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Title: Child's wreath, or, Poems for children
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 Material Information
Title: Child's wreath, or, Poems for children
Series Title: Child's wreath, or, Poems for children
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Buffum, J.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: J. D. Flagg, stereotyper and priner
Publication Date: 1853
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Bibliographic ID: UF00003203
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4352
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oclc - 05000460
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Full Text




CZE1L3'S rWUZATZ,


an



POEMS FOR CHILDREN.



EDITED BY 8.0.C.





~C7 r, I.
wu9-" bpq --




BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY J. BUNNUK.




















Intmd aoordig to Act of Congrs In Me yew
1863, by
.. BUIFUX,
In b.oICk's Ofic of the Dstrict Court of tb.
Dhorict Of MaueuseLa.







AND0Y3: 3. D. hYlZr,
ItMotpe and Pztntw.

















TABLE OP CONTENTS.




IPAU
Thin to Ramunba........................ 7
TISun ................ ..n.. 10
TheMoom ....... .................. ........u
Who Kdm% the I ..n......................
Whr IsCodo...............................
Work aod Play............................. 16
TheRobinnd the Child..................... Is
U we muy ............M ar.................
ThesV06 ....................... t ...... N
Georpanddhis Do ............ ............
Thanksevinng......... ........... ... 30
U W Bird.................................. 81







4 CONTENTS.

PAGL
Morning........ ... ...... ........ .......
B eningi.................... ............... 85
Sophis's Fool's Cp .......................... 87
I m not Too Young ......................... 89
A Child' Morning Prayr.................... 4]
My Mother ................................. 42
A Child's Evening Payer .................... 4
My Father.................................. 48
The Child's Quston....................... .
employmentt ............................... 55
IUttl Children Lo, One Another.. ........... 8
Uttle Thigs ................................ 81
money at Interet ................ ......... 68
Good-Night................................. 66
A Child's Hymn............................. 9
tte dmund.............................. 71
Anemone and Violets ..................... 78
hevenng Hymn............................. 75
If ver I See................................ 77
I'llLoe My Pret........................ 79
Th Dying Cld ............................ 80







CONTENTS. 5

PAO I
obin Bed-brest's Secret ................. 81
Child's Morning Hymn ...................... 8
Imptienoe ................................ 86
The Bird's Petition.......................... 88
Jane's New Frock........................... 90
Commandment.............................. 92
To My Litle Child...........................
The Way to be Happy.......... ........... 96
The Angel Guard.............. ........... 97
Who Taught the Birds........... ..... .... 9
The Sabbath................................101
Golden Moments .............. ............10
Good Advioe to Everybody................. .
Old Rover ........................ ....... 10
Who Taught You to Slng?...................107
Work While You Work............... ..... 10
Erining to Read ............................111
What God Made.............................118
Bird's Nesting........... .................11
The Butterfly........... .................
God Been in His Works .......................








6 CONTENTS.


PAGN.
" ............... ....................... i
PR a y er..................................... 12
I Mumt Not TumMy Motha .....*...........12

Wbim'. IvennUg Nly mj................... X






CHILD'S WREATH. 7


CeMELD's TWREATHa.



THINGS TO REMEMBER


REMEMBER, child, remember,
That God is in the sky,
And that He looks on all we do,
With an ever-wateohl eye.

Remember, 01 remember,
That all the day and night,
He kdows our thoughts and action,
For we are ever in his sight





8 CHILD'S WREATH.

Remember, child, remember,
That God is good and true,
And 'tis his will that we should be
Right and just in all we do I

Remember too that He forbids
Deception or a lie;
Remember that all who offend
Will be punished by and by.

Remember, O, remember,
That God is our best friend,
And that He wishes us to be
Good and happy in the end.

Remember, child, remember,
To pray to Him in heaven;
And for every fault, in word or deed,
Oh I ask to be forgiven.





CHILD'S WREATH. 9

Then He will hear thee, and forgive
Like a father good and kind;
So remember, child, remember,
That you love with all your mind,

The holy God who lives in heaven,
And grants us each delight,
Who safely guides us through the day,
And guards us in the night.




I M







10 CHILD'S WREATH.



THE SUN.



WHAT is it looks so very bright,
And quick dispels the dusky night,
Shedding around a cheerful light ?
It is the glorious sun.

What is it that appears at dawn,
And dries the dewy mists of morn,
And ripens all the fruits and corn ?
It is the glorious sun.

What gives the fragrance to the flower,
And paints the rainbow on the shower,
An emblem of Almighty power ?
It is the glorious sun.






CHILD'S WREATH. 11



THE MOON.



COME, little children, all tell me,
What high up in the sky you see,
That shines so bright on you and me?
'Tis, 0 'tis the moon.

