• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Abbreviations
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Municipally owned electric...
 The utilization of electrical...
 Summary and conclusion
 Bibliography














Group Title: University of Florida publication. | a Engineering Experiment Station bulletin |v no. 2
Title: The electrical industry in Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003184/00001
 Material Information
Title: The electrical industry in Florida
Series Title: University of Florida publication. | a Engineering Experiment Station bulletin |v no. 2
Physical Description: vii, 70 p. : illus., maps. ;
Language: English
Creator: Wilson, John W
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1936
 Subjects
Subject: Electric industries -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Electric industries -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 70.
Statement of Responsibility: by John W. Wilson.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003184
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA4340
ltuf - AHV7854
oclc - 01830465
alephbibnum - 001646327

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Preface
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    List of Tables
        Page iv
    List of Figures
        Page v
    Abbreviations
        Page vi
    Acknowledgement
        Page vii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Municipally owned electric utilities
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The utilization of electrical energy
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Summary and conclusion
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Bibliography
        Page 70
Full Text



University of
and


Florida


Florida State Planning Board
Publication

Engineering Experiment Station Bulletin No. 2


The Electrical Industry in Florida
By
JOHN W. WILSON. M.S. in Engineering
Instructor in Electrical Engineering


University of Florida
Gainesville. Florida
April. 1936




















PRBPACR


The ienert ion, distribution and consumption of electrical energy
is one cf the great industries of Florida. The use of electricity is an
indication A ti;e prosperity and living standards of our people. Every
citiozn of the SLate is concerned, directly or indirectly, with the fu-
..re and. welfare Lf this important servant of mankind.

For these r-esons, it is fitting that the Florida State Planniag
Board and the Eig'neering Experiment Stationof the University 6f Plorij
prepare and make available to the people of the State the facts concern-
ing the electrical industry of Florida.

Every year, important questions of rates, taxation, regulation, et
cetera, applicable to the electrical industry are discussed by private
citizens and public officials. Tomake available the basic physical facts
upon which all intelligent discussion of these problems must rest and to
aid in a more accurate solution of these problems, this bulletin on The
Electrical Industry of Florida has been prepared.


A. B. Dooley, Chairman, Blake R. Van Leer, Director,
Florida State Planning Board Engineering Experiment Station,
Technical Consultant,
H. L. M.ntgomery, Florida State Planning Board
Execu; ive Secretary,
Florida ;z.ate Planning Board
















TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

PREFACE ii

ACKNOWLEDGMENT vii

INTRODUCrION I

CHAPTER I. THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY

A. Municipalities 3

H. Private Companies 6
1. Florida Power and Light Company 6
2. Florida Public Service Company 11
3. Tampa Electric Company 13
4. Florida Power Corporation 15
5. Gulf Power Company 17
6. Other Companies 18

C. Sunmation 19

CHAPTER II. THE UTILIZATION OF BLBCTRICAL ENERGY

A. General Statistics 34
1. Electrical Energy in Manufactures 43
2. Electrical Energy in Mines and Quarries 53
3. Electrical Energy on Farms 59

B. County Statistics 63


SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 67

BIBLIOGRAPHY 70







TABLES
1age

1. history of municipally-owned generating plants of Florida 4
2. Hunicipally-owned generating plants of Florida as of Decem-
ber, 1932 5
3. Generating plants of the Florida Power and Light Company 8
4. Communities served by the Florida Power and Light Company 9
5. Capacity, service and transmission lines of Florida Power
and Light Company to
6. Generating plants of the Florida Public Service Company 11
7. Communities served by the Florida Public Service Company 12
8. Capacity, service, and transmission lines of the Florida
Public Service Company 12
9. Generating plants of the Tampa electric Company 13
lo. Communities served by the Tampa Electric Company 13
t1. Service and transmission lines of the Tampa Electric Com-
pany 14
12. Generating plants of the Florida Power Corporation 15
13. Communities served by the Florida Power Corporation 16
14. Service and transmission lines of the Florida Power Cor-
ooration 16
15. Generating plants of the Gulf Power Company 17
16. Communities served by the Gulf Power Company 17
17. Generating plants of the Southern States Power Company 18
18. Communities served by the Southern States Power Company 18
19. History of all privately-owned plants of Florida 20
20. Net output in thousands of kilowatt-hours of all plants
in the State, by years 24
21. Installed capacity in kilowatts in Florida, by years 30
22. Installed capacity in kilowatts in United States,byyears 30
23. Net kilowatt-hours generated in Florida, by years 31
24. Net kilowatt-hours generated in the United States, by
years 31
25. Miles of transmission lines in Florida, by years 32
26. Consumption of electrical energy in Florida, by years 34
27. Wealth of Florida 35
2t. Population of Florida 35
29. Company serving communities by counties 37
30. Power equipment of the manufacturing industries of Florida 44
31. Power equipment of manufacturing industries of the United
States 45
32. General statistics for Florida by industries 48
33. General data as to wages, value of products, cost of pur-
chased electrical energy and other manufacturing costs
for Florida by counties, 1929 49
34. Consumption of tuel and electrical energy in Florida by
counties, 1929 51
35. Power equipment of mines and quarries of Florida 53
36. Power equipment of mines and quarries of the United States 54
37. Consumption of fuels and electrical energy in mines and
quarries of Florida 57
38. Consumption of fuels and electrical energy in mines and
quarries of the United States 57
39. Consumption of fuels and electrical energy in mines and
quarries of Florida by counties, 1929 58
40. Statistics on Florida mines and quarries as to number of
persons employed, salaries, wages, etc. 58
41. Power equipment in mines and quarries of Florida as to
material mined 58









TABLES (Continued)


42. Number of farms and number of farms served with electrical
energy in the United States and in Florida
43. General statistics as to electrical energy on Florida farms
by counties
44. The manufacturing and farming use of electrical energy by
Florida counties in 1929












FIGURES


i. Installed generating capacity in kilowatts in Florida and
the United States by years
2. Net kilowatt-hours generated in Florida and the United
States by years
3. Wealth, population, and consumption of electrical energy
in Florida
4. Power equipment of Florida manufacturers by years
5. Power equipment of United States manufacturers by years
6. Power equipment in Florida mines and quarries
7. Power equipment in United States mines and quarries


HAPS


i. Composite map showing location of all municipally and
privately owned generating stationsand transmission
lines


Page












ABBREVIATIONS

Acq. Acquired

F.P.C. Florida Power Corporation

F.P.Co. Florida Power Company

F.P.L.C. Florida Power and Light Cmpany

F.P.S.C. Florida Public Service Company

G.P.C. Gulf Power Company

11 Hydraulic turbine

HP Horse power

IC Internal combustion engine

K.E.C. Keystone Electric Company

K.W.E.C. Key West Electric Compaay

KW Kilowatt

KWH Kilowatt-bour

H. Municipal

S.S.P.C. Southern States Power Company

S.U. Southern Utilities

S Steam turbine or steam engine

T.E.C. Tampa electric Company























Acinowledeuent


This survey is a combination of the salient points of two masters
theses presented to the Graduate Council of the University of Florida,
entitled A Survey of the Power and Light Industry of the State by John
W. Wilson and A Survey of the Consumption of Flectric Power in the State
by Claude H. Jernigan.

Much of the material herein presented was collected from the muni-
cipalities and operating companies of the State and it is largely due to
their cooperation that the information herein presented is available.
Supplementary data were obtained from various publications, particularly
those of the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, U. S. Geo-
logical Survey, Noody's Analysts of Investments (Public Utility Section ,
and the Rlectrlcal World. A complete bibliography will be found in the
appendix.

The author wishes to acknowledge his appreciation of the many help-
ful suggestions and criticisms rendered by Dean Blake R. Van Leer and
Professor Joseph Weil in the editing and the reviewing of the manuscript.







INTRODUCTION


In less than fifty years the electric light and power industry has
advanced from a laboratory experiment to a place in the front rank of
American industry. Industrial expansion and social progress have become
dependent upon the supply of electrical energy and consequently this in-
dustry has become a matter of public concern.

There is no single yardstick by which one industry can be compared
with another, but there are three rather definite elements that serve as
a basis for comparison: the number of people who depend upon them for a
living, the value of the products, and the amount of capital invested.

Considering the first element, it is found that the electrical in-
dustry ranks thirteenth in the list. This position is rather to be ex-
pected because large modern power plants are almost entirely automatic.

The electric power industry also ranks thirteenth in regard to the
value of its products, but the money value of its product is small in
proportion to its importance in our economic life.

The third element, capital invested, gives the industry fifth place,
but there is some doubt as to whether it should rank so high.

The public has become interested in the electric light and power in-
dustry because of its importance in the social and economic structure of
the country. In the words of the report of the Committee on Recent Eco-
nomic Changes in the United States: "The increasing flexibility with
which electricity can be delivered for power has enabled manufacturers
and farmers to meet with high labor costs by the application of power
driven specialized machines; and power in this flexible form has pene-
trated into every section of the United States, including many rural
areas. The survey shows that as a nation we use as much electrical en-
ergy as all the rest of the world combined."

The status of the electrical industryof Florida is of public inter-
est because of the important part which electrical energy plays in manu-
facturing, mining, agriculture, and the social life of the State. Yet
there has not been previously publishedany assembled information on this
outstanding industry. This treatise attempts to show the status of the
electrical industry in 1933, to what extent the use of electrical energy
has advanced, and to offer some prognostications as to the future of the
industry in Florida.

The survey includes statistics and data on municipalities and pri-
vate operating companies producing electrical energyfor sale to the gen-
eral public and classified as public utilities. It does not include in-
formation relative to Federal, State, County, City or private plants pro-
ducing energy not for sale.

The data have been grouped under two chapter headings, the first
dealing with the generation and distribution of energy and the second
with the uses to which the energy is put.

Chapter I is subdivided into parts dealing with the municipalities
and private operating companies; under these subheads each municipality
and privatevcompany is treated separately. The latter part of the chap-
ter is given overtoa summation of the data for the State as a whole and
comparative data for the United States.

Chapter II gives the general statistics for the State, showing the






2 THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

comparative growth in the consumption of electrical energy, the wealth
andthepopulation. Under statistics on manufactures is shown the growth
of power equipment in the United States and in Florida. Detailed infor-
mation on the several types of industry and the consumption of fuels and
electrical energy in manufactures by counties is also shown. Statistics
on Agriculture show the equipment on farms, expenditures for electrical
energy and the number of farms served.







THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Chapter I


MUNICIPALLY OWNED ELECTRIC UTILITIES

Historical facts and information relative to the dates of installa-
tion and early operation of most of the electric plants in Florida are
sadly lacking. Considerable information was accumulated from various
sources, but much of it had to be discarded because it was unreliable.

The only municipal plant on which any amount of reliable information
was available was that of the City of Jacksonville; this information is
gives briefly below.

The information on the other municipal plants of the State has been
incorporated in Table 1. This table shows for all of the plants, the
name, location, typeof prime mover Isteam, internal combustioa,or hydro)
andthecapacity in kilowatts byyears for such years as it was available.
The column showing the type indicates the type as of December, 1932. or
as of the year it was acquired by some private company. Vhen the plant
was acquiredbya private company it is indicated in the table under that
year; beginning with that yearit is transferred to Table 19, which shows
similar information for the privately owned plants.

The type and capacity of all municipal electric plants of Florida as
of December, 1932, are shown in Table 2.

Jacksonville Municipal Plant

The first municipal plant in Jacksonville was constructed in 189s;
previous to that time all of the electrical energy for the city had been
furnished bythe Jacksonville Electric Company. This plant with the nec-
essary additions in generating capacity served until 1913 when the instal-
lation of a 6,0ooo kilowatt plant was made at the present plant location
and the old plant was discarded. Additional capacity has been added from
time to time as needed. The plant today has a capacity of so,soo kilo-
watts and ranks as one of the largest in the State.














THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


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THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY 5

Toble 2


MUNICIPALLY OWNED GENERATING PLANTS AS OF DECEMBER, 1932

Location Type of Capacity in
Prime Mover Kilowatts

Alachua' 1C 92
Bartow S 1.375
Fort Pierce (two plants) S 2.000
IC 800
Gainesville S 3,550
Homestead IC 1928 900
Jacksonville S 50.500
Kissimmee IC 900
Lake Helen IC 1928 70
Lakeland S 9,000
Lake Worth IC 2.100
Leesburgl S
Moore Haven IC 1928 167
Newberry
New Smyrna IC 1.235
Ocalal S 1928 1,087
Orlando S 9.000
Qulncy S 1928 528
St. Cloud IC 410
Sebring IC 1.675
Starke IC 200
Tallahassee 5
Wauchula IC 702


iPurchase all or a major part of energy used.





THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


PRIVATELY OWNED ELECTRIC UTILITIES


FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

The Florida Power and Light Company was incorporated under Florida
laws in July, 1906, as the Miami Gas Company. Control was acquired by
the American Power and Light Company in 1924 and at that time the name
was changed to the Florida Power and Light Company. In 194l the Americas
Power and Light Company also acquired controlof the Miami Electric Light
and Power Company, the Southern Utilities, the Daytona Public Service
Company and the Ormond Supply Company. The Hiami Beach Electric Compaay
was acquired in 1925 and this, with the above mentioaed properties, was
consolidated under the Florida Power and Light Company.

In 1924 the Southern Utilities, which was incorporated in Florida in
March,, i9ij, served fifty-six communities, controlledtheSt.Johns Elec-
tric Company in St. Augustine and had generating stations in the follow-
ing towns: Arcadia, Bradenton, Cocoa, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Live
Oak, Okeechobee, Palatka, Punta Gorda, St. Augustine, Sanford, Stuart,
Tarpon Springs, Titusville and West Palm Beach.

The Daytona Public Service Company was incorporated in Florida in
1912 and in 1913 acquired all the properties and franchises of the Shantz
electric, Ice and Water Company supplying Daytona, Laytoaa Beach and Sea-
breeze.

Since the consolidation of the companies in 1925 the following pro-
oerties have been constructed and acquired.


1926

Acquired Lake City steam plant and the same year constructed pre-
sent diesel plant and discarded steam plant.
Acquired Delray diesel plant.
Acquired Sarasota diesel plant.
Constructed Baldwin diesel plant.
Constructed Lauderdale steam plant.
Constructed Punta Gorda diesel plant.
Constructed Sanford steam plant.

1927

Acquired Lake Butler diesel plant.
Acquired Oak Hill diesel plant.
Acquired La Bellesteam plant.
Constructed Sears steam plant.
1928

Acquired Fellsere municipal plant.
Acquired Sebastian diesel plant.
Acquired Waldo diesel plant.
Constructed Glades diesel plant at Pahokee.

1929


Acquired Naples diesel plant.
Constructed Belle Glade diesel plant.








THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY 7

1930

Acquired Madison diesel plant.
Acquired Monticello diesel plant.
Acquired Perry diesel plant.


During the years 1931 and 1932 the company did not acquire or con-
struct any generating stations.

Other pertinent information in regard to this company is shown in
the three accompanying tables. The first, Table 3, shows the generating
plants as of December, 1932, their location and capacity in kilowatts,
segregated according to the type of prime mover. rhe communities served
with electrical energy by the company are shown in Table 4. Table 5
shows the total generating capacity I in kilowatts, the kilowatt-hours
of electrical energy produced, and the number of miles of transmission
lines operating at io,ooo volts and over for the years 1924 to 1932 in-
clusive.







THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 3


Generating Plants of the Florido Power and Light Compony


Name


Location


Capacity in
Kilowatts


Steam:

















Diesel:



















Combination:
Steam and
Diesel


Arcadia
Bradenton
Daytona Beach
Fort Myers
Lauderdale
Live Oak
Melbourne
Miam I
Miami Beach
Palatka
Sanford
Sanford loldl
St. Augustine
Sears
west Palm Beach

Baldwin
Belle Glade
Bonita Springs
Cocoa
Delray
Glades
Lake Butler
Lake City
Madison
Monticello
Naples
Oak Hill
Perry
Punta Gorda
Sarasota
Sebastian
Stuart

Okeechobee

Titusv Ille


Okeechobee

Titusvllle


Arcadia
Bradenton
Daytona Beach
Fort Myers
4 mi. W. of Dania
Live Oak
Melbourne
Miami
Miami Beach
Palatka
4 ml. N.W. of Sanford
Sanford
St. Augustine
Sears
west Palm Beach

Baldwin
Belle Glade
Bonita Springs
Cocoa
Delray
Pahokee
Lake Butler
Lake City
Madison
Monticello
Naples
Oak Hill
Perry
Punts Gorda
Sarasota
Sebastian
Stuart


1,458
3,000
4,500
1.560
50.000
408
148
34.000
8.500
416
10.000
1.600
5.500
500
5,100

506
76
56
1.300
320
560
92
1,280
400
400
160
50
800
3.200
2,270
130
120







THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Table 4

COMMUNITIES SERVED BY THE FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY


Al landale
Ankona
Anna Maria
Arcadia
Baldwin
Bee Ridge
Belle Glade
Boca Raton
Bonaventure
Bonita Springs
Boynton Beach
Bradenton
Brownv Ile
Bunnell
Callahan
Cameron City
Canal Point
Charlotte Harbor
Chuluota
City Point
Cleveland
Cocoa
Cocoa Beach
Coral Gables
Cortez
Crescent City
Dania
Davis
Daytona Beach
Deerfield
De Iray
East Fort Myers
East Palatka
Eau Gallle
Elkton
Ellenton
Englewood
Fellsmere
Flagler Beach
Florida City
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Ogden
Frontenac
Fruitvllle
Fulford
Gardner
Geneva
Georgianna
Golden Beach
Golden Gate
Goulds
Hallandale
Hampton
Hastings


Hawthorn
Hialeah
HII lard
Holly Hill
Hollywood
Hypoluxo
Indlalantic
Indianola
Indian River City
Interlachen
Jensen
Jupiter
Kelsey City
Kendall
Keuka
LaBelle
LaGrange
Lake Butler
Lake City
Lake Monroe
Lantana
Laurel
Lawtey
Lee
Listville
Live Oak
Macclenny
McMeekin
Madison
Malabar
Manatee
Melbourne
Melbourne Beach
Melrose
Merritt
Miami
Miami Beach
Miami Shores
Miami Springs
Mims
Mission City
Monticello
Naples
Naranja
Nocatee
Nokomis
Oak Hill
Oakland Park
Ojus
Okeechobee
Olympia
Oneco
Opa Locka
Ormond
Osprey


Osteen
Palatka
Palma Sola
Palm Beach
Palm City
Palmetto
Paola
Parrish
Penny Farms
Perrine
Perry
Peters
Plneda
Pomona
Pompano
Port Orange
Port Sewall
Princeton
Punta Gorda
Redlands
Rio
Riviera
Rockdale
Rockledge
Roseland
Rubonia
Ruskin
St. Augustine
Salerno
Sanford
San Mateo
Sarasota
Sears
Sebastian
Sharpes
Silver Palm City
South Bay
South Miami
Stuart
Sun City
Terra Ceia
Tice
Titusville
Vamo
Venice
Wabasso
Waldo
We aka
Wellborn
West Palm Beach
White City
Whitfield Estates
Wilbur
Yulee









THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 5


Capacity, Service and Transmission Lines of
and Light Company

Year Capacity in Kilowatt-hours
Kilowatts Generated


1924 31,458 58,185,000
1925 69.513 114,285.000
1926 113,257 200,412,000
1927 138,031 214,169,000
1928 137,827 199.322.000
1929 138,196 202.110,000
1930 139.840 207,311.000
1931 139,840 208.125,000
1932 139,840 197,622,000


the Florida Power


Miles of
Transmission
Lines

146
232
877
1158
1150
1153
1189
1228
1250







THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


FLORIDA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY

The Florida Public Service Company was incorporated under Florida
laws in May, 1908, as the Deland Electric Light, Power and Ice Company.
In January, 1934, the name was changed to the above and in February of
the same year the property of the Bustis Light and Water Company, the
Orlando Public Service Company, the Orlando Gas Company and the Florida
Ice and Power Company was acquired.

By the endof 1934 the company had generating plants at Deland, Eus-
tis, Orlando, and Lake Wales, with a total capacity of 4,650 kilowatts
and served thirty communities in central Florida, including Deland, Bus-
tis, Tavares, Orange City, Lake Mary, Longwood, Altamonte Springs, Deland
Junction, Beresford, Lake Gem, Maitland, Tangerine, Zellwood, Plymouth,
Pinecastle. Hamilton, Waverly, Mountain Lake, Highland Park, Babson Park,
Davenport, Haines City, Dundee, Lake Wales, Frostproof and Avon Park, and
wholesaled energy to Winter Park, Mount Dora and Apopka.

During 1935 the following properties were acquired:

Apopka Water and Light Company
The municipal system at Bowling Green
The municipal system at Clermont
The distribution system at Ocoee
Mianeola Light and Power Company
Tildenville Light and Power Company

The municipal distribution system in Umatilla was acquired in 1926
and that of Winter Park in 1927. In 1927 a 12,5oo kilowatt steam plant
was constructed at Benson Springs and the following year a 15,000 kilo-
watt plant was constructed at Avon Park. In 1939 the municipal lighting
system of Winter Garden was acquired.

The company at present is controlled by the General Gas and Electric
Corporation through the Southeastern Electric and Gas Company.

The name, location, type of prime mover and capacityof the company's
generating plants are shown in Table 6. A list of the communities served
is shown inTable 7. Table 8 gives the generating capacity in kilowatts,
the number of kilowatt-hours of electrical energy produced, and the num-
ber of miles of transmission linesof the company for the years 1924-1932
inclusive.


Table 6


Generating Plants of the Florida Public Service Company

Name Location Type of Capacity in
Prime Mover Kilovatts

Avon Park Avon Park S 15,000
Benson Springs Benson Springs S 12.500
Deland Deland S 650
Orlando Orlando S 2,700
Winter Garden Winter Garden IC 728








12 THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 7


Communities Served by the Florida Public Service Company


Altamonte Springs
Altoona
Alturas
Apopka
Avon Park
Babson Park
Barberv Ile
Benson Springs
Beresford
Bowling Green
Campbell
Clermont
Conway
Davenport
Deland
Deland Junction
DeLeon Springs
Dundee
Eldridge
Eustis
Excelsior Park
Falrvilla
Fort Meade
Frostproof
Glenwood
Groveland


Haines City
Hesperides
Highland Park
Homeland
Howey
Inter Ocean City
Istokpoga
Lake Hamilton
Lake Gem
Lake Mary
Lake Placid
Lake Wales
Lockhart
Longwood
Loughman
Maitland
Mascotte
Minneola
Montverde
Mount Dora
Mount Plymouth
Mountain Lake
Oakland
Ocoee
Orange City
Orlovista


Oviedo
Pembroke
Phoemico
Piedmont
Pierson
Pinecastle
Plymouth
Royster
Seville
Sorrento
Swift
Taft
Tangerine
Tavares
Templeton
Torrey
Umatila
Waverly
West Lake Wales
Windermere
Winter Garden
Winter Park
Yalaha
Zellwood
Zolfo Springs


Table 8


Capacity, Service and Transmission Lines
Public Service Company

,ar Capacity in Kilowatt-hours
Kilowatts Generated

124 4,650 4,267,000
125 7,379,000
126 16.533,000
127 16,420,000
128 35,486.000
129 31.578 40,271.000
130 31,578 36,166,000
131 31,578 31.992,000
132 31,578 30,476,000


of the Florida


Miles of
Transmission Lines

62
280
332
374
411
437
538
538
538








THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY

The Tampa Electric Company was incorporated under the laws of Flor-
ida, in October, 1899. The company has been under Stone and Webster man-
agement since its organization. The combination hydro and steam plant
on the Hillsborough River near Tampa was the only generating station until
the installation of the West Jackson Street steam plant in 1906. The com-
pany acquired control of the Plant City Public Service Company and the
Winter Haven Water, Ice and Light Company in 1923, and the Dade City Util-
ities Company in 1924. In 1931 these properties were consolidated.

Tables 9, 10 and 11 show the names, location and capacity of the
generating station, the communities served, and service and transmission
lines of the company.


Table 9


Generating Plants of the Tampa Electric Company


Location


Tampa
Tampa Hydrol


Tampa
Hil Isborough
River


Type of
Prime Mover


Winter Haven Winter Haven S

IPortion of dam washed out in the summer of 1933.


Capacity in
Kilowatts


34,000

600
1.000


Table 10


Communities Served by the Tampa Electric Company


Auburndale
Bradley Junction
Brewster
Dade CityI
Dover
Eagle Lake
Green Bay
Hopewell
Kings Grove
Kingsway
Lake Alfred
Morris
Mulberry
Nichols


Pauway
Pierce
Plant City
Port Tampa
Ridgewood
Romeo
San Gully
Seffner
Sydney
Tampa
Tampa Shores
Temple Terrace
Thonotosassa
Winter Haven


Energy purchased from Florida Power Corporation








THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table ii


Service and Transmission Lines of the Tampa Electric Company


Kilowatt-hours
Generated
37,586,000
57,231,000
98,927,000
I 13, 157,000
141,259.000
156,335,000
167,812,000
132,078,000
120,062,000


Miles of Transmission Lines

19
49
104
104
173
179
194
204
204







THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION

The Florida Power Corporation at the time of its incorporation in
1925 acquired the property of the Central Power and Light Company in
Brooksville. The company was originally incorporated in Florida in 1915
as the St.Petersburg Lighting Company. The name was changed to Pinellas
County Power Company in 1923 and in 1924 the Tarpon Springs property was
acquired. In 1926 the Pinellas County Power Company merged with the Flor-
ida Power Corporation and the name was changed to the Florida Power Cor-
poration in 1927. During the same year the company acquired control of
the West Florida Power Company.

