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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
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Title: Routledge's nursery picture book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003267/00001
 Material Information
Title: Routledge's nursery picture book containing upwards of six hundred and thirty illustrations
Alternate Title: Nursery picture book
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Sears, Matthew Urlwin, b. ca. 1800 ( Engraver )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Foster, Myles Birket, 1825-1899 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel Brothers ( Illustrator )
Routledge, Warne, & Routledge ( Publisher )
R. Clay, Son and Taylor ( Printer )
Publisher: Routledge, Warne, and Routledge
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: R. Clay, Son, and Taylor
Publication Date: 1862
Copyright Date: 1862
 Subjects
Subject: Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Seasons -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Games -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Crusoe, Robinson (Fictitious character) -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Civilization -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1862   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1862   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1862   ( rbgenr )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1862   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Signed artists include: Dalziel, M.U. Sears, E. Evans, B. Foster,H. Weir, etc.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy imperfect: p. 13-20 torn, affecting content; one leaf (unpaged, 3 cm. shorter in length) inserted but not matching, probably belongs to another book.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003267
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4418
notis - ALG3828
oclc - 48181434
alephbibnum - 002223578

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Page 99
        Page 100
Full Text

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FRONTISPIECE




FRONTISPIECE.





ROUTLEDGE'S


NURSERY


PICTURE BOOK,

CONTAINING UPWARDS OF

SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY ILLUSTRATIONS.


K




/


WHAT A NICE BOOK!


LONDON:
ROUTLEDGE, WARNE, AND ROUTLEDGE, FARRINGDON STREET:
AND 56, WALKER STREET, NEW YORK.
1862.

























































LONDON:
PRINTED BY R. CLAY, SON, AND TAYLOR,
BREAD STREET HILL








































CONTENTS.


FLOWER ALPHABET . .


FIGURES AND PICTURES . . .

NURSERY RHYMES . . . .

STORY OF THREE BEARS . . .

ROBINSON CRUSOE . . . .

USEFUL HINTS FOR HEEDLESS CHILDREN

RUNAWAY DUCKLING . . ..

PICTURE FABLES . . . ...

BOY'S GAMES, ETC . . . ..

BOATS AND SHIPS . . ...

PERILS OF THE SEA . . . .

HORSEMANSHIP . . . . .

HORSES . . . . : .

DOGS . . . . .

DOMESTIC PETS . . . . .

POULTRY AND WATER-FOWL . . .

BRITISH GAME-BIRDS . . . .

SINGING-BIRDS. . . . . .

TALKING-BIRDS . . . . .

INSECT-EATING BIRDS . . ..

BRITISH BIRDS OF PREY . . .

THE SEASONS . . . . ..

WINDSOR AND ETON SCENES . ... .

OLD ENGLISH SPORTS . . . .

WILD BEASTS . . . . .


PAGE
. . 6-11

. 12, 13

. 14-29, 32

. . 30-31

. . 33-35

. . 36, 37

. . 38, 39

. . 40, 41

. . 42, 43

. . 44

. . 45

. . 46

* . 47

. . 48

. . 49

. . 50

. . 51

. . 52

. . 53

. . 54

. 55

. 56

. 57

. . 58, 59

. . 60-62


VARIOUS BRITISH ANIMALS .

BIRDS OF FOREIGN CLIMES .

WONDERS OF THE WORLD

REPTILES . . .

INHABITANTS OF THE OCEAN .

SHELL FISH . . .

RIVER FISH . . ..

GRIMMS' DROLLERIES . .

GRIMMS' HOUSEHOLD STORIES

THE CATS' MUSICAL PARTY .

SCHOOL-DAY SCENES . .

THE FOUR DOLLS . .

SCENES IN HUMBLE LIFE .

VILLAGE SCENES .....

SCENES IN BIBLE HISTORY .

INSECTS. . . .

BUTTERFLIES . . .

FAIRY TALES . . .

SCENES OF HOME LIFE .

PICTURES OF COUNTRY LIFE.

FUNNY PICTURES . .

GROUPS OF ANIMALS . .

VISIT TO THE COUNTRY .

SEA-SHORE RAMBLES . .


PAGE
. . . 63

. . . 64, 65

. . . 66, 67

. . . 68

. . . 69

. . . 70

. . . 71

. . . 72, 73

. . . 74-76

. . . 77

. . . 78

. . . 79

. . . 80

. . . 81

. . . 82, 83

. . . 84

. . . 85

. . . . 86, 87

. . . . 88

. . .. . 89

. . . 90, 91

. . . 92, 93

. . . 94, 95

. . . 96


*






I-


A stands for ANEMONES, telling of Spring,
And the gladness and brightness
that season does bring.


C the CONYOLVULUS, children's delight,
Which opens in day-time, and shuts
up at night.


B is the BLUE-BELL, that sparkles with
dew, [blue.
And carpets the ground with its flowers of


D is the DAISY, that grows in the lanes,
Of which Jessie and Sarah make
such pretty chains.
























E is the EGLANTINE briar, so sweet,
Which Emily trains o'er the lattice-
work neat.


is the FOXGLOVE, which Tom stays to
pop, [to the shop,
Though his mother has sent him for bread


G is the GRASS, which the sheep love _T is the HEATHER, red, purple, and
to eat, [pleasant a seat. grey, [far away.
And which makes for young RoG ert so Which reminds the poor Swiss of his home
12

















is the IvY, that gives a cool shade,
Where John eats the soup that his
daughter has made.


K


is the KING-CUP, as yellow as gold,
Which Katherine prizes as treasure
untold.


~-,


Lis the LILY, with leaves of bright green,
Which we'll wreathe round the head
of our sweet Birthday Queen.


M is for MIGNONETTE, sweet-scented
weed, [from seed.
Which Mary has raised in her garden


I




















N stands for NEMOPHILA, lovely of hue, OLEANDER, the Gardener's pride;
Like the sweet Summer sky in its 0 He thinks it's the finest in all England
delicate blue. wide.


P is the PRIMROSE, which comes in the
Spring, [finches sing.
When blackbirds, and thrushes, and gold- Pulls


for QUINCE-BLOSSOM, which naughty
young Ned [papa said.
off, without minding what Grand-






















R is the ROSE-BUD, so cherish'd by all, is
The pride of the cottage, the joy of
the hall. Which


S
- -


the SNOWDROP, so drooping and
pale, [bends to the gale.
heeds not the snow-storm, but


I -


is the TULIP, which Eleanor fair,
Loving scarlet and orange, has
placed in her hair.


V stands for VIOLETS, much prized in
the Spring, [to sing.
Whe i the birds of the grove are first heard


T




















w
To dance


WATER-LILIES, whereon Fairies
light [moon bright.
in the summer, when shines the


X stands for EXOTICS, which Grand-
mamma sends, [friends.
That Fanny may garnish the room for her


YELLOW-LILY, which John, with a
J crook, [brook.
Is trying to reach from the bank of the


Z is for ZINNIA, which carried away
The prize at the Grand Show of
Flowers one day.
/ y'





FIGURES AND PICTURES.