Tell me, child, when you're asleep,
And all around you quiet keep,
What does through your curtains peep ?
'Tis, 0 'tis the moon.

What shines when all is lone and still,
Except the little running rill
That turns the wheel of yonder mill?
'Tis, 0 'tis the moon.




12 CHILD'S WREATH.
Sweetly singing in the vale,
To whom, pray, does the nightingale
Tell her little lonely tale ?
'Tis, 0 'tis the moon.



I





CHILD'S WREATH. 18


WHO MADE THE STARS I



MOTHER, who made the stars,
Which light the beautiful blue sky ?
Who made the moon so clear and
bright,
That rises up on high?

'Twas God, my child, the glorious one,
He formed them by his power;
He made the light and brilliant sun,
And every leaf, and flower.

He paints each fragrant flower that
blows
With loveliness and bloom;
He gives the violet and rose
Their beauty and perfume.





14 CHILD'S WREATH.

Our various wants his hands supply,
His care protects us every hour;
We're kept beneath his watchful eye,
And always guarded by his power.

Then let your little heart, my love,
Its grateful homage pay
To this kind Friend, who from above
So gently guides your way.



0





CHILD'S WREATH. 15




WHERE IS GODI



IN the sun, the moon, the sky,
On the mountain wild and high,
In the thunder, in the rain,
In the grove, the wood, the plain,
In the little birds which sing;
God is seen in everything.






CHILD'S WREATH.


WORK AND PLAY.



SOME play is good to make us strong,
And school to make us wise;
But playing always- that is wrong,
And what we should despise.

There's nothing worse than idleness,
For making children bad;
'Tis sure to lead them to distress,
And much that's very sad.

Sometimes they learn to lie and cheat,
Sometimes to steal and swear;
These are the lessons in the street,
For those who idle there.





CHILD'S WREATH. 17
But how much better 'tis to learn
To count, and spell and read;
"is best to play and work in turn,
'Tis useful then indeed.




NN






18 CHILD'8 WREATH.


THE ROBIN AND CHILD.



COMe hither, sweet robin, don't be
so afraid,
I would not hurt even a feather;
Come hither, sweet robin, and pick up
some bread,
To feed you this very cold weather.

I don't mean to frighten you, dear
little thing,
And pussy-cat is not behind me;
So hop about pretty, and drop down
your wing,
And pick up the crumbs, and do n't
mind me.





CHILD'S WREATH. 19
But ah the wind blows, and I must
not stay long,
I shall let all the snow and the sleet
in;
So remember, next summer, to give me
a song,
And pay for the breakfast you're
eating.




0






20 CHILD'S WREATH.






LITTLE MARY.




"0 II am so happy I" the little girl
said,
As she sprang like a lark from her low
trundle-bed I
" 'Tis morning, bright morning I good-
morning, papa I
O, give me one kiss for good-morning,
mammal
Only just look at my pretty canary,
Chirping his sweet' Good-morning to
Maryl'"






CHILD'S WREATH. 21

The sunshine is peeping straight into
my eyes -
Good-morning to you, Mr. Sun, for you
rise
Early, to wake up my birdie and me,
And make us as happy as happy can
be.

"Happy you may be, my dear little
girl;"
And the mother stroked softly a cluster-
ing curl -
" Happy as can be but think of the
One
Who wakened this morning, both you
and the sun."
The little one turned her bright eyes
with a nod -
"Mamma, may I say 'Good-morning
to God ? "






22 CHILD'S WREATH.

"Yes, little darling one, surely you
may -
Kneel as you kneel every morning to
pray."

Mary knelt solemnly down, with her
eyes
Looking up earnestly into the skies,
And two little hands, that were folded
together,
Softly she laid on the lap of her
mother;

"Good-morning, dear Father in
Heaven," she said,
I thank thee for watching my snug
little bed,
For taking good care of me all the
dark night,






CHILD'S WREATH. 23

And waking me up with the beautiful
light.
0, keep me from naughtiness all the
long day,
Blest Jesus, who taught little children
to pray!"

An angel looked down in the sunshine
and smiled,
But she saw not the angel-- that beau-
tiful child.






24 CHILD'S WREATH.


THE VIOLET.



Dows in a green and shady bed
A modest violet grew;
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head,
As if to hide from view.

And yet it was a lovely flower,
Its colors bright and fair;
It might have graced a rosy bower,
Instead of hiding there.

Yet there it was content to bloom,
In modest tints arrayed;
And there it spread its sweet perfume,
Within the silent shade.






CHILD'S WREATH. 25

Then let me to the valley go,
This pretty flower to see;
That I may also learn to grow,
In sweet humility.













