• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The Carolina parrot
 The heron
 The harper
 Rural pleasures
 The wood mouse and the squirre...
 The garden
 The ball players
 The coot
 The apple tree
 The sea gull
 The reindeer
 The carrion crow
 Little children
 The titmouse, or blue-cap
 The camel
 The bird of paradise
 The northern seas
 The eagle
 The lion
 The kingfisher
 The fox
 The beaver
 Country pleasures
 The woodpecker
 The screech owl
 The falcon
 The fossil elephant






Title: Country sketches
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003550/00001
 Material Information
Title: Country sketches
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Howitt, Mary Botham
Publisher: Lewis Colby & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1853
Copyright Date: 1853
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Bibliographic ID: UF00003550
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    The Carolina parrot
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The heron
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The harper
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Rural pleasures
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The wood mouse and the squirrel
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The garden
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The ball players
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The coot
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The apple tree
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The sea gull
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The reindeer
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The carrion crow
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Little children
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The titmouse, or blue-cap
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The camel
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The bird of paradise
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The northern seas
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The eagle
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The lion
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The kingfisher
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The fox
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The beaver
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Country pleasures
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The woodpecker
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    The screech owl
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The falcon
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    The fossil elephant
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
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COUNTRY SKETCHES.


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', COUNTRY -

SKETCHES.
BY MARY HOWITT.
NEW YORK :
' LEWIS COLBY & CO.
-1853.



















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1853,

BY LEWIS COLBY & CO,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United
States, in and for the Southern District of New York.









COUNTRY SKETCHES.



THE CAROLINA PARROT.

THE Parrot, of which we are about to speak,
was the one of which so interesting an account
is given by Wilson in his American Ornitho-
logy. It was taken at the Big-bone lick,
where he witnessed the extreme affection and
strong sympathy which the parrots have for
each other.
The parrot went on her travels with Mr.
Wilson, through the morasses and cedar-
swamps, and on account of the trouble she
gave him, "when many a time," says Mr.
Wilson, I was tempted to abandon it."
"And in this manner," he goes on to say, "I
carried it upwards of a thousand miles in my
pocket, where it was exposed all day to the
(5)







THE CAROLINA PARROT.


jolting of the horse, but regularly liberated at
meal times and in the evening, at which it al-
ways expressed great satisfaction." The
Chiclasaw and the Choctaw Indians, among
whom he was travelling, collected about him
whenever he stopped, men, women, and child-
ren, laughing greatly at his novel companion.
Kelinky was the name the Chickasaws called
the parrot; but hearing the name of Poll, they
immediately adopted it, and through Poll's
medium, he and the Indians always became
very sociable. On arriving," says Wilson,
"at Mr. Dunbar's, below Natchez, I procured a
cage, and placed it under the piazza, where,
by its call, it soon attracted the passing flocks,
such is the attachment they have for each other.
Numerous parties frequently alighted on the
same trees immediately above, keeping up a
continual conversation with the prisoner. One
of these I wounded slightly in the wing, and
the pleasure Poll expressed on meeting with
this new companion, was really amusing. She
crept close up to it, as it hung on the side of
the cage; chattered to it in a loud tone of
voice, as if sympatlhising in its misfortunes;






















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THE CAROLINA PARROT.


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THE CAROLINA PARROT.


scratched about its head and neck with her bill;
and both, at night, nestled as close as possible
to each other, sometimes Poll's head being
thrust among the plumage of the other. On
the death of this companion, she appeared
restless for several days. On reaching New
Orleans, I placed a looking-glass inside the
place where she usually sat, and the instant
she perceived her image, all her former fond-
ness seemed to return, so that she could scarcely
absent herself from it for a moment. It was
evident she was completely deceived. Always
when evening drew on, and often during the
day, she laid her head close to that of the
image in the glass, and began to doze with
great composure and satisfaction. In a short
time she had learned to know her name; to
answer and come when called on; to climb up
my clothes, and sit on my shoulder, and eat
from my mouth. I took her with me to sea,
determined to persevere in her education."
The bird was lost at sea.







THE HERON.


Lo there the hermit of the waste,
The ghost -of ages dim,
The fisher of the solitudes,
Stands by the river's brim.

Old heron, in the feudal times,
Beside the forest stream,
And by the moorland waters,
Thus didst thou love to dream.