At the time of its organization in 1925 the company was controlled
by the National Public Service Corporation; in 1929 control was acquired
by the Seaboard Public Service Company and in 1933 the common stock was
acquired by the Penn Southern Power Company.

The West Florida Power Company in 1927 controlled the following pro-
perties: Jasper, Jennings, Havana, Tallahassee, and White Springs.

In 1926 the company (thenthe Pinellas County Power Company) acquired
Pass-a-Grille, and the systemat Bronson, and constructed the steam plant
at Inglis.

The plant and distribution system at Greenville were acquired in
1927. In 1928 the Jackson Bluff hydro plant was constructed and during
the following year the municipal plant at Dunnellon and the property at
Mayo were acquired. The power plants and distribution systems in Apala-
chicola, Branford, Carrabelle, Cedar Keys, Greensboro and New Port Richey
and the distribution systems in Cross City and Sneads were acquired in
1930. During 1933 the company purchased the Moss Bluff hydro plant.

Data on the present type and capacityof the plants, the communities
served, the kilowatt-hours of energy produced and the miles of transmis-
sion lines are shown in Tables 12, 13, and 14.


Table 12


Generating Plants of the Florida Power Corporation

Name Location Capacity in
Kilowatts

Steam: Bayboro St. Petersburg 14,800
Inglis Inglis 20,000

Diesel: Apalachicola Apalachicola 378
Branford Branford 120
Bronson Bronson
Carrabelle Carrabelle
Cedar Key Cedar Key 220
Greenville Greenville
High Springs High Springs
Mayo Mayo 60

Hydro: Dunnellon Dunnellon 3,850
Jackson Bluff Jackson Bluff 8,800
Moss Bluff Moss Bluff IAcq. 1933) 480







THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 13


Communities Served by the Florida Power Corporation


Alachua
Anclote
Anona
Anthony
Apalachicola
Archer
Aucilla
Belleair
Belleview
Branford
Bronson
Brooksville
Bushnell
Candler
Carrabelle
Cedar Keys
Center Hill
Chiefland
Citra
Clearwater
Coleman
Croom
Cross City
Crystal Beach
Crystal River
Denham
Dunedin
Dunnellon
East Lake
Elfers
Evinston
Fairfield
Felicia
Flemington
Floral City


Gainesville Suburbs
Greensboro
Greenville
Gulfport
Hardeetown
Havana
Hernando
High Springs
Hinson
Homosassa
Indian Beach Junction
Indian Rocks
Inglls
Inverness
Irvine
Island Grove
Istachatta
Jasper
Jennlngs
Kendrick
Lacoochee
Lady Lake
Lake Weir
Largo
Leesburg
Lowell
Mayo
Mcl.,iiosn
Micanopy
Midway
Newberry
New Port Richey
Nobleton
Ocala
Odessa


Okahumpka
Ok awaha
Orange Lake
Oxford
Ozona
Palm Harbor
Pasadena
Pass-a-Grille
Pinellas Park
Port Richey
Port St.Joe
Quincy
Raleigh
Reddick
Safety Harbor
St.Petersburg
Santos
Seminole
Sneads
Sparr
Stanton
Summerfield
Sumterville
Tallahassee
Tarpon Springs
Trenton
Trilby
Wall Springs
Webster
Weirsdale
White Springs
Wildwood
Williston
Yankeetown
Zephyrhills


Table 14


Service and Transmission Lines
Corporation

Kilowatt-hours
Generated


of the Florida Power


Miles of
Transmission Lines


59,254,000
83,688,000
94,416,000
103.893,000
109,489,000
98,446,000








THE. GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


GULF POWER COMPANY


The Gulf Power Company,a subsidiaryof the Commonwealth and Southern
Corporation, was incorporated in Maine in November, 1925. In 1936 the
Pensacola Electric Company, which was incorporated under Maine laws in
1906, was merged into and with the Gulf Power Company. The distribution
systems in the communities served are operated under limited franchises.

The name, location and capacity of the generating plants and the
communities served are shown in Tables 15 and 16.

All the plants except the one at Niceville are used for standby ser-
vice only, practically all of the energy sold being purchased from the
Alabama Power Company. Comparative figures were not available, but the
addenda to Table 15 gives some idea as to the ratio. The company has
about 105 miles of transmission lines.


Table I5


Generating Plants of the Gulf Power Company


Name


Chipley Plant
Crestview Plant
Milton Plant
Niceville Plant
Pensacola Plant


Location


,Chlpley
Crestview
Milton
Niceville
Pensacola


Capacity in
Kilowatts


75
94
150
208
2300


Addenda


Kilowatt-hours
Generated


Kilowatt-hours
Purchased

20,922,605
24,718,142
25,143.586
21,501.551


366,903


Table 16


Communities Served by the Gulf Power Company


Bon i fay
Campbeliton
Century
Chipley
Crestview
DeFuniak Springs
Fort Walton


Fountain
Gracev Ile
Lakewood
Laurel Hill
Lynn Haven
Millville
Milton


Nicevi le
Panama City
Pensacola
Ponce de Leon
St. Andrews
Valparaiso
Warrington







18 THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Other Companies


KEY WEST ELECTRIC COMPANY

The Key West Electric Company was incorporated in New Jersey in May,
1898. The first plant in Key West was installed in 1899. The company is
a constituent of the Engineer's Public Service Company and is managed by
Stone and Webster. The company furnishes electricityfor light and power
purposes to the City of Key West and its environs, and the single plant
operated by the company has a capacity of 1530 kilowatts.


SOUTHERN STATES POWER COMPANY

The Southern States Power Company, at the time of its incorporation
in November, 1926, was controlled by the Associated Gas and Electric Com-
pany. Early in 1927 the properties at Fernandina and Marianna were ac-
quired. The plant at Blountstown was constructed in 1928.

In 1932 the management of the company wss taken over by the Southern
Gas Securities Company, controlled by the Consolidated Electric and Gas
Company through the Central Public Utility System.

Tables 17 and 18 following show the location, type and capacity of
the plants and the communities served. The properties in the western
portion of the State are interconnected by transmission lines of less
than lo,ooo volts.


Table 17


Generating Plants of the Southern States Power Company


Name


Blountstown
Fernandina
Marianna

Marianna


Location


Capacity in
Kilowatts


Blountstown
Fernandina
Marianna

East of
Marianna


Table 18


Communities Served by the Southern States Power Company


Alford
Amelia City
Bascom
Blountstown
Bristol


Cottondale
Fernandina
Greenwood
Marianna
Ocean City








THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Information on all of the privately owned plants, including the name,
location, present ownership, date of construction or acquisition, previous
owner if any type of prime mover, and the growthof the plant's capa-
city is shown in Table 19. The zeros in the final column opposite some
of the plants indicate that the plant has been dismantled or otherwise
removed from service.

The output in thousands of kilowatt-hours of all plants in the State
for as many years as data are available is shown in Table 20. The minus
signs before someof the figures indicate that the plant, instead of pro-
ducing energy during these years, actually consumed energy on account of
the necessity of keeping the plant in repair and ready for service in
case of failure of the transmission system.

The plants showing the greatest output are those of the higher capa-
city becauseof the better efficiencyof the larger units in those plants.

The capacity of the plants of the five major private companies to-
gether with that of the City of Jacksonville represents 84 per cent of
the installed capacity in the State. These plants produced (including
the amount purchased by Gulf Power Company) over 91 per cent of the elec-
trical energy generated in the State.

Two plants in the State produced over loo,ooo,ooo kilowatt-hours of
electrical energy during 1932. They were the Lauderdale plant of the
Florida Power and Light Company and the Tampa steam plant of the Tampa
Electric Company. The municipal plant in Jacksonville ranked third with
89,oo0,00ooo kilowatt-hours to its credit.

The accompanying map is composite one showing for Florida the fol-
lowing items:

1. Location of all generating stations
2. Type of prime mover
3. Transmission lines of individual utilities
4. Communities served by individual utilities
5. Interconnections of systems

It is interesting to note that the only municipally owned transmis-
sion line operating at avoltage of over ii,ooo volts is that of Jackson-
ville, serving Jacksonville Beach.

The interconnections of the transmission lines permit the interchange
of power between the individual systems. The two divisions of the trans-
mission lines of the Florida Power Corporation, one serving the west-cen-
tral portionof the State and the other serving the Tallahassee district,
are interconnected via the system of the Georgia Power Company. This in-
ter connection also permits an interchange of energy between Georgia and
Florida. The interconnections between the Gulf Power Company and the
Alabama Power Company, permitting a similar interchange between Alabama
and Florida, are not shown.

Tables 21to25 inclusive show comparative databy years on the total
installed capacity in kilowatts and the net kilowatt-hours generated in
the United States and Florida segregated as to type of prime mover, and
the miles of transmission lines in Florida operating at a voltage of
11,ooo volts and over.

Compared with that of the rest of the United States, the percentage
of electrical energy produced by water power in Florida is very small.







Teble to


Prrletily Owed F Plea


ime

Apalaciciola
Arcadi

Ave. Park

Sigdad


Baiboe I E




Belie aiade

Illount(atee
ion) fay
Bonits Sprinas

Greae"ste.

rmanford
Brown on

rowkseVi gee

CrIIr Ie I

Cweo r Esey
Chipley

Clermont

Cocoa

Crescent City

04od City


I POrlet OQner

P.P.C.
P.P.L.C.

F.P.S.C.

I. Lanld Lumber Co.
P.P.L.C.

I.P.C.


locat on Type

IC




$
S








IC
S




IC




IC
IC
S





IC
IC



IC

IC
S

iC

PC

S


*I.A.Evun Electric Light
& Ice Plent 90 1920


i 1911 1i11 t*21l 914 t*2e 1936 9 |9 llt t** *490 1931

F.P.C.


09 I" lseo los 4114 -
S.U. F.PoL.C.

n.st.
160 ON
170: 1 -
coo.t.
601 043'1 *64WCO I
Conti. Jy o.P.C.
Pinelsll Cc. P-"er CO


12M0 12100 1
Conot.


to -


Com*t.
40 N -
90% 1000 000 -
S.U. O.*.L.C.

670 670 -
F.P.C.

F.P.C.
40
CarreolelI EI. CO.

440 140
CIlpley Liqht i Power CO. G.P.C.
44 0
Clermnt El. Co. F.P.S.C.
4d2 S 442 IO 1C- -
Coco Lt. & lee Co. S.u. F.P.L.C.


i44 IC
Ddoe City Ice Lt. 6 Poner Co.


F.P.C.


0

- IO


F.P.S.C.

P.P.L.C.

s.S.P.C.
G.P.C.
P.P.L.C.

I.P.L.C.

F.P.C.
F.P.C.




F.P.C.

G.P.C.

F. P.S.C.

P.P.L.C.

F*P.L.C.


14
F.P. L.C.
100 C
0ade City Utllltieo .o.
T.I.Co.
Power Purchased froo
P.P.C.


- -


- -I*,
00








76 TO
2500 12s



- 7
C-4



F.P.C. Ie




.P.e. Io
V.P.:.









NOW t Local tN


a Type i Ph eset O er


Table 19 (Ceatiited)

1 19 ol t1923 t24 1925 1926 tll o928l 1929 1930 L931t 93


IC S.S.P.C.

5 U.P.L.C. Dyton Publlc Service Co.
1912

S P.P.S.C. Deland Electric Light
Power 6 Ice Co.


Del ray

Ounnel lon West Of ODunnlllonf

El lenton
Eust I

Fort yJers

assess Pahokee

ureen Cove Sprlngs

areenrvl 1

mi Spri ngs

Ingl s

Jackson Bluff

Jasper

Key east

Lafel Is


Lake Butler

Lae City


F.P.L.C.

F.P..C.


S F.P.L.C.

IC F.P.L.C.

IC K.P.C.

P.P.C.

F.P.C.

S F.P.C.

N F.P.C.

F.P.C.

IC M.W.E.C.

F.P.L.C.


Original InstallatIon 1912


Eustis Light I Water Co.
1909




Keystone Power Co.,
100 S, 1911











First plant 1189 12;
In 1911 700; 1919 0IS0.


F.P. L.C.

F.P.L.C.


670 -
S.S.P.C.
4500 500 4100
Deytona Pub. S. Co.
P.P.L.C.


760
F. P.S.
O.E.L.P.&i.C.


1200 3200
F.P.Co.
Reeves I Mokher


456 456 320 -
Vun. F.P.L.C.

