• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 I
 II
 III
 IV
 V
 Back Cover






Title: The red cap
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003501/00001
 Material Information
Title: The red cap
Physical Description: 24 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crowquill, Alfred
Petter and Galpin ( Printer )
Ward & Lock ( Publisher )
Publisher: Ward & Lock
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Petter and Galpin
Publication Date: <1859?>
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales -- 1859   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1859   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1859   ( rbgenr )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1859   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1859
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Alfred Crowquill.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue on both sides of end papers and flyleaves.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003501
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225235
oclc - 47660649
notis - ALG5507
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
        Front page 2
        Front page 3
        Front page 4
        Front page 5
        Front page 6
    Title Page
        Page 1
    I
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    II
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    III
        Page 16
        Page 17
    IV
        Page 18
        Page 19
    V
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text






BY ALFR&W CROWOUILL.


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THE REB CAP;
OR, TIHE DWARF OF TIE RUGEN.


CHAPTER I.
THE first sweet breath of morning scented the air, and made the bright flowers
of many colours lift up their drooping heads, and prepare to welcome in the
coming light. The dark night faded away into a phantom grey colour, which
gradually gave place to a blush as soft as that on the cheek of modest maiden.
Every little cloud put on its purple suit as it hurried across the brightened
expanse. But a few minutes more, and the glorious sun sent his beams
over hill and dale, and bathed the earth in light.
Chirrup! chirrup !" went the little birds, as the golden light crept
into their nests, warning them to seek the food for their young. The dogs
barked, the cocks crew, the lambs bleated, the hens cackled, and the
horses neighed; for they all knew that the day had come, and that they all
had a great deal to do.
And so little Marie awoke, and opened the casement of her bedroom to
let in the fresh morning air. She peeped out into her flower-garden, and
felt delighted as she beheld how many little buds had become blossoms since
the day before. Her soft blue eyes looked from side to side, so that she
might see and admire everything, and so she believed she did: but she did
not; for she did not see a little man, a very, very little man, who was hiding
behind a foxglove. He had on a jacket of velvet, with little silver buttons
like dew drops; his pantaloons were of the same texture, and of the most
glowing golden brown; and his slippers were of sparkling crystal. His hair,
which fell on his shoulders in thick clusters, was exactly the colour of his
dress; and he had the most charming face in the world, for his bright brown
eyes were full of kindness, and his mouth seemed only made to smile. He
appeared in trouble: for there was a shadow over his brows; and he sighed
as he cast his eyes around, as if in search of something he had lost. He
sought a hiding-place behind the foxglove as the sound of Marie's opening
the casement struck upon his ear. He peeped through the leaves, and saw
the charming cause of his alarm. As she appeared, a minute after, at the




























































































































MAItIEA AT THE WINDOW.


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THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF TIHE, RUGEN.


door, he wrung his little hands, as if in great terror and grief; whilst she,
quite unobservant of him, stooped to prop up a fallen branch of a rose tree.
As she did so she saw what she supposed to be a leaf from one of the blossoms;
but, upon carefully examining it, she was astonished to find that it was one
of the most beautiful little caps of red velvet, all quilted with'satin, and had
for a tassel a silver bell.
Dear dear !" exclaimed she; what could this have been made for ?
or where is the head that it would fit ?"
She had hardly uttered these words when she started back in affright, as
the little man appeared before her.
Do not be alarlned, pretty Marie," said he; that cap belongs to me,
and I lost it last night, when I came in the moonlight to open the buds of
your flowers, that you might look upon them with pleasure when you awoke
this morning. I often help you in your garden, I assure you, although you
never have seen me; for 1 am a fairy, and make myself invisible to mortal
eyes. Alas! I cannot do so now; for, since I have lost my cap, I have lost
the power of being invisible; so tell me what I shall give you to return it
to me: say what you wish for most, and the moment I put that cap on my
head I shall have the power to grant it to you."
Oh, dear dwarf !" said Marie, "what right have I to demand anything
for giving you what is your own? Indeed! I won't keep it a minute from you."
With that she knelt down, as the dwarf approached 'her with delight, and
placed the cap over his glowing curls. As she pressed it down he seemed to
melt away between her fingers, and he was gone. She looked with wonder
at the place where he had stood, and rubbed her eyes as if she thought that
she could not be awake.
As the thought passed through her mind, the dwarf stood cap in hand
before her.
Good Marie," said he, a thousand thanks for your kindness and good-
ness of heart. I can now go back to my fellows, which I dared not have
done without my cap of invisibility. Although you are so generous as to
return it to me without conditions or wish of reward, I must not be outdone
by you; and consequently, if you have no wish of your own, I must think
what gift I can bestow upon you which will be of use to you, and unlikely
to cause the envy of your neighbours. Good! I have thought of something
which I am assured will be most gratifying to you: this, then it is:-Your
garden shall bloom with flowers, and the fruit shall yield through all seasons;
so that when the leaves fall, and the fruit is gathered in all other places, yours