And over towers and castles high,
And o'er the armed men,
Skirmishing o'er the border-lands,
Or crouching in the glen;

Thy heavy wings were seen to flit,
Thy azure shape was known
To pilgrim and to anchorite,
To deserts scorched and lone.
(10)









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THE HERON.







THE HERON.


31


Old Heron, in those feudal times
Thou wast in dangerous grace,
Secured by mandates and by laws
All for the royal chase.

No meaner head might plot thy death,
Than one which wore a crown;
No meaner hand might loose the shaft,
From the skies to strike thee down.

And out came trooping courtly dames
And men of high degree,
On steeds caparisoned in gold,
With bridles ringing free.

Came king and queen; came warrior stout;
Came lord and lady fair,
All gallant, beautiful, and bold,
Into the autumn air.

The abbot and the bishop grave,
The monk with crown new-shorn,
Who sore did rue their ravaged stew,
In the last Lent forlorn.

The keepers with their dogs in leash;
The falconers before,






THE HERON.


Who proudly on their sturdy wrists
The hooded tercel bore.

And in thy solitary haunts
By stream or sedgy mere,
The laugh, the shout; the cries of dogs
And men, came to thine ear.

And starting from thy reverie,
And springing from the bent,
Into the air, from joyous hearts,
Another shout was sent.

Up, up, into the azure skies
On circling pinions strong,
Fair eyes pursued thy mounting course
While the falcon sped along.

Up, up, into the azure skies
Thy strenuous pinions go,
While shouts and cries, and wondering eyes,
Still reach thee from below;
But higher and higher, like a spirit of fire,
Still o'er thee hangs thy foe;

Thy cruel foe, still seeking
With one down-plunging aim,


14













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II


THE AGING WITH WITH HIS FALCON.


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THE HERON.


To strike thy precious life
For ever from thy frame!
But doomed, perhaps, as down he darts
Swift as the rushing wind,
Impaled upon thy upturned beak,
To turn his own behind.
Old heron, all those times are past,
Those jocund troops are fled;
The king, the queen, the keepers green,
The dogs, the hawks, are dead!
In many a minster's solemn gloom,
In shattered abbeys lone,
Lie all thy crowned enemies,
In midnight vaults of stone!
The towers are torn, the gates outworn,
Portcullis, moat, and mound
Are vanished all, or faintly mark
Some rarely-trodden ground.

O'er all those abbeys, convents, all
Those chantries and crosses,
Where thou didst glide past in thy pride,
Grow tawny ferns and mosses.
2


17







THE HERON.


Where banners waved, the ivy grows;
Baronial times are o'er !
The forests now are cornfields green,
Green is the lakelet's shore.
Where grew the furze, now runs the fence,
Where waved the wild-rush free,
And whistled moorland-grasses sere,
Fat cattle roam the lea.
The bow is gone, the hawk is thrown
For ever from the land;
And now we live a bookish race,
All in a cultured land.
Yet here and there some remnant
Of those old woodland times;
Some waste lies brown, some forest spreads,
Some rocky streamlet chimes.
And there, beside the waters,
On moorland and on wold,
I find thee watching still,
Thou fisherman of old.
Oh, fair, fair, is the forest,
When summer is in prime !
And I love to lie by mountain lake
On its slopes of heath and thyme !


18



































THE HERON, A FISHERMAN.


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THE HERON.


In thyme so richly fragrant,
In the heath that blooms so fair,
And list the quaint bird-voices
From the moorland and the air.

All those that lead their sweetest lives
Far from the haunts of men,
Are sending forth their gladness
In many a wild cry then.

The curlew and the plover,
The gor-cock on the brae,
Send, with the singing of the lark,
Their voices far away!
The coot and moor-hen from the reeds,
Or where the waters run
Crystal and warm and glittering,
O'er the pebbles in the sun.

And from the air, in circling flight,
Comes suddenly the crowd
Of all the wild-duck army,
With pinions rustling loud;
And, dashing down into the lake,
The splashing waters bound


2-1







THE HERON.


In drops and showers of silver
And in snow-flakes all around.
Such is the joy that wakens,
That clamors, and that lives,
In all the winged creatures,
Where nature still survives;
Where nature still survives
In her regions wild and free;
So lives in all her creatures,
Old fisherman, but thee!