F.P.C.


F.P.S.C. S00 S
0 IMO I0 -
S.U. F.P.L.C.
160
Const.
100 100S 10 IC 190 240 240 507

24
F.P.C.
40 S
Mm.
20000 20000 -
Const.
8800
Conrt.
60S 0
City Op. Co. I. Fla. Power Co. .P.C.

1050 5- -
M5 0
t.E.Geedno Efle. Lt. F.P.L.C.
SIce Plant
92
I.en. P.P.L.C.
440 5 440 S 40 IC
Mn. F.P.L.C.
10 IC 140
Conet.


Del nd


- 619

400






3800









20 C




0 R


-BWI



- - I I
-.




- 92 ,









- g I
I-






TaIbe to (Ceatiffsee


Lsel Iee tip* I Present Owner I


Levo (ak
Loiu* mss








Maye


Miami


Mimi lee

Micawrep

Mo ice llo

I el olof
MM*~ Oitft


F.P. L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.


S F.P.L.C.


F.P.L.C.

F.P.C.


IC F.P.L.C.


IC F.P.L.C.
IC F.P.L.C.
S IC F.P..L.C.


T.l.C.
F.P.S.C.

F.P.L.C.

G.P.C.
F.P.L.C.


Perry Elsc. Co. ID0 S
1915


4 el. eet of S
Sania




IC
1I

S


I 1ll 1921 1912 1924 o9n1 1916 191 192 so929 920 091A 0911
00oo
Fla. le 6 Power I.P.S.C.
Co.
200 9000 M00
Coest.
40 40- 40
S.U. F.P.I.C.

F.P.L.C.
F.P.C. U C
0 R


Mimi EI. Lt. A Ior Ca.
F.P.L.C.
mO 00 00

as o
Miami fleath V. Co. F.P.L.C.

Mtceanop Wf. Co. FP..C.
40 00
F..L.C.
400 -N
Canat. Ocltmleha leC. F.P.C.1 I
Power Co.
Mulberry I1. Co. T.l.g. 3
160 IIo
F.P.L.C.
sulf U1II. Co. P.P.C. 0
0 3-
F.P.L.C.
MO sMO = rO
I IC 79 S
S.U. F.P.L.C.
Goo 4
400 600 2700
Orlado Pub. Sr. Co. F.P.S.C.
41 44
S.U. F.P.L.C.
Io0 2300

F.P. L.C.
290 S1- 0 0
Plant City Pub. ler. Ca. T.l.C.


Mulberry
Ieples

eoe Port Richey
Oechbeeill

OMeeclokee


Tampa
T-p
Orlido

Paenlathe

Perry

Plint City










Nome


Pompano
Port Tampa

Punts Gorda

St. Augustine

Sanford Iidod

Sanford 4 i.. N.W. of Sanford

Sarasota

Sears

Sebasti an

Stuart

Tar pa

Tarpon Spring@

Titusvl le


mattilta

Waldo

Wost Palm Beach

Winter Garden
lwnter Ivoen


F.P. L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.L C.

F P.L.C.

F.P. L.C.

T.E.C.


?oble 19 (Contlamu4)

S1924 1922 L923 1934 191 L926 1927 t192 1919 1930 1931 1932

Ac.F.P..L.C.


T.E.C. 4000 5 1913;
Incresed to 11500 1917.


S & IC F.P.L.C.


50 S 0
Atl.Land t Imp Co. T.E.C.
1600 S200 -
Cofnst.F.P.L.C.
2000 500 -
F.P.L.C.
1600 600-
S.U. F.P.L.C.
10000 -
Coeut.
2270 -
F.P.L.C.
-00 -
Const.
1)0 10 -
Mun. F.P.L.C.
IS IC
79 S F.P.L.C.
115 150 21500 21500 34000 -

450 5 F.P.C.
S.U. Pinerlls Co. Power Co.
245 120 -
200 IC 65 -
F.P.L.C.


60 IC
Umtllla P. Co.
32
Wldeo Lt. I Power PI.


F P.L.C.

F.P.L.C.

F.P.S.C.
T.t.C.


0
F.P.S.C.
'40
F.P.L.C.
100 -
F.P.L.C.


1000
Neifr lewee water lee I Lt. Co.


loeat lo Type Pfreent Omer i


- 3200

- 100

- 1600

- 10000

- 2270

- 500

- 130

- 120

- 34000

0

120
361

0

140

100

720
1000
T...
T.E.C.







Table 20


Net Output In Thousand at Kilowatt-hours


Type 1925 1926 127 192A 1929 1930 193t 1932


Apalachicola
Arcadia
Avon Park
Baldwin
Bayboro
Bel8 Glade
Benson Springs
Blountstown
Bonita Springs
Bradenton
Bronson
Cedar Key
Daytona Beach
Del ray
Dunnellon
Fernandina
Florida City
Ft. Myers
Ft. Pierce
Gainesville
Glades
Greenville
Ing Is
Jackson Iluff
Jacksonvi I Ie
Key West
Lake City
Lake Worth
Lakeland
Lauderdale


IC
s
S
IC
S
IC
s
IC
IC
S
IC
IC
S
IC
8
IC
IC
S

I 4 ItC
s
IC
S

S
IC
IC
iC
S
S


224 -15 -29
18.839
343 105 -8
20.735 35.590 45,142 22,106 24.349


121
II 29
2.401 151


13.457 14,955
498


1.310
68
9,284
545
60
808


4.358

58.721 72,829 82.690
2.326 2.100
2,009

7,475
90,074


673
40
14,930
800

45


39.016
154
17
519


787
-3
15.883
763
2
-10


124
-24
35,016
-e
14. 1 19

20.112
165
9
1.758
299
20
133
-1
21.969
857
0
151


4,798 4.987 5,245
46 245 811
64
44,695 49.062 36,302
2.205 26.767
85.802 88.500 92.296
2.005 1.884 2,016
2.844 3,034 3,290
2.559
7.153 7,143 7,494
128.381 136.011 141.492


Nme


435
-18
49,003
-10
19.154
3
2.330
130
0
602
288
93
448
-4
17.859
1.449
0
22
4.270
5.106
1.067
56
55,617
13.651
92.984
2.101
2.414
2,322
7,789
139.694


324
-19
18,419
-5
4.589

30.033
141
0
1.892
349
A4
204
-4
6.825
1.344
0
16
4.001
5.309
1.311
48
50,454
34.554
89.497
2.056
-8
2.376
7,667
142.870








Table 20 (Continued)


Live Oak
Mad Ison
Marianna
Marianna Hydro
Mayo
Miami
Miami Beach
Monticello
Moss Bluff
Naples
New Smyrna
Oak HI ll
Okeechobee
Orlando
Palatka
Perry
Plant City
Punts Gorda
St. Augustine
Sanford
Sanford (Old$
Sarasota
Sears
Sebastian
Stuart
Tampa
Tampa Hydro
Titusvl le
Wauchula
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


S
IC
S IC
H
IC
5
S
5
IC
H
IC
IC
IC
IC

S & IC
S
S
IC
S
IC
S
S
S
IC
S
IC
IC

S
H
S & IC
IC
S
S
st
1C
1C


452




0, 675
3.403

52



113
12,677
99

7 20 6
18.767
4.259
37.259
1.476
1.193
53

-2
54,653 94,882 112.276
2.602 696
87
839
7.653
2.570 1.423 179


II 2 43
444
1,476 Igl 727 1,284
906 Igl 525 96
57
8,202 2,642 2.875
-148 -80 -45
394
1.053 1.614 1.786
60 321


13

12,042
0


18.989
971
34.445
-8
732
380

0
139,319
1,892

665
3.436
42


24
0
1 1,834
0

5
18.603
1,125
37,910
-10
742
390
74
0
154.868
1.459
2
703
57
4


38

12.898
0
-3
2
15,522
409
38.078
-12
650
266
2

165,024
2,787

747
104
3


30 9
883 865
1.910 1,761
13 131
55 44
2.975 2.273
-100 -73
812 799
1.613 636
332 318
2,449
63 48
0 0
13,958 13,208
0 0
1 II
Abandoned
19.286 6,148
968 429
35.726 35.853
-7 0
77 27
134 0
4 4

129,900 119,466
2,176 574
I
788 616 (9 mo.)
271 150
2 23



































G U L F


M E X I C 0













FLO nDA

COMPOSITE MAP H4Ow-NG ALL 6ENEtATING
STATIONS AND TRAhtMISSION LNES


OF


LC 0

oCNTRATin STATaOIS




TVaNWIIOWM LINES

* U r* i M- m m soo- e -

-t w e-a o H ---






.41. bfla 4 4
ml- el.. a











ATLANTIC

OCEAN


t- ov






THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Florida ranks forty-sixth in the list of states in potential hydro power
resources, with 2o,ooo0 horsepower available ninety per cent of the time
and 3o.oool horsepower available fifty per cent of the time. Of this
amount of available power there had been developed as of December, 1930,
as.9551 horsepower.

The total installed capacity for the United States and for Florida
are shown graphically in Figure i. The rate of growth of the capacity
for the United States for the past ten years has been fairly constant.
In the case of Florida, however, it is found that while the rate of growth
in generating capacity was comparable to that of the United States during
the years 1911to1925 inclusive, during the year 1926 there was a marked
increase in the rate of growth, and the years 1927 and 1928 showaslight-
ly greater increase. In 1929 the rate of growth is less than for the
year 1936, and in 1930 and 1931 it is below the 1921-1925 value.

The slope of the graph for Florida over the whole period is steeper
than that for the United States, indicating that the rate of growth for
Florida during this period was greater than for the United States as a
whole. The percentage increase in generating capacity during this period
was 529 per cent for Florida and 231 per cent for the United States.

A better indication of the status of the electric light and power
industry is shown by the figures for installed kilowatts per capital. In
1920 the United States, with a population of 1o5,71o,62o0 persons had an
installed capacity of .1ia kilowatts per capital, while Florida, with a
population of 968,470 persons, had an installed capacity of .060 kilo-
watts per capital, or slightly less than fifty per cent of that for the
United States. In 1930 the United States, with a population of 122,775,
046' persons, had an installed capacity per capital of .272 kilowatts, an
increase of 119 per cent. In the same year Florida, with a population of
1,486,6252 persons, had an installed capacity per capital of .251 kilo-
watts, an increase of 318 per cent. Even though the growth for Florida
during the ten-year period had been almost three times that of the United
States as a whole, yet the installed capacity per capital for Florida was
still slightly more than eight per cent below the average for the United
States. This, however, does not indicate the need for additional capa-
city, for the present equipment produces only 1.819 kilowatt-hours per
kilowatt per year 11930o, whereas, the corresponding figure for the aver-
age of the United States is 2,876.

The graph (Figure 2) for the net kilowatt-hours generated in the
United States indicates an almost constant increase for the period 1921
to 1929, while that for Florida shows from the slope for several years
that the increase has not taken place at any regular rate, but varies
within rather wide limits. On comparing the information for the United
States and Florida, it is found that the increase in kilowatt-hours gen-
erated during the ten-year period 19o-193o, for the United States was
t3o per cent, while for Florida the increase was 418 per cent, or over
three and one-half times the average for the United States.

An examination of the per capital generation for the United States
discloses that the kilowatt-hours generated per capital for 1920 and 1930
were l3aad 781, respectively, while the corresponding figures for Flor-


IN..L.A. Statistical Bulletin.
2Fifteenth Census of the United States.






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 2t


FLORIDA


Installed Capacity in Kilowatts


32,.786
323.273
321,678


Hydro Internal
Combustion


2.040


5.240
6.450
6.450
6,450

16.600
14.250
14.250


20.761
23.293
23.519


Crnbinnt ion


7.785
7.066
8.466


Total


58,466
68.520
68.741
79,161
83,459
85.030
146,358
223. 122
314,47t
358,9)2
367,882
367,913


Table 22


UNITED STATES


Installed Capacity in Kilowatts


Year Steam Hydro Internal
(1,000 K4) (t,000 KW) Combustion
(1,000 KV)


19201
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
19272
1928
1929
1930
1931


23,699
24.665


8,445
9, 142


Combination Total
(1,000 KV) (1.000 KV)


13,094
14,399
15,483
15.971
17,369
19.519
23.619
25,398
25,437
30,330
948 33,404
935 35,086


1L920-26 U.S. Geologinli Survey, Water Supply Paper No. 579.
21927-S3 flectrical Forld January, 1929-30-31-32.


