• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 To-day and to-morrow
 A cheerful song
 Cheer, boys, cheer!
 A Cheer for the workers
 Cheer up!
 Cheer up! And keep on, never...
 An honest heart to guide us
 Never say fail!
 Never give up
 There's fortune on before us
 Delays
 The good time coming
 Daily work
 Perseverance, or try again
 Heroes
 Bye and bye
 Now or never
 Pleasure and duty
 Encouragement
 Live and let live
 Work away
 Joy and comfort
 The camp has had its day of...
 The weaver's song
 Good heart and willing hand
 Strike the iron while it's hot
 The village blacksmith
 The blacksmith
 The spinning wheel
 Factory round
 Noblemen
 Honest pride
 The peasantry of England
 The plough
 The ploughshare of old England
 The merry ploughman
 The British farmer
 Song of the haymakers
 Take down the sickle
 The barley-mowers' song
 The reapers
 The thresher
 Merrily goes the mill
 The milkmaid
 The quarry man
 Song of the miners
 The woodman's song
 Westward ho!
 The girl I left behind me
 The soldier-boy
 The soldier's tear
 I see them on thier winding...
 The British grenadiers
 What will they say in England
 Red, white, and blue
 British volunteers
 The conquering hero
 Marseilles hymn
 The boy in blue
 The Englishman
 How cherry are the mariners!
 Ye mariners of England
 Our good ship
 Man the life-boat
 The fisherman's song
 The boatie rows
 What if the sailor boldly goes
 Hearts of oak
 The fishing-boat
 The sailor's tear
 The fisherman's song
 The mariner's hymn
 Rule Britannia
 Index
 Back Cover






Group Title: The penny work-away songster : to hand-workers everywhere, this little manual, meant to help them to lighten toil by song
Title: The penny work-away songster
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003346/00001
 Material Information
Title: The penny work-away songster to hand-workers everywhere, this little manual, meant to help them to lighten toil by song
Physical Description: 64 p. : ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Clarke, J. Erskine ( John Erskine ), 1827-1920
Routledge, Warne, & Routledge ( Publisher )
Bradbury & Evans ( Printer )
Publisher: Routledge, Warne, and Routledge
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Manufacturer: Bradbury and Evans
Publication Date: 1860
 Subjects
Subject: Religious poetry, English   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1860   ( rbgenr )
Hymns -- 1860   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1860   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1860
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hymns   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: is cordially offered by J. Erskine Clarke.
General Note: "The fiftieth thousand."
General Note: Includes index.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement: p. 2, 3, and 4 of cover.
General Note: Without music.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003346
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002250910
oclc - 47806567
notis - ALK2669
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    To-day and to-morrow
        Page 3
    A cheerful song
        Page 4
    Cheer, boys, cheer!
        Page 5
    A Cheer for the workers
        Page 6
    Cheer up!
        Page 7
    Cheer up! And keep on, never minding
        Page 7
    An honest heart to guide us
        Page 8
    Never say fail!
        Page 9
    Never give up
        Page 10
    There's fortune on before us
        Page 10
    Delays
        Page 11
    The good time coming
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Daily work
        Page 14
    Perseverance, or try again
        Page 15
    Heroes
        Page 16
    Bye and bye
        Page 16
    Now or never
        Page 17
    Pleasure and duty
        Page 17
    Encouragement
        Page 18
    Live and let live
        Page 18
    Work away
        Page 19
    Joy and comfort
        Page 19
    The camp has had its day of song
        Page 20
    The weaver's song
        Page 21
    Good heart and willing hand
        Page 22
    Strike the iron while it's hot
        Page 23
    The village blacksmith
        Page 24
    The blacksmith
        Page 25
    The spinning wheel
        Page 26
    Factory round
        Page 26
    Noblemen
        Page 27
    Honest pride
        Page 28
    The peasantry of England
        Page 28
    The plough
        Page 29
    The ploughshare of old England
        Page 30
    The merry ploughman
        Page 31
    The British farmer
        Page 31
    Song of the haymakers
        Page 32
    Take down the sickle
        Page 33
    The barley-mowers' song
        Page 34
    The reapers
        Page 35
    The thresher
        Page 36
    Merrily goes the mill
        Page 37
    The milkmaid
        Page 38
    The quarry man
        Page 38
    Song of the miners
        Page 39
    The woodman's song
        Page 40
    Westward ho!
        Page 40
    The girl I left behind me
        Page 41
    The soldier-boy
        Page 42
    The soldier's tear
        Page 42
    I see them on thier winding way
        Page 43
    The British grenadiers
        Page 44
    What will they say in England
        Page 45
    Red, white, and blue
        Page 46
    British volunteers
        Page 46
    The conquering hero
        Page 47
    Marseilles hymn
        Page 48
    The boy in blue
        Page 49
    The Englishman
        Page 50
    How cherry are the mariners!
        Page 51
    Ye mariners of England
        Page 52
    Our good ship
        Page 53
    Man the life-boat
        Page 54
    The fisherman's song
        Page 55
    The boatie rows
        Page 56
    What if the sailor boldly goes
        Page 57
    Hearts of oak
        Page 58
    The fishing-boat
        Page 59
    The sailor's tear
        Page 60
    The fisherman's song
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The mariner's hymn
        Page 62
    Rule Britannia
        Page 62
    Index
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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THE PENNY


WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.





TO HAND-WORKERS EVERYWHERE,
THIS LITTLE MANUAL,
XMANT TO HELP THEM TO LIGHTEN TOIL BY SONG,

is Eortbiall Offter

BY

J. ERSKINE CLARKE, M1.A.,
Oompiler of Heart Music and Hearty Staves "; Author of
Children at Church" ; and Editor of "The Parish Magazine."


THE FIFTIETH THOUSAND.


LONDON:
ROUTLEDGE, WARNE, AND ROUTLEDGE,
FARRINGDON STREET.
NEW YORK: 56, WALKER STREET.
1860.








LASBO is worship! "-the robin is snging;
Labor is worship "-the wild bee Is ritagtg,
Listen that eloquent whisper upspringing
Speaks to thy soul from out Nature's great heart.
From the dark cloud flows the life-giving shower;
From the rough sod blows the soft breathing flower;
From the small insect, the rich coral bower;
Only man, in the plan, shrinks from his part.
Labour is life !-'tis the still water faileth;
Idleness ever despaireth, bewaileth;
Keep the watch wound, for the dark night assaileth;
Flowers droop and die in the stillness of noon.
Labour is glory !-the flying cloud lightens;
Only the waving wing changes and brightens;
Idle hearts only the dark future frightens;
Play the sweet keys, wouldst thou keep them in tunet

Song rouses the circulation, wakes up the bodily
energies, and diffuses life and animation around.
Does a lazy man ever sing? We never heard it.
Song is the outlet of mental and physical energy, and
increases both by its exercise. Therefore, if you can
sing with your voice when you are at work, do so; if
you cannot, at any rate you can make melody in your
heart, and if this little book helps you in doing so, it
will achieve the purpose for which it was put to-
gether. The Compiler requests that any inadvertent
infringement of Copyright may be at once notified to
him, that it may be apologized for and corrected; and
also, that he may be favoured with any further infor-
nation as to where the music for the words may be
obtained.





THE PENNY

WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.





TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW.
DON'T tell me of to-morrow,
Give me the man who'll say
Whene'er a good deed's to be done,
Let's do the deed to-day!
We may eommand the present,
If we act and never waitS
But repenta&ce is the phantom
Of the past, that oomes to9 jte I
Don't tel .me of to-morrow,;
There's iuch to do to-.day
Th4 can never be accoxp'is'd
If we throw the hours away;
Every moment has its dduty--
Who the future can foretell
Then why leave for to-morrow
What to-day can do as well?
Don't tell me of to-morrow;
If we look upon the past,
How much that we had left to 4o,
We could not do at last!
To-day it is the only time
For all on this frail earths
It takes an age to form a life,
A moment gives it birth!
A2




4 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
A CHEERFUL SONG.
American.
HIGH feasting makes us earthly
And never helps us rise;
Deep drinking drowns the spirit,
And keeps us from the skies:
Loud mirth is false and hollow,
Nor makes us happy long:
But would a man be merry,
Why let him sing a song.
CHORUS.
Oh! this singing! it helps to right what's wrong !
In workshops, hall, and cottages,
We'll sing a cheerful song.
Much reading may be tiresome;
It rains, you stay within;
Companions may be tedious,
Their talk be weak and vain,
With tittle, tittle, tattle,
With chit-chat dull and long:
Then, friends, would you be merry,
Why! up and sing a song.
CHoRus-Oh! this singngg! &c.
Though false ones may deceive you,
Though fickle ones forsake;
Though hollow friends may leave you,
And cause your heart to ache;
No cares can greatly press you,
Things cannot much go wrong,
If you but cast them from you,
Rise up, and sing a song.
SCouRus-Oh! this singing &c.
Though public praise may fail you,
Though friends unjustly blame,
Though slanderous tongues assail you,
And wound your honest name,




FOR ALL WORKERS. 6
With tittle, tittle, tattle,
With hinting broad and long,
Yet cast them all behind you,
And sing a cheerful song.
CHoRus-Oh! this singing! &o.


CHEER, BOYS, CHEER!
C. MAOcKA.-Music at Chappell's.
CHEER, boys, cheer! no more of idle sorrow;
Courage! true hearts shall bear us on the way;
Hope points before, and shows the bright to-morrow,
Let us forget the darkness of to-day.
SQ farewell, England! much as we may love thee,
We'll dry the tears that we have shed before;
Why should we weep to sail in search of fortune
So farewell, England! farewell evermore!
Cheer, boys, cheer! for England, mother England!
Cheer, boys, cheer! the willing strong right
hand; [labour;
Cheer, boys, cheer! there's wealth for honest
Cheer, boys, cheer! for the new and happy land.

Cheer, boys, cheer! the steady breeze is blowing,
To float us freely o'er the ocean's breast;
The world shall follow in the track we're going;
The star of Empire glitters in the West.
Here we had toil and little to reward it,
But there shall plenty smile upon our pain,
And ours shall be the prairie and the forest,
And boundless meadows ripe with golden grain.
Cheer, boys, cheer! for England, mother England!
Cheer, boys, cheer! united heart and hand;
Cheers boys, cheer! there's wealth for honest
labour;
Cheer, boys, cheer! for the new and happy land.




6 THE PENNY WtORK-AIVA SONGSTER.
A CHEER FOR THE WORKERS.
J. RICHARDSON, in Ctssell's Working Man's Friend."
oERRAH for the men who work,
Whatever may be their trade !
S Hurrah for the men who wield the pen,
And they who use the spade;
Who eari their daily bread
By the sweat of an honest brow!
Hurrah for the men who dig and delve,
And they who reap and plough I
hEurrah for the sturdy arm!
Hurrah for the steady will!
Hurrah for the worker's strength!
u~riah Air the worker's skill!
Hurah tir the rfm that guides the plough,
Ahd the hand that drives the quill!
Hurrah tor the noble workers !
h iirrah fot the young and old!
S1ite mten of worth all over the earth-
Hurrah for the workers bold!
HItrah for the men that work,
And the trade that suits them best!
tHurrah for the six days' labour,
And the one of blessed rest!
H urrah for the open heart!
Hurrah for the noble aim!
Hurrah for a quiet home !
Hurrah for an honest name !
Hunah for the men who strive!
Hurrah for the men who save,
fio sit not down to sigh,
B~ut struggle like the brave!
Hutrrah for the men who earn their bread,
And will not stoop to crave !
Uftrah for the honest workers 1 &c.