*





26 CHILD'S WREATH.


GEORGE AND HIS DOG.



GEORGE had a large and noble dog,
With hair as soft as silk;
A few black spots upon his back,
The rest as white as milk.

And many a happy hour they had,
In dull or shining weather;
For in the house or in the fields,
They always were together.

It was rare fun to see them race
Through fields of bright red clover,
And jump across the running brooks,
George and his good dog Rover.
4






CHILD'S WREATH. 27

The faithful creature knew full well
When master wished to ride;
And he would kneel down on the gras
While Georgy climbed his side.

They both were playing in the field,
When all at once they saw
A little squirrel on a stump,
With an acorn in his paw.

Rover sent forth a loud bow-wow,
And tried to start away;
He thought to scare the little beast,
Would be a noble play.

But George cried out, "For shame I
for shame I
You are so big and strong,
To worry that poor little thing
Would be both mean and wrong."






28 CHILD'S WREATH.

The dog still looked with eager eye,
And George could plainly see,
It was as much as he could do,
To let the squirrel be.

The timid creature would have feared
The dog, so bold and strong,
But seemed to know the little boy
Would let him do no wrong.

He peeped in George's smiling face,
And trusting to his care,
He kept his seat upon the stump,
And ate his acorn there.

He felt a spirit of pure love
Around the gentle boy,
As if good angels hovering there,
Watched over him in joy.





CHILD'S WREATH. 29

And true it is, the angels oft
Good little George have led;
They're with him in his happy play,
They guard his little bed.

They keep his heart so kind and true,
They make his eye so mild;
For dearly do the angels love
A gentle little child.






80 CHILD'S WREATH.


THANKSGIVING DAY.



WHAT is't to keep Thanksgiving Day ?
Is it to eat, and drink, and play,
Our work to leave, our friends to meet,
And please our taste with every sweet?
No, 'tis a day of pious joy,
And we should every hour employ,
In speaking of God's mercies given,
And raising grateful thoughts to
heaven.
The friends we meet, the food we
share,
The fire we feel, the clothes we wear,
And all the blessings that we prove,
Should fill our hearts with grateful love.






CHILD'S WREATH. 81


LITTLE BIRD! LITTLE BIRD

LITTLE bird I little bird I come to me I
I have a green cage ready for thee, -
Beauty-bright flowers I'1l bring to you,
And fresh, ripe cherries, all wet with
dew.

" Thanks, little maiden, for thy care,-
But I dearly love the clear, cool air;
And my snug little nest in the old oak
tree."
"Little bird I little bird I stay with me."

"Nay, little damsel; away I'll fly
To greener fields and a warmer sky;
When Spring returns with pattering
rain,
You will hear my merry song again."






32 CHILD'S WREATH.

"Little bird I little bird I who 11 guide
thee
Over the hills and over the sea ?
Foolish one, come in the house to stay;
For I'm very sure you'll lose your
way."

"Ah, no, little maiden, God guides me
Over the hills and over the sea;
I will be free as the rushing air,
Chasing the sun-light everywhere 1"






Ah CHILD'S WREATH. 8



MORNING.



AWAKE, little girl, it is time to arise;
Come, shake drowsy sleep from your
eyes;
The lark is loud warbling his notes in"
the skies,
And the sun is far mounted on high.

0, come, for the fields with gay flowers
o'erflow,
The glistening dew drop is trembling
still,
The lowing herds grazn the pastures
below,
And the sheep-bell is heard from the
hilL
3


I- -- ------r





84 CHILD'S WURATH.

O come, for the bee has down out of
his bed,
To begin his day's labor anew;
The spider is weaving her delicate
thread,
Which brilliantly glitter with dew.

3 come, for the ant has crept out of
her cell,
Her daily employment to seek;
khe knows the true value of moments
too well,
To waste them in indolent sleep.

Awake, little deeper, and do not de-
spise,
Of insects i~nctions to ask;
From your piflg with good resolutions
arise,
And cheerflly go to your tak.





CHILD'S WREATH. 86


EVENING.



LrTTLE girl,it is time to retire to rest;
The sheep are put into the fold;
The linnet forakes us and flies to her
nest,
To shelter her young from the cold.

The owl has flown out of his lonely
retreat,
And screams through the tall shady
trees;
The nightingale ta the hawthorn
her seat,
And sings to the evening reme.






36 CHILD'S WREATH.

The sun, too, now seems to have finished
his race,
And sinks once again to his rest;
But though we no longer can see his
bright face,
He leaves a gold streak in the west

Little girl, have you finished your daily
employ,
With industry, patience, and care ?
If o, lay your head on your pillow
with joy;
No thorn to disturb shall be there.