1-ONE BUTTERFLY.


2-TWO ASSES.


4-FOUR BOYS.


3-THREE BEES.


5-FIVE DOGS.


7-SEVEN FOWLS.


6-SIX GIRLS.


8-'EIGHT FISH.


9-NINE SHEEP.


10E S12-TWELVE PIGS.


10-TEN SHELLS.


11-ELEVEN BIRDS.





NURSERY PICTURES.




-> (


DO AS YOU ARE BID.


THE TWIN SISTERS.


It ~--


CHARLIE AND HIS POOR NEIGHBOURS.


MADAM GRUMPH AND HER PIGS.


7 THE LITTLE ARCHITECTS.
A BALL IN THE -.. iLh -





NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE BETTY BLUE HA]
Lost her holiday shoe,
What can little Betty Lov
do ?
Give her another He
To match the other,
And then she may walk And
in two.







MULTIPLICATION is vexation,
Division is as bad,
The Rule of Three perplexes me,
And Practice drives me mad,


DY SPANDY, Jack-a- i
dandy,
es plum-cake and (i
sugar-candy ;
bought some at a
grocer's shop,
out he came, hop-
hop-hop.







GREAT A, little A,
Bouncing B,
The cat's in the cupboard,
And she can't see.


BAT, bat, come under my hat,
-.7 And I'll give you a slice of bacon,
-d when I bake I'll give you a cake,
10-TEN SHELLS. m not mistaken.


12-TWELVE PIGS.


V

4





NURSERY RHYMES.


Where are you going to, my pretty
maid ?
I. am going a milking, sir, she said.
May I go with you, my pretty maid?
You're kindly welcome, sir, she said.
What is your father, my pretty
maid ?
My father's a farmer, sir, she said.


What is your fortune, my pretty
maid?
My face is my fortune, sir, she said
Then I won't marry you, my pretty
maid?
Nobody asked you, sir, she said.


There was a little man, and he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead;
He shot Johnny King through the middle of his wig,
And knocked it right off his head, head, head.


Four-and-twenty tailors went to kill a snail,
The best man amongst them durst not touch her tail;
She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe Cow.
Run, Tailors, run, or she'll kill you all, just now.


!~I \ ~


-9


- A-"-


A BALL IN THE CARPENTER'S SHOP.


~1





K


^ .';'j





NURSERY RHYMES.



There was a monkey climbed up a tree; ... ,.'
When he fell down, then down fell he. ,, '


There was a crow sat on a stone;
When he was gone, then there was none. .' 1


There was an old wife did eat an apple; -
When she ate two, she had eaten a couple. [ J


There was a horse going to the mill;
When he went on, he didn't stand still.


There was a butcher cut his thumb; ,
When it did bleed, the blood did run.


There was a joc-key rode a race;
When he rode fast, he rode apace.

I had a little hen, the prettiest ever seen,
There was an old cobbler, clouting soon; She wash'd me the dishes and kept the house clean;
When he worked quick, they were done soon. She went to the mill to fetAh me some flour,
She brought it home in less than an hour,
There was a bold ship went out to Spain; She baked me my bread, she brew'd me my ale,
When it returned, it came back again. She sat by the fire, and told many a fine tale.
When it returned, it came back again.



The North Wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then ?


There was an old crow,
Sat upon a clod.
There's an end of my song,
That's very odd.


He will hop to a barn,
And to keep himself warm
Will hide his head nil,,r hi, wi:-.
Poor thing !


o T ,-.


- ---





NURSERY RHYMES.


You little twinkling stars, that shine
Above my head so high,
If I had but a pair of wings
I'd join you in the sky.

I am not happy lying here,
With neither book nor toy;
For I am sent to bed, because
I've been a naughty boy.


L A .-4


\
'N


If you will listen, little stars,
I'll tell you all I did:
I only said I would not do
The thing that I was bid!

I'm six years old this very day,
And I can write and read,
And not to have my own way yet
Is very hard indeed.

















2 -l: I \j ,


N -~


Listen to the Kitchen Clock!
To itself it ever talks,
From ,its place it never walks;
S" Tick-tock-tick-tock."
Tell me what it says.


'C

f 'II,.
/


I wonder if we ever heard
Of children who would touch
The things they ought to let alone-
I wonder very much ?


A BALL IN THE CARPENTER'S SHOP.






NURSERY RHYMES.


1. THIS LITTLE PIG went to market.


THREE wise men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl;
If the bowl had been stronger,
My story had been longer.


2. This little pig stayed at
home.


3. This little pig
got roast beef.


4. This little pig got
none.


5. This little pig cried wee,
wee, all the way home.


RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
April day;
Little Johnny
Wants to play.


fl7 ii- L

r :- 1-=
-j L -!


I HAD a little husband no bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint-pot, and there I bid him drum;
I gave him some garters, to fasten up his hose,
And a little pocket handkerchief to wipe his pretty nose.


HUMPTY-DUMPTY sat on a wall,
Humpty-Dumpty had a great fall;
All the king's horses, and all thwking's men,
Cannot put Humpty-Dumpty together again.


- not mistaken.


'IL
1TT~L 4

-4


-1.





NURSERY RHYMES.


SOME LITTLE MICE sat in a barn to
spin.
Pus-sy came by, and she pop-ped
her head in;


"Shall I come in and cut your threads off? "
" Oh no, kind sir, you will snap our heads off."


She shall have but a pen-ny a day,
Be-cause she can't work any fast-er.


BA-A, BA-A, black sheep,
Have you any wool ?
Yes, sir, yes, sir,
Three bags full:
One for my mas-ter,
One for my dame,
And one for the, little boy
That lives in our large.


GOOSEY, goosey, gander,
Whither shall I wander?
Up-stairs, and down-stairs,
And in my lady's chamber.
There I met an old man,
Who would not say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,
And threw him down-stairs.





NURSERY RHYMES.


OLD KING COLE was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he,
And he called for his pipe and he called for his glass,
And he called for his fiddlers three.


THERE WAS a fat man of Bombay,
Who was smoking one sunshiny day,
When a bird called a Snipe flew away with his pipe,
Which vexed the fat man of Bombay.


HEY DIDDLE DIDDLE, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
And the dish ran after the spoon.


PLEASE TO REMEMBER the fifth ot November,
The Gunpowder treason r-Iot.
I see no reason shy jur powder treason
Should ever be forgot.


.1






NURSERY RHYMES.


SIMPLE SIMON went a-fishing
For to catch a whale;
All the water he had got
Was in his mother's pail.


Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He prick'd his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.


/~ ~ __

I


JACK AND JILL went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water,
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.


