make myself sick with
this good cake, as silly Harry did; I will
keep it a great while." So he took the
eake, and tugged it up stairs. It was
very heavy; he could hardly carry it.
And he locked it up in his box, and once
a day he crept slyly up stairs, and ate a
very little piece, and then locked his box
again. So he kept it several weeks, and


59








ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


it was not gone, for it was very large,
but, behold! the mice got into his box







and nibbled some. And the cake grew
dry and mouldy, and at last was good for
nothing at all. So he was obliged to
throw it away, and it grieved him to the
very heart, and nobody was sorry for him.
Well: there was another little boy at
the same school, whose name was Billy.
And one day his mamma sent him a cake,
because she loved him dearly, and he
loved her dearly. So when the cake came,


60








ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


Billy said to his school-fellows, I have
got a cake; come let us go and eat it."
So they came about him like a parcel of
bees; and Billy took a slice of cake him-
self, and then gave a piece to one, and a
piece to another, and a piece. to another,
till it was almost gone. Then Billy put
the rest by, and said, I will eat it to-mor-
row." So he went to play, and the boys
all played together very merrily. But
presently after, an old blind fiddler came
into the court; he had a long white beard,
and, because he was blind, he had a little


61








62


ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


dog, and a string to lead him. So he
came into the court, and sat down upon
a stone, and said, "My pretty lads, if
you will, I will play you a tune." And
they all left off their sport, and came and
stood round him. And Billy saw that
while he played the tears ran down his
cheeks. And Billy said, Old man, why
do you cry ?" And the old man said,
"Because I am very hungry- I have no-
body to give me any dinners or suppers-
I have nothing in the world but this little
dog; and I cannot work. If I could work
I would." Then Billy went, without say-
ing a word, and fetched the rest of his
cake, which he had intended to have eat-
en another day, and he said, Here, old
man! here is sQi cae for you." The








ABOUT THE THREE CAKES.


63


old man said, Where is it? for I am
blind, and cannot see it." So Billy put
it into his hat, and the fiddler thanked
him, and Billy was more glad than if he
had eaten ten cakes.

Pray which do you love best? Do
you love Harry, Peter, or Billy best ?










--4---

OME, let us praise God, for he is
exceedingly great. Let us bless
God, for he is very good.
He made all things, the sun to
rule the day, the moon to shine by night.
He made the great whale, and the ele-
phant, and the insect, and the little worm
that crawleth upon the ground.
The little birds sing praises to God,
when they warble sweetly in the green
shade.


6*








HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD.


The brooks and rivers praise God,
when they murmur melodiously amongst
the smooth pebbles.
I will praise God with my voice; for
I may praise him, though I am but a little
child.
A few years ago, and I was but a
little infant, and my tongue was dumb
within my mouth.
And I did not know the great name of
God, for my reason was not come unto
me.
But I can now speak, and my tongue
shall praise him: I can think of all his
kindness, and my heart shall love him.
Let us go forth into the fields; let us
see how the flowers spring ; let us listen
to the singing of the birds, and sport
upon the new grass.


66








HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD.


The winter is over and gone, the buds
come out upon the trees, the crimson
blossoms of the peach and the nectarine
are seen; and the green leaves sprout.
The hedges are bordered with tufts of
primroses, and yellow cowslips that hang
down their heads; and the blue violet
lies hid beneath the shade.
The hen sits upon her nest of straw
she watches patiently the full time, till
the young chickens get strength to break
the shell with their bills, and come out.
The lambs sport in the field, they totter


68






























"Let us go forth into the fields."- p. 66.








HYMN OF PRAISE TO GOD.


by the side of their dams, their young
limbs at first can hardly support their
weight.
If you fall, little lambs, you will not
be hurt; there is spread under you a car-
pet of soft grass; it is spread for you
and us.
The butterflies flutter from bush to
bush, and open their wings to the warm
sun.
The young animals of every kind are
sporting about; they feel themselves
happy, they are glad to be alive; they
thank Him that he has made them alive
Trees that blossom, and little lambs
that skip about, if you could you would
say, "How good He is!" But you are
dumb; we will say it for you.


70












OW, Chicken, with your giddy
brain,
Where are you running to again,
Through every tiny cranny creep-
ing,
For something new in corners peeping?
Nor toward your mother cast an eye,
Yet soon, poor thing, for her you'll cry.








72 THfE CHICKEN.

The chicken in the garden went;
The mother heard its wild lament;
She sought it far, she sought it near,
Till almost dead with grief and fear;
When quickly under her wing it fled,
And never would do so more, it said.




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