FOR ALL WORKERS. 7
CHEER UP!
By M. F. TUPPER.
NEVER go gloomily, man with a mind!
Hope is a better companion than fear,
Providence, ever benignant and kind,
Gives with a smile what you take with a tear;
All will be right,-look to the light,-
Morning is ever the daughter of night,
All that was black will be all that is bright:
Cierily, cheerily then! cheer up !
Many a foe is a friend in disguise,
Many a sorrow a blessing most true,
Helping the heart to be happy and wise,
With love ever precious and joys ever new;
Stand in the van,-strive like a man!
This is the bravest and cleverest plan,
Trusting in God, while you do what you can:
Cheerily, cheerily then! cheer up !
CHEER UP! AND KEEP ON, NEVER MINDING.
E. FA.RMER.
LET sages rave, with visage grave,
To prove this world's beyond all bearing,
But near forget, some warm hearts yet
Are left, which make it worth the wearing.
If clouds should lower, and friends look sour,
'Tis only neighbour's fare you're finding;
One maxim still cures every ill,
Cheer up and keep on, never minding!
One thing's quite clear, no mortal here
Hath happiness without some sorrow;
And though to-day joy flies away,
It may come back again to-morrow.
No hour so dear, but in its rear
Some warmer, brighter tint is winding;
Then come what may, play out tie play-
Cheer up and keep on, never minding!




FOR ALL WORKERS. 7
CHEER UP!
By M. F. TUPPER.
NEVER go gloomily, man with a mind!
Hope is a better companion than fear,
Providence, ever benignant and kind,
Gives with a smile what you take with a tear;
All will be right,-look to the light,-
Morning is ever the daughter of night,
All that was black will be all that is bright:
Cierily, cheerily then! cheer up !
Many a foe is a friend in disguise,
Many a sorrow a blessing most true,
Helping the heart to be happy and wise,
With love ever precious and joys ever new;
Stand in the van,-strive like a man!
This is the bravest and cleverest plan,
Trusting in God, while you do what you can:
Cheerily, cheerily then! cheer up !
CHEER UP! AND KEEP ON, NEVER MINDING.
E. FA.RMER.
LET sages rave, with visage grave,
To prove this world's beyond all bearing,
But near forget, some warm hearts yet
Are left, which make it worth the wearing.
If clouds should lower, and friends look sour,
'Tis only neighbour's fare you're finding;
One maxim still cures every ill,
Cheer up and keep on, never minding!
One thing's quite clear, no mortal here
Hath happiness without some sorrow;
And though to-day joy flies away,
It may come back again to-morrow.
No hour so dear, but in its rear
Some warmer, brighter tint is winding;
Then come what may, play out tie play-
Cheer up and keep on, never minding!




THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

AN HONEST HEART TO GUIDE US.
S. LOVER.-Music at Campbell's.
As day by day
We hold our way
Through this wide world below, boys,
With roads to cross,
We're at a loss
To know which way to go, boys; V
And choice so vex'd,
When man's perplex'd,
And many a doubt has tried him,
It is not long
He'll wander wrong
With an honest heart to guide him.
When rough the way,
And dark the day,
More steadfastly we tread, boys,
Than when by flowers
In wayside bowers
We from the path are led, boys.
Oh! then, beware!
The serpent there
Is gliding close beside us!
'Twere death to stay,
So speed the way,
With an honest heart to guide us,
If Fortune's gale
Should fill our sail,
While others lose the wind, boys,
Look kindly back
Upon the track
Of luckless mates behind, boys.
If we won't heed
A friend in need,




0


FOR ALL WORKERS.
May rocks ahead abide us!
Let's rather brave
Both wind and wave,
With an honest heart to guide us!
NEVER SAY FAIL!
KEEP pushing-'tis wiser
Than sitting aside,
And dreaming and sighing
'And waiting the tide.
In life's earnest battle
They only prevail
Who daily march onward
And never say fail!
With an eye ever open
A tongue that's not dumb,
And a heart that will never
To sorrow succumb-
You'll battle and conquer,
Though thousands assail;
How strong and how mighty
Who never say fail!
The spirit of angels
Is active I know,
As higher and higher
In glory they go,
Methinks on bright pinions
From heaven they sail,
To cheer and encourage
Who never say fail!
In life's rosy morning,
In manhood's firm pride,
Let this be the motto
Your footsteps to guide:
In storm and in sunshine
Whatever assail,
We'll onward and conquer,
And never say fail!




10 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
NEVER GIVE UP,
NEVER give up it is wiser and better
Always to hope than once to despair;
Fling off the load of doubt's heavy fetter,
And break the dark spell of tyrannical care;
Never give up I or the burden may sink you,-
Providence kindly has mingled the cup,
And in all trials and troubles bethink you,
The watchword of life must be, never give up!
Never give up there are chances and changes
Helping the hopeful a hundred to one,
And through the chaos high wisdom arranges
Ever success-if you'll only hope on.
Never give up for the wisest is boldest,
Knowing that Providence mingles the cup;
And of all maxims, the best, as the oldest,
Is the true watchword of never give up!
Never give up! though the grape-shot may rattle,
Or the full thunder-cloud over you burst;
Stand like a rock,--and the storm or the battle
Little shall harm you, though doing their worst:
Never give up !-if adversity presses,
Providence wisely has mingled the cup,
And the best counsel in all your distresses,
Is the stout watchword of never give up!

THERE'S FORTUNE ON BEFORE US.
Music at Davidson's.
THERE'S fortune on before us, boys!
We'll seek it day by day,
And if we strive and persevere,
'Twill meet us half the way.
With toilful brow and stalwart arm
We've sought it far and near,
Oh, never let our courage fail,
But strive and persevere I




10 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
NEVER GIVE UP,
NEVER give up it is wiser and better
Always to hope than once to despair;
Fling off the load of doubt's heavy fetter,
And break the dark spell of tyrannical care;
Never give up I or the burden may sink you,-
Providence kindly has mingled the cup,
And in all trials and troubles bethink you,
The watchword of life must be, never give up!
Never give up there are chances and changes
Helping the hopeful a hundred to one,
And through the chaos high wisdom arranges
Ever success-if you'll only hope on.
Never give up for the wisest is boldest,
Knowing that Providence mingles the cup;
And of all maxims, the best, as the oldest,
Is the true watchword of never give up!
Never give up! though the grape-shot may rattle,
Or the full thunder-cloud over you burst;
Stand like a rock,--and the storm or the battle
Little shall harm you, though doing their worst:
Never give up !-if adversity presses,
Providence wisely has mingled the cup,
And the best counsel in all your distresses,
Is the stout watchword of never give up!

THERE'S FORTUNE ON BEFORE US.
Music at Davidson's.
THERE'S fortune on before us, boys!
We'll seek it day by day,
And if we strive and persevere,
'Twill meet us half the way.
With toilful brow and stalwart arm
We've sought it far and near,
Oh, never let our courage fail,
But strive and persevere I




FOR ALL WORKERS.
With honest truth and good stout hearts,
Wherever we may roam,
No thorny path or rugged road
But leads us safely home.
So join with head, with heart and hand,
And drive despair away,
For better times are coming, friends;
We'll work and win the day.
Then courage, boys! the day will come,
To soothe our toil and pain;
When happiness shall smile on us,
And in our dwellings reign
And we shall live to bless the hour
We strove to win the day,
So fortune will our efforts crown,
And meet us on the way I

DELAYS.
SRuv delays, they breed remorse;
Take thy time while time is lent thee;
Creeping snails have. weakest force-
Fly their fault, lest thou repent thee;
Good is best when sooner wrought,
Lingering labours come to nought.
Hoist up sail while gale doth last,
Tide and wind stay no man's pleasure!
Seek not time when time is past,
Sober speed is wisdom's leisure;
After-wits are dearly bought,
Let thy fore-wit guide thy thought.
Time wears all his locks before,
Take thou hold upon his forehead;
When he flees he turns no more
And behind his scalp is naked.
Works adjourn'd have many stays,
Long demurs breed new delays.


11




12 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE GOOD TIME COMING.
CHARLES MACKAY.-Music at Davidson's.
THERE'S a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
We may not live to see the day,
But earth shall glisten in the ray
Of the good time coming.
Cannon-balls may aid the truth,
But thought's a weapon stronger,-
We'll win our battles by its aid;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
The pen shall supersede the sword,
And right, not might, shall be the lord,
In the good time coming.
Worth, not birth, shall rule mankind,
And be acknowledged stronger;-
The proper impulse has been given;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
War in all men's eyes shall be
A monster of iniquity
In the good time coming.
Nations shall not quarrel then
To prove which is the stronger,
Nor slaughter men for glory's sake;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
Hateful rivalries of creed
Shall not make their martyrs bleed,
In the good time coming.
Religion shall be shorn of pride,
And flourish all the stronger;
And Charity shall trim her lamp;-
Wait a little longer.




FOR ALL WORKERS.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
And a poor man's family
Shall not be his misery,
In the good time coming.
Every chan shall be a help
To make his rlKt arm stronger;
The happier he the more 3k has;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
Little children shall not toil
Under or above the soil,
In the good time coming;
But shall play in healthful fields
Till limbs and mind grow stronger;
And every one shall read and write ;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
The people shall be temperate,
And shall love instead of hate,
In the good time coming.
They shall use and not abuse,
And make all virtue stronger;-
The reformation has begun;-
Wait a little longer.
There's a good time coming, boys,
A good time coming:
Let us aid it all we can-
Every woman, every man,
In the good time coming.
Smallest helps, if rightly given,
Make the impulse stronger-
'Twill be strong enough one day;-
'Wait a little longer.


13




14 THE PENNY WORK-A.WAY SONGSTER.
DAILY WORK.
CHARL9 MXACKXY.
WHO lags from tread of daily work
And his appointed task would shirk,
Commits a folly an~d s-eme;
A soulleasssVe,-
Ap ry knave,-
A clog upon the wheels of time.
With work to do and store of health,
The man's unworthy to be free,
Who will not give,
That he may live,
His daily toil for daily fee.
No! let us work we only ask
Reward proportion'd to our task-
We have no quarrel with the great,
No feud with rank-
With mill or bank-
No envy of a lord's estate;
If we can earn sufficient store
To satisfy our daily need,
And can retain
For age and pain
A fraction, we are rich indeed.
No dread of toil have we or ours,
We know our worth, and weigh our powers:
The more we work the more we win;
Success to trade!
Success to spade!
And to the corn that's coming in!
And joy to him who o'er his task
Remembers toil is nature's plan.;
Who, working, thinks,
And never sinks
His independence as a man.




FOR ALL WORKERS.
Who only aski for humblest wealth,
Enough for competence and health,
And leisure when his work is done
To read his book
By chimney nook,
Or stroll at setting of the sun;
Who toils as every man should toil,
For fair reward, erect and free,
These are the men-
The best of men-
These are the men we mean to be.
PERSEVERANCE, OR TRY AGAIN.
W. E. HICKSON.-Tune "Duncan Gray."
'TIs a lesson you should heed,
Try, try, try again;
If at first you don't succeed,
Try, try, try again.
Then your courage should appear,
For if you will persevere,
You will conquer, never fear,
Try, try, try again.
Once or twice though you should fail,
Try, try, try again;
If you would at last prevail,
Try, try, try again;
If we strive, 'tis no disgrace,
Though we may not win the race;
What should you do in that case ?
Try, try, try again.
If you find your task is hard,
Try, try, try again;
Time will bring you your reward,
Try, try, try again;
All that other folks can do,
Why, with patience, should not you?
Only keep this rule in view,
Try, try, try again.


15




16 THE PENNY WOIT..-WAY SONGSTER.
HEROES.
From Cassell's Working Man's Friend."
I SING of heroes, old and young,
Who struggle much and labour hard-
Be it with head, or hand, or tongue,
And toiling feel their great reward;
Who aim to set the spirit free,-
These are the heroes, boys, for me!
Not those who boast an ancient name,
And claim their golden stores of wealth;
Whose honour, like a burning flame,
Consumes at once their time and health;
Who seem to have no mind to free,-
They are not heroes, boys, for me.
But he is the hero, high or low,
Who, has he wealth or does he lack it,
Is he fast or is he slow,
Black be his coat, or fustian jacket;
Has he a mind, and is it free ?-
That is the hero, boys, for me.
Or rich or poor, whatever his station;
In manhood's years, or vigorous youth;
Behold him scattering o'er the nation
The seeds of God's eternal truth;
Just such a man, where'er you see,
Is just the hero, boys, for me.
BYE AND BYE.
THERE'S a little mischief-making
Elfin, who is ever nigh,
Thwarting every undertaking,
And his name is Bye and Bye."
What we ought to do this minute
Will be better done, he'll cry,
If to-morrow we begin it-
Put it off," says "Bye and Bye."




