• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The shepherd and his dog
 The miser and his treasure
 The traveller and the purse
 The philosopher and the acorn
 The little fish
 The ass
 The cats and the monkey
 The bear and the hermit
 The satyr and the traveller
 The cascade and the river
 The ass and the lion
 The bees and the drones
 The rose and the amaranth
 The rose's looking-glass
 One little boy
 Another little boy
 The bee and the butterfly
 The huntsman and the dove
 The cat and the bat
 The astronomer and the fly
 The goldfish and the toad
 The crane and the crow
 The ostrich and the pelican
 The cock and polar bear
 The lion and the beasts
 The wolf and the crane
 The stag at the fountain
 The lion worn with age
 The traveller and the lark
 The boy and the butterfly
 The jackdaw and the peacock
 The dog and his shadow
 The goldfinch and starling
 The porcupine and serpents
 The eagle and the owl
 The lynx and the mole
 The rose and the amaranth
 The trees protected by the...
 The ass and the Gipsies
 The stranger
 The frog and the ox
 The dog and the crocodile
 The fox and the crane
 The kite and the chickens
 The fox and the goat
 The sportsman and the old...
 The hares weary of life
 The lion and the mouse
 The trumpeter taken prisoner
 The wolf in sheep's clothing
 The fir-tree and the thorn
 The sick lion
 The ant and the dove
 The turkey and the fowls
 The chameleon
 The farmer and the stork
 The horse and the stag
 The dog and the wolf
 The mocking-bird and oriole
 The reed and the oak
 The two bees
 The rocket and the star
 The kingfisher and sparrow
 The man and parrot
 The gardener and the rose
 The father and son
 The peacock and peasants
 The boys and the frogs
 The herdsman and the lion
 The lion, tiger, and fox
 The blind man and the lame
 The shepherd turned merchant
 The eagle and the crow
 Fortune and the boy
 The boasting traveller
 Industry and sloth
 The swallow and the birds
 The cock and the fox
 The cat and the fox
 The man and the serpent
 The castle and the cottage
 The ass and the farmer
 The farmer and the stag
 The apple-tree
 The gnat and the ox
 The wolf and the lamb
 The boy and the cherries
 The fox and the swallow
 The diamond and the pebble
 The fig-tree and flowering...
 Fortune and vice
 The milkmaid
 The lion and the ape
 The two sons
 The fish and the cormorant
 The wolf and the shepherds
 The eagles and the owl
 Back Cover