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6 TIE RED CAP; OR, THE DWAIRF OF THE RUGEN.

must be sought for by those who desire them as luxuries, and your poor
grandmother shall not need to spin so late of an evening as she has done
hitherto ; for the lucky money shall fall into her lap to cheer her in her old age.
When he had finished speaking he kissed Marie's hand, and proceeded
to walk round the flowers and the trees, singing at the same time in a low
and sweet voice the following, as he touched everything that grew:-
"From morn till night, from day to day,
Flowers and fruit on every spray;
Blight or snow, or frost or hail,
Never more shall here prevail."
At last he approached Marie, bowed, placed his cap upon his head, and
vanished.
The instant he was gone, Marie rushed in and told her old grandmother the
news. When she had faithfully described him, her grandmother held up her
hands and exclaimed, What luck! what luck! you have seen one of the
Brownies of the Rilgen."


CHAPTER II.
THE Summer passed away after his sultry task; the Autumn staggered forward
with his heavy burden of fruit, flowers, and corn, which he threw down at the
threshold of winter, and then retired to take his long rest; winter opened
his icy door, and let out a tumultuous rush of freezing winds and flying
snow flakes; and the poor dead leaves whirled in their frantic dance around
their parent stems, that groaned under their weight of sparkling snow.
Winter had come, and in one of his severest moods; but, strange to say,
although the dense, blinding snow careered over the little cot where Marie
and her grandmother dwelt, not a single flake dropped into her garden,
nor did Jack Frost have the power to creep over its boundary-hedge, although
he was very busy weaving his lacework outside.
No; her flowers budded and blossomed with all their accustomed fra-
grance, and the blushing fruit clustered on the boughs. That one little spot
which you could have run round in five minutes, looked like a beautiful
bouquet upon the cold bosom of winter. You may be sure that this wonder did
not escape the eyes of the surrounding people, who, of course, went wondering
on without any solution coming to their minds of this great mystery.
Marie trudged to the town with her beautiful nosegays that brought a
very high price, and her tempting fruit so fresh and unwithered was actually
battled for by the choice dealers. The wonderful child, with her still more

















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THlE RED CAP; OR, TIE D)WAlIF OF THE IU(;EN.


wonderful stock, soon began to be talked about, and some, more curious than
others, determined to follow her, and endeavour to discover what gardener
it was that produced such an abundant supply of unseasonable luxuries;
for they never for one moment believed that little Marie was the great
gardener, but only looked upon her as a messenger.
Often did they start after her through the deep snow, but were as often
baffled: some would slip into a deep snowdrift, whilst others would be
enveloped in a fog that soon made them repent their intentions, and Marie
got safe home without molestation.
But this state of things could not last for ever, for some sort of people
will see to the bottom of things, especially if they be other people's affairs;
so, accordingly, they determined to question Marie on her next appearance
in the market-place, and at once put an end to their doubts.
Accordingly, when she walked into the market-place, she found herself
the object of a curious ring of dealers, and was very much startled, at first,
at finding herself the centre of attraction, especially as many of the faces
did not bespeak much friendly feeling towards her. At last one more bold
than the rest stepped forward and addressed her in a half-bantering tone.
" My good little maiden," said he, as we are all very happy to deal with
you for your wonderful fruit and flowers, we think that we are entitled to
know that there is nothing in them that will peril us or those who purchase
them of us; consequently, we want to know where you get them, and who
it is that contrives to outdo all his neighbours in the production of such
wonderful produce in the very depth of the hardest winter we have known
for many years. Speak out at once, and with truth, or we will take you
before the magistrate of the market, which will save us all further trouble,
for he is celebrated for getting the truth out of everybody."
Marie trembled at this threat, but soon summoning up her courage she
lifted up her mild eyes to the face of her interrogator and said-
What is it you want to find out, Mr. Dealer? I bring my fruit and
flowers from my grandmother's garden; you all here purchase them and
sell them again at a profit: if you are afraid to deal with a little child like
me, say so, one and all of you, and I will seek some other place where the
people will have less curiosity, and more charity; but as I do not like
anybody to think ill of me, I will take any one of you home with me, that
he may see them growing, and that I tell nothing but the truth."
Very fair, very fair, indeed !" exclaimed some of the market women,
who felt kindly inclined towards the pretty and mild-spoken child.