16 THE PENNY WOIT..-WAY SONGSTER.
HEROES.
From Cassell's Working Man's Friend."
I SING of heroes, old and young,
Who struggle much and labour hard-
Be it with head, or hand, or tongue,
And toiling feel their great reward;
Who aim to set the spirit free,-
These are the heroes, boys, for me!
Not those who boast an ancient name,
And claim their golden stores of wealth;
Whose honour, like a burning flame,
Consumes at once their time and health;
Who seem to have no mind to free,-
They are not heroes, boys, for me.
But he is the hero, high or low,
Who, has he wealth or does he lack it,
Is he fast or is he slow,
Black be his coat, or fustian jacket;
Has he a mind, and is it free ?-
That is the hero, boys, for me.
Or rich or poor, whatever his station;
In manhood's years, or vigorous youth;
Behold him scattering o'er the nation
The seeds of God's eternal truth;
Just such a man, where'er you see,
Is just the hero, boys, for me.
BYE AND BYE.
THERE'S a little mischief-making
Elfin, who is ever nigh,
Thwarting every undertaking,
And his name is Bye and Bye."
What we ought to do this minute
Will be better done, he'll cry,
If to-morrow we begin it-
Put it off," says "Bye and Bye."




FOR ALL WORKERS. 17
Those who heed his treacherous wooing
Will his faithless guidance rue;
What we always put off doing,
Clearly we shall never do.
We shall reach what we endeavour,
If on now we more rely;
But unto the realms of never"
Leads the pilot Bye and Bye."
NOW OR NEVER.
Now or never, now or never,
Let the maxim ne'er depart!
'Tis the watchword that for ever
Should inspire each manly heart;
For if justice must be rendered
On the wrong that's done to thee,
That no malice be engender'd,
Now or never let it be!
Now .or never-why to-morrow ?
If the deed is good to-day,
There may lurk an age of sorrow,
In the hour that's thrown away !
It is better to be doing,
For the future who can see ?
And delay may lead to ruin-
Now or never let it be!

PLEASURE AND DUTY.
OH, righteous doom, that they who make
Pleasure their only end,
Ordering the whole life for its sake,
Miss that whereto they tend.
While they who bid stern duty lead,
Content to follow, they
Of duty only taking heed,
Find pleasure by the way.




FOR ALL WORKERS. 17
Those who heed his treacherous wooing
Will his faithless guidance rue;
What we always put off doing,
Clearly we shall never do.
We shall reach what we endeavour,
If on now we more rely;
But unto the realms of never"
Leads the pilot Bye and Bye."
NOW OR NEVER.
Now or never, now or never,
Let the maxim ne'er depart!
'Tis the watchword that for ever
Should inspire each manly heart;
For if justice must be rendered
On the wrong that's done to thee,
That no malice be engender'd,
Now or never let it be!
Now .or never-why to-morrow ?
If the deed is good to-day,
There may lurk an age of sorrow,
In the hour that's thrown away !
It is better to be doing,
For the future who can see ?
And delay may lead to ruin-
Now or never let it be!

PLEASURE AND DUTY.
OH, righteous doom, that they who make
Pleasure their only end,
Ordering the whole life for its sake,
Miss that whereto they tend.
While they who bid stern duty lead,
Content to follow, they
Of duty only taking heed,
Find pleasure by the way.




18 THE PENNY WOR-AWAY SONGSTEB.
ENCOURAGEMENT.
YET one more cheer, one brotherly cheer,
To speed the good youth on his way!
There's plenty to hope and little to fear
For those who have chosen the good part here,
While it is called to-day.
Ah! well do I wot the perils and snares
Of this bad world and its lust;
Temptations and sorrows, vexations and cares,
Grow with the young heart's wheat like tares,
And worry it down to the dust!
Yet better, I know, if the spirit will pray
When trouble is near at hand,
If the heart pleads hard for grace to obey,
Brother, no sin shall lure thee astray;
By faith thou still shalt stand.
For Heaven bends over to help and to bless,
With all a Redeemer's power,
The spirit that strives, when evils oppress,
Its God to serve and its Lord to confess
In dark temptation's hour.
Thou, then, fair brother, go cheerily forth,
And manfully do your best,
In all sincerity's warmth and worth
Go forth-be pure, be happy on earth,
And so evermore be blest!

LIVE AND LET LIVE.
J. W. LAKE.-Music at Addison's.
LIVE and let live-'tis the great law of nature,
Man to his fellow should ever be kind;
He whose high bounty protects every creature,
Taught us to practise this precept divine.
Wide is the world, and though various in station,
Each to his neighbour good wishes may give;
All men belong to humanity's nation,
Nature's great law is, to live and let live.




18 THE PENNY WOR-AWAY SONGSTEB.
ENCOURAGEMENT.
YET one more cheer, one brotherly cheer,
To speed the good youth on his way!
There's plenty to hope and little to fear
For those who have chosen the good part here,
While it is called to-day.
Ah! well do I wot the perils and snares
Of this bad world and its lust;
Temptations and sorrows, vexations and cares,
Grow with the young heart's wheat like tares,
And worry it down to the dust!
Yet better, I know, if the spirit will pray
When trouble is near at hand,
If the heart pleads hard for grace to obey,
Brother, no sin shall lure thee astray;
By faith thou still shalt stand.
For Heaven bends over to help and to bless,
With all a Redeemer's power,
The spirit that strives, when evils oppress,
Its God to serve and its Lord to confess
In dark temptation's hour.
Thou, then, fair brother, go cheerily forth,
And manfully do your best,
In all sincerity's warmth and worth
Go forth-be pure, be happy on earth,
And so evermore be blest!

LIVE AND LET LIVE.
J. W. LAKE.-Music at Addison's.
LIVE and let live-'tis the great law of nature,
Man to his fellow should ever be kind;
He whose high bounty protects every creature,
Taught us to practise this precept divine.
Wide is the world, and though various in station,
Each to his neighbour good wishes may give;
All men belong to humanity's nation,
Nature's great law is, to live and let live.




FOR ALL WORKERS. 19
Live and let live-'tis the aim of our being,
The rich and the poor on each other depend;
All men are equal before the All-seeing,
Each, in his turn, stands in need of a friend.
Be, to a foe in distress, like a brother,
Oh, it is sweet to forget and forgive;
Love all that is lovely-be kind to each other;
Nature's best law is-to live and let live.

WORK AWAY.
Music in Juvenile Ifarmonist," Sunday School Union.
I REMEMBER a lesson which was not thrown away,
Learn betimes to be of use, don't lose too much time
in play:
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
Hands were made to be useful, if you teach them the
way, [ful every day:
Therefore, for yourself or neighbour, make them use-
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
And to speed with your labour, make the most of the
day, [say :
What may hinder you to-morrow it's impossible to
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
As for grief and vexation, let them come when they
may, [light and gay:
When your heart is in your labour, it will soon be
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.

JOY AND COMFORT.
ERE the morning's busy ray
Calls you to your work away,
Ere the silent evening close
Your wearied eyes in sweet repose,
To lift your heart and voice in prayer
Be your first and latest care.




FOR ALL WORKERS. 19
Live and let live-'tis the aim of our being,
The rich and the poor on each other depend;
All men are equal before the All-seeing,
Each, in his turn, stands in need of a friend.
Be, to a foe in distress, like a brother,
Oh, it is sweet to forget and forgive;
Love all that is lovely-be kind to each other;
Nature's best law is-to live and let live.

WORK AWAY.
Music in Juvenile Ifarmonist," Sunday School Union.
I REMEMBER a lesson which was not thrown away,
Learn betimes to be of use, don't lose too much time
in play:
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
Hands were made to be useful, if you teach them the
way, [ful every day:
Therefore, for yourself or neighbour, make them use-
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
And to speed with your labour, make the most of the
day, [say :
What may hinder you to-morrow it's impossible to
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.
As for grief and vexation, let them come when they
may, [light and gay:
When your heart is in your labour, it will soon be
Work away while you're able, work away, work away.

JOY AND COMFORT.
ERE the morning's busy ray
Calls you to your work away,
Ere the silent evening close
Your wearied eyes in sweet repose,
To lift your heart and voice in prayer
Be your first and latest care.






$nor Urhers on %AN.

THE CAMP HAS HAD ITS DAY OF SONG.*
THE camp has had its day of song;
The sword, the bayonet, the plume,
Have crowded out of rhyme too long
The plough, the anvil, and the loom.
Oh, not upon our tented fields
Are Freedom's heroes bred alone;
The training of the workshop yields
More heroes true than war has known.
Who drives the bolt, who shapes the steel,
May with a heart as valiant smite,
As he who sees a foeman reel
In blood before his blow of might.
The skill that conquers space and time,
That graces life, that lightens toil,
May spring from courage more sublime
Than that which makes a realm its spoil.
Let labour, then, look up and see
His craft no pith of honour lacks;
The soldier's rifle yet shall be
Less honour'd than the woodman's axe.
Let Art his own appointment prize,
Nor deem that gold or outward height
Can compensate the worth that lies
In tastes that breed their own delight.
And may the time draw nearer still,
When men this sacred truth shall heed,
That from the thought, and from the will,
Must all that raises man proceed.
Ode composed for the Charitable Mechanics' Association ol
Massachusetts, by E. Sargent, Esq.




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. 2
Though pride should hold our calling low,
For us shall duty make it good;
And we from truth to truth shall go,
'Till life and death are understood.

THE WEAVER'S SONG.
BARRY CORNWALL.-MusiC at Z. T. Purday's.
WEAVE, brothers, weave !-swiftly throw
The shuttle athwart the loom,
And show us how brightly your flowers grow
That have beauty but not perfume:
Come, show us the rose with a hundred dyes,
The lily that hath no spot,
The violet deep as your true love's eyes,
And the little forget-me-not.
S!!.., sing, brothers! weave and sing,
i good both to sing and weave;
'Tis better to work than live idle,
'Tis better to sing than grieve.
Weave, brothers, weave!-weave and bid
The colours of sunset glow;
Let grace in each gliding thread be hid,
Let beauty about ye blow:
Let your skein be long, and your silk be fine,
And your hands both firm and sure;
And time nor chance shall your work untwine,
But all like a truth endure.
So, sing, brothers, &c.
Weave, brothers, weave !-toil is ours,
But toil is the lot of man;
One gathers the fruit, one gathers the flowers,
One soweth the seed again!
There is not a creature, from England's king
To the peasant that delves the soil,
That knows half the pleasure the seasons bring,
If he have not his share of toil.
So, sing, brothers, &o.




22 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

GOOD HEART AND WILLING HAND.
CHARLES MACEAT.
IN storms or shine, two friends of mine
Go forth to work or play;
And when they visit poor men's homes
They bless them by the way.
'Tis willing hand! 'tis cheerful heart!
The two best friends I know;
Around the hearth come joy and mirth
Where'er their faces glow.
Come shine-'tis bright! Come dark-'tis
Come cold, 'tis warm ere long; [light!
So heavily fall the hammer stroke,
Merrily sound the song.
Who falls may stand, if good right hand
Is first, not second best;
Who weeps may sing, if kindly heart
Has lodging in his breast.
The humblest board has dainties pour'd,
When they sit down to dine;
The crust they eat is honey sweet
The water good as wine.
They fill the purse with honest gold;
They lead no creature wrong;
So heavily fall the hammer stroke!
Merrily sound the song.
Without these twain the poor complain
Of evils hard to bear,
But with them poverty grows rich,
And finds a loaf to spare !
Their looks are fire, their words inspire,
Their deeds give courage high;
About their knees the children run,
Or climb, they know not why
0




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. 23
Who sails, or rides, or walks with them,
Ne'er finds the journey long;
So heavily fall the hammer stroke!
Merrily sound the song I

STRIKE THE IRON WHILE IT'S HOT.
J. E. CARPENTER.-Music at B. Williams's.
WITH the light be up and doing,
For there's danger in delay;
Hope deferred but leads to ruin,
Now or never, wins the day.
With the thought the deed begin it,
Act at once upon the spot;
What you'd gain, the way to win it,
Strike the iron while it s hot.
Strike the iron, &c.
Good advice ye need not spurn it,
But the man who'll soonest rise
Faces danger but to turn it,
And upon himself relies.
Never wait another's aiding,
You yourself may be forgot;
Lose no time in vain upbraiding,
Strike the iron while it's hot.
Strike the iron, &e.
Would ye do a kindly action,
Though your aid be vainly lent,
There is still the satisfaction
That the act was kindly meant.
Pause not then to ask another,
If to do the deed or not,
Look on each as on a brother,
Strike the iron while it's hot.
Strike the iron, &c.