Group Title: The child's own picture and verse book : selected and arranged, from the best authorities
Title: The child's own picture and verse book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003320/00001
 Material Information
Title: The child's own picture and verse book selected and arranged, from the best authorities
Physical Description: 201 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miller, James, d. 1883 ( Publisher )
Billin and Brothers ( Printer )
Publisher: James Miller
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Billin and Brothers
Publication Date: 1859 c1858
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1859   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1859   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1859   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1859   ( local )
Bldn -- 1859
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by a "grandfather" ; illustrated with one hundred engravings.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy 1: illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003320
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224077
oclc - 25516374
notis - ALG4336
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The shepherd and his dog
        Page 9
    The miser and his treasure
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The traveller and the purse
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The philosopher and the acorn
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The little fish
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The ass
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The cats and the monkey
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The bear and the hermit
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The satyr and the traveller
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The cascade and the river
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The ass and the lion
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The bees and the drones
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The rose and the amaranth
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The rose's looking-glass
        Page 34
        Page 35
    One little boy
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Another little boy
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The bee and the butterfly
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The huntsman and the dove
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The cat and the bat
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The astronomer and the fly
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The goldfish and the toad
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The crane and the crow
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The ostrich and the pelican
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The cock and polar bear
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The lion and the beasts
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The stag at the fountain
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The lion worn with age
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The traveller and the lark
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The boy and the butterfly
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The jackdaw and the peacock
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The dog and his shadow
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The goldfinch and starling
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The porcupine and serpents
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The eagle and the owl
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The lynx and the mole
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The rose and the amaranth
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The trees protected by the gods
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The ass and the Gipsies
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The stranger
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The frog and the ox
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The dog and the crocodile
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The fox and the crane
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The kite and the chickens
        Page 94
        Page 95
    The fox and the goat
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The sportsman and the old hound
        Page 98
        Page 99
    The hares weary of life
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The lion and the mouse
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The trumpeter taken prisoner
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The wolf in sheep's clothing
        Page 106
        Page 107
    The fir-tree and the thorn
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The sick lion
        Page 110
        Page 111
    The ant and the dove
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The turkey and the fowls
        Page 114
        Page 115
    The chameleon
        Page 116
        Page 117
    The farmer and the stork
        Page 118
        Page 119
    The horse and the stag
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The dog and the wolf
        Page 122
        Page 123
    The mocking-bird and oriole
        Page 124
        Page 125
    The reed and the oak
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The two bees
        Page 128
        Page 129
    The rocket and the star
        Page 130
        Page 131
    The kingfisher and sparrow
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The man and parrot
        Page 134
        Page 135
    The gardener and the rose
        Page 136
        Page 137
    The father and son
        Page 138
        Page 139
    The peacock and peasants
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The boys and the frogs
        Page 142
        Page 143
    The herdsman and the lion
        Page 144
        Page 145
    The lion, tiger, and fox
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The blind man and the lame
        Page 148
        Page 149
    The shepherd turned merchant
        Page 150
        Page 151
    The eagle and the crow
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Fortune and the boy
        Page 154
        Page 155
    The boasting traveller
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Industry and sloth
        Page 158
        Page 159
    The swallow and the birds
        Page 160
        Page 161
    The cock and the fox
        Page 162
        Page 163
    The cat and the fox
        Page 164
        Page 165
    The man and the serpent
        Page 166
        Page 167
    The castle and the cottage
        Page 168
        Page 169
    The ass and the farmer
        Page 170
        Page 171
    The farmer and the stag
        Page 172
        Page 173
    The apple-tree
        Page 174
        Page 175
    The gnat and the ox
        Page 176
        Page 177
    The wolf and the lamb
        Page 178
        Page 179
    The boy and the cherries
        Page 180
        Page 181
    The fox and the swallow
        Page 182
        Page 183
    The diamond and the pebble
        Page 184
        Page 185
    The fig-tree and flowering shrub
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Fortune and vice
        Page 188
        Page 189
    The milkmaid
        Page 190
        Page 191
    The lion and the ape
        Page 192
        Page 193
    The two sons
        Page 194
        Page 195
    The fish and the cormorant
        Page 196
        Page 197
    The wolf and the shepherds
        Page 198
        Page 199
    The eagles and the owl
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text





THLE CNILDLLO OWN













SELECTED AND ARRANGED, FROM THE BEST AUTHORITIES,
BY A "GRANDFATHER."


ILLUSTRATED WITH ONE HUNDRED ENGRAVINGS.












IQ




|(t I^Ii
_p




JAMES MILLER, 436 BROADWAY.
Mi. DC C C .1 X.
































Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858,
BY JAMES MILLER,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.


















NEW YORK:
BILLION AND BROTHER, PRINTERS,
XX, NORTH WILLIAM ST.



















CONTENTS.



PAGB
THE SHEPHERD AND HIS DOG, 9
THE MISER AND HIS TREASURE, II
THE TRAVELLERS AND THE PURSE, 13
THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE ACORN, I
THE LITTLE FISH, 17
THE ASS, 19
THE CATS AND THE MONKEY, 21
-THE BEAR AND THE HERMIT 23
THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER 2
THE CASCADE AND THE RIVER, 27
THE ASS AND THE LION, 29
THE BEES AND THE DRONES, 31
THE ROSE AND THE AMARANTH, 33
THE ROSE'S LOOKING-GLASS, 35
ONE LITTLE BOY, 37
ANOTHER LITTLE BOY, 39
THE BEE AND THE BUTTERFLY, I I
THE HUNTSMAN AND THE DOVE, .
THE CAT AND THE BAT, .
THE ASTRONOMER AND THE FLY, .