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THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THE RUGEN.


Nothing could be fairer," said the rough fellow who had taken upon
himself the office of spokesman ; you can all depend upon me, I am sure,
for a faithful account of all I see."
Well, perhaps it would be better for one or two of us to go," said a man,
pushing himself forward; if there should be any devilry about it, why
should Wilhelm stand the risk? if there is not, and nothing but fair profit and
fair dealing, why should we let Wilhelm make it all right for himself with
the grandmother, or whoever it is ?"
Very good," said an old woman; "if the child is willing to show where
and how these things grow, why a party of you go home with her and
satisfy us, for it would not do to let her carry her choice fruit and flowers
anywhere else, as you know at this dull time of the year it is a great benefit
to us all: so let us buy what she has brought to-day, and then choose out
three or four from among yourselves, and then g'o see."
Agreed! agreed!" exclaimed many voices, and Marne proceeded as
usual to sell her basket-load to the various fruit and flower dealers. When
the morning's work was over, the men that had been chosen prepared to start
with Marie on her return home; though not without some slight misgivings,
as they had not forgotten the mishaps of those who had gone before them on
the like errand; but they felt a little reassured when they remembered that
little Marie would be well guarded, and that she could not easily escape
them, as she had hitherto done when followed by their predecessors.
On they trudged through the snow, assisting their guide over the difficulties
of the path with a rough an? homely kindness; for although they were but
boors, they could not help feeling interested in the blithe little creature whose
smiling face betokened nothing but good nature.
It was not long before she pointed out the smoke from her grandmother's
chimney, although it was hardly distinguishable from the chilling mist that was
rolling over the snow-covered moor. Even her cottage and the surrounding
hedges were scarcely to be made out in the snow-wreaths that enveloped them.
Well!" said they, that's a curious place to raise flowers and fruit in,
my little girl: you are surely laughing at us."
No, indeed, I am not," replied she; you will soon seen when you
get on the other side of that high hedge, and through that planked doorway."
So saying, she tripped on so lightly that she hardly left the impress of her
foot on the yielding snow. They looked at each other, and, shrugging their
shoulders, followed her in silence.
A few minutes brought them opposite the roughly-planked door which


~


10







































































IAI;III (;6IN(; TO MAIIKET.









THE RED CAP; OR, THIE DWARF OF THE IUGEN.


she had spoken of; she placed her finger on the latch and they entered.
Wonder of wonders! what was it they beheld? They all stood like
statues, dumb with astonishment. There the flowers bloomed, and the fruit
hung in clusters upon the boughs, and there was actually a gleam of sunshine
glowing on the wall.
Walk in, friends," said the little maid, my grandmother will be glad
to see you, and you must rest here to-night, as darkness will make the moor
impassable; and, besides, you can llelp me to take my marketings to the town
in the morning, where I am sure we shall be looked for with great anxiety."
They nodded their heads, but none of them spoke; they could not for
very amazement, but they thought that the best thing they could do was to
follow her, so they did.
Marie's grandmother, altboiugh rather astonished at her unlooked-for
visitors, bustled about, and put the best the cottage afforded before them;
and, not withstanding their astonishment, they did not fail to do ample justice
to the beautiful white wheaten bread, the sweet holne-made )butter, and
the appetising rashers of bacon that hissed and sang as they were taken oil
the glowing embers. After some time taken up in this pleasing occupation,
they were fain to give up, for they could eat no more, Marie and her grand-
mother cleared all away, and putting some noble logs upon the hearth,
asked them to draw their chairs round the fire. This they accordingly did,
and, whilst they filled their capacious pipes, the old woman and Marie pro-
ceeded upstairs to look out warm blankets to make their beds more com-
fortable on the sweet-smelling heather of which they would be composed.
They looked at each other, not with very intelligent looks, for they were
plain men, but there was something between cunning and doubt in their
faces; they hesitated for a minute or two, to be sure that the old woman
and the child were out of hearing before they ventured to speak. At last
the cunning Wilhelm spoke.
What do you think of all this?" said he, throwing his head backwards
to indicate the two upstairs.
Well, I really don't know what to think," said one of his friends;
which reply not being satisfactory, he turned his inquiring look upon the
others, who both being, if possible, more stupid than the one who had ven-
tured to reply after a fashion, they drew their pipes very hard, and winked
at Wilhelm. Wilhelm, who had a slight gleam of. light in his brain, which
only gave him cunning, saw at once his position, and that if anything was
to be done, it must be by him; so he blew out some very heavy clouds of


12







































































THE DWARF IN THE KITICEIN.









THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THE RUGEN.


smoke, as if to fully clear his brain, and then muttered in a very sepulchral
tone, accompanied by another twitch backward of his head-
"A witch, boys!"
As this came rather suddenly upon his friends, they all took their pipes
from their mouths and stared.
But witch or no witch," continued he, after allowing a moment for the
expression of their surprise, we, mind, and only we, must contrive to profit
by this opportunity; why, if we could manage to lock up the old woman and
the young one here, we might make our fortunes out of their magic garden;
and if we can make heaps of money, what does it matter whether it is a good
or a bad angel that's gardener here."
This proposal was met by an unanimous Ha !" and voluminous clouds
of smoke that completely hid the heads that were of so little use to their
owners. Wilhelm thought to himself as he looked upon his companions that
they were three too many, and that he had been a fool not to have had the
adventure to himself; however, a plan might strike him by which he could
rid himself of his stupid partners. He thought this and stared at the fire,
and his three companions stared at the fire; and, strange to say, stupid as
they were, they thought the very same thing.
The old woman, after a short time, resumed her seat by the fire, quite
unconscious, in the freedom of her hospitality, of the four very large snakes
that she was warming on her hearthstone. She accordingly chattered on
to them in the fulness of her heart, and passed her shrivelled hands care-
lessly over the bright locks of her grandchild, whose head lay in her lap,
where she soon slumbered.
Soon the time came for retiring, and the four friends made their way
to their allotted chamber, where they found everything as cosy and com-
fortable as possible, and there they lay, whispering future plans of mischief
against their kind entertainers until they murmured themselves to sleep.
In the warm kitchen the old clock ticked on, whilst its face glowed in
the warm light of the dying embers that still had sufficient power to warm
up the red-tiled hearth. Presently a shadow passed the line of light, when,
by looking intently, you could distinguish a very little man warming his
hands and muttering to himself. He kicked the logs with his foot and the
fire blazed up, when there stood the very good little brown dwarf of the
Riigen that had been so very kind to little Marie.
He had evidently been listening to the conversation of the four con-
spirators, for, after seating himself on the old woman's footstool, which was


14




































































THE PUNISHMENT OF TIE UNGRATEFUL PLOTTERS.









THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THE RUGEIN.


rather high for him, he sat for a few moments swinging his legs to and fro;
at last in a half nmuter to himself he said, Ungrateful brutes! cowardly
lubbers! we shall see. Ah! ah!" and then he laughed to himself a scoffing
laugh, which did not promise well for the snoring gentlemen upstairs.
Fainter and fainter became the light from the logs, so that you could
not be sure whether there was anything on the little stool or not, until you
were reassured by the sound of the little laugh of the Brownie before the fire.
What he thought of doing, and what he did, you will find in the next
chapter.


CHAPTER III.
Oni! how the snow did come down the next morning: you could not see
three yards before you, for the little flakes and the big flakes springing up
round and round, and piling themselves up in great heaps.
I'm nearly frozen," said Wilhelm, endeavouring to rub his eyes open.
This exclamation roused his companions, who all cried out that they
felt equally frozen; then they all tried to pull the clothes up over them,
but when they did so their eyes were all soon open, for their hands dug into
the snow, and where were they ? Why, all huddled together at the foot of a
tree, and snowed up to their necks; and if they did not make good haste
in getting out of their snow beds, the clothes would soon be over their heads,
and they would very likely take the very long sleep. Seeing this, they did
not hesitate to scratch or plunge until they got out of their uncomfortable
quarters. When they had done so they looked at each other, and the sight
was mutually unpleasant, for they each thought that the other looked like
a half-frozen fool.
The first that found his voice exclaimed-
Well, if ever I --
The others said nothing, for even Wilhelm had not the courage to utter
a single word. They thought that they heard sonebodly laugh, but it was
such a little laugh that they could not be sure. Somebody did laugh, though;
it was the little Brownie who had been their chambermaid, and tucked
them all up in their snow beds, and laughed to see how very miserable
their roguery had made them.
Sadly puzzled, they lighted their pipes and putted away in hopes of
thawing their ideas; but finding that they could make nothing of it, they
started on what they imagined to be their way home.