YeIr Steam


19201
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
19272
1928
19Y.9
1930
1031








THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Table 23


FLORIDA

Net Kilowatt-Hours Generated


Fuels
(1,000 KWH)

1 19,641
134,232
151,257
173.092
207,443
307.315
491,451


650.1283
635,898
616,299


Hydro
(t,000 KWH)

12,090
10.459
9,113
9,220
10.845
10.819
18.219


20.205
51,617
33.701


Table 24


UNITED STATES


Net Kilowatt-Hours Generated


Fuels
(t,000,000 KWH)

27.405
26.005
30,447
36.322
39,045
43.514
47,602


1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931


Hydro
(1,000,000 KWH)

16.150
14,971
17.206
19.343
19.969
22,236
26.189


Total
(t,000,000 KWH)

43.555
40.976
47,653
55.665
59.014
65,750
73.791
79.5882
A7.850
97,352
95.936
92.225


11920-26 U.S. geological Survey, Water Supply Paper No. 579.
21927-2 Electrical World, January, 1929-30-31-32.
53929-31 Difference between total and hydro.
41929-31 N.E.L.A. Statistical Bulletins, Mos. 5,6,7,8.


Year


19201
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1950
1931
1932


Total
(4,000 KWH)

132.631
144,691
160.410
182,312
218,288
318.134
509.670
605,0002
636.576
670,333
687.515
650,000
610.000






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 25


FLORIDA


Miles of Transmission Lines


Total

81
227
561
1.312
2,401
2,516
2.601
2.756
2.871
,.8 77


NOTEs The above totals include the transmission lines of the following
companies: Florida Power Cnrporation. Florida Power and Light Company,
Florida Public Service Company, and Tampa Electric Company.


- te
Soolraea 800


19o0 "t34 l920
solo &06 t
rio.rf ,
lafIteI d l eei rsI eaersiass CepoIest i. K1i***ei,


sell


Yenr






THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY 33

ida were 137 and 467 respectively. These figures indicate an increase
of 89.5 per cent for the United States and an increase of 437 per cent
for Florida over the ten-year period.

The population density of Florida was only 26.61 (19301 as compared
with 41.31 for the United States as a whole. That 48.31 per cent of the
population of Florida is rural accounts in part for the fact that, not-
withstanding the above mentioned increase of 237 per cent, the per capital
generation for Florida was only 59.1 per cent as great as that for the
United States in 1930.


1920 1924 1928


1932


Figure 2

Net Kilovatt-Heur@ of Electrical Energy Generated


lFifteenth Census of the United States.






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Chapter II


THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY

The estimated consumption of electrical energy in Florida for the
years 1929-1932 inclusive, with the basis for these estimates, is shows
in Table a6. ihe total loss transmission plus distribution was sub-
tracted from the output giving the estimated consumption. The total loss
was-estimated as 233 of the total output. This percentage is based upon
the estimates of various officials and engineers. It is realized that
during the period covered in this table; improvements inelectrical appa-
ratus have been made which might reduce these losses. idoever, much old
equipment is still in use, while some of the distribution system are
poorly designed,and this tends to offset the effects of the lower losses
of modern equipment. Hesides, many of the transmission lines are oper-
ating at loads much lighter than those for which they were designed. This
too tends to increase the percentage of loss. Is viewof the above facts,
it was decided to use a constant percentage of loss for all years since
more detailed information could not be obtained.

The wealth of Florida is shown in Table 27. Yearly estimates of the
wealth could not be obtained, nor were data available over enough years
tu show the general trend. All of these data were taken from the World
Almanac for 1930, 1931, and 1933.

Table aM gives the population of Florida for 1920, i93S, 1928, and
1930.
Table 26


Consumption of Electrical Energy
by Years 1920-1932


Output *
(1t00 KWH)



132.631
144.691
160,410
182.312
218.288
318.134
509,670
605.000
636.576
670.333
687.515
690,000
610.000


Losses
(Estimated)
(2)0 I)
(1000 KWH)


30,500
33,100
36.800
41,900
90,200
73.200
117,000
139.000
146,000
154.000
158,000
150.000
140.000


in Florida


Consumption
(Output minus
losses)
(1000 KM)


102,131
111.591
123.610
140.412
168,088
244.934
392,670
45, 000
490.576
516,333
529.515
500.000
470.000


*Output figures, 1920-26,
Output figures, 1927-32,
Vorld for tach year.


from U.B.G.S. Water Supply Paper No. S79.
from the January issue of the Electrical






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


The data of these three tables (26,27,28) are shown graphically in
Figure 3. As would be anticipated from the information given on the gen-
eration of electrical energy, a rapid increase in the consumption is in-
dicated during the period 1925-g219. The graph forconsumption (Figure 31
shows a similarity to that for generation (Figure 2) and both show a de-
crease during the years 1931 and 1932. The graphs of the wealth and pop-
ulation both show increases for the period covered, but not enough data
are available to warrant a detailed discussion. It should be noted, how-
ever, that during the period shown the wealth and population increased
less than so per cent, while the consumption of electrical energy during
the same period increased over 400 per cent.

A list of the distribution systems in the State and their owners,
classified according to counties, is shown in Table 29. The number of
distribution points in each county gives some indication of the population
and its distribution where the population is spread over the entire area,
there are usually a relatively larger number of points of distribution.

Table 27


Wealth of Florida*

Year Amount

1923 (Census Estimate) $2,440.491,000
1928 (Estimated) 2.887.000,000
1929 (Estimated) 2,905,000,000


Data taken from the World Almanac.


Table 28


Population of Florida

Year Number

1920 (Census I 968,470
1925 (State Census 1.26.3549
1928 (World Almanac, estimated) 1,411.000
1930 ICensusI 1,466,625






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


a letrical Energy in 100,000,000* Kilowatt-Hours
b Wealth in t,000,00Q,00s of Dollars
Population in t,000,Cs Persons


































1920 1924 1928 1932

Figure 3

Consumption of Electrical Energy, Wealth and Population in Florida







THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY

Table 29


Distribution Bystems of Florida


Owner


Place


ALACHUA COUNTY

Alachua
Archer
Evinston
Gainesville
Gainesville
suburbs
Hawthorne
High Springs
Island Grove
Melrose
Micanopy
Newberry
Naldo

BAKER COUNTY


Macclenny

BAY COUNTY

Fountain
Lynn Haven
Ml Iville
Panamq City
St. Andrews


BREVARD COUNTY (CONTINUED)


M.
F.P.C.
F.P.C.
M.

F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.C.
F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.C.
M.
F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.


G.P.C.
*i


Pineda
Rockledge
Sharpes
Titusville


BROWARD COUNTY

Danla
Davis
Deerfield
Ft. Lauderdale
Hallendale
Oakland Park
Pompano

CALHOUN COUNTY

Blountstown

CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Charlotte Harbor
Cleveland
Punta Gorda


RRAOFORD COUNTY CITRUS COUNTY


Hampton
Lawtey
Starke


BREVARD COUNTY

Bonaventure
City Point
Cocoa
Cocoa Beach
Eau Gallie
Frontenac
Gesorgianna
Indialantic Beach
Indianola
Indian River City
La Grange
Malabar
Melbourne
Melbourne Beach
Merritt
MIms


F.P.L.C.
"





F.P.L.C.

n
"

a
if
n


el

it


tl

fl
1


Crystal River
Felicia
Floral City
Hernando
Homosassa
Inverness

CLAY COUNTY


F.P.C.


Green Cove Springs K.E.C.
Keystone Heights "
Penney Farms F.P.L.C.


COLLIER COUNTY


Naples


COLUMBIA COUNTY


Lake City


F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.


Place


F.P.L.C.


F.P.L.C.
n




n




S.S.P.C.



F.P.L.C.

a'






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Ploce OMner

DADE COUNTY

Slack Point F.P.L.C.
Coral Galbir
Florida City
Fulford
Golden Beach
Goulds n
Hialeah "
Holly ood "
Homestead M.
Kendall F.P.L.C.
Miami N
Miami Beach
Miami Shores
Mimi Springs
Naranja
Ojus N
006 Lockla
Perrine "
Peters N
Princeton
Red I nds
Rockdale N
Silver Palm City n
South Miami "

DESOTO COUNTY

Arcadia F.P.L.C.
srownville N
Ft. Ogden
Nocatee

DIXIE COUNTY

Cross City F.P.C.

DUVAL COUNTY

Baldwin F.P.L.C.
Jacksonville M.
Jacksonville Beach M.

ESCAMBIA COUNTY

Century G.P.C.
Pensacola "
Warrington "

FLAGLER COUNTY

Bunnell F.P.L.C.
Flagler Beach


Place

FRANKLIN COUNT

Apalachicola
Carrabel le

GADSOEN COUNT


TY




Y


Geeensboro
Havana
Hinson
Midway Priv
ulincy

GILCHRIST COUNTY

Trenton

GLAOES COUNTY

Moore Haven

GULF COUNTY

Port St.Joe
Wewahitchka

HAMILTON COUNTY

Jasper
Jennings
hilte Springs

HAROEE COUNTY

Bowling Green
Gardner
Torrey
Wauchu I
Zolfo Springs

HENRY COUNTY

La Belle
Sears

HERNANDO COUNTY

Brooksville
Croom
Istachatta
Nobleton

HIGHLANDS COUNTY

Avon Park
Istokpoga


Owner



F.P.C.




F.P.C.


lately Owned
M.


F.P.C.



M.



F.P.C.
M.



F.P.C.
N




F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
M.
F.P.S.C.



F.P.L.C.




F.P.C.



N


F.P.S.C.
M






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Owner


Place


HIGHLANDS COUNTY (CONTImwuO)


Lake Placid
Sebring


F.P.S.C.
M.


HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY


Dover
Hopewel
Kingsgrove
Plant City
Port Tampa
Seffner
Sidney
Tampa
Temple Terrace
Thonotosassa

HOLMES COUNTY

Sonifay
Ponce de Leon


T.E.C.
*


Leesburg
Mascotte
Minneola
Mount Plymouth
Montverde
Mount Dora
Okahumpka
Sorrento
Tavares
Umatilla
Yalaha


LEE COUNTY


G.P.C.
10


INDIAN RIVER COUNTY


Fellsmere
Sebastian
Wabasso


JACKSON COUNTY

Alford
Bascom
CampbelIton
Cottondale
Gracev lle
Greenwood
Marianna
Sneads

JEFFERSON COUNTY


Aucilla
Monticello


F.P.L.C.






S.S.P.C.
S.S.P.C.
G.P.C.
5.5.P.C.
G.P.C.
S.S.P.C.
S.S.P.C.
F.P.C.



F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.


LAFAYETTE COUNTY


F.P.C.


LAKE COUNTY

Altoona F.P.S.C.
Clermont 5
Eustis
Groveland
Howey-In-the-Hills "
Lady Lake F.P.C.
Lake Gem F.P.S.C.


Bonita Springs
East Ft. lers
Fort Myers
Tice

LEON COUNTY

Tallahassee

LEVY COUNTY

Bronson
Cedar Keys
Chiefland
Hardee Town
Inglis
Raleigh
WIll ston
Yankeetown

LIBERTY COUNTY

Bristol

MADISON COUNTY

Greenville
Lee
Madison

MANATEE COUNTY

Anna Maria
Bradenton
Cortez
Ellenton
Listvlle
Manatee
Onaco
Palms Sola
Palmetto
Parrish
Terra Cela


Place


Owner


M.
F.P.S.C.





F.P.C.
F.P.S.C.



FP.L
n
n




F.P.L.C.
n
"l


F.P.C.



it


S.S.P.C.



F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.



Is
N

N

M5







THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Pln:e


VARION COUNTY

Anthony
Candler
Cit ra
DunnelIon
East Lake
Fairfield
F emington
I rv ine
Kendrick
Lake e#ir
Lowell
Mclntosh
Oca Ia
Oklawaha
Orange Lake
Realick
Sparr
StAnton
Summerf field
weirsdale

MARTIN COUNTY

Golden Gate
Jensen
Olympi a
Palm City
Port Sewall
Rio
Salerno
Stuart

OQONRO COUNTY


Key west


NASSAU COUNTY

Callahan
Fernandina
HI liard
Ocean City
Yulee

OKALOOSA COUNTY

Camp Walton
Crehtvie*
Lairel Hill
Nicevi ll
Valparais

OKEE'cHOttt: rTV


Owner



r.P.C.













M.
F.P.C.











F.P. L.C.












K. A.E.C.




F. P.L.C.
S.S. P.C.
11





























:.P.L.C.
S. S.P.C.
F.P.L.C.
S.S.P.C.
F.P.L.C.


G.P.C.


Okeechobee


Place


ORANGE COUNTY

Apopka
Conway
Fairville
Lockhart
Maitland
Oakland
Ocoee
Orlando
Orlo Vista
Piedmont
Pinecastle
Plymouth
Iaft
Tangerine
Windermere
Winter Garden
Winter Park
Ze Ilwood

OSCEOLA COUNTY

Campbell
Inter Ocean City
Kissimmee
St. Cloud

PALM BEACH COUNTY

Belle Glade
Boca Raton
Boynton Beach
Canal Point
Delray Beach
Greenacres City
Hypoluxo
Jupiter
Kelsey City
Lake Worth
Lantana
Palm Beach
Riviera
South Bay
West Palm Beach

PASCO COUNTY

Dade City
Denham
Elfers
Lacoochee
New Port Richey
Odessa
Port Richey
Trilby
ZephyrhillIs


F.P.S.C.







