• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover






Group Title: Illustrated primer
Title: The Illustrated primer
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003504/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Illustrated primer
Physical Description: <32> p. : col. illus. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Avery, Samuel Putnam, 1822-1904 ( Engraver )
Hobbs, George W ( Publisher )
Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Andrew & Filmer ( Engraver )
Publisher: George W. Hobbs
Place of Publication: Charlestown, Mass.
Publication Date: 1859
Copyright Date: 1859
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1859   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1859   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1859   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1859   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1859   ( local )
Bldn -- 1859
Genre: Readers   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Charlestown
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Avery, W. Roberts, and Andrew-Filmer.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003504
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4829
notis - ALK2485
oclc - 12249291
alephbibnum - 002250733

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
    Title Page
        Page 7
    Main
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Back Cover
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text


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PUBLISHED BY


CHARLESTOWN, MASS.
1859.




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THE CAT AND THE RAT.


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I HB D RPTZJ
F E AYWM N X L
SGCO QUK Y

e c o v y w m n u
h b d p q g i j f t
k x z r s a &


S2 3 4 511
7 8 9 10 11 12 i







be
ce
de
ge
he


ba
ca
da
ga
ha
la
pa
ra


wax
tax
lax

fix
six
mix


bad
sad
lad

cut
put
rut


bi
ci
di
gi
hi


lap
cap
nap

sum
hum
rum


bu
cu
du
gu
hu


boy
toy
joy
men
ten
hen


bo
co
do
go
ho

ft


,rr


by
cy
dy
gy
hy
ly
py
ry






BA BE BI BO BU
CA CE CI CO CU
DA DE DI DO DU
FA FE FI FO FU
HA HU
LA LU
TA TU
SA SU


CAT LEG PAN LAW
HAT BEG TAN CAW
RAT PEG CAN DAW
TOP WAG PUP KIT
MOP TAG CUP MIT
HOP RAG SUP HIT




0


ALICE LEARNING TO KNIT


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Bat
Rat
Cat
Mat
Hat
Pat


Fly
Sing
Tree


Dish
Fish
Wish
Dark
Hark
Bark
Bush


Bag Fan
Rag Can
Sag Ran
Mag Man
Lag Pan.
Fag Dan


Bird


Win
Bill


Pen
Hen
Den
Ten
Wen
Ben


Gold
Hold
Bold
Nest
Best
Test
Rock


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Lamb
Sheep
'Wool


Hash
Brush
Hush


g Pond
g Bond
g Fond


Fro
Son
Lon


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Black
Slack
Cleans
Leans
Shells
Bells


Ring
Bring
Thing
Moon
Spoon
Room


Place
Grace
Name
Game
Sleep
Deep


---------


Jump
Bump
Hump
Leak
Cheek
Cheese





Rab
Habi
Car p


bit
it
'et


Or ange
Cher ry
Cur rant
Ap pie
Mel on
Ber ry


Ar thur
Ro ver
Do ver
Hen ry
Bon net
Win dow


-m


sp~
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ah


Cour age
Hur ry
Sor row
Gar ret
Har ry
Ter ror


Spar row
Ar row
Nar row
For est
Clo ver
Hon est



Vel vet
En ter
Lin net
Kit ten
Beg gar
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GIRL AND GRANDMOTHER.


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1 The dog ran at the ox.
jHe is a bad dog.


Let
Can


drop
prop
crag
drag


me see the new top.
you make it spin?


spot
shot
blot
scot


flat
spat
slat
plat


must
crust
dust
rust


See, the girl has done her work.
Do you think it is done well ?
If it is, she will go to play.
She can have a run with her dog.
There is a tall clock in the room.
Can you tell the time by the clock?


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I MITST PRAY EVERY DAY.
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LITTLE RHYMES FOR LITTLE FOLKS.
must not let Gentle ever,
y ter-per fret. Sel-fish never.

must not tease, I must not cry,
It try to please. But try, try, try.

must not get I ought to do
to a pet. My duty, too.

ought to seek I must not lie,
tem-per meek. For God is nigh.

e child that tries 0 guard my tongue
ill get more wise. While I am young.

must praise I must be mild:
1 my days. A loving child.


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ILLDA AND HER BIBLE.
UILDA AND HER BIBLE.


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wa fer
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spo ken
to ken
bro ker
po ker
soak er


Rilda has gone to her room. She
is alone. She is reading a book. Do
you know what book it is? It is
called the best of books. It is the
Bible. Rilda loves to read her Bible.
Do you love to read yours? See
what a fine vase of flowers she has
placed on her table. She keeps her
room very neat. i


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spider
gro cer
care ful
use ful
joy ful


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t LOVE ONE ANOTHER.

ji Children, do you love each other?
Are you always kind and true?
Do you always do to others
As you'd have them do to you?

Are you gentle to each other?
Are you careful, day by day,
Not to give offence by actions,
Or by anything you say?

Little children, love each other;
Never give another pain;
If your brother speak in anger,
Answer not in wrath again.


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Be not selfish to each other;
Never spoil another's rest;
Strive to make each other happy,
And you will yourselves be blest.


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~~---------
THE SPRING WALK,
We had a pleasant walk to-day
Over the meadows and far away,
Across the bridge by the water-mill,
By the wood-side, and up the hill.
Amid a hedge where the first leaves
Were peeping from their sheaths so sly,
We saw four eggs within a nest,
And they were blue as a summer sky.
Where daisies opened to the sun
In a broad meadow green and white,
The lambs were racing eagerly;
We never saw a prettier sight.
And many pretty birds we saw,
Which had come o'er the stormy main,
To build their nest, and rear their
Young, ,
And sing in our old woods again.




















































ARTHUR AND HIS DOG.