Whenever I meet thee, heron,
By river broad and deep,
Where mountain-torrents run and moan,
Or ponded waters sleep;

By tarns upon the naked hills;
In stony regions gray,
Or wading in the sounding sea
Amid the hissing spray:
Where'er I see thee, heron,
Thy cheer is silent still;
Solemnly watching by the wave,
Or o'er the dusky hill.


22










































THE WILD DUCK.







THE HERON.


Waving thy shadowy wings
In motion grave and slow,
Like a spirit of the solemn past
That museth on its wo!
Like one that in all present joy
Finds no congenial tone,
For his heart is in the perished past,
And -seeketh that alone !
Then hail to thee, old heron,
Flit on from dream to dream;
Be ye the watcher on the shore,
The spirit of the stream;

For still at sight of thee come back
The storied time of old;
The jovial hawking train, the chase,
The sturdy bowman bold.

Still wandering over cultured fields,
Or 'mid the human throng,
Come back the feudal castle,
The harper and his song.

And it is pleasant thus to dream
In this kingdom of the free,


25







THE HERON.


Now laws are strong and roads arb good,
Of outlaw neathh the tree.
Now knowledge falls like sunshine,
And peace walks in our towns-
Oh pleasant are the feudal days
And the bloody strife of crowns!
Then hail to thee old heron !
Flit on to lake and streams !
And by their waters dreaming,
Still prompt these pleasant dreams!


26























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THE HARPER.


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RURAL PLEASURES.






RURAL PLEASURES.


HERE happy would they stray in summer
hours,
To spy the birds in their green leafy bowers,
And learn their various voices; to delight
In the gay tints, and ever bickering flight
Of dragon-flies upon the river's brim;
Or swift king fisher in his gaudy trim
Come skimming past, with a shrill, sudden
cry;
Or on the river's sunny marge to lie,
And count the insects that meandering trace,
In some smooth nook, their circuit on its
face.
Now gravely ponder on the frothy cells
Of insects, hung on flowery pinnacles;
Now, wading the deep grass, exulting trace,
The corn-crake's curious voice from place to
place
(31)







RURAL PLEASURES.


Now here-now there-now distant-now at
hand-
Now hush'd, just where in wondering mirth
they stand.
To lie abroad on Nature's lonely breast,
Amid the music of a summer's sky,
Where tall, dark pines the northern bank
invest
Of a still lake; and see the long pikes lie r
Basking upon the shallows; with the dark
crest,
And threatening pomp, the swan go sail-
ing by;
And many a wild fowl on its breast that
shone,
Flickering like liquid silver, in the joyous
sun;
The duck, deep poring with her downward
head,
Like buoy floating on the ocean wave;
The Spanish goose, like drops of crystal,
shed
The water o'er him, his rich plumes to lave;
The beautiful widgeon, springing upward,
spread


32

































A DUCK.






RURAL PLEASURES.


His clapping


wings; the heron stalking


grave
Into the stream; the coot and water-hen
Vanish into the flood, then, far off, rise again;
Such were their joys !


2?


35







THE WOOD MOUSE AND THE
SQUIRREL.

D'YE know the little wood mouse,
That pretty little thing,
That sits among the forest leaves,
Or by the forest spring ?

Its fur is red, like the red chestnut,
And it is small and slim;
It leads a life most innocent,
Within the forest dim.

'Tis a timid, gentle creature,
And seldom comes in sight;
It has a long and wiry tail,
And eyes both black and bright.

It makes its bed of soft dry moss,
In a hole that's deep and strong;
And there it sleeps, secure and warm,
The dreary winter long.
(36)
































FIELD MOUSE.







THE WOOD MOUSE AND THE SQUIRREL, 39
And though it keeps no calendar,
It knows when flowers are springing;
And it waketh to its summer life,
When the nightingale is singing.

Upon the boughs the squirrel plays,
The wood-mouse plays below;
And plenty of food she finds for herself,
Where the beech and the chestnut grow.

She sits in the hedge-sparrow's nest,
When its summer brood is fled,
And picks the berries from the bough
Of the hawthorn overhead.

And I saw a little wood mouse once,
Like Oberon in his hall,
With the green, green moss beneath his
feet,
Sit under a mushroom tall.