LITTLE JACK HORNER sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie:
He put in his thumb, and he took out a plum,
And said, "What a good boy am I!"




22 NURSERY RHYMES.




A FROG BE WOULD A-WOOING GO,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
-Heigho, says Anthony Rowley!


So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,
And on the road he met with a rat,
With a rowley powley, &c.


Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see?"
-. K M oe oWith a rowley powley, &c.


When they came to the door of Mousey's hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock and they gave a loud call.
._____With a rowley powley, &c.


But while they were all a merry-makinig,
Heigho, says Rowley,
.A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, &c.


The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,
The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
b6/j K -With a rowley powley, &c.


This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright;
M Heigho, says Rowley.
V He took up his hat and he wished them good night,
With a rowley powley, &c.


But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,
A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up.
With a rowley powley, &c.


_So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley,
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee!
____-With a rowley uowley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley!






NURSERY RHYMES.


SING a song of sixpence,
A bag full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie;


I, I




I.


The king was in his counting-house,
Counting out his money;


When the pie was open'd,
The birds began to sing:
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king ?


The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey;


The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
By came a little bird,
And snapt off her nose.


D2




















ToM, TOM, was a piper's son,
He learned to play when he was
young,
But the only tune that he could
play,
Was Over the hills and far
away."


NURSERY RHYMES.


Tom with his pipe made such a
noise,
That he pleased both the girls
and boys,
They'd dance and skip while he
did play,
" Over the hills and far away."


Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
As soon as he played he began for to dance,
Even pigs on their hind-legs would after him prance.


He met old dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe and she used her legs;
She danced about till her eggs were all broke,
She began for to fret, but he laughed at the joke.


And as Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began for to play;
So Doll and the cow they danced a lilt,
Till the pail fell down and the milk was all spilt.


4o M












IT was on a merry time,
When Jenny Wren was youi
So neatly as she danced,
And so sweetly as. she sung,-

Robin Redbreast lost his heart
He was a gallant bird;
He doffd his hat to Jenny,
And thus to her he said:

"'My dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cherry-pie,
And drink nice currant-wine.

"I'll dress you like a Goldfinc
Or like a Peacock gay;
Wo if you'll have me, Jenny,
Let us appoint the day."


NURSERY RHYMES.




_ .._ ._


ng,


i O- OC- _O BIN A. J N "
L. -. --_ : _: -







MARRIAGE OF COCK ROBIN AND JENNY W


25





Jenny blush'd behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind:
Then let it be to-morrow, Bob,
I take your offer kind."

Robin rose up early,
At the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
To sing a roundelay.

The Cock then blew his horn,
To let the neighbours know
This was Robin's wedding-day,
And they might see the show.

The Bullfinch walk'd by Robin,
And thus to him did say,
Pray mark, friend Robin Redbreasf,
That Goldfinch dress'd so gay;





REN.


"What though her gay apparel
Becomes her very well,
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look
Must bear away the bell."
Then came the Bride and Bridegroom;
Quite plainly was she dress'd,
And blush'd so much, her cheeks were
As red as Robin's breast.


But Robin cheer'd her up;
My pretty Jen," said he,
"We're going to be married,
And happy we shall be."
" Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
"Who gives this maid away?"
"I do," says the Goldfinch,
"And her fortune I will pay!"





NURSERY RHYMES.


"And will you have her, Robin, The birds were ask'd to dine,
To be your wedded wife?" Not Jenny's friends alone,
"Yes, I will," says Robin, But every pretty songster
And love her all my life t" That had Cock Robin known.


"And you will have him, Jenny,
Your husband now to be?"
"Yes, I will," says Jenny,
"And love him heartily!"
Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
"You're married now," says Parson Rook:
While the Lark aloud did sing.
" Happy be the Bridegroom,
And happy be the Bride!
And may not man, nor bird, nor beast,
This happy pair divide! "


The concert it was fine;
And every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin,
And Jenny Wren the Bride.
When in came the Cuckoo,
And made a great rout,
He caught hold of Jenny,
And pull'd her about.


They had a cherry-pie,
Besides some currant-wine,
And every guest brought something,
That sumptuous they might dine.
They each took a bumper,
And drank to the pair,
Cock Robin the Bridegroom,
And Jenny the Fair.
The dinner things removed,
They all began to sing;
And soon they made the place
Near a mile round to ring.


Cock Robin was angry,
And so was the Sparrow,
Who fetch'd in a hurry
His bow and his arrow.
His aim then he took,
But he took it not right;
His skill was not good,
Or, he shot in a fright;


For the Cuckoo he miss'd,
But Cock Robin he killed !-
And all the birds mourn'd
That his blood was so spill'd.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE DEATH AND BURIAL


WHo kill'd Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I kill'd Cock Robin.

This is the Sparrow,
With his bow and arrow.


Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish,
I caught his blood.

This is the Fish,
That held the dish.


OF POOR COCK ROBIN.


Who saw him die?
I, said ihe Fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die.

This is the little Fly
Who saw Cock Robin die.


Who'll make his shroud?
I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle,
I'll make his shroud.

This is the Beetle,
With his thread and needle.





NURSERY RHYMES.


Who'll dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and show'l,
I'll dig his grave.

This is the Owl,
With his spade and show'l.


Who'll be the Parson?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book,
I'll be the Parson.

This is the Rook,
Reading his book.


-- kA-
1^^^J


Who'll be the Clerk ?
I, said the Lark,
If it's not in the dark,
I'll be the Clerk.

This is the Lark,
Saying "Amen" like a clerk.


Who'll carry him to the grave?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I'll carry him to the grave.

This is the Kite,
About to take flight.





NURSERY RHYMES. 29


t-. -.


Who'll carry the link?
I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute,
I'll carry the link.
This is the Linnet,
And a link with fire in it.


Who'll be chief mourner?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.
This is the Dove,
Who Cock Robin did love.


Who'll sing a psalm?
I, said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush,
I'll sing a psalm.
This is the Thrush,
Singing psalms from a bush.


Who'll toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull;
So, Cock Robin, farewell!
This is the Bull
Who the Bell-rope did pull.


All the birds of the air
Fell a sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll
For Poor Cock Robin.


^




THE THREE BEARS.


A MEDDLESOME little girl,
named Silverlocks, because
of her bright curly hair,
started off one day, without
leave, to gather wild flowers.
She went into a wood, and
presently came to a lonely
place where there was a
snug little house, inhabited
by three Bears, who were
not then at home. The
saucy little puss first peeped
in at the open window,
and then boldly entered the
house, little thinking what
sort of folks lived there.
Now the three Bears had
gone out to take a walk.
The biggest of them was
Papa Bruin, who was very
rough; the next in size


was Mammy Muff; and the
smallest of the three was
their darling Tiny. Before
they left home Mammy
Muff had placed the soup,
just made for dinner, in
three jars of different sizes
on a table to get cool.
When Silverlocks found
out the soup by its savoury
smell she was in high glee,
and thought to satisfy her
hunger by eating up the
portion in the little jar,
which she found most to
her taste; and so she knelt
on a bench before it, and,
with the help of Tiny's
spoon, soon emptied his jar.
After this, being rather
tired, she looked about


THE THREE BEARS TAKING A WALK IN THE WOOD.


