• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Aunt Ellen's visit to little...
 Little Mary's cottage
 The farm-yard
 The visit to Dame Goodluck
 A walk in the fields






Group Title: Uncle George's juveniles
Title: Aunt Ellen's visit to Little Mary
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003549/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Ellen's visit to Little Mary
Series Title: Uncle George's juveniles
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1853
 Subjects
Subject: Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003549
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221699
oclc - 11096833
notis - ALG1927
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Aunt Ellen's visit to little Mary
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Little Mary's cottage
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The farm-yard
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The visit to Dame Goodluck
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A walk in the fields
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
Full Text
































HAY MAKING.






AUNT ELLEN'S


VISIT TO LITTLE MARY.


OLL


NEW-YORK.


LEAVITT & ALLEN.


_____






















Entered aeording to Act of Congress, i the year 1858 by
LEAVE~ T & ALLEN,
in the Clerk's Offiee of the Distriet Court C the United Statem
in and for the Eastern District of New-York.






STORIES.

AUNT ELLEN'S VISIT TO LITTLE
MARY.
LITrrr Mary lives in a pretty cottage.
Little Mary's Papa and Mamma and her
little brother, Harry, all live in the same
cottage. One day Aunt Ellen came to
see little Mary and little Harry. She
walked near four miles to see them. Her
little dog Prince ran by her side. It was
in June, and Aunt Ellen saw men and
women in the fields making hay, and
loading it on wagons. The hay smelt
(5)






6 AUNT ELLEN'S VISIT TO LITTLE MARY.
very sweet, and all the hay-makers seemed
to be very busy and very happy.
Aunt Ellen had to walk down the long
lane that it so shaded with trees. The
trees hang over the path, so that you can
hardly see the blue sky. And the little
birds hop about the branches, and sing
loudly just over your. head. As Aunt
Ellen was walking down the lane she saw
some women sitting under the hedge.
They had very dark faces, and they wore
red cloaks. They had made a fire with
some dry sticks, and were boiling water
in a kettle. Soon after Aunt Ellen saw
a boy in a gentleman's back yard feeding
his rabbits with cabbage leaves; he
seemed to enjoy his employment very
much.

















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'III


BOY FEEDING RABBITS.
BOY FEEDING RABBITS*






AUNT ELLEN S VISIT TO LITTLE MARY. 9
Farther on, Aunt Ellen saw another
boy driving a flock of geese to the common.
There were eleven geese, and the boy
drove them with a long stick. The geese
had pure white feathers, and looked clean
and pretty. The boy had a good deal of
trouble in keeping them from turning and
going back to the yard. When he walked
close to them, they stretched their long
necks and hissed at him. At last the
boy got the geese over to the common.






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE.
AT the end of the shady lane, Aunt
Ellen came to the tall and thick hedge,
in which there is a wicket-gate painted
white; she lifted the latch, and then she
and her dog Prince walked into the garden.
There were many lovely flowers in the
garden, roses and pinks, and stocks; and
the lilac trees and the laburnum were in
full bloom. There was a splendid Pea-
cock, standing on the rail just by the
gate, and Prince wanted to run after it,
but Aunt Ellen called him back.
(10)




























THE PEACOCK.






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE. 13
As soon as little Mary saw Aunt Ellen
and Prince coming up the gravel walk,
she clapped her hands for joy, and ran
out to meet them.






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE.
(Continued.)
WHEN her Papa's dog, Fury, saw Prince,
he trotted quietly down the walk, after
little Mary; and then little Mary jumped
up and kissed Aunt Ellen, she was so glad
to see her, and Fury and Prince had a
famous roll on the grass.
In front of little Mary's cottage there
is a green lawn; some shrubs and flowers
(14)






















- S;


FURY.






ITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE. 17
are planted at. each of the corners. Fury
and Prince had a fine scamper on the
lawn; while Aunt Ellen and little Mary
went into the cottage.






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE.
(Continued.)
THE entrance to the cottage is through
a porch, which is covered with yellow
jessamine and sweet honey-suckle. By
the side of it there are some tall holly-
hocks, which are red, and white, and
pink, and purple. Just outside of the
porch there is Spotted Bob, little Mary's
Starling; he is hung up in a wicker cage,
and sometimes little Mary opens the cage
door and lets Bob out for a hohday. Be
(18)







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PJIB.i 1!