I saw him sit, and his dinner eat,
All under the forest tree-
His dinner of chestnut, ripe and red;
And he ate it heartily.







40 THE WOOD MOUSE AND THE SQUIRREL.

I wish you could have seen him there;
It did my spirit good,
To see the small thing God had made
Thus eating in the wood

I saw that God regardeth them,
Those creatures good and small
Their table in the wild is spread
By Him who cares for all!










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7


THE SQUIRREL.






THE GARDEN.


COME to the garden! Let us pass
Adown this smoothly-shaven grass;
Soft, cool, and as a carpet laid
For the fair foot of Eastern maid.
Here cannot come the scorching heat
Of noonday to thy cool retreat;
The shadow of a broad plane-tree
Is o'er thee like a canopy;
And, just anigh, within thine ear,
The tinkle of a fountain clear,
Within a marble basin falling;
And 'mong the shrouding leaves is heard
The song of many an unseen bird;
And near and far the cuckoo calling!-
And here comes odors that the breeze
Brings from the scented flowering trees;
Rich scent that gives the fancy flight
To eastern gardens of delight;
(43)







THE GARDEN.


And say, whatever bower of bliss,
Was fairer in romance than this ?
Romance! ay sure, and we will find
Some tale for this sweet spot designed,
Some ancient tale of wo and wonder,
Made to be read the blue sky under-
Made to be read when thoughts are free;
Some tale of fancy, fresh and airy,
Of beautiful dwellers in the sea,
Or gambols of the summer fa-ery !

Now scorching noon is passed, and closed
The book on which our thoughts reposed,
That pleasant book of fairy wonder,
Made to be read the blue skies under.
Now let us take a wider range,
The garden has unceasing change;
And in this sunset's golden tide,
See how the flowers are beautified;
Sweet flower-sweet, radiant flowers that we
Regard as visible poetry-
The flowers of Greece, the flowers of Spain,
Of islands in the Southern main;
Of sunny Persia; far Cathay,
And the lion-realms of Africa-


44













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THE GARDEN 47

How do they send the fancy forth,
As if she had a ship to speed her
To the far corners of the earth,
Where'er a vagrant thought can lead her!
Where'er there is a breath of flowers,
That far-off pleasant land is ours ?







THE BALL PLAYERS.


UP goes the ball with might and main,
And soon it cometh down again;
Ups and downs, I've heard them say
For many a year, is the world's way!
Up goes the ball,-like a goblet-cup;
Hold your hand as you send it up !
Down it comes,-ere it reach the ground,
Catch the ball so firm and round !
An up and down, that is the way,
With a good round ball, that you must play;
Up, high as you can, then down again,
Five and five, and a double ten.
The world is a ball, and every star,
And the sun himself, great balls they are;
Round they go, and round about,
Ever and ever, yet ne'er are out!
(48)









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THE BALL PLAYERS;







THE BALL PLAYERS.


Up goes the ball! oh, if I threw
Up to the very sky so blue,
Up to the moon, or to Charley Wain,
'Twould be long ere the ball came down again.
An up and down-that is the way,
With a good round ball, that you must play;
Up high as you can and down again,
Ten and ten, and six times ten!
Face to the shade, and back to the shine;
Send up your balls with a toss like mine,
Straight as a dart, as if 'twere cast
From the spring of a mighty arbalast!
There it goes good luck to the ball!
Here it comes with a plumping fall;
How merry it is, our balls to throw,
Standing together thus in a row !
An up and a down, that is the way,
With a good round ball, that you must play;
Up, high as you can, and down again
Now we have counted ten times ten.


51






THE COOT.


OH coot! oh bold, adventurous coot,
I pray thee tell to me,
The perils of that stormy time
That bore thee to the sea!
I saw thee on the river fair,
Within thy sedgy screen;
Around thee grew the bulrush tall,
And reeds so strong and green.
The kingfisher came back again
To view thy fairy place;
The stately swan sailed statelier by,
As if thy home to grace.
But soon the mountain-flood came down,
And bowed the bulrush strong;
And far above those tall green reeds,
The waters poured along.
(52)







THE COOT.