ARTHUR AND HIS DOG,


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See, the boys have come out to
play. What a fine large dog they
have got; his name is Rover; they
love him dearly. Do you know what
the boys are doing ? They are mak-
ing him speak, or bark, for the stick.
In the winter they tie him to their
sled, and make him draw their little
sister. Should you not like such a
ride ? Their mother is sitting on the
piazza sewing; she is well pleased to
see how merry the boys are. When
Arthur was very small, he was play-
ing beside the river, when he fell in,
and would have been drowned, but
for Rover, who jumped in and quickly
drew him out. I do not wonder that
Arthur loves his dog.


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SI went to the yard, and I saw the old hen
Go clucking about with her chickens ten.
She clucked and she scratched and she bristled away,
And what do you think I heard the hen say ?
I heard her say, The sun never did shine
On anything like to these chickens of mine.
You may hunt the full moon, and the stars, if you
please,
But you never will find ten such chickens as these.
The cat loves her kittens, the ewe loves her lamb,
But they do not know what a proud mother I am;
For lambs, nor for kittens, I won't part with these,
Though the sheep and the cat should go down on
their knees,
No! No! not though
The kittens could crow,
Or the lammie on two yellow legs could go.
My dear downy darlings my sweet little things !
Come nestle now cosily under my wings."
So the hen said,
And the chickens all sped
SAs fast as they could to their nice feather bed.
And there let them sleep in their feathers so warm,
, While my little chick nestles here on my arm.


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A NURSERY SONG.


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'" What a sharp little fellow is Mister Fly!
He goes where he pleases, low or high,
And can walk on the wall with his feet to the sl
He eats the sugar, and goes away,
Nor ever once asks what there is to pay,
And sometimes he crosses the tea-pot's steam,
And comes and plunges his head in the cream;
Then on the edge of the jug he stands,
And cleans his wings with his feet and hands,
Then gives a buzz, as if to say,
A.t present I haven't a minute to stay."
Then away he '11 fly
Where the sunbeams lie,
And neither stop to shake hands
Nor bid you good-by.
Such a strange little fellow is Mister Fly,
Who goes where he pleases, low or high,
And can walk on the ceiling
Without ever feeling
A fear of tumbling down sky-high."


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THE FLY.


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THE LITTLE PEACEMAKER.


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THE LITTLE PEACEMAKER,
A merry little fellow was Charlie H.,
and a great favorite with his playfel-
lows. His temper was so mild and
obliging, that he was never known to
say or do an unkind thing to any one.
As to quarrelling with him, it was im-
possible; neither could he bear to see
others quarrel.
Whenever any of his companions
were disposed to fall out, Charlie
would at once mediate between them,
saying, Come, now, don't quarrel; it
is such a pity. You must n't quar-
rel, now; do make up, it is so much
better. So Charlie was loved very
much; and every little boy and girl
who tries to imitate Charlie will be
loved too. )


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41







THE BLIND BOY.
DEAR sister, said a poor blind boy,
That little bird sings very long;
Say, do you see him in his joy ?
And is he pretty as his song ?
t
Yes, brother, yes, replied the maid,
I see the bird on yonder tree.
The poor boy sighed, and gently said,
SI wish that I could see.

The flowers, you say, are very fair,
And bright green leaves are on the
trees,
And pretty birds are singing there;
How beautiful for one who sees I

SBut, sister, God is kind to me,
Though sight, alas, he has not given;
And well I know there are no blind
Among the children up in heaven.
0^^ %)B~_g~g~i9_6ig~~







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STER MARTHA IN HEAVEN.


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I know my sister Martha's dead,
That weeping for her's all in vain;
For mother dried my eyes, and said
We all should meet again.
She told me how the grave but led
To a much happier land than ours;
A land where summer never shed
Its ever-blooming flowers;
That sorrow never entered where
The star-paved floor of heaven lay;
But angels ever waited there
To wipe our tears away.
I will no longer weep and sigh,
But night and morning bend my knee,
And pray to God that when I die
I may an angel be.







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LIZZIE GRAY AND HER HAT.


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40







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LIZZIE GRAY AND HER HAT.
Lizzie Gray wanted a new hat; and
when told that she must make her old
one do, she went about muttering I
will have one, any way !"
One day she took her hat, and hid
it behind the wood-house; and when
asked where it was, said it had blown
off while she was on the bridge, and
gone sailing down the stream.
It so happened that her father
thought he would take the children
to ride, that day, and Lizzie was very
anxious to go; but, then, she had no
hat. At last her sister lent her one;
but, just as they were getting ready,
who should appear but Rover, caper-
ing, and shaking the lost hat. Lizzie
did not go to ride, that day; she was
locked in her room alone, there to
jweep for her wickedness.


__--.A





FATHER IS COMING.
THE clock is on the stroke of six,
The father's work is done;
Sweep up the hearth, and mend the
fire,
And put the kettle on.
He's crossing o'er the wold apace,
He's stronger than the storm;
He does not feel the cold, not he,
His heart it is so warm.
I know he's coming by this sign,
That baby's almost wild; I
See how he laughs, and crows, and
Stares,
Heaven bless the merry child!
\ Hark! hark! I hear his footsteps now,
^ He's through the garden gate;
SRun, little Bess, and ope the door,
And do not let him wait!













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THE CAT AND THE RAT.


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