M.
*

F.P.S.C.














F.P.S.C.

M.
M.




F.P.L.C.





F..LC


II


T.E.C.
F.P.C.


E.P.L.C.






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Ploce


PINELLAS COUNTY

Anona
Bel ealre
Clearwater
Crystal Beach
Dunedin
Aulfport
Indian Beach
Junction
Indian Rocks
Largo
Ozona
Palm Harbor
Pasadena
Pass-a-Grille
Pinellas
Safety Harbor
St.Petersburg
Seminole
Tampa Shores
Tarpon Springs
Wall Springs


Owner



F.P.C.
"t

I,
ft









N
n










T.E.C.
F.P.C.
F.P.C.
"


"


M
N


POLK COUNTY


Alturas
Auburndale
Babson Park
Bartow
Bradley Junction
Brewster
Davenport
Dundee
Eagle Lake
Ft. Meade
Frostproof
Green day
Haines City
Hesperides
Highland Park
Home I and
Lake Alfred
Lake Hamilton
Lake Wales
Lakeland
Loughman
Morris
Mountain Lake
Mulberry
Nichols
Pauway
Pembroke
Phoemico
Pierce
RIdgewood
Romeo
Royster


F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
M.
T.E.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
M.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
T.E.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.
T.E.C.
T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.


Place


Owner


San Gully
Swift
Templeton
Waverly
West Lake Wales
Winter Haven

PUTNAM COUNTY

Crescent City
East Palatka
Interlachen
Keuka
Palatka
Pomona
San Mateo City
Welaka

ST. JOHNS COUNTY

Elkton
Hastings
St.Augustine


T.E.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
T.E.C.



F.P.L.C.














N
M


F..LC


ST.LUCIE COUNTY

Ft. Pierce M.
White City F.P.L.C.

SANTA ROSA COUNTY


MIIton

SARASOTA COUNTY

Bee Ridge
Englewood
Fruitvill e
Laure I
Nokomi s
Osprey
Sarasota
Vamo
Ven Ice

SEMINOLE COUNTY

Altamonte Springs
Cameron City
Chuluota
Geneva
Lake Mary
Lake Monroe
Longwood
Oviedo
Paola
Sanford


G.P.C.


F.P.L.C.
N


N
N








F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.









Place


THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Owuer Place


SUMMER COUNTY

Bushnell
Center Hill
Co leman
Oxford
Sumterville
Webster
Wildwood

SUWANEE COUNTY


Branford
Live Oak
wel born


TAYLOR COUNTY


Perry


UNION COUNTY

Lake Butler

VOLUSIA COUNTY

Allandale
Barbervi le
Benson Springs
Beresford


M.
F.P.C.


F.P.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.



F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.


Daytona Beach
Del and
Deland Junction
DeLeon Springs
Eldrldge
Glenwood
Holly Hill
Lake Helen
Mission City
New Smyrna
Oak Mill
Orange City
Ormond
Osteen
Pierson
Port Orange
Seville
Wilbur


Oter

F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
M.
F.P.L.C.
M.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C,
F.P.L.C.
F.P.S.C.
F.P.L.C.


WAKULLA COUNTY

None

WALTON COUNTY

DeFunlak Springs G.P.C.
Lakewood G.P.C.

WASHINGTON COUNTY


Chipley


G.P.C.







THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


USE OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY IN MANUFACTURING

The Statistics on the power equipment used in manufacturing in Flor-
ida and the United States for the years 1889 to 1929 inclusive are shown
in Tables 30 and 31. The total horsepower of the prime movers is sepa-
rated into the several types. The horsepower of the electric motors dri-
ven by energy generated by the companies reporting and the horsepower of
electric motors driven by purchased electrical energy are also shown.

Attention should here be called to the fact that in this and the
following sections, the ratings of all prime movers and electric motors
are given in terms of horsepower, while the ratings of the generators in
the preceding sections were given in kilowatts. This is standard prac-
tice and attention is called to it merely to avoid confusion. The rela-
tion between the horsepower and the kilowatt is: i horsepower equals
0.746 kilowatts, or i kilowatt equals 1.34 horsepower.

Figure 4 shows the graphs of the horsepower of prime movers, the
horsepower of electric motors driven by purchased electrical energy and
the horsepower of electric motors driven by energy generated by Florida
manufacturing establishments. The growth of the horsepower of prime
movers used in manufactures was fairly steady from 1889 to 1919. It then
decreased sharply until 1925, when another period of increase began, last-
ing until 1929.

The use of electrical energy in the manufactures of Florida began
in 1889, but it was not until after 1909 that any rapid advancement was
made. Between 1919 and 1925 the installed horsepower of electric motors
using purchased electrical energy increased quite rapidly. This advance-
ment was made at the expense of the installed horsepowerof prime movers.
The horsepower of electric motors driven by generated energy increased
very slowly up to 1925. A marked increase took place during 1928, but
during 1929 some of this increase was lost. From 1925 to 1929 the horse-
power of prime movers and the horsepower of electric motors driven by
purchased energy both show increases. however, the change in the horse-
power of motors using purchased energy was much more rapid and the indi-
cation is that soon the horsepower of these motors will exceed that of
the prime movers used in manufactures.

The corresponding graphs for the United States, (Figure 5) show
practically the same variations except that they are more steady. The
installed horsepower of motors using purchased electrical energy in 1929
exceeded that of the prime movers.

A comparison of the graphs for Florida and the United States indi-
cates that Florida has been slower to electrify manufactures than the
United States as a whole. During the period 1919 to 1929 the increase in
the horsepower of motors using purchased energy in Florida was 298 per
cent, while in the United States the Increase was 139 per cent. In 1929,
46 per cent of the power machinery in Florida was driven by electric mo-
tors using purchased energy and in the United States the average figure
was 51 per cent. These figures are an approximation arrived at by divid-
ing the horsepower of motors using purchased energy by the sum of the
horsepower of the prime movers.










Table 30


Power Equipment of Florida Manufacturina Industries

[Compiled from Censuses of the U.8.)


Prime Movere-Installed Capacity

Steam Turbines Internal Combustion
and Engines Engines
HP. HP.


93,934
86.724
86, 157
S11.285
84,708
38.267
15.479


10.732
14,421
11,667
4,609
1,497
213
63


Llicttic Motor Capacity


Water Whemls
and
Water Turbines
HP.



795
II
239
171
1.102
496


JrLven by
Purchased
Energy
HP.


88,029
75,640
46,346
22.368
3,353
162
13


Driven by
Energy Generated
by Company
Reporting
HP.

28,077
30.009
13,163
12,475
4.210
140
3


Notet figures for 1919 and earlier are not strictly comparableto those for later years be-ause
of the change from SOO to 15,000 in the minimum value-of-products Limit.


Total HP.


1929
1927
1925
I119
1909
1899
1889


104.666
101,940
97,835
116, 133
86.376
39.582
16.038








Table 1S


Power Equipment of United States Manufacturing Induetries

(Compiled from Censuses of the U.S.)


Prim Movere--Installed Capacity


Electric Motor Capacity


Total HP. Steam Turbines Internal Combustion
and Engines Engines
HP. HP.


20,155,397
19,693 371
19,903,800
20,043,170
18,406,175
16,802,706
9,778,418
5,866,084


17.361,926
16.923.931
16,916,856
17,036.210
15,591,171
14,228.632
8,189,564
4.581.595


1,233.853
1,170,744
1,186, 116
1,241.829
988.591
751,186
134,742
8.950


Water Wheels
and
Water Turbines
HP.


1.559.618
1,508.666
1.800.828
1,765,131
1,826,413
1.822.888
1.454.112
1,255,206


Driven by
Purchased
Energy
iP.


22,775,664'
19.132.310
15.868.828
9,284,499
5.884,724
1,749,031
182.562
88,571


Driven by
Energy Generated
by Company
Reporting
HP.

12.376,276
11.219.979
10,254,745
6,969,203
4,938,530
3,068,109
310,374
15,569


Notel Pigures for 19t9 and earlier are not strictly comparable to those for later years because
of the change front SO00 to SS,000 in the minimum value-of-products limit.






46 THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

By another deduction, which although sot entirely accurate might be
considered approximately so, it is found that 60 per cent of the manufac-
tures of Florida are electrified, as against 82 per cent of those of the
United States. The method of obtaining these figures was as follows:
the sme of the horsepower of electric motors using purchased electrical
energy and the horsepower of the motors using generated energy gives the
total horsepower of electric motors used in manufacturing; the sue of the
horsepower of prime mov-rs and the horsepower of motors using purchased
energy gives the total horsepower used in manufacturing; dividing the
first sum by the second s,,m givesavery good approximation as to the per
cent of elecTrification.

t130 H.P.

a Prime ov- 7 S
b otors Dri-e. by Purchased lectricol Energy
e Motors Drli4. uy 3onerot*e Electrical Energy

o ?-.-.- _. .-- . . : i- _





no o
800














40 .
-- - ..- ,
















20 .. .. --.--- ... -... /1






tI89 1.99 t909 1919 1919

Figure 4
Power Equipment of Florida Manufactur e
/ .... -*- c- --V ,ti--i













Power Equipment of Plorido Jnanufqctur~







THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY 47


24 -- -.. .. ... .
a Prime Movers --
b Motors Driven by Purchased Electrical. Energy
c Motors Driven by Generated Electrical Energy
SScale 1,000,000s of Horsepower *
20- .
.. -....... t-. .....



I-
..... ..".. -... ....... .... ......: -.
. ... I













F





4I I







1889 1899 1909 1919 1929

Figure S

Power Equipment of United States Manufactures


A reproduction of page 6 of the Fifteenth Census of the Unsted States
t(knufactures 1ig9, State Series) is given as Table 32. This is present-
ed here to give the detailed statistics on the various types of manufac-
tures in Florida. the ice manufactures have the greatest amount of in-
stalled horsepower of electric motors driven by purchased electrical en-
ergy. The railroad shops have the next greatest amount. The lumber and
timber products manufactures have the largest amount of installed prime
mover horsepower.










THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA



Table 32

6 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES: 1929

T..L. 12.-GENERAL STATISTICS FOR THE STATE, BY INDUSTRIES: 1929




'"r i. .". "-u '"",- S '.ss ., I :C ""







Awl angs, tents, sas, d cn ,vers 2 t 10i 43 r Mf,9 2s1m or



aBnd . ........ 1 '7 1, t..
..^ . . ---- - 1- 1l 1 n I 1, .. .. U
Ott Onatnis. toast 0.0 L. t ta 0,10 106 r-- t 0 s4 a t 2 43544 1 it,7 O a t.ta3 .aS7 a 4ot.a,4 1itt 2as, 26

,,tkatodeotsoid ..l. t .os not 1n dn

'_ to ... 3.1S7 1 718,1t7 e. 4, 9 2 9,.0 i 1 .. .0



OstaI. o -447d t7 n a r t,- 1 3.1..7
% t a t. 004 IN.s.I Mn 246. a 1..
3-. 2a .. a ts 7 1 1 5.4 12 a 4. 2. 1 2,1




1 l 3 1 30 S 8 .1 A
o 17 3 ts 37 ts taro t9. oa J iates 03650 estrt 48,056










1' b,',,7,.. .t.. .0" .'' I| ItB3 311b2 [B,3
*."..;* .14 I. 112 .... 1... m N *' s s ruas
7 0 O ta 4 1 M S5 70173424 429,(M,,7 11 48 4 4214 m 44k







ou The r el~tan ior Di a u an srt, 0 0 in t 3fo ts ]tota niosos 430,0n 86 0
to .1 37 1..: 1.2 M M iMiIr 2a 1t29ot I a Ia af 1T 14, 4740 te a ti 0013
.I^ N.7 476 4, 64 2,7. rB m7 w 4 am 0 4B,

I. o 1------ -- .. 1 1 ,312 2, 4048 A 0 .234



44 Ott an 1, 2400 2ta601 0,tM771 938 0.4 K -4.2,4Mt A0.,08
.... et in tr6 18 .442 04.73 2.086 20 S4 78. ,403 282.4,




------------o ---rt--0 .8 .0 510i inns 3.70 4 8 0 7 t. tEtoi




.. ... .. -------- k m 7% V. B. 1 I l 17.