SILVERLOCKS EATING TINY'S SOUP.


SILVERLOCKS SITTING IN TINY'S CHAIR.





THE THREE BEARS.


SILVERLOCKS SLEEPING IN TINY'S BED;


for a nice seat, and saw there were three chairs of
different sizes; she took a fancy to the smallest, the
one that belonged to Tiny, and rocked herself in it
until it broke in pieces. Silverlocks now felt sleepy,
and -went up-stairs to the bed-room; she there found
three beds, two being large and one very small, and after




gone, but his little chair J I j.
broken in pieces.
All three Bears then ran J k
up-stairs to see if any one
was there. The first thing
they found was that the beds
were all tumbled, and they
cried out angrily, one after
another, Who has dis-
turbedmy bed?" But Tiny,
looking about more sharply
than his parents, found
Silverlocks fast asleep in ,
his crib; this made him
scream out, in his shrill
voice, "Oh here's the little


TINY'S ANGER AT FINDING HIS SOUP GONE.


trying them, one by one, she popped into the smallest
and soon fell asleep.
By this time the three Bears had come back, and on
going into the house they all cried out, one after the
other, "Who has been to my soup ?" Poor Tiny was
the most put out, for he found not only his soup all



I girl who has disturbed my
bed !" looking as fierce as
only a young Bear could look
who had lost his dinner.
Silverlocks awoke in a
great fright, and finding the
window was luckily open,
she made a spring towards it,
before the Bears could catch
her, jumped out of window,
and ran home as fast as
she could, without once
looking back. Her fright
having properly punished
her for her disobedience and
77 7 idle curiosity.


FRIGHT AND ESCAPE OF SILVERLOCKS.
<&






NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE BO-PEEP has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;


Little Bo-peep fell fast a-sleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke she found it a joke,
For still they all were fleeting.


It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Unto a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails, side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.


Let them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.


Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found 'em indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind 'em.


Then she heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And ran o'er hill and dale-o,
And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,
To tack to each sheep its tail-o.





ROBINSON CRUSOE. 33


IS SHIPWRECKED.


DETERMINES TO GO TO SEA.


N
C>
*3I

Jc


BUILDS A CABIN.


READS HIS BIBLE BEFORE


ROBINSON CRUSOE AND THE GOAT.


GOING TO REST.





ROBINSON CRUSOE.


-N


IN HIS ISLAND DRESS.


FIRST SIGHT OF THE SAVAGES.


BUILDS A CANOE.


N


ROBINSON CRUSOE RESCUES FRIDAY.


THE FAMILY MEAL.





ROBINSON CRUSOE.


7
4 Y-


THE GUN FRIGHTENS FRIDAY.


FRIDAY AND THE BEAR.


LAUNCHING THE CANOE.


ROBINSON CRUSOE ON HIS RETURN.


FRIDAY FINDS HIS FATHER.






USEFUL HINTS FOR


NONE but mischievous boys take birds'
are hatched.


nests after the eggs


THE DOLL's HOUSE: only to be played with when
lessons are over.


CRUELTY to dumb animals seldom escapes punishment.


T iE child who teazes a cat must expect to be scratched.


.. -_ _r .- X. 4
*:-.*- *: }. *-.( _-^ _,. .\_ f-. -^
-2 -"


THE boy who made the best use of his pocket-money.


THOUGHTLESS PATTY, who used her pet bird like a dog."


6I


HEEDLESS HARRY, trying to catch a poor young bird
with his cap, breaks its wing.


GREEDY ANNIE finds the mice have got at the cake
she locked up to eat by herself.





HEEDLESS CHILDREN.


THE VANITY OF BEAUTY.


EATING FORBIDDEN FRUIT.


THE MISCHIEVOUS BOY.


AWKWARD HABITS.


DANGER OF BIRD-NESTING.


SEA-SIDE DANGERS. MEDDLING" MATT.


DON'T LEAN AGAINST THE DOOR.


TEASING TOM.




pppp-


FIRST DAY OUT.


LEARNING TO WADDLE.


THE YOUNG DUCKLINGS INTRODUCED TO GRANDMAMMA.

$.


FIRST ACQUAINTANCE WITH DANGER.


SAFE AGAIN WITH MAMMA.


THE RUNAWAY DUCKLING.





THE RUNAWAY DUCKLING.


LEARNING TO DIVE.


FIRST LESSON IN FLYING.


~--~
~;- \


DUCKLING TAKEN PRISONER.


ESCAPES TO THE WATER.


DUCKLING WISHES HE WAS AT HOME AGAIN.


HARD LIFE IN THE MARSHES.


THE CONSEQUENCE OF KEEPING WILD COMPANY.


REPENTANCE COMES TOO LATE.


41611%11!10-




PICTURE FABLES.


SAYS Dolly, How can I sit up with ease ?
They've quite forgot to p.ut joints in my knees !"


THOSE who throw stones may their idleness rue,
Like the boy whom these two swans pursue.


" No, no! Mr. Kite, you won't make us afraid,"
Say the birds; you're only of painted paper made."


MOUSER, alone, of these four kittens is game,
Velvet, Slyboots, and Lickdish are all too tame.


THIS boy, like his dog, to learn early began,
And became, in due time, a wise and great man.


DON'T shine too hotly, dear Sun, we pray,
Or like water our snow man will melt away.




GAY'S


THE LADY AND THE WASP.
I


THE MONKEY WHO HAD SEEN THE WORLD.


THE SETTER AND THE PARTRIDGE.


THE PEACOCK, TURKEY, AND GOOSE.


THE PHILOSOPHER AND THE PHEASANTS.


THE GOAT WITHOUT A BEARD.


I


FABLES.




SCHOOLBOY GAMES.


GYMNASTICS. RING-TAW.


CIL V$


CAPTAIN HIGHFLYER.


CRICKET.


A FAST MAN.


FRENCH AND ENGLISH.


A TAILPIECE.


SNOW-BALLING.


LEAP-FROG.


SEE SAW.


LEAPFROG.


JUMP LITTLE NAG-TAIL


HOCKEY.


DRAWING THE OVEN.





GAMES AND PASTIMES.


4
Tj

a


ARCHERY.


THE TARGET.


AUNT SALLY.


SHOOTING POSITION.


BATTING.


BASTE THE BEAR.


A YOUNG ARCHITECT.


DOMINOES.


SHADOW BUFF.