The moon through your curtains shall
cheerfully peep,
Her silver dance on your
eyes, I
And mild evening breeze shall fan
you to sleep,
Till bright morning bids you arise.






CHILD'S WREATH. 87


SOPHIA'S FOOLS-CAP.



SOPHIA was a little child,
Obliging, good, and very mild;
Yet lest of dress she should be vain,
Mamma still dressed her well, but
plain-
Her/parents, sensible and kind,
Wished only to adorn her mind;
No other dress when good had she,
But useful, neat simplicity.

Though seldom, yet I she was rude
Or even in a naughtymood,
Her punishment was this disgrace -
A large fine cap adorned with lace;






38 CHILD'S WREATH.

With feathers and with ribbons too;
The work was neat, the fashion new;
Yet as a fool's-cap was its name,
She dreaded much to wear the same.

A lady, fashionably gay,
Did to mamma a visit pay;
Sophia stared, then whispering said,
" Why, dear mamma, look at her head I
To be so tall and wicked too,
The strangest thing I ever knew I
What naughty tricks, pray, has she
done,
That they have put a fool's-cap on ?"

0






CHILD'S W rATE. s9


rM NOT TOO YOUNG.


I'M not too young for God to see,
He knows my name and nature too;
And all day long He looks at me,
And sees my actions through and
through.

He listens to the words I say,
He knows the thoughts I have with-
in;
And whether I'm at work or play,
He's sure to see it if I sin.

If some good minister is near,
It makes us careful what we do;
And how much more we ought to fear
The Lord, who sees us through and
through.




40 CHILD'S WRBITH.
Thus when I want to do amiss,
However pleasant it may be,
Il always try to think of this, -
I 'm not too young for God to see.


'I





CHILD'S WREATH 41




A CHILD'S MORNING PRAYER.



I THANK Thee, Lord, for quiet rest,
And for thy care of me;
O, let me through this day be blet,
And kept from harm by Thee.

O, let me love Thee I kind thou art
To children such as I;
Give me a gentle, hcly heart,
Be Thou my friend on high I

ilelp me to please my parents dear,
And do whatever they tell;
Bless all my friends both far and near,
And keep them safe and well.





42 CHILD.' WHATH.


MY MOTHER


WHO fed me from her gentle breast,
And hushed me in her arms to rest,
And on my cheek sweet kisses prest ?
My Mother.

When sleep forsook my open eye,
Who was it sang sweet lullaby,
And rocked me that I should not cry ?
My Mother.

Who sat and watched my infant head,
When sleeping on my cradle bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed ?
My Mother.






CHILD'S WRATH. 48

When pain and sickness made me cry,
Who gazed upon my heavy eye,
And wept for fear that I should die ?
My Mother.

Who dressed my doll in clothes so gay,
And taught me pretty how to play,
And minded all I had to sy?
My Mother.

Who ran to help me when I fell,
And would some pretty story tell,
Or kim the place to make it well ?
My Mother.

Who taught my infant lips to pray,
And love God's holy book and day,
And walk in wisdom's pleasant way ?
My Mother.





44 CHILD'S WBRATH.


And can I ever cease to be,
Affectionate and kind to thee,
Who was so very kind to me ?
My Mother.

Ah I no, the thought I cannot bear,
And if God please my life to spare,
I hope I shall reward thy care,
My Mother.

When thou art feeble, old and gray,
My healthy arms shall be thy stay,
And I will soothe thy pains away,
My Mother.

And when I see thee hang thy head,
'Twill be my turn to watch thy bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed,
My Mother.





CHILD'S WREATH. 45
For God who lives above the skies,
Would look with vengeance in his eyes,
If I should ever dare despise
My Mother.




I11





40 CHILD'S WRB&TH.


A CHILD'S EVENING PRAYER.



Jzsue, tender Shepherd, hear me,
Bles thy little lamb to-night;
Through the darkness be Thou near
me,
Watch my sleep till morning light.


All this day Thy hand has led me,
And I thank Thee for thy care;
Thou hast warmed, and fed, and clothed
me,
Listen to my evening prayer.




CHmwo's WRATH. 47

May my sins be all forgiven;
Bles the friends I love so well;
When I die, take me to heaven,
Happy there with Thee to dwell.



{^






48 CHILD'S WREATH.


MY FATHER.

WHO took me from my mother's arms,
And smiling at her soft alarms,
Showed me the world and nature's
charms?
My Father.

Who made me feel and understand
The wonders of the sea and land,
And mark through all, the Maker's
hand ?
My Father.

Who climbed with me the mountain
height,
And watched my look of dread delight,
While rose the glorious orb of light?
My Father.






CHILD'S WREATH. 49

Who, from each flower and verdant
stalk,
Gathered a honeyed store of talk,
To fill the long delightful walk ?
My Father.