S. ^ 3 a 14 A la 8,2 w i 3.141 100,7

3 toA I t. 04 s"to4,sao MOme 14.00 2 4,0110 a3,t B3 2 i2.37
S o1 7 o 1 033,40. 03 8 000 3 S, 9084 20.94
S d .smenovnti^ IX k M1131...--- It 15710 I m.Wl S.30 1.M 433I7 12,1
710 1.01 es torts n 2331.342 12 73 s ma k
.. i. 05 0p1 7.3 0 ,54=5 1I3BS i.nM1 l44,48





_u =B U ind P4od0ct5oa Cmr.a4.
0 04t HaldB 4,020 0,or .03 (mploye- of omt1 0087o61i .offlcM, 27200w.






N.,. 4 1w, No d k oo
o1nu~rI 27lwl a .434 in bin as
Vla ittolr~f lm peadorors in ns tat raitta toe~ pedati 405,5 osttatetso 8.teayU TaOS: Sta si s rotastf ea. e i
ti~2 ttso 4.4232e.OyIoFsin omastoia ataatsoa58Ey.07o-Pnm6..3
a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 Wotttta tivt n9.Oaca4aat4atsiedatafua t uat.. taassa2L~.is 6






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Table 33 shows, for Florida, the wages, other costs of manufactur-
ing, value of products, estimated cost of electrical energy; the ratio
between the cost of electrical energy and wages, and the ratio between
the cost of electrical energy and the value of the products. This infor-
mation is given for the entire State and for individual counties. The
estimate of the cost of electrical energy is based upon the average cost
to manufacturers of purchased energy per kilowatt-hour and the number of
kilowatt-hours per county purchased for manufactures.


Table 33


Manufactures of Florida* -
*k.
County Wages Other Costs Value of Cost of Elec- *
of Products trick Energy -gi
Monufoctur- Purchased o
ing (estimated) o 0
0 0-
OUu


C
sou
c-.

a- 0o
0.-
o 0
OUU&
00


STATE
TOTAL S54,582,198
Alachua 792.821
Baker 264,895
8ay 607.243
Bradford 142,727
Brevard 194,907
Broward 193.635
Calhoun 195,955
Charlotte 36.696
Citrus 44.710
Clay 122.176
Columbia 208,181
Oade 3.318,501
DeSoto 459.813
Ouval 7,015,448
Escambia 2,431.901
Flagler 195.277
Franklin 526,574
Gadsden 1,106.200
Gilchrist 59,799
Gulf 174.527
Hamilton 219,903
Hardee 47,205
Hernando 75,580
Highlands 502.363
Hil ls-
borough 15,027.406
Holmes 143,375
Indian River 28,129
Jackson 270.317
Jefferson 333,957
Lafayette 60.680
Lake 56.,133
Lee 208.193
Leon 589,098
Levy 527.343


$96.898.240
2,368,152
272.178
368,124
107,480
206.444
252.841
188, III
63.430
38,096
66,127
245.891
4,979,624
655.680
32.944.159
4.354.368
119.354
324.053
932.528
70.966
169.306
196.210
42.982
91,696
456,153

23,569,937
179.147
23,385
924,006
258.846
30.153
619,738
270,577
811,780
467,905


S232,386,427
4.068.673
750,544
1.288,775
376.228
640.042
767.548
613.805
165,405
126,759
274,405
662.997
14,708,222
1.558,684
59,521,101
10.375,898
436,945
1,455,414
3,080,639
179.157
445,743
542,215
160,662
261.491
1.558,123

58,395.138
548,140
83,476
1.517.724
324,713
120,138
1,789,513
786,027
2,049.974
1.538,685


$2,040,000 3.74
35.600 4.49


1.120
99
10. 100
26.600
376
10.700

442
7,250
310,000
19,300
326.000
83.300
172
3.670
2.550
43

2.280
3.990
1,840
1.390


0.18
0.07
9.30
7.28
0.19
29.60

0.36
3.48
9.35
4.20
4.17
3.35
0.09
0.70
0.25
0.07

1.04
8.46
2.43
0.28


293,000 1.95

3,530 16.80
4,820 1.77
5,970 1.79


20,300
37,200
10,300
176


3.57
17.86
1.75
0.03


*Compiled from Fifteenth Census of U.S. Manufactures: i929.


0.88
0.87

0.09
0.03
3.85
3.47
0.06
6.48

0.17
1.10
2.11
1.54
0.55
0.80
0.04
0.25
0.08
0.02

0.42
2.49
0.70
0.09

0.50

4.23
0.32
0.73

1.13
4.73
0.50
0.01






THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 33 (Continued)


County Wages Other Colts Value of Cost of Elec- -.,
Products tried Energy o

Liberty $204,481 5135.168 $524.766
Madison 187.453 334,339 735.443 13.800 2.03
Manatee 580,473 828,336 2.437,088 8.000 1.38
Marion 515.673 786.850 2.027.539 21.400 4.15
Martin 137,679 104,412 333.916 399 0.29
Monroe 648.404 888.140 2,267,993 5.680 0.88
Nassau 272,873 323.506 919,974 12,700 5.59
Okaloosa 72,461 52.548 163,851 2,210 3.05
Orange 741,979 1.253.608 3,695.845 88.800 11.97
Osceola 686,476 724.442 2,144.695 1,770 0.26
Palm each 662.235 1.034.529 3.152,498 71.400 10.78
Pasco 793.979 427,627 1.821,823 5.400 0.68
Pinellas 967,783 1.792.558 5.207.096 144.000 14.68
Polk 1.848.549 3.154,739 7,685,423 110.000 5.95
Putnam 777,702 828,298 2.351,356 12.400 1.59
St.Johns 700.474 557,993 2,146.773 46.200 6.59
St.Lucie 144.223 311,690 697.620 36.900 25.60
Sarasota 168.110 163.616 537.388 4.070 2.42
Seminole 602.100 1,332,259 3,034.534 127.000 21.10
Sumter 262.640 202.467 594.181 1,550 0.59
Suwannee 326.285 242.914 884,183 1.390 0.43
Taylor 1,053,742 1.057.152 4.420,410 11.500 1.05
Union 156.511 259.030 661.374
Volusia 681.583 345.671 2.615.996 66.500 10.75
Wakulla 134.596 94,611 373.279
Walton 670.537 476,293 1.663.180 407 0.06
Washington 762.344 371,210 1,673.427 4,450 0.58


Other Coun-
ties" 2,284,149


1.662,796


5,966,777 23,500 1.03


*Collier, Dixie, Glades, Hendry, Okeechobee, and Santa Rosa.


u


o


a
+

0.52
0.33
1.06
0.12
0.25
I.38
1.44
2.40
0.08
2.26
0.30
2.76
1.43
0.53
2. 15
5.29
0.76
4.38
0.26
0.16
0.26

2.55

0.02
0.27

0.39








THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


The quantities of coal, coke, fuel oil and purchased electrical en-
ergy used in the manufactures of Florida per county in 1929 are shown in
Table 34. This information, together with that in fable 33, was taken
from the Fifteenth Census of the United States. Manufactures: 1929. The
data presented embrace 62 of the 67 counties of Florida; information
on the other counties was not collected because they included only very
small enterprises. Duval, Dade and dillsborough Counties led in the
consumption of purchased electrical energy for manufactures. Escambia
County led the State in the consumption of both anthracite and bitumi-
nous coal, while Duval County was first in the consumption of fuel oil.
The data for four of the counties listed (Collier, Gulf, lHolmes and Li-
berty) shows no purchase of electrical energy for manufactures in 1929.
These counties also used very little fuels in manufactures, with the ex-
ception of Gulf County which used 259,0oo gallons of fuel oil.


Table 34


Consumption of Fuel and
Electrical Energy in Florida*


County


STATE TOTAL
Alachua
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Browa rd
Calhoun
Charlotte
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Oade
OeSoto
Dixie
Ouval
Escambla
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
G IchrIst
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson


Coal
Anthra- Bitumi-
cite nous
(tons: (tons:
2,240 2,000
lbs.) lbs.l


Coke
(tons:
2,000
lbs.)


2.251 225.512 34,817
8.047 1.999
9
6
3
10 268




40
7.751 820
474 50

235 38.588 7.236
1,078 70,287 594

8 141
16 311 45

28
800

28


12
30 68,748 8,337
350
2
II 55


Fuel Oils,
Including
Crude Oils
and Sas Oils
Used as Fuel
(Gallons)


27.536.313
168.000
35.770
25.050
2.575
93.379


13,000
163,586
1.600
3.329,350
362.546

8,122,245
428,636

180.511
59. 113
7,820

259,000
20,000
27.454


47,240
5,061.129

2.290


Purchased
Electric
Energy
(Kilowatt
hours)


98.600.142
1,719.282
54,150
4,800
875,951
1.288.278
18,150
516.026
21.400

350.124
14.952.123
933,351
121.000
15,781.765
4.022.097
8.334
177,165
123,000
2,100
9,793

110,330
192.752
235.820
88,702
67,240
14, 176,033

170,740
232.709






THE ELECTRIC INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Coal
Anthro- Bitumi-
cite nous


Table 34 (Continued)


Coke ruel 01


Is


Jefferson
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
LiOerty
Mad ison
Manatee
Marion
Ma .tin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okee.lhubee
Orange
Osceoia
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucle
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
volusia
lI ton
Hashington


30
35 1.7RI
117


/0 881.847


*Data from Fifteenth Census of the U.S., Manufactures: 1929.


County


0


Purchased
Electric
Energy

288,050
998.806
1,792.069
499,585
8.505

183.333
386.515
1.032,267
19.250
274.744
615.619
106.995
731.865
4.249.921
85.497
3.444.870
260.393
6.930.723
5.297,981
599,945
2.237.915
1.783.270
39.000
196.286
6.154.545
75.125
67.253
556.240
3.217.812
19.647
214.901


6 45. 102
335 891 220 137.990
119 2.902 737 125.866
437 960.000
700
25.000
836 722 898.458
42 875 377 68.570
24.000
2.539 700 299,173
150 52 204.300
158

248 3,066 090, 135
36.260
1.697 2.'26 871.979
600
1.998 5.815 1.597.943
5.030 886 1.166.930
239 60 144.633
1,531 452 244.118
404 71,498
2,400
90 5.000
5.452 442 107.359
2.080 220.000
50


5






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Statistics on the Use of Electrical Energy
in Mines and Quarrles


The power equipment of the mines and quarries of Florida and the
United States are shown in Fables 35 and 36. I'hese data were taken from
the Census of Nines and Quarries of the United States for the years 1909,
1919, and 1929. In 1929 the schedule for the Census of Mines and Quar-
ries was changed, so for comparison the figures hadtobe adjusted. This
was done by subtracting from the figures for 1929 the items which had
been added, and subtracting from the previous years the figures for
items which had not been included in the Census for 1929. It was thus
possible to adjust all the figures for Florida, and those for the total
horsepower of prime movers and the horsepower of electric motors driven
by purchased electrical energy for the United States.

Figure 6 shows graphically forFlorida the changes in the horsepower
of prime movers, the horsepower of the motors driven by purchased electri-
cal energy, and the horsepower of the electric motors driven by energy
generated by the mining establishments. The horsepower of the prime mo-
vers increased rapidly between 1902and 1909. the period 1909-1919 showed
almost no change, and then during the years 1919 t 1929 there was an in-
crease of approximately 15 per cent. The graph for the horsepower of
motors using generated energy indicates a rapid increase from 1902 to
1919, hut only a slight increase during the 1919-1929 period. The graph
for the horsepower of electric motors driven by purchased electrical en-


Table 35


Power Equipment of Mines and Quarries
of Florida


Steam Engines
No. HP.


6.525
6.326
12.428
38.894
10.157


Steam Turbines
No. HP.


38,008
38,008
17,751


Internal Combustion
Engines
No. HP.


4.572
6.246
12.510
3,472
30


*Data on these lines may be compared.


I 80 938
I 80 979
34


Electric Motors
Driven by Pur-
chased Energy
No. HP.


57,199
58,427
2,280


Electric Motors
Driven by Gener-
ated Energy
No. HP.


32, 126
32,126
31,710
12,315
500


Electric
Generators

No. HP.

22 22,958
22 22,958


*Data on these lines may be compared.


Total HP. of
Prime Movers


1929"
1929
1919*
1909'
1902*


49. 185
50,660
42.689
42.366
10.357


Water Wheels
and Water
Turbines
No. HP.


1929*
1929
1919"
1909"
1902*






i4 THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

Table 36


Power Equipment of Mines and Ouarries of the United States
(Compiled from Censuses of U.S.Mines and Quarries)


Steam Engines
No. HP.



14,144 1.737.858

46.744 5.259,076

71,801 3,840,925

64,179, 2,432.963


Steam Turbines Internal Com-
No. HP. bustion Engines
No. HP.


794 684,878 4,421 274.208

505 474,315 57.417 1.372,698

23,799 528.264

13.506 259.695


Water Wheels and Elec.Motors Driven Elec.Motors Driven
Water Turbines by Purchased Energy by Generated Energy
No. HP. No. HP. No. HP.