24 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH.
H. W. LoxNeFimow.-Music at Addison and Co.'s.
UNDER a spreading chestnut tree
The village smithy stands;
The smith a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands,
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands;
His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
His face is like the tan;
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
He earns whatever he can, I
And looks the whole world in the face,
For he owes not any man.
Week in, week out, from morn till night,
You can hear his bellows blow;
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge
With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell
When the evening sun is low.
And children, coming home from school,
Look in at the open door:
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows' roar,
And catch the burning sparks that fly
Like chaff from a threshing-floor.
He goes on Sunday to the church,
And sits among the boys;
He hears the parson pray and preach,
He hears his daughter s voice,
Singing in the village choir;
And it makes his heart rejoice-
It sounds to him like her mother's voice
Singing in paradise.
He needs must think of her once more-
How in the grave she lies ;




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. 25
And with his hard, rough hand he wipes
A tear out of his eyes.
Toiling, rejoicing, sorrowing,
Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
Each evening sees its close;
Something attempted, something done,
Has earn'd a night's repose.
Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
For the lesson thou hast taught:
Thus, at the flaming forge of life,
Our fortunes must be wrought-
Thus, on its sounding anvil, shaped
Each burning deed and thought.

THE BLACKSMITH.
W. J. RossoN.-Music at Cocks and Co.'s.
ToIL, toil and work by the furnace heat,
While our voices chime with the hammer's beat,
Andour browsthey are crown'd withthe burning sleet.
The anvil it rings with each crushing blow,
And the iron is white from the fiery glow.
One, two: one, two: hark! the hammers sing,
And round the still village the echoes ring.
One, two: one, two: that, boys, will do.
Now bend it, now weld it; now shout for the lord
Of the mighty earth-the sharp, keen sword !"
Toil, toil and work by the bellows' song:
Our faces are black, and our backs are strong,
And our arms are as nervous as twisted thong.
Now the huge forge pants, and the sparks fly off,
And the iron it seethes in the water-trough.
One, two: one, two: hark! the hammers sing,
And round the still village the echoes ring,
One, two: one, two: that, boys, will do.
Now shape it, now weld it; now shout to the slayer
Of the sharp keen sword-" the good plough-share !




26 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SPINNING WHEEL.
Music in Hullah s Mannal.
THE wheel, oh, how it hums!
The merry spinning-wheel.
Good dame, when the snow comes,
The shepherd shall not feel
The blast; with plaid and hose
He'll breast the winter storm,
And hark! how loud it blows
Around our ingle warm!
0 dame, thy sailor-boy
Upon the giddy mast
Sits high, and sings with joy
(Tottering before the blast).
God speed the murmuring wheel,
That spins the lambkin's fleece,
Which wraps us while we reel
Across the swelling seas.
And he, the sire! that's gone
Up to the summit's rock,
To watch through night, alone,
The wanderings of his flock,
Afar the fagot's flame
Upon the hearth he spies,
And prays God bless the dame
Her busy wheel that plies.
FACTORY ROUND.
THE bobbins are twisting and twirling
With a murmuring, buzzing sound;
The swifts are steadily whirling
Around, and around, and around.
So seconds, and minutes, and hours
Are hastily passing away;
And happy are they who, like us,
Are industrious, honest, and gay.
All up all up a-running, a-running, a-going!
All up i all up 1 a-runming, a-running, a-going !




26 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SPINNING WHEEL.
Music in Hullah s Mannal.
THE wheel, oh, how it hums!
The merry spinning-wheel.
Good dame, when the snow comes,
The shepherd shall not feel
The blast; with plaid and hose
He'll breast the winter storm,
And hark! how loud it blows
Around our ingle warm!
0 dame, thy sailor-boy
Upon the giddy mast
Sits high, and sings with joy
(Tottering before the blast).
God speed the murmuring wheel,
That spins the lambkin's fleece,
Which wraps us while we reel
Across the swelling seas.
And he, the sire! that's gone
Up to the summit's rock,
To watch through night, alone,
The wanderings of his flock,
Afar the fagot's flame
Upon the hearth he spies,
And prays God bless the dame
Her busy wheel that plies.
FACTORY ROUND.
THE bobbins are twisting and twirling
With a murmuring, buzzing sound;
The swifts are steadily whirling
Around, and around, and around.
So seconds, and minutes, and hours
Are hastily passing away;
And happy are they who, like us,
Are industrious, honest, and gay.
All up all up a-running, a-running, a-going!
All up i all up 1 a-runming, a-running, a-going !




FOR WORnERS ON LAD, )
A FACTORY SONG.
BxInHTiY, brightly shines the skein,
Golden yellow, smooth, and soft;
But the slender silken thread,
Winding, see! is broken oft.
Well, no matter, find the end,
A little knot soon makes a mend;
But watch the knotty place with eare,
'Tis apt to break again just there.
Like the silk our tempers seem,
Smooth and even till they're tried!
But oft we see the thread of peace
Broke short by roughness and by pride.
Well now quickly join the ends;
Forgive forget! shake hands! be friends!
But watch the knotty place with care,
Lest it should break again just there.
NOBLEMEN,
C. H. STUART.
THE noblest men I know on earth
Are men whose hands are brown with fil;
Who, back'd by no ancestral birth,
Hew down the woods, and till the soil,
And thereby win a prouder fame
Than crowns a king's or warrior's namn.
The working men, whatever their t sk,
To carve the stone, or bear the hod,
They wear upon their honest brows
The royal stamp and seal of God!
And brighter are their drops of sweat
Than diamonds in a coronet.
God bless the noble working men,
Who rear the cities of the plain,
Who dig the mines and build the ships,
Who drive the commerce of the main!
God bless them! for their swarthy hands
Have wrought the glory of all lands.




28 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
HONEST PRIDE.
JAMES SIMMONDS.-Music at Brewer and Co.'s.
LrTEr, ye tillers of the soil that gave our fathers
birth, [on earth.
And I will tell you what I deem a poor man's pride
I'm proud to toil with willing hands, and earn my
daily bread, [I'm fed;
Yet prouder still, no man can say by ill-got gold
I'm proud to see my frugal wife sit smiling by my
side, [my bride;
Prouder to think 'twas not for gold that she became
rm proud to help a falling friend, and do what good
I can, [honest man.
Prouder to know the world must say that I'm an
I'm proud to see my children smile as they climb
their mother's knee, [blush for me;
Prouder to think, when I'm no more, they cannot
Humble when night is gliding on to read the holy
prayer, [worldly care-
And prove that there's a heavenly balm for every
I'm proud that all my actions, and not my words
alone, [throne;
Will help to guide my children to an everlasting
And proud am I that all the world, who see the
course I ran, [an honest man."
Must say, wile bending o'er my grave, Here lies

THE PEASANTRY OF ENGLAND.
Music at Z. T. Purday's.
THE peasantry of England,
The merry hearts and free;
The sword may boast a braver band,
But give the scythe to me.
Give me the frame of industry,
Worth all your classic tomes.
God guard the English peasantry,
And bless their happy homes.




28 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
HONEST PRIDE.
JAMES SIMMONDS.-Music at Brewer and Co.'s.
LrTEr, ye tillers of the soil that gave our fathers
birth, [on earth.
And I will tell you what I deem a poor man's pride
I'm proud to toil with willing hands, and earn my
daily bread, [I'm fed;
Yet prouder still, no man can say by ill-got gold
I'm proud to see my frugal wife sit smiling by my
side, [my bride;
Prouder to think 'twas not for gold that she became
rm proud to help a falling friend, and do what good
I can, [honest man.
Prouder to know the world must say that I'm an
I'm proud to see my children smile as they climb
their mother's knee, [blush for me;
Prouder to think, when I'm no more, they cannot
Humble when night is gliding on to read the holy
prayer, [worldly care-
And prove that there's a heavenly balm for every
I'm proud that all my actions, and not my words
alone, [throne;
Will help to guide my children to an everlasting
And proud am I that all the world, who see the
course I ran, [an honest man."
Must say, wile bending o'er my grave, Here lies

THE PEASANTRY OF ENGLAND.
Music at Z. T. Purday's.
THE peasantry of England,
The merry hearts and free;
The sword may boast a braver band,
But give the scythe to me.
Give me the frame of industry,
Worth all your classic tomes.
God guard the English peasantry,
And bless their happy homes.




0OR WORKERS ON LAND.
The sinews of old England,
The bulwark of the soil,
How much we owe each manly hand,
Thus fearless of its toil!
Oh he who loves the harvest free,
Will sing where'er he roams.
God bless the English peasantry,
And give them happy homes.
God speed the plough of England,
Woe I hail thee with three cheers,
And here's to those whose labour planned
The all which life endears.
May still the wealth of industry
Be seen where'er man roams;
A cheer for England s peasantry,
God send them happy homes.

THE PLOUGH.
Practice Songs," Nos III., IV. Ward and Co.
THE teams are waiting in the field,
The ploughmen all a row,
As brisk and gay as birds in May,
They make a goodly show.
The farmer stands and sees all hands
Turn'd out and ready now;
Yet ere they start with all our heart,
We'll say, "God speed the plough."
We till the field, but He must yield
The sunshine and the rains.
In hope we plough, in hope we sow,
That He may bless our pains.
With willing mind and ready hand
Away to labour go!
Bear even weight, make furrow straight,
But say, God speed the plough I"




50 THE aXM.flr woBI-AW*AY 86 s'TEa.

THE PLOUGHSHARE OF OLD ENGLAND.
Erz. CooK.-Music at 2. T. Ptrdayas.
THE sailor boasts his stately ship,
The bulwark of the isle;
The soldier loves his sword, and sings
Of tented plains the while.
But we will hang the plow3hshare up
Within our fathers' hall
And guard it as the deity
Of plenteous festivals.
We'll pluck the brilliant poppies,
And the far-famed barley-corn,
To wreathe with bursting wheat-ears
That outshine the saffron morn;
We'll crown it with a glowing heart,
And pledge our fertile land,
The ploughshare of old England,
And the sturdy peasant band.
The work it does is good and blest,
And may be proudly told;
We see it in the teeming barns
And fields of waving gold.
Its metal is unsullied,
No blood-stain lingers there;
God speed it well, and let it
Thrive unshackled everywhere.
The bark may rest upon the wave,
The spear may gather dust;
But never may the prow that cuts
The furrow lie and rust.
Fill p, fill up, with glowing heart,
And pledge our fertile land,
The oughshare of old England,
And the sturdy peasant band.




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. S3
THE MERRY PLOUGHMAN.
As I was a-wandering ae morning in spring,
I heard a merry ploughman sae sweetly to sing;
And as he was singing thae words he did say,
"There's nae life like the ploughman's in the month
o' sweet May.
The lav'rock in the morning she'll rise frae her nest,
And mount to the air wi' the dew on her breast;
And wi' the merry ploughman she'llwhistle and sing,
And at night she'll return to her nest back again."
THE BRITISH FARMER.
J. E. CARPmSTEB-Music at Z. T. Purday's.
*HEBE's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold;
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old roof-tree.
The sailor may honour the rolling seas,
The soldier may boast of his victories;
But they fight for the land, and stand or fall,
For the tillage and plough that give health to all.
Here's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold;
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old
roof-tree.
All titles and honour and power must yield
To him who rules in the harvest-field,
For kings of the soil are the good and the brave,
Who til the land where the corn-fields wave.
Whose flocks are fed on the herbage green,
Whose countless herds in the vales are seen,
Whose home is content, and whose blessing is health,
And whose labour gives to our isle its wealth.
Here's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold,
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old
roof-tree.