Not on an insect would he tread,
Nor strike the stinging nettle dead;
Who taught at once my heart and
head?
My Father.
Who wrote upon that heart the line,
Religion graved on virtue's shrine,
To make the human race divine ?
My Father.
Who taught my early mind to know
The God from whom all blessings flow,
Creator of all things below?
My Father.





60 caILD'a WUTAB.

Who now in pale and lucid light
Of memory, gleams upon my sight,
Burting the sepulchre of night ?
My Father.

0! teach me still the Christian plan I
Thy practice with thy precept ran;
Nor yet desert me now a man,
My Father.

Still let thy scholar's heart rejoice,
With charms of thy angelic voice,
Still prompt the motive and the choice,
My Father.

For yet remains a little space,
SI shall meet thee face to face:
And not, as now, in vain embrace,
My Father.





CHILD'S WEBATH. 51

Soon, and before the mercy-seat,
Spirits made perfect-- we shall meet I
Thee, with what transport shall I greet,
My Father.





6NN






52 CrHLD' WREATH.



THE CHILD'S QUESTION.



"THEY tell me, mother, that I must
die,
That this frame of mine in the grave
shall lie;
That the cold, cold earth shall be my
.bed
Where I shall pillow my weary head;
That I must sink to the quiet tomb
With no light to cheer me in my gloom;
O I tell me, mother, can this be true -
Must I be hid in the grave from you ?

And they also say that my eyes so
bright,
Which beam on all with a loving light,






CHILD'S WREATH. 58

Shal be eesd in death; and that my
voice
Which they my makes every heart
rejoice,
Shall abo be hushed in that qpming
day,
When "grim king Death" shall claim
his prey;
Then tell me, mother, can these things
be,
Must I be taken away from thee ?
Must I for these great events prepare
Must I go to the tomb to lie moulder-
ing there?"

"Yes, yes, my child, thon must smuly
die,
Thy.body must in the cold tomb lie 1
Yet death is the path, my child, I own,
Which leads thee to thy Father's threome






54 CHILD'S WRNATa.

And though it is dOtW'k l wifrb
view,
Yet the light of truth lu jfaMtem
through,
And in the bright reaI *Of peoe m
love
In thy Ather's house i l',
Thou shalt be blest silk lb taeb
care,
And hall with his ,aib ie &h y
share;
Then dread not death, 0tt oat A
pend,
To lead thee to thy Godmad MliS


D ~





K* A1 'arjA 1&ATH.
t i


-iCOYoMExNT.


W o '. ts and play with ml
unr &Ltree ?
MV im tar left me alone;
fMy M i* prrow, come hither to
msk
And pMy MItM me while they are
gon."

0, B, Hitd boy, I can't come, in-
deed;
r I'e Nso teie to idle away;
I've got all y dear little children to

a amy aMt to new cover
.!* *





6 'CoHILD WUA.L

"Pretty bee, do not boss about over
that flower,
But come here and play wi me, do,
The sparrow wont come and tay with
me an hour;
But my, pretty bee, ill not you?"

" no, little boy, for do not you see,
Those must work who would prosper
and thrive ?
If I play, they would call me a sad idle
bee,
And perhaps turn me out of the
hive."

Stop I stop I little ant, do not run off
so fast;
Wait with me a little and play I
I hope I shall fnd a companion at la;
Jou are not so buy as they."






oRILD'S WIEATH.


"0 no, little boy, I can't stay with
you;
We're not made to play, but to
labor;
I always have something or other to
do,
If not for myself, for a neighbor."

What, then have they all some em-
ployment but me,
Who lie lounging here like a dunce I
0 then, like the aunt, and the sparrow,
and bee, *
Ill go to my lesson at once."






68 CHILD'S WRAATI.


LITTLE CHILDREN, LOVE ONE
ANOTHER.




A LITTLE gil, with a happy look,
Sat slowly leading a ponderous book,
All bound with velvet and edged with
gold,
And its weight wa more than the child
could hold;
Yet dearly she loved to ponder it o'er,
And every day she prized it more;
For it aid, and she looked at her
smiling mother, -
It aid, "Little children, love one
another."






OEILD'B WREATH. 59

She thought it was beautiful in the
book,
And the lemon home to her heart she
took;
She walked on her way with a trust-
ing grace,
And a dove-like look in her meek
young face,
Which aid just as plain as words could
my,
"The Holy Bible I must obey;"
So, mamma, ll be kind to my darling-
brother,
Forlittle children must love each other.

rm sorry he's naughty, and will not
play;
But Ill love him still, for I think the
way
To make him gentle and kind to e,






60 CHILD'S WREATH.

Will be better shown, if I let him see
I strive to do what I think is right;
And thus when I kneel in prayer to-
night,
I will clasp my hands around my
brother
And say, 'Little children, love one
another.'"