16



















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THE LANDLORD TAKES MARIE HOME.


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THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THE RUGEN.


CHAPTER IV.
MARIE and her grandmother were almost as much astonished as their four
lodgers when they found that they had all departed without notice and
without breakfast.
Marie, however, packed up her usual quantity of flowers and fruit, and
laced up her strong snow shoes, and prepared for her trip to the town, although
she felt some few misgivings as to the future conduct of her yesterday's com-
panions, whose mysterious departure, notwithstanding her confidence in her
innocence, gave her some uneasiness.
And had she known all she would have staid at home, for Wilhelm and
his companions had, after many mishaps, found their way to their onmes,
breathing vengeance against the old witch, as they called her, and her
cunning young helpmate.
The whole market was in a ferment as they all told the improbable
tale together. Some laughed, some believed that they had been outwitted
by the little market woman, whilst others threw their heads back, holding
their hands to their mouths, as much as to imply that they had all been
drinking. As they were in this confusion, an old man with grey hair and
nipped features walked into the midst of them: they made way for him,
for they knew him to be a rich old curmudgeon of the neighbourhood.
What is all this about?" said he, in sharp, discordant tones.
Everybody commenced the tale, which, of course, caused such a con-
fusion, that the old man covered his ears, and grinned with rage.
Silence screamed he; or, as I'm a magistrate, I'll send you all to
prison. Come here, you Wilhelm, as you seem to have been the principal
in this folly,-explain !"
Wilhelm accordingly told all the concern he had had in the affair, and
how he and his companions had been served.
Pooh pooh said the old man, when he had heard him patiently to
an end, you have all been addling your brains with drinking and smoking,
and now want to palm your drunken dreams upon me. Go to your stalls,
and don't keep the place in confusion."
As they were about to depart, as he desired them, they saw Marie
entering the market gate. Everybody's finger pointed at her, and the old
man started with surprise, for he beheld in her the grand-daughter of one
of his tenants.


18




















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1 IARLE AND lHER,(ANDM 'iIER PREPARIN(' TO DEPART.


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THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THIE RUGEN.


He walked up to the child, whose looks plainly betokened her fear; an d,
taking her by the hand, asked her explanation as to the truth of what he
had heard. She immediately pulled the green leaves from her basket, and
showed him the beautiful fruit and flowers. His astonishment, indeed, was
great, but he did not express it, giving way only to a kind of inward
rumbling.
He thought-but it was no good, you may be sure; that is, you might
have been sure if you could have looked in his face.
IIe took Marie by the hand, and passed from amongst the disappointed
group, who had all calculated upon making something out of the child's
innocence; but a powerful hand had snatched their prey from them-for
himself.


CHAPTER V.
MARIE and her grandmother prepared to depart from their home; for, of
course, the miserly landlord beheld a mine of wealth in their magic garden,
and sent them away without the slightest remorse, pretending not to believe
one word of the story that they told him.
Marie shed many tears whilst endeavouring to console her poor old
grandmother, who had not courage enough to bear up against the loss of a
home so endeared to her; for there all her children, and her children's
children, had been born, and all the happiest days of her life had been
spent.
But they must go; so they tied up their bundles, and, giving one
long lingering look at the beautiful garden, stepped forth into the cold
wintry way. The landlord and his people slammed the gate at their backs,
and the snow sprinkled over their clothes.
No sooner had they gone than the old miser prepared to gather the fruit
and flowers in large baskets, resolved to take them to the great city where
the rich and vain lived, who would eagerly buy such unparalleled luxuries.
He sent one man forward on horseback to notify his arrival on the next day,
and invited the inhabitants, both great and small," to come and see his
great fruit and flower show in the very depth of winter. How he rubbed his
hands at the golden prospect before him! for, as he looked round, there
appeared to be none the less in the garden for all his gathering.
The next morning early found the expectant people surrounding the
place that he had taken for his show; they counted with admiration the many


20




















































-7 -- -


THE DWARFF APPEARS TO THE LANDLORD.