" MY NAME IS NORVAL "


BULL'S EYES AND SHEEP'S EYES.


BOBBING FOR TITTLEBATS.


SKATING.


^\


ZN25 ca zfcS.






SHIPS AND BOATS.


DANDY RIGGED YACHT.


SCHOONER.


THE YACHT "AMERICA."


DUTCH GALLIOT.












-~Al


SAILING.


'N
J N
It-N


SLOOP.


FELUCCA.


~~1


BRIG.


BOATING.





PERILS OF THE SEA.


"MAN OVERBOARD."


THE WRECK.


WASHED ASHORE.


HOMEWARD-BOUND.


FRANKLIN'S WINTER QUARTERS IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS.




HORSEMANSHIP.


MOUNTING.


THE WALK.


THE CANTER.


REARING.


LEAPING.


TROTTING.


A A


THE RACE-HORSE.


RIDING.


DRIVING.


'Wus-W^





HORSES.


WEIGHT-CARRYING HUNTER.


~z~&.> 2'.
~ ~


~LffiI 1


DRAY-HORSE.


SHETLAND PONY.


WILD HORSE.


-w"x


BARB.


G2


M .',




I


DOGS.


BLOODHOUND.


NEWFOUNDLAND DOG.


BULL-DOG.


FOXHOUND.


ENGLISH TERRIER.


SHEPHERD'S DOG.


KING CHARLES'S SPANIEL.


GREYHOUND.


.SCOTCH TERRIER.


MASTIFF.


POINTER.


'1


7r


WATER SPANIEL.


BEAGLE.





DOMESTIC PETS.


STOCK-DOVE. RING-DOVE.


RUNT.


TURTLE-DOVE.


JACOBIN.


TRUMPETER.


* ,~ *~
2
9. tA
r


CROPPER.


RUFF.


TURBIT.


S F-*--


GUINEA PIGS.


SQUIRRELS.


RABBITS.






POULTRY AND WATER-FOWL.


-'i .-ik


WORKING FOWLS.


DOMESTIC FOWLS. TURKEY.


I


,.', ~


GUINEA FOWL.


SOLAN GOOSE.




* i !JI*


PEACOK.


DAB-CHICK.


WILD DUCK.


TEAL.


WIDGEON.


SWANS.





BRITISH GAME BIRDS.


GREAT BUSTARD.


BLACK GROUSE.


RED GROUSE.


PARTRIDGE.


CORNCRAKE OR LANDRAIL.


WOODCOCK.








, __ t "^~


WATER-HEN.


SNIPE.


CURLEW.


PHEASANT.


QUAIL.


RUFF.





SINGING BIRDS.


LINNET.


BULLFINCH


GOLDFINCH.


BLACKBIRD.


CHAFFINCHI


THRUSH.


SKYLARK,


BLACK-CAP.


~v ~ji


NIGHTINGALE.


SISKIN.


GREENFINCH.


REDSTART.




TALKING BIRDS.


COCKATOO.A


GREEN PARROT.


BLUE AND YELLOW MACAW


MAGPIEl


PARRAKEET.


STARLING;


JACKDAW.


RAVE
714


53


MACAW(


C..... -* * ^ . I '* ______ ^


e9 I


GREY PARROT.


JAY. I





BRITISH


BIRDS-INSECT


EATERS.


zT- .
MARTIN.


CHIMNEY MARTIN.


SWIFT.


CUCKOO.


GREEN


WOODPECKER.


BIRDS' NESTS.


NUTHATCH.


SAND MARTIN.


PIED WAGTAIL.


FIELDFARE.


TOMTIT.


GOAT-SUCKER.




BRITISH BIRDS OF PREY.


GOLDEN EAGLE


CORMORANT.


SNOWY-OWL ROOK.


r


CROW.


KESTREL.


THOUGH.


PEREGRINE FALCON.


SPARROW-HAWK.


BITTERN.A
B ITT ERN.


KITE.


STORMY PETREL.


KINGFISHER.





5o THE SEASONS.





























SPRING.


SUMMER.


AUTUMN.


WINTER.






WINDSOR AND ETON.


~t~N .<'

A' -

* w a'


WINDSOR CASTLE.


ANCIENT OAK.


WINDSOR FOREST.


4


AVENUE OF ELMS, HOME PARK.


ETON COLLEGE.


SCENE NEAR WINDSOR.


WINDSOR CASTLE.


,

"L




OLD ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES.


ROBIN HOOD, SCARLET, AND JOHN.


THE SPINNING-WHEEL.


BRINGING IN THE MAY-POLE.


A MERRY MAY-MAKING.


J





OLD ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES.


PARISH TOP.


BOWLS.


MASTER OF FENCE.


BEAR-BAITING.


(



~ ~4.

s.s&a. 1


QUARTER-STAFF.


MOUNTEBANE S.





WILD BEASTS.


KANGAROO.


INDIAN ELEPHANT.


PANTHER.


LlowS.


JAGUAR.


ROYAL TIGER.


BROWN BEAR.

.- .-..I


Vsis^-


RHINOCEROS.


HIPPOPOTAMUS.


GIRAFFE.


PUMA.


CAMEL.


".


\
^





WILD BEASTS.


A


REINDEER.


POLAR BEAR.


STRIPED HYENA.


CHIMPANSEE.


STEINBOK.


WOLF.


YAK.


GAZELLE.


ZEBRA.


-4,.






WILD BEASTS.


i! /,/ ~3$%~


MARMOSET.


PORCUPINE.


ANT-EATER.


OPOSSUM.


RUFFLED LEMUR.


SLOTH.


/


j


LLAMA.


CHAMOIS.


JERBOA.


OCELOT.


BEAVER.


- 71


RACOON.





VARIOUS BRITISH ANIMALS.


V

,'I


FALLOW-DEER.


WEASEL.


GOATS.


FOX.


STOAT.


BADGER.


HARVEST MOUSE.


BOAR.


DORMOUSE.


SQUIRREL.


HARE.


OTTER.


RAT.


TIN ~


BULL.


RAM.





BIRDS OF FOREIGN CLIMES.


BLACK SWAN,


EMERALD BIRD OF PARADISE,


HUMMING BIRDS. TOCO TOUCAN.


f .


FLAMINGO.


EMU.


CASSOWARY.


HOOPOEE,


CRANE.


K

I-





BIRDS OF FOREIGN CLIMES.


BEARDED VULTURE.


, V* L
GRIFFON VULTURE.


CONDOR,


WHITE SPOONBILL.


WHITE PELICAN.


? OSTRICH.


EIDER DUCK.


ALBATROSS.


RESPLENDENT TROGON.


OSPREY.


*Jl


CAPE PENGUIN.


Q^a




WONDERS OF THE WORLD.


THE PYRAMID OF CHEOPS.


STATUE ON MEMNON.


THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA.