" And where is she, the water coot,"
I cried, that creature good ?"
But then I saw thee in thine ark
Regardless of the flood.
Amid the foaming waves thou sat'st,
And steer'dst thy little boat;
Thy nest of rush and water-reed
So bravely set afloat.
And on it went, and.safely on
That wild and stormy tide;
And there thou sat'st a-mother-bird,
Thy young ones at thy side.
Oh coot! oh bold, adventurous coot,
I pray thee tell to me,
The perils of that stormy voyage
That bore thee to the sea!
Hadst thou no fear, as night came down
Upon thy watery way,
Of enemies, and dangers dire
That round about thee lay?






THE APPLE TREE.


LET them sing of bright red gold;
Let them sing of silver fair;
Sing of all that's on the earth,
All that's-in the air;
All that's in the sunny air,
All that's in the sea;
And I'll sing a song as rare
Of the apple tree!
The red-bloomed apple tree;
The red-cheeked apple tree;
That's the tree for you and me,
The ripe, rosy apple tree!
Learned men have learned books,
Which they ponder day and night;
Easier leaves than theirs I read,-
Blossoms pink and white;
(54)




















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THE APPLE TREE.


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THE APPLE TREE.


Blossom-leaves all pink and white,
Wherein I can see
Charactered, as clear as light,
The old apple tree!
The gold-cheeked apple tree;
The red-streaked apple tree;
All the fruit that growth on
The ripe, rosy apple tree!
Autumn comes, and our good man
Soon as harvest is o'er,
Speculates on apple crops-
Be they less or more;
I could tell him; less or more
Is well known to me;
I have eyes that see the core
Of the apple tree;
The old, mossy apple tree;
The young, glossy apple tree;
Scathed or sound, the country round,
I know every apple tree!


57






THE SEA GULL.


OH the white sea gull, the wild sea gull,
A joyful bird is he,
As he lies like a cradled thing at rest,
In the arms of a sunny sea!
The little waves rock to and fro,
And the white gull lies asleep,
As the fisher's bark, with breeze and tide,
Goes merrily over the deep.
The ship, with her fair sail set, goes by,
And her people stand to note,
How the sea gull sits on the rocking waves
As still as an anchored boat.
The sea is fresh, the sea is fair,
And the sky calm overhead,
And the sea gull lies on the deep, deep sea,
Like a king in his regal bed!
(58)







































































THE SEA GULL.


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THE SEA GULL.


Oh the white sea gull, the bold sea gull
A joyful bird is he,
Sitting, like a king, in calm repose
On the breast of the heaving sea.
The waves leap up, the wild wind blows,
And the gulls together crowd,
And wheel about and madly scream
To the sea that is roaring loud.
And let the sea roar ever so loud,
And the winds pipe ever so high,
With a wilder joy the bold sea gull,
Sendeth forth a wilder cry.


61






THE REINDEER.


REINDEER, not in fields like ours
Full of grass and bright with flowers;
Not in pasture-dales where glide
Never frozen rivers wide;
Not on hills where verdure bright
Clothes them to the topmost height,
Hast thou dwelling; nor dost thou
Feed beneath the orange bough;
Nor doth olive, nor doth vine
Bud or blossom in land of thine;
Thou wast made to feed and fare
In a region bleak and bare;
In a dreary land of snow
Where green weeds can scarcely grow!
Where the skies are gray and drear;
Where 'tis night for half the year;
Reindeer, where, unless for thee,
Human dweller could not be.
(62)























THE REINDEER.


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THE REINDEER.


When thou wast at first designed
By the same Creative Mind-
With thy patience and thy speed;
With thy aid for human need;
With thy gentleness; thy might;
With thy simple appetite;
With thy foot so framed to go
Over frozen wastes of snow,
Thou wast made for sterner skies
Than horizoned Paradis


65







THE CARRION CROW.


ON a splintered bough sits the carrion crow,
And first he croaks loud and then he croaks
low;
Twenties of years ago that bough
Was leafless and barkless as it is now.
It is on the top of an ancient oak
That the carrion crow has perched to croak;
In the gloom of a forest the old oak grows,-
When it was young there's nobody knows.
The old trunk is gnarled and gray,
But the wood has rotted all away,
Nothing remains but a cave-like shell,
Where bats, and spiders, and millipedes dwell.
And the tawny owl and the noisy daw,
In many a hollow and many a flaw;
By night or by day, were you there about,
You might see them creep in, or see them creep
out.
(66)



























































"LA


THE CARRION CROW.