A








6 CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE GOLDFISH AND THE TOAD, .49
THE CRANE AND THE CROW, .. 51
THE OSTRICH AND THE PELICAN, 53
THE COCK AND POLAR BEAR, 55
THE LION AND THE BEASTS, 57
THE WOLF AND THE CRANE, 59
THE STAG AT THE FOUNTAIN, 61
THE LION WORN WITH AGE, 63
THE TRAVELLER AND THE LARK, 65
THE BOY AND THE BUTTERFLY, 67
THE JACKDAW AND THE PEACOCK, 69
THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW, 71
THE GOLDFINCH AND STARLING, 73
THE PORCUPINE AND SERPENTS, 75
THE EAGLE AND THE OWL, 77
THE LYNX AMD THE MOLE, 79
THE MULES AND THE ROBBERS, 81
THE TREES PROTECTED BY THE GODS, 83
THE ASS AND THE GIPSIES, 85
THE STRANGER, .. 87
THE FROG AND THE OX, 89
THE DOG AND THE CROCODILE, 91
THE FOX AND THE CRANE, 93
THE KITE AND THE CHICKENS, 95
THE FOX AND THE GOAT, 97
THE SPORTSMAN AND THE OLD HOUND, 99
THE HARES WEARY OF LIFE, .1 .. IO1
THE LION AND THE MOUSE, 103
THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER, 105
THE WOLF IN SHEEP CLOTHING, t 107









- CONTENTS.


THE FIR-TREE AND THE THORN,
THE SICK LION, .
THE ANT AND THE DOVE,
THE TURKEY AND THE FOWLS, .
THE CHAMELION, .
THE FARMER AND THE STORK, .
THE HORSE AND STAG,
THE DOG AND WOLF,
THE MOCKING-BIRD AND ORIOLE,
THE REED AND THE OAK,
THE TWO BEES,
THE ROCKET AND THE STAR,
THE KINGFISHER AND SPARROW,
THE MAN AND PARROT,
THE GARDENER AND THE ROSE,
THE FATHER AND SON,
THE PEACOCK AND PEASANTS,
THE BOYS AND THE FROGS,
THE HERDSMAN AND THE LION,
THE LION, TIGER, AND FOX,
THE BLIND MAN AND THE LAME,
THE SHEPHERD TURNED MERCHANT,
THE EAGLE AND THE CROW, .
FORTUNE AND THE BOY, .
THE BOASTING TRAVELLER,
INDUSTRY AND SLOTH,
THE SWALLOW AND THE BIRDS
THE COCK AND THE FOX, .
THE CAT AND THE FOX,
THE MAN AND THE SERPENT,


PAGE
. 109
III

.. II
IIS


IIg
121
123
. I25
127
S. 129
IPI
* 133
135
* 137
139
S 14I1
S .. 143
. 145
147

. 149
151
. I53
155

. 157
.. 159
S 161
.. 163
. 165
167








8


CONTENTS.


THE CASTLE AND THE COTTAGE,
THE ASS AND THE FARMER,
THE FARMER AND THE STAG,
THE APPLE-TREE, .
THE GNAT AND THE OX,
THE WOLF AND THE LAMB,
THE BOY AND THE CHERRIES,
THE FOX AND THE SWALLOW,
THE DIAMOND AND THE PEBBLE,
THE FIG-TREE AND FLOWERING SHRUB,
FORTUNE AND VICE,
THE MILKMAID, .
THE LION AND THE APE,
THE TWO SONS, .
THE FISH AND THE CORMORANT,
THE WOLF AND SHEPHERDS,
THE EAGLES AND THE OWL,


PAGC
S 169
S 171
S* 73
75
. 177
.* 179
181
183
185


S 189
191
l 193
S 195
* 197
** 199
S 201






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 9






THE SHEPHERD AND HIS DOG.
-4---e-

A DoG his master so deceived,
He was the best of curs believed;
And on the sheep in secret preyed.
The master, finding out his crime,
A rope about his neck did twine.
SAh !" said the Dog, mercy, I pray!
"You pardoned, once, the Wolf; you may
Forgive me, too." "Wretch! the Wolf declares
Hostility, and boldly dares
His prey to take. You trusted were, and now
I'll hang you by the neck on yonder bough."






SCHILLDS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 11





THE MISER AND HIS TREASURE.


A MISER some money together had got,
And he dug a great hole in a wild, lonely spot-
Concealed there the treasure. One morning he found
That a thief had been there, and his cries did resound:
"My treasure! my money! Ah, me, it is gone !"
A stranger passed by while that he did mourn.
"Pray, sir," he inquired, did you want it to pay
For rent or provisions ?" "What !" the Miser did say,
"Spend it! No, friend; to look at the gold,
Was the reason I hid it in this gaping hole."
" Oh, then," said the stranger, "with stones fill it now;
For they are as good for your purpose, I vow."