THE KREMLIN Or MOSCOW.





WONDERS OF THE WORLD.


THE PORCELAIN TOWER OF NANKIN.


THE EDDYSTONE LIGHTHOUSE.


THE CRYSTAL PALACE, SYDENHAM.


p"Eksawsis.:.-


MENAI SUSPENSION BRIDGE.





6(s REPTILES.


COBRA DI CAPELLO.


BOA CONSTRICTOR. RATTLE-SNAKE.


~\\~ ~

\. 'V.


COMMON LIZARD.


BLIND-WORM OR SLOW-WORM.


CHAMELEON.


.1


ALLIGATOR.


PUFF ADDER.


VIPER.


TORTOISE.


CROCODILE.


IGUANA.


A


,:, _,ty







INHABITANTS OF THE SEA.



A -~


V 1


WHITE SHARK.


NARWHAL.


SWORD-FISH.


CONGER.


SHORT SUN-FISH.


.1


SALMON.


GURNARD.


STURGEON.


N--


SLaka~. Wi


JOHN DORY.


FLYING-FISH.


a.


- I


______________________ "p
-m


69


WHALE.


TUNNY.


DOLPHIN.


COD.


^ *:





70 SHELL FISHES.


OYSTER.


NAUTILUS.


SCALLOP.


THORNY WOODCOCK.


LOBSTER.


PEARL OYSTER.


CUTTLE-FISH.


MUSSEL.


CRAB.


rz


SHRIMP AND PRAWN.

/2


LIMPET.


CRAY-FISH.


__=__-g W.__.= -_ .,_, ..
.- .:-_---=3-- -^ -_ __-_" -, L--





I -
/.
,t, It:,,


THE YOUNG ANGLERS.


TENCH.


.


PERCH.


, f


EEL.












GUDGEON.


ROACH AND DACE.

,"7


MINNOW, LOACH, &c.


CARP.


BREAM.


PIKE.


'v ~N


TROUT.


CHUB.


K2


-c_ *-*: -


RIVER FISH. :




GRIMMS' ODD FANCIES.


-I




GRIMMS' ODD FANCIES. 78-






I.- -- .- ----











LI. _____ -I/itl




GRIMMS' HOUSEHOLD TALES.


THE TWO TRAVELLERS.

A LONG time ago, a Tailor and a Shoemaker set off
on their travels together. The former was a very good
man, but the other was a cruel -wicked fellow. As they
went along they met with a lame Stork, which the
Shoemaker wanted to kill out of mischief, but the Tailor
would not let him do so, and after binding up the poor
bird's leg, set him free. A little while after this one of
the youngest and fairest children of a neighboring King
was lost by its nurse in a wood, and great was the grief
of the royal family at the sad event; indeed, the King
promised the hand of his eldest daughter to the man
who should succeed in finding his darling child. As
soon as this reached the ears of the two travellers, they
set about making search for the royal infant in different
directions. While they were looking very eagerly, the
Stork came up to the Tailor, carrying the little child in
its long beak, and to the great joy of the worthy man
who had cured its lameness, offered to take the child
to the palace for the Tailor, that the latter might claim
the promised reward. They presented themselves at
court, and the overjoyed King gladly gave up his eldest
daughter to be the wife of the worthy Tailor. As for the
envious Shoemaker he was so enraged at his friend's better
luck, that he died in a fit of passion.


THE COTTAGE IN THE WOOD.

A WOOD-CUTTERB who had two daughters, having to work
at a distance from home, ordered the elder of the two girls
to take his dinner to him. She lost her way, and being
tired went into a cottage to rest herself, and to beg for
some milk; when she got this she drank it up greedily
without giving some to a dwarf who looked up to her
beseechingly. She fell asleep soon after, and the old man
of the cottage opening a trap-door pushed her into a cellar.
As she did not return, her sister was sent to look after
her, and stopped at the same cottage; but when they
gave her some milk, she of her own accord offered some
of it to the dwarf. She too fell asleep as her sister had
done, but when the old man was about to throw her into
the cellar, the dwarf came behind him unawares, and
by a sudden and violent push thrust him in head fore-
most. The good-natured girl on awaking found the
dwarf changed into a beautiful Prince, who, after releas-
ing her selfish sister from the cellar where she remained
unhurt, took them both to his father's court. The old
King was greatly pleased with the kind-hearted girl who,
by offering some of her food of her own accord to the
Prince his son, had broken the spell by which the old
man had changed him into a dwarf, and willingly con-
sented to the union of the happy pair,




GRIMMS' HOUSEHOLD TALES.
\


THE FROG PRINCE.

A PRETTY young Princess, when playing one day with
her golden ball, let it roll into a fountain, and while
she was weeping at her loss, a frog jumped up from
the water and asked her why she grieved. When. she
had told him of her loss, he offered to restore the ball
to her, if she would promise to take him home with
her, and always love him; this she readily agreed to
do, but no sooner had she got the golden ball again,
than she ran off leaving the poor frog quite sad. But,
next day while she was dining with the King, her
father, a little knock was heard at the door, and who
should be there but the frog. He insisted on coming into
the room, and when the King heard all that had happened,
he was very angry with his daughter for not keeping
her promise to the frog, and made her take him up in
her hand and caress him. This put the proud Princess
in a great passion, and she threw the poor frog violently
on the ground, when in a moment he was changed into
a handsome Prince. Poor fellow, he had been changed
by an evil witch into a frog, and such was the nature
of the spell that no one but the Princess could restore
him to his own shape. As soon as the King saw how
much he loved the Princess he consented to their union,
and they lived long and happily together.


.


SNOW-WHITE AND ROSE-RED.

Two little girls, named Snow-white and Rose-red were
so good and kind-hearted that even the most timid animals
would come near them without fear, and wild ones never
hurt them. One day a great bear came to their cottage-
door and begged they would let him in as he was half
frozen; they did so and asked their mother to let him take
a nap on the hearth. He was very thankful, and went
away, but often came again to see them, and he let them
play with him as much as they liked. But when the
spring came he left off his visits, and they were very sorry
for this, especially Snow-white. The little girls went into
a wood one day for a walk, when they met with an ugly
dwarf, who had got entangled with his long beard amongst
the briars. They released him, but he only grumbled at
their kindness. Several times afterwards they got him out
of trouble, but he was always surly; and one day, when
they found him counting his money, he got so angry that
he set up quite a howl, and when a great Bear came up, he
asked him to make a meal of the good little girls. The
Bear, however, was their old friend, and gave the dwarf
such a hug that he never spoke again. As soon as he was
dead the Bear, who was a Prince on whom the dwarf had
cast a spell, took his own shape again, and married Snow-
white when she was old enough to be his wife.


I 1.


-75




GRIMMS' HOUSEHOLD TALES.


THE WEDDING OF MRS. FOX.