The little girl did as her Bible taught,
And pleasant indeed was the change it
wrought;
For the boy looked up in glad surprise,
To meet the light of her loving eyes;
His heart was full, he could not speak,
But he pressed a kiss on his sister's
cheek;
And God looked down on that happy
mother,
Whose little children loved each other.





CELD S WREATH. 61


LITTLE THINGS.



LITTLE drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean,
And the beauteous land.

And the little moments,
Humble though they be,
Make the mighty ages
Of eternity.

So our little errors
Lead the soul away
From the paths of virtue,
Oft in sin to stray.





68 cHILD'8 WBEATH.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.

Little seeds of mercy,
Sown by youthful hands,
Grow to bless the nations,
Far in heathen lands.




0





GRUILD W3hTIL 6a


MONEY AT INTBBER T.



I JAD some money in my purse,
Kept there almost forever,
Waiting to buy a pair of skates,
To skate upon the river.

But yesterday, dear grandpapa,
I saw a painful sight;
It drew the money from my purse,
And left it empty, quite.

A ragged boy led by the hand
A little sister sweet,
Who crept along the frozen ground
With half uncovered feet.





64 CHLD'S WRBATH.

My hand sought out the silver prize,
That in my pocket lay -
When in my ear I heard a voice,
That softly seemed to say,

'Think of the skates, the shining
skates I
Think of the glorious ice I
If you relieve the suffering child,
Pleasure must pay the price.'

'Pleasure a greater price must pay,'
Another voice replied,
'If suffered thus to close the hand
That pity opens wide.'

Out came the money, grandpapa;
How could I then refuse ?
And to the smiling boy I said,
Buy 'sis a pair of shoes.






CHILD'S WREATH. 85

You should have seen the little girl,
Her laughing eyes of blue,
As showering kisses from her hand,
She sang -' New shoe, new shoe.'"

" God bless the gift," said grandpapa,
And add to mercy's store -
He lendeth to the Lord, my son,
Who giveth to the poor."





66 CHILD'S WREATH.


GOOD NIGHT.



" GOOD-NIGHT," said the plough to the
weary old horse,
And Dobbin responded Good-
night"
Then with Tom on his back, to the
farm-house he turned,
With a feeling of quiet delight.

" Good-night," said the ox, with a comi-
cal bow,
As he turned from the heavy old
cart;
Which laughed till it shook a round
wheel from its side,
Then creaked out "Good-night,
from my heart."






CHILD'S WREATH. 67

"Good-night," said the hen, when her
supper was done,
To Fanny who stood in the door;
"Good-night, answered Benny; "come
back in the morn,
And you and your chicks shall have
more."

"Quack! quack I" said the duck,"I
wish you all well,
Though I cannot tell what is polite."
"The will for the deed," answered
Benny the brave -
"Good-night, Madame Duckey, Good
night."

The geese were parading the beautiful
green,
But the goslings were wearied out
quite;





68 CHILD'S WREATH.

So, shutting their peepers, from under
the wing
They murmured a sleepy Good-
night."

Now the shadows of evening were
gathering ap ce,
And fading the last gleam of light;
So to father and mother, both Fanny
and Ben,
Gave a kiss, sad a merry Good-
night"






CHILD'S WR.ATIL 69


A CHILD'S HYMN.



WHiCHEVEz. way I turn,
Whichever way I look,
Above, below, around, beside,
I read as in a book;
From all I have, or feel, or see,
That God is very good to me.

How fragrant are the flowers,
How nice the things I eat,
The song of happy birds,
How lovely and how sweet;
0 every sense will tell with glee,
That God is very good to me.






70 CHILD'S WREATH.

At home my father's smile,
Or mother's tender care,
Blessings at bed and board,
Attend me everywhere.
And all around will still agree,
That God is very good to me.

Then let my childish voice
Give Thee, O Lord, the praie,
And be Thy love my guide
Through all my coming days;
And let my whole existence be,
A book of gratitude to Thee.






CHILD'S WREATH. 71



LITTLE EDMUND.



"BE good, little Edmund," your mother
will say,-
She will whisper it soft in your ear,-
And ofttimes repeat it, by night and by
day,
That you need not forget it, my
dear.

And the ant at its work, and the flower-
loving bee,
And the sweet little bird in the
wood,
As it warbles a song from its nest on
the tree,
Seem to say," Little Eddy, be good."






72 CHILD'8 WREATH.

"Be good," says the Bible that vol-
ume of love -
And the wisest are bound to obey-
For the truths that it teaches will lead
us above,
When death calls the spirit away.