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THE CARRION CROW.


69


And there on the top of that ancient oak,
The carrion crow he sits to croak;
The -words of his croaking I fain would know;
What does he say-that carrion crow?
He says, and he's merry as he can be,-
" To-night there's a famous feast for me;
For me and my mate so beautiful,
Where the hound lies deadby the forest-pool."






LITTLE CHILDREN.


SPORTING through the forest wide;
Playing by the water-side;
Wandering o'er the healthy fells;
Down within the woodland dells;
All among the mountain wild,
Dwelleth many a little child!
In the baron's hall of pride;
By the poor man's dull fire-side:
'Mid the mighty, 'mid the mean,
Little children may be seen,
Like the flowers that spring up fair
Bright and countless, every where!
In the far isles of the main;
In the desert's lone domain;
In the savage mountain glen,
'Mong the tribes of swarthy men;
Wheresoe'er a foot hath gone:
Wheresoe'er the sun hath shone
(70)



















11


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163


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LITTLE CHILDREN GATHERING FLOWERS. 71


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LITTLE CHILDREN.


On.a league of peopled ground,
Little children may be found !
Blessings on them! they in me
Move a kindly sympathy,
With their wishes, hopes, and fears;
With their laughter and their tears;
With their wonder so intense,
And their small experience!


73






THE TITMOUSE, OR BLUE-CAP.

THE merry titmouse is a comical fellow;
He weareth a plumage of purple and yellow,
Barred over with black, and with white inter-
laced ;
Depend on't, the titmouse has excellent taste.
And he, like his betters of noble old blood,
Keeps up, with great spirit, a family feud;
A feud with the owl; and why? would you
know;
An old, by-gone quarrel of ages ago.
Perhaps in the ark might be taken offence.-
But I know not, indeed, of the where and the
whence;
Only this is quite true,-let them meet as they
may,
Having quarrelled long since, they would
quarrel to day.
(74)



















































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oro L







THE TITMOUSE, OR BLUE-CAP.


But I'll leave them to settflehis ancient affair,
And now look at his nest, made with exquisite
care,
Of lichen, and moss, and the soft downy feather,
And the web of the spider to keep it together.

Is a brick out of place by your window ? don't
send
For the man with the trowel the fracture to
mend,
Through the dry months of summer, just leave
it alone,
For the poor little titmouse has made it his
own.







THE CAMEL.


CAMEL, thou art good and mild,
Might'st be guided by a child!
Thou wast made for usefulness,
Man to comfort and to bless.
Thou dost clothe him; thou dost feed;
Thou dost lend to him thy speed.
And through wilds of trackless sand,
In the hot Arabian land,
Where no rock its shadow throws;
Where no pleasant water flows;
Where the hot air is not stirred,
By the wing of singing bird,
There thou go'st untired and meek,
Day by day, and week by week,
Bearing weight of precious things,
Silks for merchants, gold for kings;
Pearls of Ormuz, riches rare,
Damascene and Indian ware;
(78)

















































THE CAMEL.


_ I

L i







THE CAMEL. 81

Bale on bale, and heap on heap,
Freighted like a costly ship!

When the red Simoom comes near,
Camel, dost thou know no fear ?
When the desert sands uprise
Flaming crimson to the skies,
And like pillared giants strong,
Stalk the dreary waste along,
Bringing death unto his prey,
Does not thy good heart give way ?


-nor







THE BIRD OF PARADISE.

OH lovely bird of paradise,
I'll go where thou dost go!
Rise higher yet, and higher yet,
For a stormy wind doth blow.
Now up above the tempest
We are sailing in the calm,
Amid the golden sunshine,
And where the air is balm.
See, far below us rolling,
The storm-cloud black and wide;
The fury of its raging
Is as an angry tide!
Oh gentle bird of paradise,
Thy happy lot I'll share;
And go where'er thou goest
On, through the sunny air!
(82)

















K


THE BIRD OF PARADISE.






