• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The emigrants
 The concert of birds
 The shipwreck
 The navies of the ancient...
 The express rider
 The Scottish fugitives
 My rabbits
 The knife grinder
 Hunting the nyl-ghau
 The mad bull
 The street pavers
 The mother's death
 The shipping at New York
 The young shepherd
 The butcher's cattle






Group Title: Emigrants: and other stories.
Title: Emigrants : and other stories.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003202/00001
 Material Information
Title: Emigrants : and other stories.
Series Title: Emigrants : and other stories.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1853
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003202
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4351
ltuf - ALG6068
oclc - 45964902
alephbibnum - 002225789

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The emigrants
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The concert of birds
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The shipwreck
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The navies of the ancient Greeks
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The express rider
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The Scottish fugitives
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    My rabbits
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The knife grinder
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Hunting the nyl-ghau
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The mad bull
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The street pavers
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The mother's death
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The shipping at New York
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The young shepherd
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The butcher's cattle
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
Full Text






















THE CAMP IN THE WOOD.






THE


EMIGRANTS:

OTHERSTORIE.
OTHER, STORIES.


NEW-YORt.
LEAVITT& ALLEN





a

















* w osew4ug to AY, of itoingws in tie yr ISK by
LIUMT? & ALLMWI
l kAs clove Offif of the Dktt COMut of the Umite Uaw
I md for t0 Ederm Distrist of Now*YTw








STORIES.




THE EMIGRANTS.
SoMx years ago, a party of emigrant,.
consisting of three families, each of si
persons, started from St Louis for the
wilderness of Minnesota. They had three
large wagons, a number of cattle and all
the provisions and tools for settling in a
new country. For the first two days their
road led over broad prairies where not a
tree was to be seen. Tie grass was hig
and in some places, the emigrants had to
(5)
~': '
6 s ; ,





TRI EMIGRANTS.


search for the road, although other wagons
had passed along but a short time before.
There are many such vast prairies in the
west. About sunset on the second day,
our party of emigrants reached a beautiful
grove of trees near a small stream. Here
they resolved to encamp for the night.
The horses were taken from the shafts of
*the wagons, and left to graze near the
cattle. Fires were kindled, supper cooked,
and then as the moon arose, the weary
emigrants prepared for the night's repose.
At the four ends of a square, blazing fires
were kindled, to scare away such wolves
as might be lurking about. Within this
square the three wagons were drawn, and
placed in a triangular way in the centre.
Then the horses and cattle were drawn
























THU BOY AND WOIU.





THE =b!IGRANITS.


around the wagons and tied. It was ar-
ranged that one of the three men should
watch for a few hours, and then awaken
another one to take his place, so that
there would be a guard throughout "the
night. The party then sought repose in
the wagons. The howling of the wolves
was heard near the camp soon afterwards;
but as a good watch was kept, none of
these animals ventured to get within the
square. The guard deemed every thing
perfectly safe. About eleven o'clock, a
scream was heard at the back of one of
the wagons. The guard rushed to that
place, and there saw a large wolf dragging
a boy by the shoulder, who had been se-
verely bitten. Next day the party arrived
where they intended to settle.











THE CONCERT OF BIRDS.
ONE summer day, I wandered to a shady
wood, and reclined upon'the green moss,
under a huge oak. The day was very
warm, but the cool shade under the tree
was delightful. While I reclined there, I
heard a very sweet concert. Four or five
birds of different species were perched
upon the branches of the oak. The voices
were not alike but perfectly in concord.
Sometimes a bird with a full, clear warble
would commence, and after he had sang
a sweet prelude, another and another
(10)


























THE CHORUS OF BIRDS.





T CHORUS 01 BRDS. 1S
would join, until there was a grand swell
of harmony such as I had never before
heard; finally the music would die away
until it became the song of a single little
bird. I was so charmed, that I could have
remained beneath that oak all day. How
cheerful the birds seemed. Each one
sang as if it was happy that God had given
it life; and I thought that the Almighty
Creator had given to the earth most beau-
tiful songsters, to sing his praise in chorus.