U.
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r~c4);


MARY'S STARLING.


r ki


C,"






LITTLE MARY'S STARLING.


has been taught to speak many
quite as plainly as a little girl can
but he does not know what the
mean.


words
speak,
words


21






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE.
(Continued.)
BOB was hopping about the garden
when Aunt Ellen came in; and when
he saw Aunt Ellen, he said "How do
you do ?" quite as well as Poll, the grey
parrot, which belongs to little Harry.
This parrot is so tame that she is not shut
ap in a cage, but flies among the trees ;
when it is too cold to go out, she hops into
a warm box in a corner of the kitchen.
Aunt Ellen was very tired with her long
walk. As soon as she reached the porch
(22)














THE GREY PARROT.


is


- "l






LITTLE MARY'S COTTAGE. 25

she sat down in the old oak chair to rest
herself. Then little Mary ran to tell her
Mamma that Aunt Ellen was come.
Mamma and little Harry were delighted
to see Aunt Ellen. And when Papa came
home from the hay-field he was delighted
also.






THE FARM-YARD.
EARLY the next morning little Mary
called Aunt Ellen, and they went out for
a walk. First they went into the farm-
yard and looked at Papa's Horse; and
Aunt Ellen lifted little Mary on to his
back, and the horse was so good that he
walked a little way while Aunt Ellen
held the little girl on his back.
Presently they heard a chattering over
their heads; they all looked up, and saw
(26)


























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PAPA'S HORSE.


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~fi~rC~~
--






THE FARM-YARD. 29
a pretty bird, with blue feathers in its
wings, who was flying about, making all
the chatter. Little Mary knew that it
was a Jay.






THE FARM-YARD.
(Continued.)
THEN they looked over the low wall
into a meadow, and there saw the great
Bull, who looked so very fierce that they
did not like to go near. Then they went
to the cow-house, where Betty was milk-
ing the cows: and Betty gave Aunt Ellen
and little Mary some warm new milk in
a cup. And little Mary had a calf;
she called it Little Snowdrop;" her dear
Papa had given it to her on her last birth-
day. After that they went to see Billy,
(30)







I


THE COWS.


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~C cen ~


~m~n~;~






THE FARM-YARD. 33
the Goat. He has such a pretty house
to live in, on the top of some little rocks.
Little Mary gave Billy some hay, and
Billy jumped up and put his fore-feet on
her arm while he ate it.
Then they went to the end of the wood,
and then to a nice green meadow, covered
with daisies, and butter cups, and cow-
slips, and harebells. A young girl was
sitting on the grass dressing her hair
with flowers, and a young man was lying
by the side of her, laughing to see how
fine she was making herself. Little Mary
picked some flowers to put in her own
hair.

3






THE FARM-YARD.
(Continued.)
THEN they went to look at the Guinea
Fowls, and little Mary threw them some
corn, and all the Guinea Fowls came
running to eat up the corn, crying, Come
back-come back." After that they went
across the farm-yard to the barn. There
were some great pigs running about on
the straw grunting, and some little ones
squeaking; and there were so many cocks
and hens that little Mary could not count
them. And in the barn there was James
(34)















































THE GUINEA FOWL.


4
PI






THE FARM-YARD. 37
Roper, threshing wheat with a flail. Aunt
Ellen asked him to give her some of the
wheat; and then she told little Mary that
it was taken to a mill to be ground into
flour; and that the miller sent some of
the flour to her Mamma, who made it into
bread, or cakes, or puddings.
At the end of the meadow is the lane
in which little Mary's cottage stands. A
man was driving a flock of sheep along
the lane, and his dog was barking at them
to make them go faster. There was
another dog behind with a long curly
tail, and he came and put his nose into
little Harry's hand and then trotted off.






THE FARM-YARD.


(Continued.)
SOON after that they came to the little
white gate in the hedge, and as soon as
Fury and Prince saw them on the lawn,
the two dogs galloped to meet them, and
nearly upset little Harry.
Then little Mary took Aunt Ellen to
the great pond to look at the Swan, which
Captain Harmer had brought from Wales,
and given to her Papa; and while they
were looking at the Swan, and the little
ducks all sailing after their mother in
(38)



















THE SWAN.


IL


~ rr r






THE FARM-YARD.


41


the pond, Betty came to say that break-
fast was ready. Then they all went into
the cottage with very good appetites.