_i -_- .II

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THE RED CAP; (O), 'TlE DWAIFW OF THE RTUGEN.


large hampers as they were deposited in a row by his people; they sniffed the
air for the odour of the flowers, which many declared delicious.
The crafty owner walked up and down in front of his treasures, smiling to
himself as he saw the continually increasing crowd of fashionable people, all
bustling for a front place.
At last the eventful moment came, when, with careful hands, the cords
were severed and the lids were lifted, and discovered that the beautiful
flowers were nothing but dead brown weeds, and that the fruit was mouldy,
dirty potatoes and stones.
The miser stood transfixed with horror and amazement, whilst his men
prepared to slink away, for they saw the savage looks of the mob, and feared
for their safety; but, poor fellows, they were collared amidst a universal
uproar, which drowned their pleadings for mercy: one stout fellow seized
upon their master, and handed him from one to the other until he was sadly
mauled.
The open baskets of rubbish, which they imagined had been brought there
to hoax them, offered plenty of missiles, which the mob quickly availed
themselves of, and pelted the unfortunates through the town, from which they
made their escape as quickly as possible, followed by the groans and yells of
the market people, accompanied by no very pleasant hard stones and rubbish ;
nor did they stop their pace until, completely exhausted, they found themselves
at the fatal cottage. But how changed was all around them In their hurry
to depart they had left the garden-door open, and Jack Frost had quickly
walked in and covered everything with his glittering white, so that the late
beautiful garden could not be distinguished from the neighboring fields.
They rushed in-doors and piled up the logs to make a blaze and thaw
their frozen limbs. The warmth soon threw them all into a deep slumber,
excepting only the master, whose bitter thoughts kept him from sleeping.
He gazed with savage eyes upon the flame, following the fantastic curling
of the smoke, as it rose in dense volumes and threw deep shadows into the
chimney corners.
At last, one shadow became more constant than the rest, and arrested his
attention; it seemed to approach him, and, to his great affright, took the
form of a little man : the Brownie was before him, with a severe frown upon
his handsome face. Grovelling man," said he, you have met with a just
reward for your want of proper feeling towards the old and the young, equally
claiming your protection. You wished to snatch from them the gifts
bestowed upon them for their goodness and innocence, but the Fairies of the


22




































































THE PICTURE OF THE OLD MAN'S SON.









THE RED CAP; OR, THE DWARF OF THE IUGEN.


Riigen do not bestow their gifts upon human beings like you; they have no
virtue in such hands. I gave to her garden eternal summer; when you
seized it it was no longer hers, and turned into stones and weeds: but,
wherever she goes she will find the gift follow her. Seek her, then, and
repair the folly you have committed; her innocence and guileless heart will
make a summer wherever she goes, and claim the protection of all good
angels: have her near you, and you will find the winter depart from your
heart, which now freezes up the springs that should be full of gushing kind-
ness to all around you, in return for the gifts of fortune which you possess. I
have no more words for you. Marie and her grandmother go slowly on their
path: go you quickly, for you have lost time to make up, and but spare time to
do it in. Farewell! you will see me no more." He vanished as he ceased speak-
ing, and the first pale streaks of day found their way through the frosted casements.
That hard old man smiled, although it took him some time to get accustomed
to the cheerful voice of Marie. Yes, Marie, for a fear and trembling came
upon him on the eventful morning of his interview with the Brownie, that he
might be too late to rescue her from her perilous path through the snow;
but he did, and to the astonishment of every one took her to his grand home.
But what a home it soon became! Instead of the grim and gloomy house, it
turned into a cheerful, smiling palace. Marie tripped about and scattered
sunshine into the darkest corners; cheerful voices sounded where cold, dis-
trustful whispers had crept about before. And she one day even dared to
tear the veil down from before the picture of the old man's son, who had
left him in a moment of anger, and had never been mentioned in his pre-
sence for years.
It was then only she surmised the cause of one little sigh amidst his
newly-discovered smiles, and she soon had influence enough to obliterate
that one little spot upon his happiness, and laughed and cried with father
and son when she saw them in each other's arms.
The young son soon discovered the worth of the sweet magician who had
been impertinent enough to tell him, and make him believe, that he had
been very wrong. He accordingly told his father and mentioned who had
convinced him of his error, and spoke in such terms that the old man smiled
one of his best smiles.
And not long after the old man was foolish enough to let his son marry
the simple, single-hearted girl, because he had discovered that her simplicity
had read a very good and salutary lesson to their learning and wisdom, and
that to know right from wrong was the simplest thing in the world.







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