THE SHIPWBRK.
THE ship Brooklyn was a noble vessel.
She sailed from New York for the Medi-
terranean Sea. After she had been out
of port for several days, all on board being
in high spirits, a gale sprang up, and by
degrees increased to the fury of a hur-
ricane. The ship was driven about and
tossed on the great waves. Her spars
were broken, and one mast fell over the
side. Night came on, and a storm with
thunder and lightning, Artick terror into
all on board of the Brooklyn. There were
(14)


























TIE SHIP IN THE STORM.





TEI SmEPWRuOL


brave men among the crew, men who had
passed through many a storm. But the
Brooklyn was a new ship and no one was
certain that she would be able to with-
stand the fury of the waves. All the
masts were torn away, the rudder became
useless; and the ship lay a wreck, at the
mercy of the sea. Happily, before any
lives were lost, the storm abated. Otherb
masts were then constructed; the rudder
repaired and the ship steered back to the
port from which she sailed. The crew
were happy on account of the narrow
escape from death which they had made.











THE NAVIES OF THE ANCIENT
GREEKS.
IN ancient times Greece was divided
into many states, the chief of which were
Athens and Sparta. Athens, Corinth, and
some other maritime states, possessed
powerful navies. By means of her great
fleetsof war-ships, Athensaoquired wealth
and power. A large number of cities
were forced to acknowledge her supre-
macy and pay tribute. The war-ships
of the ancient Greeks were not much
larger than our sloops. They were so
(18)

























AEOINT GREEK VESSEL.





THE NAVIES OF THE ANCIENT GREEKS. 21
built as to be propelled by both oars and
sails. The largest vessels were called
triremes, and had three banks of oars.
These ships had strong bows, and the
heads of various birds and beasts carved
in brass, were often placed on them.
When two hostile fleets met, the vessels
were run against each other with great
force. When neither vessel sunk from
the shock, the warriors on board fought
hand-to-hand, in the same manner as if
they had been on land. The seamen of
Athens were very skilful in guiding their
vessels against those of the enemy, so as
to give fatal blows.












THE EXPRESS RIDER.
ON account of the number of rail roads
and telegraphs, express riders are seldom
employed now. Some time ago, these
riders were employed to convey all im-
portant news from one part of the country
to another. Good horses wore then in
greater demand than now. Express riding
is very exhartnig to man and beast.
When very important news is to be con-
veyed, the express rider gets a handsome
reward for his severe labor, but in general
the profits of this business do not pay for
(22)

























TU BZXPRISS PCDU.





THN MEXPERUS EMhU


the sacrifice of natural rest. Sometimes
these riders meet with terrible accidents;
and these are to be dreaded most while
riding swiftly at night, along roads where
there are but few lights. Should the
horse stumble while at full speed, the
rider must be thrown and severely injured.
We should be thankful for the invention
of telegraphs, which enable us to send
news hundreds and even thousands of
miles without danger or trouble to man
or beast. In some parts of the United
States there are still regular express riders
to carry news that cannot be delayed for
the stage.











THE SCOTTISH FUGITIVES.
MArY years ago, there was great trouble
in Scotland. A number of the people
.wanted Charles Edward Stuart, the de-
scendant of their old Scottish king, to
reign over them instead of George II., who
was then king of all Great Britain. Many
noblemen were among this party. Charles
Edward landed in Scotland, and was soon
at the head of a large army. At first he
was successful. He defeated the army
sent against him by King George, in two
bloody battles. He even advanced as far
(26)



























TEEN SOOTTI8H FUGITIVES.





THE SCOTTISH FUGITIVE.


as the borders of England. The road to
London was open. But Charles Edward
delayed his march, and in the meantime
King George equipped a powerful army;
and gave the command of it to the Duke
of Cumberland. The army of Charles
Edward was defeated and dispersed.
Charles Edward wandered a long time
among the Highlands and then sailed for
France. Some of his noble followers were
captured and put to death for treason.
Others escaped to the wildest portions
of the Highlands. Some ladies fled with
their husbands, and wandered with them
for many months among the rocky regions.
Some of these ladies journeyed on horse-
back others were compelled to travel on
foot.


29 4










MY RABBITS.
I EHAu a large number of rabbits.
Some are entirely white, with red or pink
eyes. Others are spotted with black or
brown, I bought a pair of white ones, and
a pair of spotted ones; and as rabbits
breed very fast, I soon found that I had
more rabbits than I could feed and pro-
tect. I had a long box made, somewhat
like the coop in which chickens are sent
to market, but much larger than any
coop of that kind I ever saw. The palings
on the front of the box were wide enough
(30)























My RABBITS.