THERE was once a wicked old Fox who used to
beat his poor wife very cruelly. He fell sick, but this
only made him more savage, so that Mrs. Fox was in
fear of her life. Her faithful servant, the Cat, pitying
her for this ill-treatment, persuaded her to give out that
her husband was dead, hoping that the arrival of new
suitors would frighten him into better behaviour.
As soon as the report was spread, there were plenty
ready to come forward. A great Wolf was the first to
offer himself; then came in turn, a Dog, a Stag, a Bear,
and a Lion; but none of these suitors answered to the
description Mrs. Fox gave Pussy of what she required:
that was, that her future lord and master must have red
stockings and a pointed mouth. At last a young Fox
appeared at the door, and when the Cat saw he had red
stockings and a pointed mouth she let him in, and he
offered himself to Mrs. Fox as her future husband. The
old Fox overhearing this, instead of repenting, became
quite senseless with passion, when his wife, believing him
to be dead in earnest, with the help of Pussy seized him
by the head and heels, and threw him out of window.
He was picked up really dead next. day, and, as soon
as propriety would permit, the widow took the young
Fox for her husband.


THE GOOSE GIRL.

A YouNG Princess set off on a journey to meet the
Prince to whom she was betrothed, and rode on a won-
derful horse named Falada, that could speak. The Queen
her mother had given her a charmed napkin which would
guard her from evil as long as she took care of it; bu,
the handmaiden who travelled with her managed to
steal it, and so obtained power over her mistress and
Falada. She then took possession of the fine clothes of
the princess, rode on her horse, and passed herself off
as the betrothed bride of the Prince, and was accordingly
received with honour at his court. Her mistress was
treated as a servant and ordered to help a boy named
Conrad, in taking care of a flock of geese, and was called
the Goose-girl. The false Princess then had Falada
killed, but his former mistress contrived to have his head
fixed against an arch under which she passed daily, that
she might take comfort from talking to it. When the
king was told of this by Conrad, he persuaded the Goose-
girl to tell him her history, and when he had heard of
the wicked deed of her maid, he ordered her to be
severely punished, and all her fine clothes to be taken
from her and given to the Princess. He then introduced
the Goose-girl to the Prince as his real bride, and the
wedding of the happy pair was celebrated with great joy.

\ ,(U


7





THE CATS' MUSICAL PARTY.


Miss TABITHA To .-
TOISESHELL was an old
maid, and, being very
fond of company, she
invited several of her
friends to an afternoon
party at her residence.
When they arrived, she
gave them plenty of
milk and other good
things which she had
provided, and asked
four clever Cats of the
Black family to enter- --.
tain the guests with -



THE ETHIOPIAN SERENADERS AMUSING THE COMPANY.


ll/\.
'IA


'' -- A


their imitation of the
Ethiopian serenaders.
When they had finished,
Mr. Tom Black and
Miss White sang a
duet together, and a
very pleasant party it
was.
When it broke up,
and all the guests had
thanked Miss Tortoise-
shell, Mr. Tom Black
very politely offered his
arm to Miss White, and
saw her safe home.


MISS WHITE SAFE HOME.


A LITTLE MUSIC.


MR. BLACK SEES





78 SCHOOL-DAY SCENES.


How the Pocket-money goes.


Who is to get the Prize?


Going Home for the Holidays.


Chairing the Winner.




THE FOUR DOLLS.


Miss Adelaide's Doll admired by the Cottagers.


Julia and her Doll pay a visit together to the
poor Gleaner.


Matilda introduces her Doll to her Schoolfellows.



) .:
A,:!

AMA, -
"Awl' !.- .- ,


Lucile allows her beautiful Marion to dance with
the Italian boy's frights.
L 2


.' .,.- .' ^ ,




SCENES IN HUMBLE LIFE.


ITALIAN PEASANTS.


THE POOR MAN'S BIRD.


(


LITTLE DRUMMER AND HIS PUPILS.


PREPARING TO MARCH.





VILLAGE SCENES.


I-,


THE HAPPY FATHER.


THE COUNTRY SCHOOL


THE SOLDIER'S RETURN.


THE DANCING BEAR.,





SCENES IN BIBLE HISTORY.











El


BETHLEHEM,
the Birth-place of our Saviour.


MOUNT TABOR,
The Scene of our Saviour's Transfiguration.


.' ~ -


THE ALTAR OF BURNT-OFFERING.


THE GOLDEN CANDLESTICK.


THE CITY OF JERUSALEM.


NAZARETH.


JERICHO.






SCENES IN BIBLE HISTORY.


MOUNT SINAI,
where the Law was given to Moses.


THE RED SEA,
which overwhelmed Pharaoh and his hosts.


-.- :4-,- n-- - ---_ -


TYRE, a celebrated City of the Phoenicians, the strong
City spoken of by Joshua.


SIDON, a City of Phoenicia,
said to have been founded by Sidon, the son of Canaan


- -


* ~ _


JACOB'S WELL, where our Saviour showed himself to
the Woman of Samaria.


THE CITY OF DAMASCUS, supposed to have been
founded by Moses.




INSECTS.


DRAGON-FLY.


GARDEN SPIDER.


HUMMING-BIRD MOTH.


WOOD ANT.


MAY-FLY.


EARWIG.


'>


/


HOUSE CRICKET.


FIELD CRICKET.









GNAT AND GADFLY.


BURYING-BEETLE.


BEES AT WORK.


BEETLES.


HORNET AND WASP.


LOCUST.


GLOWWORM.






BUTTERFLIES. t \


Fig. 1. BLACK-VEINED WHITE. P. SMALL, GARDI.N WHITE. 5. BATH WIHIT.,
2. LARGE GARDEN WHITE. 4. GREEN-VEINED VIBITE.


Fig. 1. ORANGE TEP, a. Female. 3. MARBLED WHITE. 5. WALL.
2. WOOD WRITE. 4. WoOD AaiGos. 6. GRAYL[NO.


Fig. 1. RED ADMIRAL. 2. PsACOCK. 3. CAMBEIWELL BEAUTi.


Fif. 1. WnHIT ADMIRAL.


2. PURPLE EMPBROX. 3. PAINTED LADT.





FAIRY TALES.


THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.

THERE was once a King and a Queen who for many
years had no children; at last a little girl of great
* beauty was born to them, and a number of fairies were
4 invited to the christTeing, all of whom bestowed precious
gifts on the child. But one old fairy, who had not been
invited, made her appearance, and out of spite, threw
a spell over the Princess: so that if she should prick
her finger on the day of her reaching sixteen, she would
die, as well as all those around her. One of the other
fairies, however, now stepped forward, and assured the
King and Queen, that their daughter would not die at that
time, but be put to sleep, and her attendants also, for
a hundred years, at the end of which a young Prince
would find her out, and break the spell by merely looking
at her. Just as the old fairy had foretold, the Princess
did prick her finger on reaching the age of sixteen, when
to all appearance she and all her retinue fell dead. At
the end of a hundred years, a young Prince, when hunting,
came Jto a castle in which he could find no living
creature; he boldly went through all the rooms until
he came to a grand bed-room, where he found a lovely
Princess with many servants around her, all in a deep
sleep. No sooner had he looked on the face of the young
beauty, than she opened her eyes, and smiled, saying
she had long expected him; all her companions then
awoke also. The Prince fell deeply in love with her,
and they were soon after happily united.