,,HILJ'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 13







THE TRAVELLERS AND THE PURSE.


FIRST TRAVELLER.
SEE, comrade, see what I have found;
A purse, here, lying on the ground.

SECOND TRAVELLER.
Nay, then, say we, for you must see
This treasure belongs, too, to me.
But hark, what noise now greets my ear ?
Stop thief! 's the cry. They're coming here.

FIRST TRAVELLER.
Alas! alas! we now are lost.

SECOND TRAVELLER.
We; nay, 'tis you, for to your cost
You did refuse good luck to share,
So you alone the blame must bear.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.







THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE ACORN.



PHILOSOPHER.

GREAT Oak Tree, are you sure 'tis just,
That bear small Acorns now you must,
While here upon this little vine
Great Pumpkins grow ?

OAK TREE.
'Tis time
That you, vain man, should plainly see
That all is good God does decree.
I drop an Acorn on your head;
If it were as a Pumpkin grown,
The heavy weight would strike you dead;
So, all's quite right, you now will own.


15


0 4







CHILIDS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 17





THE LITTLE FISH.


"THou little Fish, poor simple thing!
Make not toward the hook a spring.
'Twill pierce, 'twill rend thy throat, indeed;
'Twill give thee pain, 'twill make thee bleed!
A Boy sits there, but not for play;
Poor little Fish, swim swift away!"

The Fish he thought he knew the best;
He saw the rich, bright bait alone;
He thought that only for a jest
The Boy the line had thrown;
So swimming up, the bait he took;
Poor thing, how soon he found the hook!
2*







CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE ASS.


GET on, you Ass! why, I declare,
Like any snail you are creeping there!

ASS.
Well, if I don't go galloping on,
I honestly take my burden along!
Of divers service the master has need;
I bear the burden, he rides the steed.

Now when the long day's wprk was o'er
The Ass came to the stable door;
He found his stall the steed's beside;
His crib with fodder was supplied;
And on his straw, with grave delight,
He calmly slept the livelong night.


19


nl2~i-----c~-r~~-rr-~-iT--aalrr~--rsn 7-------~---1 r-- -*llli7--~-rrr-~- -I-rrl------~--~---- ----r --rr-----






CHIL'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 21







THE CATS AND THE MONKEY.


A MoxmT once weighing a nice piece of cheese,
(Which two Cats had stolen to eat at their ease,
And wished it divided in two parts quite fair,
So neither would have more nor less than his share,)
Kept biting off pieces the right weight to find,
Till, when it weighed even, nothing was left but rind.
So often in lawsuits the clients discover,
When the lawyers are paid, there is nothing left over.






CHILDYS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 23






THE BEAR AND THE HERMIT.
~-4---

BEAR.
MY benefactor slept. A wicked fly
Has lighted on his face. I now will try
To brush him off, lest, tickling his dear nose,
He drives away my master's sweet repose.

HERMIT.
Oh, dear! oh, dear! you wicked bear,
Ydu've torn my face to pieces. Just see there,
You've scratched my nose, nearly put out my eye,
In striving to dislodge a harmless fly.
Beware, in future, e'en when motives good;
Direct your actions, lest you ill intrude.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 25






THE SATYR AND THE TRAVELLER.


TRAVELLER.

OH, dear! 'tis cold, my fingers I must blow
To warm; they are frozen in this snow.
My friend, your soup is good, but 'tis too hot;
I'll blow, and cool it. That's better, is it not?

SATYR.
Good day, sir, leave my hut. I'll entertain
No guest who can't from silly jest refrain;
I am no fool, and need not to be told
One breath can not blow hot and cold.






CHILDS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 27





THE CASCADE AND THE RIVER.


CASCADE.

How tame and wearisome is thy course,
Dear River; why not use your force
To drive, as I do, with turmoil and haste,
And the precious sweets of excitement taste ?
See how my waters dash down from the hill,
And the noise of my song increaseth still.