For as sure as the brook to the river
doth run,
And the river to ocean's broad wave,
This rule if well learned from your
cradle, my son,
Will prove your best wealth at the
grave.






OHILD'S WREATH. 78




ANEMONES AND VIOLETS.



ANEMONES and violets,
Children of the spring I
Thank you for the pleasant flower--
Nature's offering I

Violets, anemones,
SBursting into birth;
Nature's painted playthings -
The pretty things of earth I

Blooming in the woodlands,
Underneath the trees;
Little meek-eyed violets,
Pale anemones.






74 CHILD'S WREATH.

Clustering by the brook-side,
Clustering in the glen,
Nature hides her dearest flowers,
Far away from men;

Robes herself in velvet,
Jewelled like an earl's;
Violets anemones -
Amethysts and pearls.





CHILD'S WREATH. 75


EVENING HYMN.



COME, come, little lad, retire to your
rest;
The robin is seeking repose, -
The sparrow has gone to her own
little nest,
And the moon has in splendor arose.

The stars are all shining like diamonds
so bright,
And they shed dewy tears from their
eyes;
The nightingale's song is cheerful to-
night,
And echo in gladness replies.






76 CHILD'S WREATH.

Then come, little lad, lie down now to
sleep,
And dream of your innocent play;
And near you bright angels their vigils
shall keep,
Till hailed by the bright lord of day.

Then arise all refreshed and go to your
play,
Pulling flowers that spring up from
the earth,
And angels shall guard you throughout
the long day,
And smile at your innocent mirth.





CHILD'S WREATH. 77


IF EVER I SEE.



IF ever I see,
On bush or tree,
Young birds in their pretty nest,
I must not in play,
Steal the birds away,
To grieve their mother's breast

My mother I know
Would sorrow so,
Should I be stolen away;
So I'll speak to the birds
In my softest words,
Nor hurt them in my play.





78 CHILD'S WREATH.

And when they can fly
In the bright blue sky,
They 11 warble a song to me;
And then if I'm sad
It will make me glad
To think they are happy and free.




I





CHILD'S WREATH. 79


FLL LOVE MY PARENTS.



MY father -mother- blessed names,
Each my love and service claims;
1l fly to heed their last request,
And grieve not those who love me
best.





80 CHILD'S WREATH.




THE DYING CHILD.



PUT yip arm around me, mother,
Draw your chair beside my bed;
Let me lean upon your bosom
This poor weary, aching head.

Once I thought I could not leave you,
Once I was afraid to die;
Now I feel 'tis Jesus calls me
To his mansion in the sky.

Why should you be grieving, mother,
That your child is going home,
To that land where sin and sorrow,
fain and weakness, never come.





CHILD'S WREATH. 81



BOBIN RED-BREASTS SECRET.



I'AM little robin red-breat, ir,
My nest is in the tree;
If you look up in yonder elm,
My pleasant home you'll see.
We made it very soft and nice-
My pretty mate and I -
And all the time we worked at it,
We sang most merrily.

The green leaves shade our lovely
home
From the hot scorching sun;
So many birds live in the tree
We do not want for fun.
The light breeze gently rocks our nest,
6





82 CHILD'S WREATH.

And hushes us to sleep;
We 're up betimes to sing our song,
And the first daylight greet.

I have a secret I would like
The little girl to know;
But I wont tell a single boy-
They rob the poor birds so.
We have four pretty little nests,
We watch them with great care;
Full fifty eggs are in this tree -
Do n't tell the boys they're here.

Joe Thompson robbed the nest last
year,
And year before, Tom Brown;
11' tell it loud as I can sing,
To every one in town.
Swallow and sparrow, lark and thrush,
Will tell you just the same;






CHILD'S WREATH. 83

To make us all so sorrowful
It is a wicked shame.

0, did you hear the concert
This morning from our tree ?
We give it every morning
Just as the clock strikes three.
We praise our great Creator,
Whose holy love we share;
Dear children, learn to praise Him too,
For all his tender care.






84 CHILD'S WREATH.




LITTLE CHILD'S MORNING
HYMN.



THE morning bright,
With rosy light,
Has waked me from my sleep;
Father I I own
Thy love alone
Thy little one doth keep.

All through the day,
I humbly pray
Be Thou my guard and guide I
My sins forgive,
And let me live,
Blest Jesus I near Thy side.






CHIL D'S WEATI. 86

Oh, make Thy rest
Within my breast,
Great Spirit of all grace 1
Make me like Thee
Then I shall be
Prepared to see Thy ce.






86 CHILD'S WREATH.



IMPATIENCE.



"LITTLE Nelly, do not fret,
Do not so impatient get,
Do not scowl that pretty face,
Prythee tell me what's the case ?"