KY lAfllT3


to let the rabbits have light and air, and
yet not admit the paw of a cat. This box
was placed in front of the garden, on a
wooden stand three feet high. Every
morning, I went to see my rabbits, to give
them food and clean their box. The little
animals were very playful and did not
seem to be afraid of me. When I thought
the box was too full for comfort, I sold a
number of the rabbits. These pets amuse
me very much in my leisure hours.
0











THE KNIFE GRINDEB.
OLD Timothy earns his living by sharp.
ening knives and scissors. He has a
large machine which he can wheel about
the streets. When he finds a customer,
he sets his barrow down, puts his, wheel
in rapid motion by means of a treddle.
He then Applies the' knife or scissors to
the whirling stone, the sparks fly and in
a few moments, he will give you the knife
with a fine edge. Sometimes, he repairs
scissors by putting new rivets in them
and gives them a bright polish. Old
(84)




























TiHE KNIEZ GRINDEL,





TrHE nrr ouRnW


Timothy looks ragged and dirty; and you
might suppose that he is very poor. But
he has constant employment and contrives
to get so many sixpences during the day
that he receives better weekly payment
than most regular mechanics. He has a
good home where his family is well-pro-
vided, contented and happy. Old Timothy
hopes that he will be able in a few years
to give up this wandering business, set
up a small store and live more at his ease.
He is a sober, steady man and deserves
to prosper.











HUNTING THE NYL-GHAU.
Tna Nyl-Ghau is found in the interior
of South Africa. It is somewhat like the
common stag, but much larger. The body,
horns and tail resemble those of a bull;
it is in the head, neck and legs that we
find the likeness to the deer. The color,
in general, is ash, or gray. The height
of the back is about four feet. The horns
are of a triangular shape, and often
seven inches in length. The Nyl-Ghau
eats oats and is fond of grass and hay. It
is vicious and fierce in the rutting season,
(38)












n -ThiN


HUNTING THB NYL-GHAU.





HUNTING Tim NYL-GIAU.


but at other times tame and gentle. The
female has no horns and looks more like
the deer than the male. The young Nyl-
Ghau is like the fawn. In South Africa,
the natives frequently engage in hunting
the Nyl-Ghau. Armed only with a short
spear, called an assagia, an African will
venture to attack the largest Nyl-Ghau
he can find in a herd. If he is a skilful
hunter, he will slay the animal with a
single stroke behind the shoulder. If the
Nyl-Ghau is only slightly wounded, it will
boldly rush upon the hunter, and he must
be swift and active or he will be gored to
death.












THE MAD BU~L
ONE day, a mad bull broke out of a pen
on a farm just outside of New York. He
ran into the city, pursuing many people,
and frightening many more almost out
of their senses. Down through some small
streets the furious beast ran till it reached
Broadway, the great thoroughfare of New
York. The pavements were crowded
with people, some walking for pleasure
and others hurrying along on business
The bellowing of the bull gave the alarm
and there was a general flight. Some
(42) t

























THU MAD BULL.





THE MAD BULL.


sought safety in the stores. Others fled
along the cross streets. The bull selected
a boy as the particular object of his rage.
He chased the boy for some time, caught
him, tossed him in the air, and gored him
terribly in the breast. He then ran into
a dry-goods store, being more enraged at
the sight of some red stuffs there, forced
the salesmen to jump upon high shelves,
overturned and tore bundles of the finest
goods, and then ran into the street again.
There he was shot by a brave fellow, who
coolly stood in front and shot him to the
heart.









THE STREET PAYERS.