The River flowed on in her quiet way,
And there came to the two a summer's day;
The sun's intense heat the Cascade dried,
But the still, deep River its power defied.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 29





THE ASS AND THE LION.
-4-~---

AN Ass once went, on hunting-day,
To scare the beasts with horrid bray.
The Lion, concealed quite near, then made
A prey of those the noise dismayed.
Satiate with sport, the Ass he calls,
And bids him cease his horrid brawls.
He, puffed with self-importance, said:
"Sir, to some purpose I have brayed !"
" No Ass more famously could do,"
The Lion says, "but thee I knew,
Or I might have been frighted too."
3*






CHILDYS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.







THE BEES AND THE DRONES.


BEFORE the Wasp the Drones once laid
A cause, for honey the Bees had made.
He-asked at once for his decision-
Made, then, to both this proposition:
"You each shall take a hive, and here
Some honey make; 'twill then be clear
Whose honey-comb shall likest be
To this you claim." The Bees agree;
The Drones refuse. The judge, at last,
Upon the case this sentence passed:
"'Tis plain to whom belongs this hoard;
To the Bees let it be restored."


31






CHILI'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK 33





THE ROSE AND THE AMARANTH.


ROSE.
NEIGHBOR, friend Amaranth, just see,
None pass without observing me;
While I perceive that very few
Seem any note to take of you.

AMARANTH.
Sweet Rose, I know you stand alone,
The Queen of Beauty, all must own.
Far be such vanity from me,
My merit sole is constancy.
Less exquisite, I longer last,
Unchanged and fresh when you have passed.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 35





THE ROSE'S LOOKINKGLASS.


A BLUSH ROSE once, in Beauty's pride,
Bloomed by a little river's side.
With pleasure gay, and haughty air,
She saw her beauty mirrored there.
But oh! alas! there came a storm,
And tore the leaves from her fair form.
She saw the stalk, its beauty flown,
Still mirrored in the ruthless stream;
And mourned, alas! her beauty gone,
And wished she had more modest been.
The head so raised with pomp and pride,
More modest bowed, the storm's power had defied.


--7- ---------- -- --- -- --- -- -------------- ~-~- -1






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 37





ONE LITTLE BOY.


I'M a little gentleman,
Play, and ride, and dance I can;
Very handsome clothes I wear,
And I live on dainty fare;
And whenever out I ride,
I've a servant by my side.
And I never, all the day,
Need do any thing but play;
Nor even soil my little hand,
Because I am so very grand:
I'm very glad, I'm sure,
I need not labor, like the poor.
For I think I could not bear
Such old shabby clothes to wear.
4






39


CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.





ANOTHER LITTLE BOY.


I'M a little husbandman,
Work and labor hard I can;
I'm as happy all the day
At my work, as if 'twere play;
When to work I go along,
Singing loud my morning song,
With my wallet on my back,
Or my wagon whip to smack;
O, I am as happy then,
As the idle gentleman.
Down I lie content, and say
I've been useful all the day.
I'd rather be a plough-boy than
A useless little gentleman.







CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.





THE BEE AND THE BUTTERFLY.


A BUTTERFLY said unto a Bee,
"My dearest friend, I cannot see
Why you devote such constant care,
Your wax and honey to prepare.
Why not, like me, from every flower,
Draw just enough to please each hour ?"
" Ah," said the Bee, a life like mine
Is of more use than such as thine.
I can to others pleasure give;
You, for yourself alone, would live.
My name is linked with industry and care,
Your pleasures are as volatile as air."
4*


41






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 43





THE HUNTSMAN AND THE DOVE.


A HuNTSMAN aiming at a Dove,
Who to her mate cooed soft of love,
Was, by an adder in the grass,
Bitten, as near him he did pass.
The venom spread: the man, who found
That he must die there on the ground,
Cried, "Just is my sentence, thus to fall
When I another's death proposed:
I could not hope to live unpunished long,
And by my cruelty my life is closed."







CHILDYS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 45





THE CAT AND THE BAT.


A BAT who flying once by day,
By Tabby soon was caught as prey;
But hard she pleaded for her life,-
"I am no mouse, madam, you see,
And I am sure you'll not eat me,
When rats and mice are rife."
Pussy replied, You speak most true,
For, as a mouse, I'll not eat you,
On that I give my word:
For who to eat a mouse would care,
When they might have more sumptuous fare,
By feeding on a bird "







CHILPS OWVN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.





THE ASTRONOMER AND THE FLY.