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK.
AFTER breakfast when little Mary had
said her lesson very nicely, Aunt Ellen
took her and little brother Harry for a
walk. When they had walked a little
way they met Jack Sprat, the plough-
man's son. He had a slate in his hand
and was whistling away merrily as a lark.
Aunt Ellen asked Jack where he was
going, and Jack said, "To Dame Good-
luck's." Then Aunt Ellen said, "Tell
Dame Goodluck I will call and see her."
And Jack said "Yes, ma'am, I will;" and
(42)





DAME GOODLUCK
DAME GOODLUCK.


flt


WO






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK. 45
off he ran. Very soon, Aunt Ellen and
little Mary and her brother came to Dame
Goodluck's cottage. Aunt Ellen tapped
at the door: they heard the Dame say,
"Pray, come in!" so they all walked into
the cottage. And there they found
Dame Goodluck, with her spectacles on,
sitting on a chair. She was hemming a
pocket handkerchief, and one little boy
was reading his lesson to her. There
were a great many little boys and girls in
the room. Aunt Ellen stopped a few
minutes to speak to the good Dame, and
little Mary sa'w Betty Brown there, and
went to talk to her about feeding her calf.
And little Harry asked one of the boys to
lend him a slate, and he made a drawing
of a horse, which looked more like a cow.






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK.
(Continued.)
THERE was a Squirrel sitting on a table
near the window. He had got some great
chestnuts to play with, and one of the
boys gave him a book to look at.
When Aunt Ellen had done talking
with Dame Goodluck, the Dame took little
Harry and little Mary to see a tortoise
which her son James, who is a sailor,
brought from India. The tortoise was
crawling very slowly on the grass in the
garden. Little Harry was almost afraid
(46)















4


TIE SQUIRREL.


/ z: ^


-7






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK. 49
to touch it; but Dame Goodluck took it
up in her hands, and then little Harry
felt what a hard back it had. Aunt
Ellen told little Mary that her comb was
made from the shell of a tortoise.






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK.
(Continued.)
THEN the Dame took them to the end
of the garden, where there is a little house
with some wire before it, and there they
saw two beautiful canary birds, which
James Goodluck had also given to his
mother. Little Mary and Harry thought
that they were the most lovely little
birds they had ever seen, and would not
leave it till Aunt Ellen called them away.
Then they all bade the Dame good day,
and started for the fields.
(5o)















/1A/


THE CANARY BIRDS.


C~Z\






THE VISIT TO DAME GOODLUCK. 53
They passed by a large house, and
saw a gentleman and a lady sitting at
the foot of a large beech tree, both read-
ing out of one book. Papa knew them;
they looked up and nodded to Papa, and
then went on reading.






A WALK IN THE FIELDS.
LITTLE Mary ran about the fields, and
and in one corer she spied out a Lark's
nest, with four young ones, and the
mother covering them over with her
wings. Little Mary did not make any
noise, but ran away gently, and then took
little Harry to see them, but they did not
frighten them. A little further on they
found a black looking thing on the ground,
and they called Aunt Ellen to look at it.
Aunt Ellen told them it was a Mole, and
that it often buried itself in the earth.
(54)






















THE LARK'S NEST.






A WALK IN THE FIELDS. 57
Papa showed little Mary an oak tree
blown quite down into the water; and a
little further on, when they came to some
marshy land, Papa pointed out to Aunt
Ellen a bird that is not often met with,
called a Ruff. It has beautiful feathers
round its neck, standing out like a lady's
frill.






A WALK IN THE FIELDS.
(Continued.)
THEY went running on, and presently a
pretty brown rabbit came out of the hedge
and looked about it, and when it saw little
Mary, it ran away so fast that it was out
of sight in a minute. Then not long after
they saw a large bird among the hay that
had been cut down. Aunt Ellen said it
was a French partridge-which is larger
and more handsome than the English
Partridge. When little Harry went near
it, it ran along the field so fast that little
(58)












n3j4


THE RABBIT.


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I AL


THE ENGLISH PARTRIDGE.


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A WALK IN THE FIELDS.


63


Harry soon gave up chasing it. Men
often go out with guns to shoot Partridges,
and sometimes they kill twenty in one
day. They take dogs with them who
find out where the birds are. Soon they
came to a boy sitting under a tree. He
told Aunt Ellen that he was the son of
James Roper, the thresher, and that he
was sent there to keep the birds off the
corn; and he showed them the wooden
clapper with which he frightened them.
After a short time, Aunt Ellen and little
Mary and little Harry came to the wood
where the tall trees are. There were a
great many rooks flying about, cawing,
and making a loud noise. In the midst
of the wood there is a little pond, and
Aunt Ellen called to the children to show






64 A WALK IN THE FIELDS.

them a curious bird with a long beak,
which was standing on some rushes by
the side of the pond. It was a Woodcock.
When they had walked a little further
they saw a little animal with a long neck
and long body, and very short legs. It
had very sharp eyes, and was looking
intently at the Woodcock. When it heard
footsteps it ran into a hedge in a mo-
ment. Aunt Ellen said it was a Weasel.




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