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. S3
THE MERRY PLOUGHMAN.
As I was a-wandering ae morning in spring,
I heard a merry ploughman sae sweetly to sing;
And as he was singing thae words he did say,
"There's nae life like the ploughman's in the month
o' sweet May.
The lav'rock in the morning she'll rise frae her nest,
And mount to the air wi' the dew on her breast;
And wi' the merry ploughman she'llwhistle and sing,
And at night she'll return to her nest back again."
THE BRITISH FARMER.
J. E. CARPmSTEB-Music at Z. T. Purday's.
*HEBE's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold;
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old roof-tree.
The sailor may honour the rolling seas,
The soldier may boast of his victories;
But they fight for the land, and stand or fall,
For the tillage and plough that give health to all.
Here's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold;
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old
roof-tree.
All titles and honour and power must yield
To him who rules in the harvest-field,
For kings of the soil are the good and the brave,
Who til the land where the corn-fields wave.
Whose flocks are fed on the herbage green,
Whose countless herds in the vales are seen,
Whose home is content, and whose blessing is health,
And whose labour gives to our isle its wealth.
Here's a song for the British farmer bold,
With his golden grain and his cattle-fold,
A loftier theme perchance may be,
But here's power and wealth to his old
roof-tree.




S2 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

SONG OF THE HAYMAKERS.
ELIZA COOK.
THE noontide is hot, and our foreheads are brown,
Our palms are all shining and hard-
And hard is our work with the wain and the plough,
Oh! but poor is our daily reward.
But there's joy in the sunshine and mirth in the lark,
That skims whistling away overhead;
Our spirits are light, though our skins may be dark,
And there's peace with our meal of brown bread.
We dwell in the meadows and toil in the sod,
Far away from the city's dull gloom;
And more jolly are we, though in rags we may be,
Than the pale faces over the loom.
Then a song and a cheer for the bonny green stack,
Climbing up to the sun wide and high-
For the pitchers and rakers, and merry haymakers,
And a beautiful midsummer sky.
Come forth, gentle ladies-come forth, noble sirs,
Pray lend us your presence awhile,
Your garments will take no stain from the burs,
And a freckle won't tarnish your smile.
Our carpet's as soft, for your delicate-feet,
As the pile of your velveted floor,
And the scent of our greensward is surely as sweet
As the perfume of Araby's shore.
Come forth, noble masters, come forth to the field,
Where freshness and health may be found;
Where the windows are spread for the butterfly's bed,
And the clover-bloom falleth around.
Then a song and a cheer, &c.
"Hold fast," cries the waggoner-steady and quick,
And then comes the hearty gee wo!
While the cunning old team-horses manage to pick
A sweet mouthful to munch as they go.




FOR WORKERS ON LAND. 33
The tawny-faced children come round us to play,
And bravely they scatter the heap,
Till the tiniest one quite outspent with the fun
Is curl'd up with the sheep dog asleep.
While old age sits down on the haycock's crown
At the close of the labouring day,
And wishes his life, like the grass at his feet,
May be pure at its passing away.
Then a song and a cheer, &c.

TAKE DOWN THE SICKLE.
C. EASTMAN.
TARE down the sickle, boys hurrah!
The ears of ripen'd grain
Are waiting for the reaper's hand
Upon the fertile plain !
S The mellow moon, the changing leaves,
The earlier setting sun,
Proclaim, at last, my merry boys,
The harvest-time begun.
Thick on the hills, to-morrow's noon
The gather'd stock must see,
And with the loads of yellow corn
Shall groan the axle-tree !
The frost, my boys, will soon be here
And winter's on the way-
These glorious days will never, boys,
For lazy farmers stay !
Take down the sickle, boys, hurrah !
While loads of ripen'd grain
Are waiting for the reaper's hand
Upon the fruitful plain,
We'll gather up the golden corn
In thankfulness once more,
And fill with the returning seed
Our baskets and our store.




34 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE BARLEY-MOWERS' SONG.
MARY HOWITT.
BARLEY-MOWEaR here we stand,
One, two, three, a steady band;
True of heart and strong of limb,
Ready in our harvest-trim;
All a-row with spirits blithe,
Now we whet the bended scythe.
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink a-tink.
Side by side now, bending low,
Down the swaths of barley go;
Stroke by stroke, as true as chime
Of the bells, we keep in time:
Then we whet the ringing scythe,
Standing 'mid the barley lithe.
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink a-tink.
After labour cometh ease;
Sitting now beneath the trees,
Round we send the barley-wine,
Life infusing, clear and fine,
Then refresh'd, alert, and blythe,
Rise we all, and whet the scythe.
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink a-tink.
Barley-mowers must be true,
Keeping still the end in view;
One with all, and all with one,
Working on till set of sun;
Bending all with spirits blythe,
Whetting all at once the scythe.
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink a-tink.
Day and night, and night and day,
Time, the mower, will not stay,
We may hear him in our path
By the falling barley-swath;




FOR WoRxKEB OxN TIAV. 35
While we sing with spirits blithe,
We may hear his ringing scythe.
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink a-tink.
Time, the mower, cuts down all,
High and low, and great and small,
Fear him not, for we will grow
Ready like the field we mow;
Like the bending barley lithe,
Ready for Time's whetted scythe,
Rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink, rink-a-tink atink.


THE REAPERS.
Music in Parker's Training School Song Book,"
WITH sickles gleaming brightly
Go forth the reapers lightly,
The waving grain to shear.
The morning birds are waking,
The yellow ears are shaking-
The harvest-time is here.
Now all the landscape pleases,
While early morning breezes
So freshly round them blow.
The lark is upward springing,
And song-birds' notes are ringing,
As to the fields they go.
From morn till eve they labour,
Each sharing with his neighbour
The burden of the day.
And when their toils are ending,
The moon's bright beams descending
Will light their homeward way.




36 THE, PENNY WORK-Ai AY SONGSTER.
THE THRESHER.
G; BENSETT.-MUsic in Part III. of "School Pieces." Piper
and Co. Price ls.
OH! his limbs are strong as boughs of oak,
And his thews like links of mail.
How his quick breath streams while round him gleams
With a whirl his mighty flail!
For it's thump, thump, thump, with right good will,
From morn till set of sun;
And his arm and flail will never fail
Till his daily task be done.
With the first glad birds that hail the morn
He is up at work amain,
Till the old barn floor is cover'd o'er
With the sweet and pearly grain.
Oh! his heart is light as hearts will be
With a purpose good and strong,
And his strokes keep time to catch the chime
Of his blithely earoll'd song.
For it's thump, thump, thump, with right good will,
From morn till set of sun ;
And his arm and flail will never fail
Till his daily task be done.
While the boys that 'mid the corn-stacks hide
Echo back his gleesome lay,
As they toss the chaff, and shout and laugh
In the golden noon of day.
But a lesson they may read and learn,
And the Thresher makes it plain,
For the chaff he finds he gives the winds,
But he garners up the grain.
Then it's work, work, work, with a right good will,
And store the sheaves of truth;
From the precious seed strike husk and weed,
In the harvest time of youth.




FOR. WOKERS ON LAND.


MERRILY GOES THE MILL.
GEORGE COLMAN.--Music at Nelson's.
MERRILY rolls the mill-stream on,
Merrily goes the mill,
And merry to-night shall be my song,
As ever the gay lark's trill.
While the stream shall flow,
And the mill shall go,
And my garners are bravely stored,
Come all who will,
There's a welcome still
At the joyful miller's board.
Well may the miller's heart be light,
Well may his song be gay;
For the rich man's smile and the poor man's prayer
Have been his for many a day.
And they bless the name
Of the miller's dame
In cots where the lowly mourn;
For want and woe
At her coming go,
And joy and peace return.
Merrily rolls, &c.
Fair is the miller's daughter, too,
With her locks of golden hair,
With her laughing eye and sunny brow;
Still better is she than fair.
She hath lighten'd toil
With her winning smile;
And if ever his heart was sad,
Let her sing the song
He hath loved so long,
And the miller's heart was glad.
Merrily rolls, &c.




88 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTEB.
THE MILKMAID.
In Parker's Collection.
HARK to yonder milkmaid singing
Cheerly o'er the '"l;,.!..- i' .il.
Cowslips all around are springing,
Sweetly paint the golden vale.
Never yet did courtly maiden
Move so .: i i; .t k, look so fair;
Never breast with jewels laden
Pour'd a song so void of care.
Happy she by vale and mountain,
Free from fettert blythe to rove,
Fearless I .- r t I. o*rystal fountain,
Peaceful sleeps within the grove,
THE QUARRY MAN.
By J. BRADSnAWE WALiaR.
THx sun has seen him all day long,
With the sweat upon his brow,
Tearing, with sinewy arm and strong,
Huge blocks from their beds below!
Little he knows, or seeks to ken,
Of all the great world-beside;
Who wields the sword, or who the pen,
Or if tyrants realms divide.
No need hath he of dainties rare,
Or of costly pamuerine wines;
His lips are kiss'd i.v i t -.ir .t ir,
On the rude rook iL-' I.,,. .'Lii:-.
That ruddy child, besmeared o'er
With blackberries ripe, hath come
With his frugal I, .1 i i .. ,, 1, moor,
From a lowly cottage home.
Again he seeks the ponderous rock,
And he strikes with -;-. ,i.f ,i 1:
The work of ages feels rii- -h,. 1I:,
And it rushes into light!




88 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTEB.
THE MILKMAID.
In Parker's Collection.
HARK to yonder milkmaid singing
Cheerly o'er the '"l;,.!..- i' .il.
Cowslips all around are springing,
Sweetly paint the golden vale.
Never yet did courtly maiden
Move so .: i i; .t k, look so fair;
Never breast with jewels laden
Pour'd a song so void of care.
Happy she by vale and mountain,
Free from fettert blythe to rove,
Fearless I .- r t I. o*rystal fountain,
Peaceful sleeps within the grove,
THE QUARRY MAN.
By J. BRADSnAWE WALiaR.
THx sun has seen him all day long,
With the sweat upon his brow,
Tearing, with sinewy arm and strong,
Huge blocks from their beds below!
Little he knows, or seeks to ken,
Of all the great world-beside;
Who wields the sword, or who the pen,
Or if tyrants realms divide.
No need hath he of dainties rare,
Or of costly pamuerine wines;
His lips are kiss'd i.v i t -.ir .t ir,
On the rude rook iL-' I.,,. .'Lii:-.
That ruddy child, besmeared o'er
With blackberries ripe, hath come
With his frugal I, .1 i i .. ,, 1, moor,
From a lowly cottage home.
Again he seeks the ponderous rock,
And he strikes with -;-. ,i.f ,i 1:
The work of ages feels rii- -h,. 1I:,
And it rushes into light!




YOR WORKERS ON LAND 89
His time is measured by the sun-
Now he hails its western ray;,
Another hard day's toil is done,
And he whistles on his way.
Cheerly along the lone green lane,
To his straw-thatch'd cot he goes;
He hears his children's voice again,
And 'tis there his joys repose.

',:-'.;* OF THE MINERS.
A. L. O. E., Authoress of the Claremont Tales."
Down in the mine which the sunbeams ne'er lighten,
We cheerfully labour our living.to win; [brighten
For where are the hardships which hope cannot
What matters the gloom if there's sunshine within!
On the home of our sovereign the light may be glow-
ing, [twine,
Round the porch of the peasants the rosebuds may
But both palace and cottage, tHl I, ._iul.:' tt .i ..n'nr
To brave hands and busy h bi!!: ..n u in Hh l-r nin! i
We toil here for all that in life is endearing,
We toil for the wives and the children we love;
Their smiles are as bright, and their words are as
cheering, *
To miners below, as to peasants above. [fingers,
Begrimed though the face be, and blacken'd the
Pure lips and a conscience unsullied be mine,
For sin is the dark [h!~ ,. dt t Ii_ v.1.- .. it lingers,
And true hearts and pure hearts may beat in the
mine!
Oh, yes! for the Spirit of mercy attending,
Brings tidings of pardon and --... x \..mn U-re. ii_:-.
And when humble prayer from the depths is ascend-
The snowy-wing'd angels are hovering near!
By the light which to all those who ask it is given,
Then search for the treasure of wisdom divine,
That the Lord i.iv .. ,nIt ..lO.'d_ i.l Lis jewels in heaven,
The humble-tLh tjnirbd-wlh.: t...d in the mine!