"HERE is a new planet, my fortune is made,"
A star-gazing wiseacre exultingly said;
"It is large, it is black, it is dazzling and new,
I hope no one else will discover it, too.
Yet stop; to be sure I distinctly have seen,
My glass I'll unscrew, and every part clean:
Ah, me! with despair I am likely to die,
My planet, I find, is a poor little fly
Who here is imprisoned, and my magnifier
Has enlarged him, my gigantic hopes to inspire."


47







CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 49






THE GOLDFISH AND THE TOAD.


GOLDFISH.

Do you not envy us, O Toad,
Who bear'st of ugliness a load,
While we in sparkling splendor live,
And pleasure to all gazers give ?


TOAD.

I envy not your brilliant lot:
I dwell beside a humble cot,
Stroll through the garden, breathe free air,
And all the sweets of freedom share.
5






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.


THE CRANE AND THE CROW.



CROW.
o n ow.


LONG-LEGGED, ugly, whooping Crane,
Of your fine feathers be not vain;
Strut round and swagger as you may,
Folks won't admire your plumage gay.


CRANE.

I may be ugly, as you say,
But your black coat is not so gay;
A whooping Crane I'm called, I know,
But I am not a (arrion Crow !


51







CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 53






THE OSTRICH AND THE PELICAN.

-4-----

OSTRICH,

POOR Pelican, that from your bosom's blood,
Dost feed your little foolish brood,
I think the world won't deem you wise,
To squander thus your energies,


PELICAN.

If the world praises such as you,
I hope it will not praise me, too.
To gad about, and "scatter dirt,"
Your unborn offspring you desert.
5*






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE COCK AND POLAR BEAR.


COCK.

STRANGER, shaggy, r'bugh and drear,
That com'st our cheerful cot so near,
Whence do you come ?


BEAR.

From my wooden cage
I've just escaped, and would engage
In pleasant talk with Chanticleer.
With us the day lasts half the year,
And Cock's shrill voice we never hear.


55





CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 57





THE LION AND TIE BEASTS.


WHEN in alliance with the strong,
The weak are sure to suffer wrong.
A Lion, in a royal whim,
Took other beasts to hunt with him,
A stag entangled in their toil,
He into three divides the spoil;
Then in these words the lordly beast
His humble company addressed:
" This portion I as strongest claim;
This, because Lion is my name;
And as for the remaining share,
To touch it, let me see who dare !"
Thus, as it ever will befall,
The greedy tyrant seized on all.





CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 59





THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


A WOLF across his greedy throat,
One day a pointed bone had got,
With promises he lured in vain,
Each creature to relieve his pain;
At last his oaths a Crane persuade,
With venturous beak to give him aid;
The hardy cure when well effected,
Longskhanks, the promised fee expected:
"Wh'at," says the Wolf, "your neck you draw,
In safety, from my hungry maw,
And dare demand another prize ?
Ungrateful! fly, if thou art wise."






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.





THE STAG AT THE FOUNTAIN.


A STAG upon a fountain's side,
Beheld his branching horns with pride;
While of his spindle-shanks, ashamed,
Their disproportioned form he blamed; "
Sudden he hears the hunter's cries,
And to the forest nimbly flies;
The woods receive their well-known guest,
His tangled horns his feet arrest;
The hounds approach, and seize their prey,
Who, dying, thus was heard to say:
" Wretch that I am! too late I learn,
How little we the truth discern!
What would have saved me, I despised,
And what has been my ruin, prized!"
6


61






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.


THE LION WORN WITH AGE.


WHEN fate and fortune cease to smile,
Prepare for insults from the vile.
Worn out, and in a dying way,
A venerable Lion lay;
The Boar came on with rankling tooth,
For some offence received in youth;
The Bull then ventured with his horn,
To gore him for an ancient scorn;
The sorry Ass, O last disgrace!
Approached and kicked him in the face,
Then he, expiring,-" 'Tis severe,
The insults of the brave to bear:
But, wretch! when spurned by thee I lie,
High time it is indeed to die!"


63






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE TRAVELLER AND THE LARK.


TRAVELLER.
How early, Lark, hast thou begun
Thy song of triumph to the sun ?

LARK.
To the dear God I sing-thus raise
To him my thanks, to him my praise;
It is a custom old of mine;
Is it not, Traveller, also thine ?