THE BIRD OF PA


Whate'er the food thou eatest,
Bird, I will eat it too,
And ere it reach the stormy earth,
Will drink with thee the dew!
My father, and my mother,
I'll leave them for thy sake;
And where thy nest is builded,
My pleasant home will make!
Is it woven of the sunshine,
And the fragrance of the spice;
And cradled round with happiness?
Sweet bird of paradise!


85







THE NORTHERN SEAS.


UP! up! let us a voyage take;
Why sit we here at ease ?
Find us a vessel tight and snug,
Bound for the northern seas.
I long to see the northern lights,
With their rushing splendors fly;
Like living things with flaming wings,
Wide o'er the wondrous sky.
I long to see those icebergs vast,
With heads all crowned with snow;
Whose green roots sleep in the awful deep,
Two hundred fathoms low.
I long to hear the thundering crash
Of their terrific fall;
And the echoes from a thousand cliffs,
Like lonely voices call.
(86)






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TIE NORTHERN SEAS.







THE NORTHERN SEAS. 89
There shall we see the fierce white bear;
The sleepy seals aground,
And the spouting whales that to and fro
Sail with a dreary sound.
There may we tread on depths of ice,
That the hairy mammoth hide;
Perfect, as when in times of old,
The mighty creature died.







THE EAGLE.


No, not in the meadow, and not on the shore;
And not on the wide heath with furze covered
o'er,
Where the cry of the plover, the hum of the
bee,
Gives a feeling of joyful security:
And not in the woods where the nightingale's
song,
From the chestnut and orange pours all the
day long;
And not where the martin has built in the eaves,
And the red-breast o'ercovered the children
with leaves,
Shall ye find the proud eagle ? 0 no, come
away;
I will show you his dwelling, and point out his
prey !
Away let us go where the mountains are high,
With tall splintered peak towering into the sky,
(90)












































THE EAGLEg.







THE EAGLE. 93

Where old ruined castles are dreary and lone,
And seem as if built for a world that is gone;
There, up on the topmost tower, black as the
night,
Sits the old monarch eagle in full blaze of
light:
He is king of these mountains; save him and
his mate,
No eagle dwells here; he is lonely and great!
Look, look how he sits! with his keen glancing
eye,
And his proud head thrown back, looking into
the sky.
Now see how he soars! like a speck in the
height
Of the blue vaulted sky, and now lost in the
light!


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THE LION.


LION, thou art girt with might!
King by uncontested right;
Strength, and majesty, and pride
Are in thee personified !
Slavish doubt or timid fear
Never came the spirit near;
What it is to fly, or bow
To a mightier-than thou,
Never has been known to thee,
Creature terrible and free!
Power the Mightiest, gave the lion
Sinews like to brands of iron!
Gave him force which never failed;
Gave a heart that never quailed.
Triple-mailed coat of steel,
Plates of brass from heel to heel,
Less defensive were in wearing
Than the lion's heart of daring;
(94)



















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THE LION.


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THE LION.


Nor could towers of strength impart,
Trust like that which keeps his heart.
What are things to match with him?
Serpents old, and strong and grim,
Seas upon a desert-shore,
Mountain-wildernesses hoar,
Night and storm, and earthquakes dire,
Thawless frost and raging ire-
All that's strong, and stern and dark,
All that doth not miss its mark,
All that makes man's nature tremble,
Doth the desert-king resemble !







THE KINGFISHER.


FoR the handsome kingfisher, go not to the tree,
No bird of the field or the forest is he;
In the dry riven rock he did never abide,
And not on the brown heath all barren and
wide.

He lives where the fresh, sparkling waters are
flowing,
Where the tall, heavy typha and loosestrife
are growing;
By the bright little streams that all joyfully run
Awhile in the shadow, and then in the sun.

He lives in a hole that is quite to his mind,
With the green mossy hazel roots firmly en-
twined;
Where the dark alder-bough waves gracefully
o'er,
And the sword-flag and arrow-head grow at his
door.
(98)



































THE KINGFISHER.


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THE KINGFISHER.


There busily, busily, all the day long,
He seeks for small fishes the shallows among;
For he builds his nest of the pearly fish-bone,
Deep, deep in the bank far retired, and alone.
Then the brown water-rat from his burrow
looks out,
To see what his neighbor kingfisher's about;
And the green dragon-fly, flitting slowly away,
Just pauses one moment to bid him good day.


101




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