YOUNG AND HANDSOME.

YOUNG AND HANDSOME was the name of the only
daughter of a fairy, who did not wish her to marry, not
liking to lose her company, and so she kept her shut up
in a beautiful palace, surrounded by various delights;
but no youthful suitor was allowed to come there.
Young and Handsome found this kind of life very dull:
she had no one to speak to except her mother and
her female attendants, and she would now and then
take a stroll far away from the palace to see what the
world was like. One day she saw a fine looking young
Shepherd, named Lindor, lying on the grass, asleep;
when he awoke, he was amazed and delighted with
the charming creature before him, and as she was not
less pleased with his looks, they fell in love, and pro-
mised to be constant to each other. The Princess
hurried home, and longed to see Lindor again, but a
fairy whose love he had refused, threw a spell over him,
and impris ed him in a distant castle. Zephyr, a fairy
spirit, who had long pitied the lonely life led by Young
and Handsom now appeared before her, and after
telling her whatt had become of Lindor, offered to go
and release him. He soon managed to get inside the
prison, for no bolts or bars could keep him out, and it
was not long before he set the young Shepherd free,
and conducted him to the palace of Young and Hand-
some, whose Fairy mother then consented to her union
with the object of her choice.





FAIRY TALES.


THE WIDOW AND HER TWO DAUGHTERS.

A PooR widow had two handsome daughters, Blanche
and Rose. The first was selfish and discontented, but her
sister was ever kind and cheerful. One day an old woman
came to the cottage and asked for rest and refreshment;
but when the poor widow desired Blanche to give her
some food, she did so with a bad grace, while Rose went
out singing, and soon brought in a new-laid egg for the old
woman. She had no sooner given it to her poor guest
than the latter appeared in her proper character of a
fairy, and before leaving the cottage, she promised to make
Blanche a queen, and Rose a farmer's wife, saying that the
lot she had given to each was that they would like best.
Before long it turned out as the fairy had foretold:
Blanche had a royal Prince for a suitor, and became
a proud queen, but she was never happy or satisfied;
while Rose as a farmer's wife was quite content with her
lot, and desired nothing better, never envying her sister's
grandeur. Many years passed away without their meeting,
and at length Blanche, who was growing more peevish and
restless than ever, started off on a visit to Rose, although
the King had forbidden her to do so. When he heard
of her going thither he would not allow her to return
to his court. The disgraced and wretched Queen now
prayed that the fairy would take back the crown she had
given her, and make her again her sister's equal. This
favour was granted, and she lived many years with Blanche
contented and happy.


PRINCESS CHARMING.


AN old king had a daughter who, from the rare beauty,
grace, and other attractions bestowed on her by her
godmother, a fairy, was named Princess Charming. But
these gifts she was to lose in the event of her proving fickle
in character. In order to prevent this, and to save her
from being spoiled by flattery, the king, her father, made
her live in a pavilion decked with beautiful flowers, far
away from his court, where the good fairy, her god-
mother, watched over her early youth. When she grew
up, a noble young prince, named Constant, the nephew
of the fairy, offered himself as her suitor, and the Princess
at first returned his love, so that it was generally thought
she would accept his hand. But after a short time she
grew indifferent to him, and would avoid his presence
and wander about alone, amongst her flowers and butter-
flies. Soon after this a much handsomer suitor came
forward, and she at once showed him a preference. To
the surprise of all, her attractions now gradually faded
away and she pined in health and spirits. Long before
her beauty was gone her new lover, as fickle as herself,
quite forsook her, but Prince Constant remained true to
his love, and by his watchful care restored her to health.
Gratitude for this now inspired the Princess with real
love, and the fairy, satisfied that she was no longer
fickle, renewed her former gifts. Princess Charming was
herself again, and was in a short time married to her
faithful lover Prince Constant.
S2






SCENES OF HOME LIFE.





-I __
2 --


THE FAMILY PARTY.


THE BIRTHDAY PRESENT.


THE PET LAMB.


A VISIT TO THE POOR COTTAGERS.


LITTLE GEORGIE AND HIS NURSE.


Ii' -
II -
.11* Ii


AMY PREPARES TO GO TO SCHOOL.





PICTURES OF COUNTRY LIFE.



1 -.3
4


PEASANT CHILDREN.


THE STREAMLET.


" Under a spreading chestnut-tree,
The Village Smithy stands."


THE OLD CHURCH PORCH.


- ~tr


HAYMAKING.





FUNNY PICTURES.


"CRABBED AGE."


"TENDER YOUTH."


Conductor. Now then, Angel'! "
Old Lady. Here I am."


A TAIL-PIECE.


ACTIVE SERVICE IN CHINA.


A TALE-BEARER.


A QUEER FISH.


A BELLE.


THE JOLLY FIDDLER.


A BEAU.


ROLL AND BUTTER.


AS




FUNNY PICTURES,


1'"'


-~.i* ri


" MARBLES ARE OUT."


" TOPS ARE IN."


E RIDDLE-"DO YOU GIVE IT UP?"


A GAME OF FOOTBALL.


A GREAT CONJUROR.


NO CONJUROR.


DOING PENANCE.


33LIND MAN'S BUFF-" SEEING'S BELIEVING."


HOOP STICKS.





















BLANKS AND SHANKS.


THE DISTINGUISHED FOREIGNER.





GROUPS OF ANIMALS.


OWL AND CAT.


EAGLE AND HUMMING-BIRD.


DOGS WATCHING FOR RATS.


RABBIT AND CAT.





GROUPS OF ANIMALS.


MAGPIE AND HAWK.


KITE CARRYING ITS YOUNG.


OSTRICH CATCHING DUCKLINGS.


JACKDAW AND CAT.





A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.



+ m--.lB


1'


A STROLL BY THE LAKE.


ARCHERY IN THE MEADOW.


-- ;2 .


THE DANGEROUS POND.


A RIDE IN THE PARK.





A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.


-4 -


A CHAT IN THE WOOD.


THE COTTAGE WINDOW.


INDOOR AMUSEMENTS.


~ ~ '.- -


A MORNING CALL.





SEA-SHORE RAMBLES.


FISHING-BOAT ON THE BEACH.


THE FISHERMAN'S COTTAGE.


RIDING HOME; THE PONY KNOCKED UP.


A WALK ON THE CLIFFS.




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