And as so loud in air he sang,
And as the Traveller onward sprang,
How blithe, how bright did all appear,
In that clear, sunny atmosphere !
And God, well-pleased, in heaven above,
Received their hymns of praise and love.
6*






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 67






THE BOY AND THE BUTTERFLY.


BO Y.
SUNSHINE-ROVING Butterfly!
Flower-loving Butterfly!
Say, upon what dost thou fare,
Always fluttering in the air ?

BUTTERFLY.
Flower-odors and sunshine
Are the food of me and mine.

While the Child to seize it thought,
Fearing, trembling, it besought,
" Do not so, dear Child! I pray,
In the sunshine let me play;
Ere has passed the evening red,
Thou may'st find me cold and dead!


*





CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 69





THE JACKDAW AND THE PEACOCK.
-4e---

A JACKDAW, empty, pert, and vain,
Who held his equals in disdain,
One day some beauteous feathers found,
Left by a Peacock on the ground.
When in the gaudy plumage dressed,
The shallow thing his fortune blessed:
With stately gesture strode along,
And boldly joined the Peacock throng;
Who, his impertinence to pay,
First stripped him, and then chased away.
The crest-fall'n coxcomb homeward sneaks,
And his forsaken comrades seeks;
Where'er he comes with scorn they leave him,
And not a Jackdaw will receive him.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.


THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.


WHO others' property invade,
With loss of theirs are justly paid.
A Spaniel swimming with his food,
Believed his shadow in the flood
A real dog; and while he tries,
Him of his dinner to surprise,
From his loosed jaws down dropped his own;
And shade and substance both were flown.


71






CHILD'S 0 WA ,PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE GOLDFINCH AND STARLING.
-4----

"TELL me, my pretty Starling, why
Thus-from your gilded cage you fly?
Here, every want was satisfied,
Now for your own you must provide.
To give you all that you could ask,
Has ever been our master's task;
Now you must seek throughout the street,
For every seed, or grain, you eat:"
A Goldfinch to a Starling said,
Who from his master's cage had fled.
"'Tis true," the Starling said, "less good
Will be my lodgings, and my food;
But nothing will my wings confine,
And native liberty be mine."


73






CHILDS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.


THE PORCUPINE AND SERPENTS.


A PoncuPrnE, by dogs sore prest,
Sought refuge in a Serpent's nest:
Their hospitality they gave,
From his pursuers him to save.
But, finding that his quills, so keen,
When thrown pierced through their tender skin,
They told him that, the danger over,
He had best seek another cover.
" Ah," said th' intruder, here I stay,
Defying you to send me away;
You cannot sting me, for my dart
Can pierce your tongue in every part."
The Serpents, finding contest vain,
Had to permit him to remain.


5


75





CHIL'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 77





THE EAGLE AND THE OWL.


"WHY sit you blinking in that hole ?"
Once said an Eagle to an Owl.
"Come out, 'tis time to fly, not sleep;
This is no hour your bed to keep;
The sun shines bright, the day is clear,
So, prithee, stay no longer here."
" Ah," said the Owl, "for you, 'tis true,
The gairish light of day may do;
But, for my part, this hollow tree
Provides the light which best suits me;
While you are sleeping, then, to-night,
I, for my prey, will wing my flight.
Pass on, our natures can never agree,
What you delight in, would be death to me."
7*






CHILD'S OWVN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK 79






THE LYNX AND THE MOLE.
I-4---

A LYNX, once seated near a Mole,
Began thus with him to condole:
" Your blindness, friend, a sore cross must be;
I'm sure, if I should lose the power to see,
My foes would soon destroy my life, indeed;
But now they dare not come to make me bleed."
"Beware," the Mole cried, for danger now is near,
Which, though I cannot see, I surely hear."
Before the Lynx, from where he stood, could flee,
The hunter pierced him from behind a tree.
Thus self-sufficient, vaunting of his eyes,
He fell the skillful hunter's ready prize.






81


CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK





THE MULES AND THE ROBBERS.


Two Mules, with each a heavy load,
Journeyed together on the road;
One carried gold, and went before,
The other sacks of barley bore.
With crest erect the leader strode,
And the bells jingled as he trode:
The other meekly trudged along.
A troop of robbers round them throng,
The humble barley who despise,
Intent to seize the richer prize.
The first was wounded in the fray,
And his rich lading borne away,
Wailing his ills with sad lament,
While t'other trotted on content;
"The scorn," he says, "I can endure,
That makes my sacks and hide secure."