40 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE WOODMAN'S SONG.
How happy is the woodman's lot !
In the wild and tangled wood,
Where the broad green boughs give a shady cot,
And a gleaming axe his food;
Then fall beneath his sturdy stroke
The pliant ash and the mighty oak.
His axe rings well in the merry wood,
At the early peep of day,
In the spot where the monarch oak hath stood,
For ages past away;
And when the shades of eve steal o'er,
The sound of his axe is heard no more.
When death shall fell the parent tree,
The younger shoot shall stand;
In the forest-depths his grave shall be,
When stiff the woodman's hand.
And the axe of the son shall be heard once more,
In the wood where his sires have work'd before.
WESTWARD HO!
C. JzFmnRYs.-Music at C. Jefferys'.
BROTHERS, sisters, ye who toil,
Ply the loom, or till the soil,
From o'ercrowded cities come,
Seek with me a forest home.
There shall labour win its way,
Toiling, thriving, day by day;
Strong in heart and hope let s go
Through the prairies-Westward ho!
Where the giant pine now reigns
We will have our smiling plains;
Rude our first log hut may be,
But from care it shall be free.
Linger not, no more delay,
Heaven itself points out the way;
Strong in heart and hope, then, go
Through the prairies-Westward ho!




40 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE WOODMAN'S SONG.
How happy is the woodman's lot !
In the wild and tangled wood,
Where the broad green boughs give a shady cot,
And a gleaming axe his food;
Then fall beneath his sturdy stroke
The pliant ash and the mighty oak.
His axe rings well in the merry wood,
At the early peep of day,
In the spot where the monarch oak hath stood,
For ages past away;
And when the shades of eve steal o'er,
The sound of his axe is heard no more.
When death shall fell the parent tree,
The younger shoot shall stand;
In the forest-depths his grave shall be,
When stiff the woodman's hand.
And the axe of the son shall be heard once more,
In the wood where his sires have work'd before.
WESTWARD HO!
C. JzFmnRYs.-Music at C. Jefferys'.
BROTHERS, sisters, ye who toil,
Ply the loom, or till the soil,
From o'ercrowded cities come,
Seek with me a forest home.
There shall labour win its way,
Toiling, thriving, day by day;
Strong in heart and hope let s go
Through the prairies-Westward ho!
Where the giant pine now reigns
We will have our smiling plains;
Rude our first log hut may be,
But from care it shall be free.
Linger not, no more delay,
Heaven itself points out the way;
Strong in heart and hope, then, go
Through the prairies-Westward ho!




41



THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME.
Music at Davidson's.
THE hour was sad I left the maid,
A lingering farewell taking,
Her sighs and tears my steps delay'd,
I thought her heart was breaking ;
In hurried words her name I bless'd,
I breathed the vows that bind me,
And to my heart in anguish pressed
The girl I left behind me.
Then to the East we bore away
To win a name in story,
And there where dawns the sun of day,
There dawn'd our sun of glory.
Both blazed in noon on Alma's height,
Where, in the post assigned me,
I shared the glory of that fight,
Sweet girl I left behind me.
Full many a name our banners bore,
Of former deeds of daring;
But they were of the deeds of yore,
In which we had no sharing;
But now our laurels freshly won,
With the old ones shall entwined be,
Still worthy of our sires each son,
Sweet girl I left behind me.
The hope of final victory,
Within my bosom burning,
Is mingled with sweet thoughts of thee,
And of my glad returning.
But should I ne'er return again,
Still worth thy love thou'lt find me,
Dishonour's breath shall never stain
The name I leave behind me.




42 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SOLDIER-BOY.
Dr. WILLIAM MAGIN .
I GIVE my soldier-boy a blade
In fair Damascus fashioned well;
Who first the glittering falchion sway'd,
Who first beneath its fury fell,
I know not, but I hope to know,
That for no mean or hireling trade,
To guard no feeling base or low,
I give my soldier-boy a blade.
Cold, calm, and clear the lucid flood,
In which the tempering work was done;
As calm, as clear, as cool of mood,
Be thou whene'er it sees the sun.
For country's claim, at honour's call,
For outraged friend, insulted maid;
At mercy's voice to bid it fall,
I give my soldier-boy a blade.
The eye which mark'd its peerless edge,
The hand that weigh'd its balanced poise,
Anvil and pincers, forge and wedge,
Are gone with all their flame and noise,
And still the gleaming sword remains;
So when in dust I low am laid,
Remember, by those heart-felt strains,
I gave my soldier-boy a blade.
THE SOLDIER'S TEAR.
J. H. BAYLY.-Music at Duff and Hodgson's.
UPoN the hill he turn'd
To take a last fond look
Of the valley and the village church,
And the cottage by the brook;
He listen'd to the sounds
So familiar to his ear;
And the soldier lean'd upon his sword,
And wiped away a tear.




42 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SOLDIER-BOY.
Dr. WILLIAM MAGIN .
I GIVE my soldier-boy a blade
In fair Damascus fashioned well;
Who first the glittering falchion sway'd,
Who first beneath its fury fell,
I know not, but I hope to know,
That for no mean or hireling trade,
To guard no feeling base or low,
I give my soldier-boy a blade.
Cold, calm, and clear the lucid flood,
In which the tempering work was done;
As calm, as clear, as cool of mood,
Be thou whene'er it sees the sun.
For country's claim, at honour's call,
For outraged friend, insulted maid;
At mercy's voice to bid it fall,
I give my soldier-boy a blade.
The eye which mark'd its peerless edge,
The hand that weigh'd its balanced poise,
Anvil and pincers, forge and wedge,
Are gone with all their flame and noise,
And still the gleaming sword remains;
So when in dust I low am laid,
Remember, by those heart-felt strains,
I gave my soldier-boy a blade.
THE SOLDIER'S TEAR.
J. H. BAYLY.-Music at Duff and Hodgson's.
UPoN the hill he turn'd
To take a last fond look
Of the valley and the village church,
And the cottage by the brook;
He listen'd to the sounds
So familiar to his ear;
And the soldier lean'd upon his sword,
And wiped away a tear.




FOR SOLDIERS.
Beside the cottage porch
A girl was on her knees.
She held aloft a snowy scarf
Which flutter'd in the breeze:
She breathed a prayer for him,
A prayer he could not hear,
But he paused to bless her as she knelt,
And wiped away a tear.
He turn'd and left the spot,
Oh, do not deem him weak,
For dauntless was the soldier's heart,
Though tears were on his cheek.
Go watch the foremost ranks
In danger's dark career,
Be sure the hand most daring there
Has wiped away a tear.
I SEE THEM ON THEIR WINDING WAY.
Bishop HEBER.-Music at Chappell and Co.'s.
I SEE them on their winding way,
About their ranks the moonbeams play,
Their lofty deeds and daring high
Blend with the notes of victory;
And waving arms and banners bright
Are glancing in the mellow light.
They're lost and gone, the moon is past-
The wood's dark shade is o'er them cast,
And fainter, fainter, fainter still,
The moon is rising o'er the hill.
Again, again the pealing drum,
The clashing horn, they come, they come;
Through rocky pass, o'er wooded steep,
In long and glittering files they sweep,
And nearer, nearer, yet more near,
Their softened chorus meets the ear.
Forth, forth, and meet them on their wjy,
The tramping hoofs brook no delay.
With thrilling fife and pealing drum
And clashing horn they come, they come.




44 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

THE BRITISH GRENADIERS.
Music at Cramer, Beale, and Chappell's.
SOME talk of Alexander,
And some of Hercules;
Of Hector and Lysander,
And such great names as these;
But of all the world's brave heroes,
There's none that can compare,
With a tow, row, row, row, row, row,
Of the British Grenadier.
Whene'er we are commanded
To storm.the palisades,
Our leaders march with fuses,
And we with hand grenades;
We throw them from the glacis
About the enemy's ears,
Sing tow, row, row, row, row, row,
The British Grenadiers.
And when the siege is over,
We to the town repair,
The townsmen cry, Hurrah! boys,
Here comes a Grenadier;
Here come the Grenadiers, my boys,
Who know no doubts or fears,
Then sing tow, row, row, row, row, row,
The British Grenadiers.
Then let us fill a bumper,
And drink a health to those
Who carry caps and pouches,
And wear the loop-ed clothes;
May they and their commanders
Live happy all their years,
With a tow, row, row, row, row, row,
For the British Grenadiers.




FOR SOLDIERS. 46
WHAT WILL THEY SAY IN ENGLAND?
J. B. MoxSELL.
WWHAT will they say in England,
When there the story's told
Of deeds of might, on Alma's height,
Done by the brave and bold ?
Of Russia, proud at noontide,
Humbled ere set of sun?-
They'll say 'twas like old England,
They'll say 'twas nobly done!
What will they say in England,
When, hushed in awe and dread,
Fond hearts through all our happy homes
Think of the mighty dead-
And muse in speechless anguish
On father, brother, son?
They'll say, in dear old England,
God's holy will be done!
What will they say in England,
The matron and the maid,
Whose widow'd, wither'd hearts have found
The price that each has paid-
The gladness that their homes have lost,
For all the glory won ?-
They'll say, in Christian England,
God's holy will be done!
What will they say in England?
Our names, both night and day,
Are in their hearts, and on their lips,
When they laugh, or weep, or pray;
They watch on earth-they plead with Heaven.
Then forward to the fight!
Who droops or fears, when England cheers,
And God defends the right?




46 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
RED, WHITE, AND BLUE.
Music at Davidson's.
0 BRITANNIA! the Pride of the Ocean
The home of the brave and the free,
The shrine of each patriot's devotion,
The world offers homage to thee.
At thy mandate heroes assemble,
When liberty's form stands in view,
Thy banners make tyrants to tremble,
When borne by the red, white, and blue.
When war spread its wide desolation,
And threatened the land to deform,
The ark of Freedom's foundation,
Britannia, rode safe through the storm;
With her garland of victory round her,
So bravely she bore up her crew,
And her flag floated proudly before her,
The boast of the red, white, and blue.
The wine cup, the wine cup, bring hither,
And fill it up true to the brim,
May the wreath Nelson won never wither,
Nor the star of his glory grow dim.
May the service united ne er sever,
But still to her colours prove true,
The Army and Navy for ever!
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue!
BRITISH VOLUNTEERS.
IN Britain's isle, fair Commerce reign'd,
And Peace her children blest,
And Freedom all her rights maintained,
In every British breast;
Till mad Ambition, stain'd with gore,
With threats assailed our ears;
And roused to guard our native land,
An host of volunteers.
And roused to guard, &c.




46 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
RED, WHITE, AND BLUE.
Music at Davidson's.
0 BRITANNIA! the Pride of the Ocean
The home of the brave and the free,
The shrine of each patriot's devotion,
The world offers homage to thee.
At thy mandate heroes assemble,
When liberty's form stands in view,
Thy banners make tyrants to tremble,
When borne by the red, white, and blue.
When war spread its wide desolation,
And threatened the land to deform,
The ark of Freedom's foundation,
Britannia, rode safe through the storm;
With her garland of victory round her,
So bravely she bore up her crew,
And her flag floated proudly before her,
The boast of the red, white, and blue.
The wine cup, the wine cup, bring hither,
And fill it up true to the brim,
May the wreath Nelson won never wither,
Nor the star of his glory grow dim.
May the service united ne er sever,
But still to her colours prove true,
The Army and Navy for ever!
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue!
BRITISH VOLUNTEERS.
IN Britain's isle, fair Commerce reign'd,
And Peace her children blest,
And Freedom all her rights maintained,
In every British breast;
Till mad Ambition, stain'd with gore,
With threats assailed our ears;
And roused to guard our native land,
An host of volunteers.
And roused to guard, &c.




FOR SOLDIERS. 47
The annals of our land can tell,
What British arms have done;
The foes to England that have fell,
The battles bravely won.
Our God! our Queen! our country's oause,
Our standard now uprears;
Whilst to maintain our rights and laws,
Each Briton volunteers.
Whilst to maintain, &c.