HAV you ever seen men paving the
streets of the city. In some places where
square blocks of stone are used, paving is
very difficult. Where the common round
pebbles are laid the work is heavy and
wearisome, but it does not call for the
exercise of much skill. The street is first
graded to the desired level, laborers being
employed to dig down or fill up as may
be necessary. The street is then spread
with gravel, in which the stones are laid.
A few men start ahead and place the
(46)





















THI ST~UT PAY=&B


c~


INN
ISIN
lot





In IrT PhYDBV.


stones in their proper places. Others
follow and using a very heavy tool, made
of wood, and shod with iron, drive the
stones tightly down. In this way the
pavers proceed until the whole street is
paved. Streets paved with round pebbles
are dry, but rough; and when carts and
carriages drive over them, a great noise
is made. Smooth, square blocks are much
superior; but their cost is so great that
none but the wealthiest cities can afford
them. Paving with wooden blocks has
been tried; but the blocks did not endure
for a sufficient time.











THE MOTHER'S DEATH.
MRS. GAnRDW was a widow. She had
lost her husband when her children were
still mere infants; and by hard labor and
constant care, she had raised those child-
ren to bebhonst and respectable members
of society. She was struck with palsy
and rendered completely helpless. Then
her children, William and Susan, showed
that they were grateful for her toils on
their behalf. During a whole year they
worked for her support, paid the doctor's
heavy charges and supplied all her wants
(60)
























TIIE MOTHER'S DEATH.





STIH MNOT E' DIATH.


Never did children display more affection
for a parent. At length, Mrs. Garden felt
that her last hour was approaching. She
only wishes to live for the sake of her'
children. She knew that they would lead
virtuous lives, for she had taught them to
pursue the way of the righteous. But it
pained her to leave them. However, the
widow was resigned to the will of God.
About sunset, one day, during which the
children had watched by the bedside
almost constantly, Mrs. Garden breathed
her last. William and Susan scarcely
knew that she was dead, 'so gently did
her spirit pass away. They wept for a
long while, and then prayed that God
would give them strength to live so as r
be worthy of such a mother.












THE SHIPPING AT NEW YORK
Nzw YouR is the largest city upon the
continent of America, and one of the
largest ports in the world. There you
may see vessels, from all commercial
countries, of all sizes, and of many varie-
ties of construction. There are the great
steamships that run between New York
and Liverpool, and others built for the
California trade. These steamships are
the swiftest ever built. Some of them
have run from Liverpool to New York in
less than ten days. Along the wharves
(54)






:7'


I I,


SHIPPING AT NEW YORK.


N





THE SLIPPING AT NXW YORK.


on the East River there is such a crowd
of vessels that their masts and rigging
will almost prevent you from seeing the
houses from the river. The bustle and
hurry of loading and unloading these
vessels will surprise even those persons
who reside in other large commercial
cities. A vast amount of business is here
transacted. Every man seems resolved
to go ahead as fast as he can. On the
other side of the city, you may see the
beautiful steamboats that run upon the
Hudson river and Long Island Sound.
Some of these boats are over three hun-
dred feet long. They are furnished in
the most gorgeous style and their cabins
look like parlors in palaces.












THE YOUNG SHEPHERD.
ROGER is only ten years old. But he
can tend his father's sheep on the hill, as
well as if he was a man. He is very
careful to keep them out of the corn and
grain fields. Roger has a good dog, named
Shoot, who aids him in keeping other
dogs from worrying the sheep. Roger can
read, and he often takes books with him
when he goes to take care of the sheep,
so that he will not grow weary of being
alone. He makes pets of the little lambs
and frisks about with them.
(58)


























THE YOUNG IIEPHEBD.




























TH2 BUTCHER'S CATTLE











THE BUTCHER'S CATTLE.
A Burer named Barney Williams had
a lot back of his house, in which he kept
a large number of cattle. As soon as he
had killed about one half the number, he
bought others. In this way, he always
had a fine lot of cattle in his lot. The
butcher was a cruel, brutal man. His bus-
iness had so hardened his heart that he
delighted to torture the cattle before he
killed them. Sometimes, he would break
off one of a bullock's horns, and thus make
the poor beast bellow with pain. The
(63)





THE BUTO'rm OCATLU


neighbors complained of the numerous
display of his brutality; but though he
was often fined, he stubbornly continued
his cruel practices. At length he met
with that reward which his neighbors
often said he deserved. One day he went
into the lot, in a brutal mood, and began
to beat a huge bull with the handle of his
axe. The beast was enraged and strove
to gore him. Barney jumped aside and
cut the bull in the shoulder with his axe.
But the beast rushed on him and gored
him to death. Never be cruel to dumb
animal




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