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 83





THE TREES PROTECTED BY THE GODS.
-4c---

IN days of yore, each god selected
A Tree by him to be protected:
Phoebus the Bay; the Oak was Jove's;
The beauteous Mother of the Loves
The Myrtle chose; the Poplar tree,
Alcides: the Pine, Cybele.
"Why," says Minerva, do you please
To choose such unproductive trees ?"
"Because," says Jove, we would not seem
To give for profit our esteem."
Pallas replies, Say what you will,
I love my useful Olive still,
For its good fruit." Then father Jove,-
0 wisest of the powers above!
Thou well hast said! true worth alone
By its utility is shown."







85


CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.








THE ASS AND THE GIPSIES.
-4--6--

HrI whom the fates to misery doom,
Disgrace pursues beyond the tomb.
Gipsies, to bear their baggage, led
An Ass, o'ercharged and scantly fed:
Of blows and poverty he died.
The Gipsies stripped the wretch's hide
To make a drum; which,,beaten still,
Seemed a continuance of ill.
8






87


CHILLYS OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE STRANGER.
-4---

WHo knocks so loudly at the gate ?
The night is dark, the hour is late,
And the full moon is down!
O, 'tis a stranger gone astray!
That calls to ask the nearest way
To yonder little town.
Why, 'tis a long and dreary mile,
For one overcome with cold and toil;
Go to her, Charles, and say,
Good lady! here repose to-night,
And with the morning's earliest light,
We'll guide you on your way.






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.





THE FROG AND THE OX.


WHEN little folks will ape the great,
'Tis easy to forsee their fate.
A Frog a well-fed Ox had seen,
And, envying much his goodly mien,
She puffed and swelled her wrinkled hide,
And to her brood in triumph cried:
" Well! do I equal him in size ?
" Ah, no!" a little one replies.
Again her stretched-out sides dilate;
The difference still, they said, was great.
One effort more, in fate's despite,
She desperate made with all her might:
'Twas all in vain. The reptile, curst
With envy and ambition, burst.
8*


89






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK. 91





THE DOG AND THE CROCODILE.
-4-

WHo to the wise false counsel give,
Their labor lose, and scorn receive.
The dogs, 'tis said, that lap the Nile,
Run, to avoid the Crocodile.
One, who concealed in sedges lay,
Cries to a Hound-" Here! hark you! stay!
Drink at your leisure of the stream,
Nor of imagined dangers dream !"
" I thank you, sir; you well advise;"
At distance due the Dog replies,
"'Tis what I certainly should do,
Had I no cause to fly from you."






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK 93





THE FOX AND THE CRANE.


REYNARD one day, in merry vein,
To dine invited neighbor Crane;
He gave her neither frogs nor fish,
But mince-meat in a shallow dish;
So that while Reynard lapt his fill,
No morsel passed her pointed bill,
And sad and fasting she went home.
Next day she asked the Fox to come
And sup; and gave, for only food,
A hash that smelt extremely good,
Served in a jar with narrow neck,
Where Longshanks just could put her beak.
The Crane supped well; her famished guest
By no means relishing the feast.
" No malice," says the Crane, adieu!
Remember, I was taught by you."






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.






THE KITE AND THE CHICKENS.
-4----

CHICKENS neathh their mother's sway
Had escapedd the Kite from day to day;
From force despairing of his prize,
The rogue assumed a friendly guise;
Advised she should a treaty make,
And him for their protector take:
"Than whom," he says, none better knows,
To guard them from surrounding foes."
The harmless hen his lies believe,
The robber for their guard receive:
Who soon with beak and talon shows
What a vile patron she had chose.
Says one, whom chance had still preserved,
" 'Tis what your folly has deserved !"


95






CHILD'S OWN PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK.


THE FOX AND THE GOAT.


WHEN dangers press, a cunning man
Escapes by any means he can.
A Fox had fall'n into a pit,
And could no way get out of it;
A thirsty Goat hard by who stood,
Cries, Neighbor, is the water good ?"
"So excellent," the Fox replied,
"I here remain unsatisfied;
Come down, my friend, take my advice."
Long-beard went down, and in a trice,
Reynard climbed out upon his head,
And left him prisoner in his stead.
9


97




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