Now, while the angry lion's roar,
Our enemies appall;
We'll rush, indignant, to the shore,
To conquer or to fall !
Our homes, our children, and our wives,
To every Briton dear,
We'll part with only with the lives
Of every volunteer.
We'll part with only, &c.




THE CONQUERING HERO.
Music at Z. T. Puroday's, Holborn.
SEE the conquering hero comes!
Sound the trumpet, beat the drums.
Sports prepare, the laurel bring,
Songs of triumph to him sing.

See the god-like youth advance !
Breathe the flutes, and lead the dance.
Myrtles wreathe, and roses twine,
To deck the hero's brow divine.




48 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

MARSEILLES HYMN.
M. DELISLE.-Music at Clementi, Collard, and Collard's.
YE sons of France, awake to glory!
Hark, hark, what myriads bid you rise,
Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary,
Behold their tears and hear their cries.
Shall hateful tyrants, mischief breeding,
With hireling hosts, a ruffian band,
Affright and desolate the land
While peace and liberty lie bleeding.
To arms, to arms, ye brave,
Th' avenging sword unsheathe.
March on, march on, all hearts resolved
On victory or death.

Now, now the dangerous storm is rolling,
Which treacherous chiefs, confederate, raise;
The dogs of war let loose are howling,
And lo! our fields and cities blaze
And shall we basely view the ruin,
While lawless force, with guilty stride,
Spreads desolation far and wide,
With crimes and blood his hands embruing.
To arms, ye brave, &c.

O liberty! can man resign thee,
Once having felt thy generous flame ?
Can dungeons, bolts, or bars confine thee,
Or whips thy noble spirit tame ?
Too long the world has wept, bewailing
That falsehood's dagger tyrants wield;
But freedom is our sword and shield,
And all their arts are unavailing.
To arms, ye brave, &c.







Jor "orhzr5 at SBa.

THE BOY IN BLUE.
ELZA COOK.-Music at Cocks's.
CHEER up, cheer up, my mother dear,
Oh, why do you sit and weep ?
Do you think that He, who guards me here,
Forsakes me on the deep ?
Let hope and faith illume the glance
That sees the bark set sail!
Look! look at her now and see her dance.
Oh, why do you turn so pale ?
'Tis an English ship and an English crew,
So, mother, be proud of your boy in blue.
Oh, wonder not that, next to thee,
I love the galloping wave,
'Tis the first of coursers wild and free,
And only carries the brave;
It has borne me nigh to the dark lee shore,
But we struggled heart and hand,
And a fight with the sea in its angry roar
Shames all your strife on land.
The storm was long, but it found me true,
So, mother, be proud of your boy in blue.
And if the breakers kill our ship,
And your boy goes down in the foanm,
Be sure the last breath on his lip
Is a prayer for those at home.
But come, cheer up! methinks I heard
A voice in the anchor-chain
That whisper'd like a fairy bird,
The bark will come back again."
God bless you, mother; adieu! adieu!
But never weep for your boy in blue.




50 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.

THE ENGLISHMAN.
ELIZA CooK.-Music at Duff and Co.'s.
THER's a land that bears a world-known name,
Though it is but a little spot;
'Tis first on the blazing scroll of fame,
And who shall say it is not ?
Of the deathless ones who shine and live,
In arms, in heart, in song,
The brightest the whole wide world can give
To that little land belong.
'Tis the star of the earth, deny it who can,
The island home of an Englishman.

There's a flag that floats o'er every sea,
No matter when or where,
And to treat that flag as aught but the free,
Is more than the strongest dare.
For the lion-spirits that tread the deck,
Have carried the palm of the brave,
And that flag may sink with a shot-torn wreck,
But never float o'er a slave.
Its honour is stainless, deny it who can,
The flag of a true-born Englishman.

The Briton may traverse the pole or zone,
And boldly claim his right,
For he calls such a vast domain his own,
That the sun never sets on his might.
Let the haughty stranger seek to know,
The place of his home and birth,
And a flush will glow from cheek to brow,
While he tells of his native earth.
'Tis a glorious charter, deny it who can,
That's breathed in the words, I'm an Englishman.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA. 51
HOW CHEERY ARE THE MARINERS!
PARK BENJAMm.-Music by Dempeter.
How cheery are the mariners-
Those lovers of the sea I
Their hearts are like its yeasty waves,
As bounding and as free.
They whistle when the storm-bird wheels
In circles round the mast;
And sing when, deep in foam, the ship
Ploughs onward to the blast.
What care the mariners for gales ?
There's music in their roar,
When wide the berth along the lee.
And leagues of room before.
Let billows toss to mountain heights,
Or sink to chasms low,
The vessel stout will ride it out,
Nor reel beneath ite blow.
With streamers down and eawvas furl'd,
The gallant hull will float,
Securely as, on inland lake,
Floats the toy pleasure-boat;
And sound asleep some mariners,
And some, with watchful eyes,
Will fearless be of dangers dark,
That roll along the skies.
God keep those cheery mariners!
And temper all the gales
That sweep against the rocky coat
To their storm-shatter'd sails;
And men on shore will bless the ship
That could so guided be,
Safe in the hollow of his hand,
To brave the mighty sea!




52 THE PENNY WORt-AWAY SONGSTER.
YE MARINERS OF ENGLAND.
THOMAS CAMPBELL.-MUSiC at Z. T. Purday's.
YE mariners of England,
That guard our native seas;
Whose flag has braved a thousand years
The battle and the breeze!
Your glorious standard launch again,
To match another foe !
And sweep through the deep,
While the stormy tempests blow;
While the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.
The spirits of your fathers
Shall start from every wave!
For the deck it was their field of fame,
And ocean was their grave;
Where Blake and mighty Nelson fell,
Your manly hearts shall glow,
As ye sweep through the deep,
While the stormy tempests blow;
While the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.
Britannia needs no bulwarks,
No towers along the steep;
Her march is o'er the mountain waves,
Her home is on the deep.
With thunders from her native oak,
She quells the floods below;
As they roar on the shore,
When the stormy tempests blow;
When the battle rages loud and long,
And the stormy tempests blow.
The meteor-flag of Englanda
Shall yet terrific burn;
Till danger's troubled night depart,
And the star of peace return.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA.
Then, then, ye ocean warriors!
Our song and feast shall flow
To the fame of your name,
When the storm has ceased to flow;
When the fiery fight is heard no more,
And the storm has ceased to blow.
OUR GOOD SHIP.
GEORGE LINLEY.-Music at Campbell's.
OUR good ship flies before the gale,
Like a falcon bold and free;
The wind that fills each snow-white sail
Whistles loud o'er the foaming sea:
But what care we though the tempest rave,
And the tall masts bend on high ?
We have breasted oft the angry wave
'Neath a dark and frowning sky,
'Mid thb thunder's pealing crash,
And the lightning's vivid flash;
Then quail not, mariner! drown every fear,
Let hope inspire each lip;
The Hand that rules the storm will steer
In safety our good ship.
See! see! aloft, yon guiding star
Foretells that the danger is o'er,
And memory points to our homes afar,
To the hearts that we left on shore.
If thinking of those whom we fondly love
Hath chill'd one manly breast,
Breathe a prayer to Him who reigns above,
Who hath lull'd the waves to rest.
When yawns a watery grave,
His arm is nigh to save.
Then never despair, though peril be near,
Let hope inspire each lip;
The Hand that rules the storm will steer
In safety our good ship.




54 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
MAN THE LIFE-BOAT.
Mrs. CRAWFORD.-Music at Davidson's.
MAN- the life-boat! man the life-boat!
Help, or yon ship is lost!
Man the life-boat! man the life-boat!
See how she's tempest-toss'd!
No human power, in such an hour,
The gallant bark can save;
Her mainmast gone, and, hurrying on,
She seeks her watery grave!
Man the life-boat! &c
Man the life-boat! man the life-boat!
See the dread signal flies !
Ha !-she has struck, and from the rock
Despairing shouts arise;
And one there stands, and wrings his hands,
Amid the tempest wild;
For on the beach he cannot reach
He sees his wife and child !
Man the life-boat &c.
Man the life-boat I man the life-boat I
Now ply the oars amain !
Your pull be strong, your stroke be long,
Or all will yet be vain.
Life-saving ark, yon doomed barque
Immortal souls doth bear;
Nor gems, nor gold, nor wealth untold,
But men, brave men are there.
Man the life-boat! &c.
Speed the life-boat! speed the life-boat!
O God their efforts crown !
She dashes on-the ship is gone
Full forty fathoms down !
Ha !-see-the crew are struggling now
Amid the breakers' roar-
They're in the boat-they're all afloat-
Hurrah they've gained the shore !
Bless the life-boat! &c.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA. 55
THE FISHERMAN'S SONG.
AWAY, away o'er the feathery crest
Of the beautiful blue are we;
For our toil-lot lies on its boiling breast,
And our wealth's in the glorious sea:
And we've hymn'd in the grasp of the fiercest night
To the God of the sons of toil,
As we cleft the wave by its own white light,
And bore off its scaly spoil.
Then oh for the long and the strong oar-sweep
We have given, and will again;
For when children's weal lies in the deep,
Oh, their fathers must be men.
And we'll think, as the blast grows loud and long,
That we hear our offspring' cries-
And we'll think as the surge grows tall and strong,
Of the tears in their mothers' eyes; [green,
And we'll reel through the clutch of the shivering
For the warm, warm clasp at home-
For the soothing smile of each heart's own queen,
And her arms, like the flying foam.
Then oh for the long and the strong oar-sweep
We have given, and will again;
For when children's weal lies in the deep,
Oh, their fathers must be men.
And if death, at times, through a foamy cloud,
On the brown-brow'd boatman glares,
He can pay him his glance with a soul as proud
As the form of a mortal bears.
And oh 'twere glorious sure to die
In our toils, for some on shore,
With a hopeful eye fix'd calm on the sky,
And a hand on the broken oar.
Then oh! for a long, strong, steady sweep;
Hold to it-hurrah-dash on;
If our babes must fast till we rob the deep,
'Tis time that we had begun.




56 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE BOATIE ROWS.
WEEL may the boatie row,
And better may she speed;
Arid weel may the boatie row
That wins the bairns' bread!
The boatie rows, the boatie rows,
The boatie rdws indeed;
And happy be the lot of a'
That wishes her to speed !
I cast my line in Largo Bay,
And fishes I caught nine;
There's three to boil, and three to fry,
And three to bait the line.
The boatie rows, the boatie rows,
The boatie rows indeed;
And happy be the lot of a'
That wishes her to speed!
Oh, weel may the boatie row
That fills a heavy creel,
And clothes us a' frae head to feet,
And buys our parritch meal.
The boatie rows, the boatie rows,
The boatie rows indeed;
And happy be the lot of a'
That wish the boatie speed!
When Jamie vow'd he would be mine,
And wan frae me my heart,
Oh, muckle lighter grew my creel!
He swore we'd never part.
The boatie rows, the boatie rows,
The boatie rows fu' weel ;
And muckle lighter is the lade
When love bears up the creel.
My kurtch I put upon my head,
And dressed mysel' fu' braw;
I trow my heart was dowf and wae,
When Jamie gaed awa'.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA.
But weel may the boatie row,
And lucky be her part;
And lightsome be the lassie's care
That yields an honest heart!
When Sawnie, Jock, and Janetie
Are up, and gotten lear,
They'll help to gar the boatie row,
And lighten a' our care.
The boatie rows, the boatie rows,
The boatie rows fu' weel;
And lightsome be her heart that bears
The merlin and the creel!
And when wi' age we are worn down,
And hirpling round the door,
They'll row to keep us hale and warm,
As we did them before.
Then weel may the boatie row,
That wins the bairns' bread;
And happy be the lot of a'
That wish the boat to speed.

WHAT IF THE SAILOR BOLDLY GOES.
C. DIBDIN.-Music at Davidson's.
WHAT if the sailor boldly goes,
To distant climates bound,-
Braves wind from every point that blows
The varying compass round ?
No longer, when compelled to rove,
To make him rich amends,
As the needle true, he finds his love,
His country, and his friends.
Thus, every danger life endures
May to o'erwhelm him come,
Trouble at sea only insures
Pleasure that waits at home:


57




68 THE PENIY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
He braves the storm, that calm to prove
Propitious Fortune sends;
As the needle true, to find his love,
His country, and his friends.