" Sister Martha, do n't you know,
Mother said an hour ago,
I must sew this seam so long,
Ere I play my last new song.

And when taking stitches fast,
Hoping soon to sew the last,
'Tis provoking do n't you think
That my thread should 'snarl and
kink?'"





CHILD'S WREATH. 87

"Little Nelly, only heed,
Tis a lesson that you need;
One that older heads than thine,
Ever to forget incline.

But the truth applies to all,
Be the trial great or small,
Patient spirit always find
God in everything is kind."






88 CHILD'S WREATH.



THE BIRD'S PETITION.



0, STAY your hand, my little boy,
And do not rob my nest;
Why should you for a moment's joy,
My happy brood molest ?

My little ones, my hope and pride,
Have not yet learned to fly;
And if you take them from my side,
They soon will pine and die.

Think, gentle boy, what you would feel,
And your dear mother too,
If to your bed some thief should steal,
And hurry off with you.






CHILD'S WREATH. 89

0, do not, do not climb the tree,
To spoil our nest so warm,
For you indeed must cruel be
If you should do us harm.

Return then to your happy home,
And be it happy long;
And to your window I will come,
And thank you with a song.









t






90 CHILD'S WREATH.


,ANE'S NEW FROCK.


A so you have gota new frock,little
Jane,
And a pretty one truly it is;
Well, I hope you 11 ne'er vex your
dear mother again,
But thank your kind parents for
this.

But, why do you run, Jane, so oft to
the glass,
And why strut about all the day,
And toss up your head when your play-
fellows pass,
If you are rather smarter than they ?






CHILD'S WREATH. 91

I fear that gay frock, Jane, may do you
some harm,
If your heart thus to pride should
incline,
For dress is to keep us but tidy and
warm,
And not make us gaudy and fine.

That we may with piety ever be
dressed,
Should still be our chiefest desire,
For modesty is of all ornaments best,
Humility, richest attire.






92 CHILD'5 WaATL.






THE GREAT COMMANDMENT.



WITH all thy heart love God above,
And as thyself thy neighbor love.





CHILD'S WREATH. 93



TO MY LITTLE CHILD.



LITTLE boy with laughing eye,
Bright and blue as yonder sky;
Come, and I will teach you, love,
Who it is that lives above.

It is God who made the earth,
God who gave you, dearest, birth:
God who sees each sparrow fall 1
God who reigns great King of all

God who sends the pleasant breeze,
Blowing sweet through flowers and
trees,
God who gives you every joy,
God who loves you, little boy.






94 CHILD'S WREATH.

He is beautiful and bright,
Living in eternal light;
Would not you, my little love,
Like to live with Him above ?

Ask Him then to show you how
You may please Him here below;
Ask Him grace and help to send,
Ask through Christ, your kindest
friend.

You must learn to read and look
Often in His holy book;
There, my darling, you will find,
God is very good and kind.






CHILD'S WREATH. 95


THE WAY TO BE HAPPY.



How pleasant it is at the end of the
day,
No follies to have to repent;
To reflect on the past, and be able to
say,
My time has been properly spent.

When I've done all my business with
patience and care,
And been good and obliging and
kind,
I lie on my pillow and sleep away
there,
With a happy and peaceable mind.





96 CHILD'S WREATH.

But instead of all this, if it must be
confessed
That I careless and idle have been;
I lie down as usual to go to my rest,
But feel discontented within.

Then as I do n't like all the trouble
I've had,
In the future Ill try to prevent it;
For I never am naughty without being
sad,
Or good without being contented.



0






CHILD'S WREATH. 97




THE ANGEL GUARD.



A LITTLE girl knelt down to pray,
As she was used to do,-
" God guard my sister every day,
And baby brother too."

God heard in heaven the simple prayer,
And bade an angel fly,
To take the children in his care,
And every want supply.

They saw him not, but he was there,
Their strong and glorious Friend,
Still hovering o'er them everywhere,
To succor and defend.
7





98 CHILD'S WREATH.

From morn till eve his mighty arm
Averted every ill;
From eve till morn, a shield from
harm,
His wing was o'er them still.

O, blessed be the God of love,
Who hears when children pray,
And sends his angels from above,
To guard them night and day.





CHILD'S WREATH.


WHO TAUGHT THE BIRDS I



WHO taught the bird to build her nest,
Of wool and hay and moss?
Who taught her how to weave it best,
And lay the twigs across ?

Who taught the busy bee to fly
Among the sweetest flowers ?
And lay her store of honey by,
To eat in winter hours?

Who taught the little ants the way
Their narrow holes to bore,
And through the pleasant summer's day
To gather up their store ?




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