HEARTS OF OAK
D. GARRICK.-Music at D'Almaine and Co,'s.
COME, cheer up, my lads 'tis to glory we steer,
To add something more to this wonderful year;
To honour we call you, not press you like slaves,
For who are so free as the sons of the waves ?
Hearts of oak are our ships,
Gallant tars are our men;
We always are ready,
Steady, boys, steady!
We'll fight and we'll conquer again and again.

We ne'er see our foes but we wish them to stay,
They never see us but they wish us away;
If they run, why we follow, or run them ashore,
For if they won t fight us, we cannot do more.
Hearts of oak, &c.

They swear they'll invade us, these terrible foes!
They frighten our women, our children, and beaux;
But should their flat bottoms in darkness get o'er,
Still Britons they'll find to receive them on shore.
Hearts of oak, &c.

Britannia triumphant, her ships sweep the sea,
Her standard is justice-her watchword, Be free !"
Then cheer up, my lads! with one heart let us sing,
"Our soldiers, our sailors, our statesmen, and king."
Hearts of oak, &c.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA.


THE FISHING-BOAT.
MARY 0owITT.

GOING OUT.
BRISKLY blows the evening gale,
Fresh and free it blows;
Blessings on the fishing-boat,
How merrily she goes !

CHRIST He loved the fishermen ;
Walking by the sea,
How he bless'd the fishing-boats
Down in Galilee !

Dark the night, and wild the wave,
CatIST the boat is keeping;
Trust in Him, and have no fear,
Though He seemeth sleeping.

COMING IN.
Briskly blows the morning breeze,
Fresh and strong it blows;
Blessings on the fishing-boat,
How steadily she goes !

CH1IST He loved the fishermen;
And He blessed the net
Which the hopeless fishers threw
In Gennesaret.

He has blessed our going out,
Bless'd, too, our returning ;
Given us laden nets at night,
And fair wind in the morning,


69




60 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SAILOR'S TEAR.
Music at J. F. Harris's.
HE leap'd into his boat, as it lay upon the strand,-
But, oh! his heart was far away with friends upon
the land; [infant dear,
He thought of those he loved the best-a wife and
And feeling fill'd the sailor's breast,-the sailor's eye
a tear.
They stood upon the far-off cliff, and waved a kerchief
white, [of sight;
And gazed upon his gallant bark till she was out
The sailor cast a look behind, no longer they were
near, [a tear.
Then to the canvas raised his eye, and wiped away
Ere long o'er ocean's blue expanse his sturdy bark
has sped, [ahead;
The gallant sailor from her prow descries a sail
And then he raised his mighty arm, for Britain's foe
was near,- [tear.
Ay, then he raised his arm-but not to wipe away a

THE FISHERMAN'S SONG.
NEALE.
COME, messmates, 'tis time to hoist the sail,
It is fair as fair can be;
And the eddying tide, and the northerly gale,
Will carry us out to sea.
So down with the boat from the beach so steep,
We must part with the setting sun;
For ere we can spread our nets in the deep
We've a weary way to run.
As through the night watches we drift about,
We'll think of the times that are fled,
And of Him who nce called other fishermen out,
To be fishers of men instead.




60 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE SAILOR'S TEAR.
Music at J. F. Harris's.
HE leap'd into his boat, as it lay upon the strand,-
But, oh! his heart was far away with friends upon
the land; [infant dear,
He thought of those he loved the best-a wife and
And feeling fill'd the sailor's breast,-the sailor's eye
a tear.
They stood upon the far-off cliff, and waved a kerchief
white, [of sight;
And gazed upon his gallant bark till she was out
The sailor cast a look behind, no longer they were
near, [a tear.
Then to the canvas raised his eye, and wiped away
Ere long o'er ocean's blue expanse his sturdy bark
has sped, [ahead;
The gallant sailor from her prow descries a sail
And then he raised his mighty arm, for Britain's foe
was near,- [tear.
Ay, then he raised his arm-but not to wipe away a

THE FISHERMAN'S SONG.
NEALE.
COME, messmates, 'tis time to hoist the sail,
It is fair as fair can be;
And the eddying tide, and the northerly gale,
Will carry us out to sea.
So down with the boat from the beach so steep,
We must part with the setting sun;
For ere we can spread our nets in the deep
We've a weary way to run.
As through the night watches we drift about,
We'll think of the times that are fled,
And of Him who nce called other fishermen out,
To be fishers of men instead.




FOR WORKERS AT SEA.


Like us they had hunger and cold to bear;
Rough weather, like us, they knew;
And He, who guarded them by his care,
Full often was with them too.
'Twas the fourth long watch of a stormy night,
And but little way they had made,
When He came o'er the waters and stood in their sight,
And their hearts were sore afraid;
But He cheer'd their spirits, and said, It is I,"
And then they could fear no harm.
And though we cannot behold Him nigh,
He is guarding us still with his arm.
They had toil'd all the night, and had taken naught;
He commanded the stormy sea,
They let down their nets, and of fishes caught
An hundred and fifty-three.
And good success to our boats He will send,
If we trust in his mercy aright;
For He pitieth those who at home depend
On what we shall take to-night.
And if ever in danger and fear we are toss'd
About on the stormy deep,
We'll tell how they once thought that all was lost,
When their Lord "was fast asleep."
He saved them then-He can save us still-
For his are the winds and the sea
And if He is with us, we'll fear no ill,
Whatever the danger be.
Or if He see fit that our boat should sink,
By a storm or a leak, like lead,
Yet still of the glorious day we'll think,
When the sea shall yield her dead;
For they who depart in his faith and fear
Shall find their passage is short,
From the troublesome waves that beset life here,
To the everlasting port.


61




62 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE MALINER'S HYM1N.
By 'AROLT4E SOUTHEY.
LAwUCH thy bark, mariner Christian Go d speed
thee !
Let loose the rudder bands! good angels lead thee 4
Set thy sails warily, tempests will come;
Steer thy course steadily Christian, steer hone!
Look to the weather-bow, breakers are round thee!
Let fall the plummet now, shallows may groundthee.
Reef in the foresail there hold the helm fast!
So-let the vessel wear !-there swept the blast.
What of the night, watchman? what of the night?
" Cloudy-all quiet-no land yet--all's rigl.t.'"
Be wakeful, be vigilant;! danger may be
At an hour when all seemeth secures to thee,
How! gains the teak so fast ? Clear out thae holdw
Hoist up thy merchad.ize--heave out thy gold!
There-let the ipgots go ,ow the ship rights;
Hurrah! the harbour's near-lo the red light !
Slacken not sail yet at ialet or island;
Straight for the beacon pteer-str-igt foi th high
land;
Crowd all thyeavs n, w o ett through the fgsW.,
Christian east iexhor ww Heaivea is thyione !


RULE BRITANNIA.
JArIs TsaoVoN.--Miic at Cocks .and Ctes.
WHEN Britain first, at Heaven's command,
Arose from out the azure main,
This was the eharter of the land,
And guardian angels sang this stra~ n:
Rule Britanzai% Britannia, rule the wayes !
Britons never shall be slaves.




62 THE PENNY WORK-AWAY SONGSTER.
THE MALINER'S HYM1N.
By 'AROLT4E SOUTHEY.
LAwUCH thy bark, mariner Christian Go d speed
thee !
Let loose the rudder bands! good angels lead thee 4
Set thy sails warily, tempests will come;
Steer thy course steadily Christian, steer hone!
Look to the weather-bow, breakers are round thee!
Let fall the plummet now, shallows may groundthee.
Reef in the foresail there hold the helm fast!
So-let the vessel wear !-there swept the blast.
What of the night, watchman? what of the night?
" Cloudy-all quiet-no land yet--all's rigl.t.'"
Be wakeful, be vigilant;! danger may be
At an hour when all seemeth secures to thee,
How! gains the teak so fast ? Clear out thae holdw
Hoist up thy merchad.ize--heave out thy gold!
There-let the ipgots go ,ow the ship rights;
Hurrah! the harbour's near-lo the red light !
Slacken not sail yet at ialet or island;
Straight for the beacon pteer-str-igt foi th high
land;
Crowd all thyeavs n, w o ett through the fgsW.,
Christian east iexhor ww Heaivea is thyione !


RULE BRITANNIA.
JArIs TsaoVoN.--Miic at Cocks .and Ctes.
WHEN Britain first, at Heaven's command,
Arose from out the azure main,
This was the eharter of the land,
And guardian angels sang this stra~ n:
Rule Britanzai% Britannia, rule the wayes !
Britons never shall be slaves.




FOR WORRES8 AT SEA. 63
The nations not so blest as thee
Must, in their turn, to tyrants fall;
While thou shalt flourish, great and free,
The dread and envy of them all.
Rule Britannia! &c.
Still more majestic shalt thou rise,
More dreadful for each foreign stroke;
As the loud blast that tears the skies,
Serves but to root thy native oak.
Rule Britannia! &c.
Thee haughty tyrants ne'er shall tame ;
All their attempts to pull thee down
Will but arouse thy generous flame,
But work their woe and thy renown.
Rule Britannia &c.
To thee belongs the rural reign;
Thy cities shall with commerce shine;
All thine shall be the subject main,
And every shore it circles thine.
Rule Britannia &c.,
The Muses, still with freedom found,
Shall to thy happy coasts repair,
Blest isle, with matchless beauty crowned,
And manly hearts to guard the fair.
Rule Britannia! &c.


INDEX.

fia -all %krhers.
PAGE PAGE
To-day and To-morrow ...... 3 An honest Heart to guide us.. 8
A Cheerful Song ............ 4 Never say Fail .. ....... 9
Cheer, Boys, Cheer .......... 5 Never give up .............. 10
A Cheer for the Workers 6... 6 There's Fortune on before us. 10
Cheer up ................... 7 Delays ...................... 11
Cheer up! and keep on, never The Good Time Coming .... 12
minding .................. 7 Daily W ork ................ 14




? 64 INDEX. 1
PAGE PAGE
Perseverance, or Try Again.. 15 Encouragement .............. 18
Heroes ...................... 16 Live and Let Live............ 18
Byeand Bye ............... 16 Work Away............. 19
Now or Never................ 17 Joy and Comfort .......... 19
Pleasure and Duty .......... 17

Ior nrkter o' ar*r
The Camp has had its Day of The Ploughshare of Old Eng-
Song .................... 20 land ..................... 30
The Weaver's Song .......... 21 The Merry Ploughman ...... 31
Good Heart and Willing Hand 22 The British Farmer.......... 31
Strike the Iron while it's hot 23 Song of the Haymakers...... 32
The Village Blacksmith...... 24 Take down the Sickle........ 33
The Blacksmith ............ 25 The Barley-Mowers' Song.... 34
The Spinning Wheel ........ 26 The Reapers ................ 35
Factory Round .............. 26 The Thresher ...............36
A Factory Song............ 27 Merrily goes the Mill ........ 37
Noblemen .............. 27 The Milkmaid ............. 38
Honest Pride ................ 28 The Qu-rry Man ............ 38
The Peasantry of England .. 28 Song of the Miners .......... 39
The Plough ................ 29 The Woodman's Song ...... 40
Westward ho I ............... 40


The Girl I left behind me .... 41 What will they say in England 45
"The Soldier-Boy ........... 42 Red, White, and Blue........ 46
The Soldier's Tear .......... 42 British Volunteers.......... 46
I see them on their Winding The Conquering Hero ...... 47
Way ...................... 43 Marseilles Hymn ........... 48
The British Grenadiers ...... 44


frr Waners at S^a.
The Boy in Blue ......... 49 What if the Sailor boldly goes 57
The Englishman ........... 50 Hearts of Oak ............. 58
How Cheery are the Mariners 51 The Fishing-Boat ........... 69
Ye Mariners of England .... 52 The Sailor's Tear............ 60
Our Gjod Ship ............. 53 The Fisherman's Song ...... 60
Man the Life-Boat .......... 54 The Mariner's Hymn ........ 62
The Fisherman's Song ...... 55 Rule Britannia ...........,.. 62
The Boatie Rows ............ 56


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