4.467.959
46.081 123.811 4,771.818
1.558,752
41.524 41,114 1.629.580
205,489
115.620 5,070 216,103
19.764
60.897 23.556


34,024 1,552.981 1.609 736,489

33.039 1.260.466


14,342

2.893


507,624

130.494


LData on these lines may be compared.
2Data on these lines may be compnrad.


190t


1920


1930


Tigure 6
Power Equipmunt of Florida Mines and Ouarrie.


Total HP. of
Prime Movers


2.502,132
2.743.025
3,341,350
5,147,613
3,179,270
4,484,809
1.636.490
2.844,006


19291
1929
19191
1919
1909'
1909
19021
1902


19292
1929 125
19192
1919 329
19092
1909 1.220
19022
1902 980


Electric
Generators
No. HP.


1900


o Pritu MOTers i 1,000. of torsepower
b Ktoora Drihrn try Generated 1ecIltIcal Eaerrr la t,000m of Horsepower
c Motore Driven &y Purcthaled Electrical ~nergy l,000 of lorsrpo~ei-




I IIi I I II




; /1" [I ^^^^^/






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


ergy began at zero in 1909, increased slowly during the period to 1919,
and then increased with such rapidity that by 1929 the horsepower of
motors using purchased electrical energy exceeded by over 8,ooo the horse-
power of the prime movers in use.

The graphs for the horsepower of prime movers and the horsepower of
motors using purchased electrical energy in the mines and quarries of the
United States are shown in Figure 7. The prime mover graph shows a very
rapid increase from 190o to 1909. Between 1909 and 1919 the increase was
very small, and from 1919 to 1929 there was a marked decrease in horse-
power. The graph for the electric motors indicates a small gain from
1902 to 1909, a large increase between 1909 and 1919, and a still larger
increase between 1919 and 1929. In 1929 the horsepower of motors driven
by purchased electrical energy exceeded that of the prime movers by al-
most 2,ooo,ooo horsepower.










St.- -r ;.

r- -,, ir l i ii I -q-,T -- .
I i 1 1 I "- N E 1 I I I I I t I I n I.LI
was 6 4 p








Soto 3930
Ir gl re 7
Paws, Cquipseat of 98ted stages IIIes %ad QuorIast


In 1929, S4 per cent of the power equipment of Florida mines and
quarries was driven by electric motors using purchased electrical energy;
the corresponding figure for the mines and quarries of the United States
was 64 per cent.

By a deduction similar to that made in regard to manufactures, it is
found that on a horsepower basis 84 per cent of the mines and quarries of
Florida and 83 per cent of those of the United States, are electrified.





THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Tables 37 and 38 give the quantities and cost of fuels and purchased
electrical energy for the mines and quarries of Florida and the United
States for 1919 and 1929. The quantity figures are broken up into the
kinds of fuel, and the quantity of electrical energy generated by the
mines is given for 1929. The cost of fuel used in Florida mines and quar-
ries in 1919 was over 20 times the cost of purchased electrical energy
for the same period, but in 1929 the cost of purchased electrical energy
was 20 per cent greater than the cost of fuels. These 1919-1929 changes
represent an increase of over 1o00 per cent in the amount paid for pur-
chased electrical energy and a decrease of 43 per cent in the amount paid
for fuel.

The data for the Ulnited States indicate an even more pronounced
trend toward the use of purchased electrical energy. In 1919 the cost of
fuel for the mines and quarries of the United States exceeded the cost of
purchased electrical energy by almost 200 per cent, but in 1929 the cost
of purchased electrical energy exceeded the cost of fuel by almost 5o per
cent.

The consumption of fuels and purchased electrical energy for the
principal mining counties of Vlorida are shown in Table 39. These data
were taken fromthe Fifteenth Census of the United States; Nines and Quar-
ries: 1929. Polk County consumed by far the most electrical energy and
fuel, Gadsden County used the most coal, and Dade County the most gaso-
line and kerosene.

Table 40 gives a comparison of the figures for 1919 and 1929 for
Florida of the number of mines and quarries, persons engaged, salaried
employees, wage earners, salaries, ages, purchased electrical energy,
and the value of the products. The persons engaged, wage earners and
wages decreased slightly, while the other items increased. The number
of wage earners remained practically constant, which is rather remarkable
when one considers the large amount of power machinery which was intro-
duced during this period.

Statistics on the power equipment of the principal mining industries
of Florida are shown in Table 41. These mining industries include phos-
phate rock, limestone, clay and sand, and gravel. The phosphate rock in-
dustry has by far the largest amount of power equipment. This is to be
expected because Florida produces nearly 7s per cent of all the phosphate
rock mined in the United States. In the limestone quarries we find some
use made of water power, which is unusual in Florida.







THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Table 37


Consumption of Fuels and Electrical Energy
in Mines and Quarries of Florida


Fuel 1929

Anthracite coal
Long tons)
Bituminous coal 36,386
(short tors)
Coke (short tons)
Fuel oil (gals.) 26,361,007
Gasoline and kerosene
(gals.) 412,343
Natural gas
IM. cu. ft.

Purchased KWH 106,917.257
KWH generated
by companies 52,209.426
Total cost of fuel $963.386
Cost of purchased
electrical energy $1.146,590

*Adjusted for comparison to 1919.


1929*


33,136


26,308,364

257.229







$918.109

$1,117.616


Table 38


Consumption of Fuels and Electrical Energy
in Mines and Quarries of the United States


Fuel

Anthracite coal
(long tons)
Bituminous coal
short tons)
Coke (short tons)
Fuel oils (gals.)
Gasoline and
kerosene [gals. I
Natural gas
IM. cu. ft.)

Purchased KWH
KWH generated
by companies

Total cost of fuel
Cost of purchased
electrical energy


1929


5,223,195

8.825.007
136.896
169,985,047

16.565.785

25,536.328

5.382.178.325

2,080.612,1t6

$49,145,531

$71,769.087


*Adjusted for comparison to 1919.


19t9
(00
100

32,688

146
33,072, 102

487,620







$1.613,472

$74,224


1929*


5,219,391

8, 124,449
136.563
151,798,301

10.353,281

25.396.090






$44.693.267

$66.416.383


8.697.365

16,208.535
53,795
152,830,986

4,113.438

2,817.454






$74,081,877

$27.229,977





THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 3Q


Consumption of Fuels and Electrical Energy in Mines
and Quarries in Florida, by Counties, 19290


Fuel Oils Gosoline and
Kerosene
Sales. Gals.


31,416
52.043
2.025.432

2,062.536

22.059.908

129.670


5.732
166.795
40.205
25.781

40.300
94.525
9.000
32,005


Electrical Energy
Purchased Generated
KWH KWH


1,570.440
1.686.650
1.056.000
924.600
6.537.890
51.282
92,494,365
955,060
1.640.970


Table 40


Florida Mines and Quarries
1929 t9?29


S17.000
1.300.000

2,567.550

48.224.876


number of mines and
Persons engaged
Salaried employees
wage earners
Salaries
wages
Purchased electrical
Value of products


quarries 74
3.583
394
3.173
$986,795
$3,151.530
energy 1.146.590
$14,014,933


revised for comparison.


Table 41


Power Equipment of Florida Mines and Quarries*

Clay Limestone Phosphate Sand and
Rock travel


Steam Engines, HP.
Steam Turbines, HP.
Internal Combustion engines, HP.
Water wheels and turbines, HP.
Electric motors
Driven by purchased energy, HP.
Driven by energy generated
by mine reported, HP.
Electric generators, KW.


4.234
800 90
125 2.202
80


1.481
36,518
1.855


1,087 4.468 51.414

47 30.966
35 22.222


*Data taken from Fifteenth Census of U.S., Mines and Quarrlesi 1929.


County



Citrus
Dade
Gidsden
Hernando
Hi I lsboroul
Levy
Polk
Putnaw
Others


Coal-
Bituminous
(Short tons)

1.719
2.150
10,1531
1.335
)h
1,500
5.171
4.883
9.497


1919 Increase


65
3.449
372
3,061
1937.299
$3.045.821
1,117.616
S13.524.552


55
3.694
314
3.372
$666.202
$3.107.513
74,224
16.976.913


15.4
-6.6
18.5
-9.2
40.7
-2.0
1,405.7
50.7


1.005

1.674


1,228

435
242






THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY


Statistics on the Use of Electrical Energy on Florida Fares

The estimated total number of farms and the number of those served
with electrical energy in the United States and in Florida 1928 to 1933
inclusive, are given in Table q2. The data show that in 19a8 q.? per cent
of the farms of Florida were served with electrical energy and by 1930
the percentage had risen to6.2. The corresponding figures for the United
States were 7.2 per cent and 10.2 per cent respectively. The recent Nat-
ional Power Survey of the Federal Power Cmmission estimated that in 1933,
9 per cent of the farms of Florida and 11.5 per cent of the farm of the
United States were receiving electric service. This appears to show the
state in a fairly good condition until one considers that 60 per cent of
the farms in California and Rhode Island and 50 per cent of the farm in
six other states are served with electrical energy.

fhe figures for the 1928-1933 period shown increase of 90 per cent
in the number of farms of Florida receiving electric service and an in-
crease of 57 per cent for the United States, which indicates that electri-
fication is going forward more rapidly in Florida.

Table 42

Estimated number of Farms and Forms Served

UNITED STATES FLORIDA

Total Farms arms Served Total Forms Farms Served

1928 6,321.844 460.9692 5682 2,781
1929 6.305,2461 556.871 58.824 3.386
1930 6.288.6482 644.421 58,9662 3.647
1931 6,292,432 698,786 58,966 5,214.
1933 6,300,0003 725,0003 58.9663 5,306
Table 43 shows the amount paid by Florida farmers to the power com-
panies, the farm expenditures, percentage of expenditures paid for elec-
trical energy, the numberof electric motors for farm work, the number of
telephones, the number of farms and the farms with dwellings lighted by
electrical energy. These statistics are given by counties and for the en-
tire state, and were compiled from the Fifteenth Census of the United
States, Agriculture. The farmers of five counties did not pay anything to
the power companies for electrical energy; a glance at the table of dis-
tribution systemswill reveal poor facilities. Low population density and
lack of industries contribute to this situation and indicate a low living
standard.
On a basis of the number of farms served in 1929, the amount paid for
electrical energywasslightly less than eight dollarsper month per farm,
as an average for the State. This figure might sees high until one con-
siders the many fields inwhich electrical energy is adaptable. A partial
list included dairying, poultry raising, truck growing and citrus; and em-
braceswaterpumping, milking, incubation, refrigeration, heating, venti-
lating and grinding.

tStatintical Bulletin of N.E.L.A., 1929-1932.
2United States Census of Agriculture, 1930.
3National Power Survey, Federal Power commission, Interim Report,
Power Series L.
Interpoloted.





Table 43


Electrical Energy on Florida Farms

(Dta rompiles from the Fifteenth Census of U.S., Agriculturo)


County




STATE
TOTAL
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambla
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
GIIchrist
Glades


Electric
Light and
Power (Paid
to Companies,
1929)

$334, Ill
2,606

1.754
1,029
7,614
1,800
70
1,579
250
6,022
200
25
27,015
2,730
108
14,75.7
4,987
85

1,546
85
48


Form
Expenditures




$44,771,488
814,574
143,025
161,825
240.526
818,543
1.493.979
79,581
93,601
98,689
445,418
53,157
I18.544
3.278,593
463.579
36,292
1.251,119
371,620
272,672
2,052
975,778
140,017
75,399


Percentage of
Expenditures
Paid for
Electrical
Energy 1929

0.73
0.32
0.00
1.09
0.41
0.93
0. 12
0.01
1.47
0.25
1.35
0.36
0.02
0.83
0.58
0.05
1.77
1.34
0.03
0.00
0.16
0.06
0.06


Farm
Dwellings
Lighted
with Elee-
tricity


Elctrie
Motors
for Frrm
drr.rk



2,41
25
3
10
4
45
40
1
8
2


10
278
19

88
40
3

10
2


6.489
135
31
31
26
151
49
13
25
II
57
3
25
299
BI
7
229
101
15
IS

50
5
6


t930 bn
en


58,966 .
2,264 ?
461
216
921
633
938
579 .
93 "-
257
452
32 5
1,193
1,160
520 .
145
1,001
1,214
144
5
1,372
476
131


3,525
86
20
13
65
53
13
12
8

17
8
8
56
42
I
140
32
5

92
7
3






Table 43 (Continued)

County Electric rarm Percentage of Electric Telephones Dwellings Firms
Light and Expenditures Expenditures Motors Lighted
Power

Gulf 20,152 0.00 1 2 7 85
Hamilton 178 130.426 0.13 6 7 794
Hardee 2.015 437.331 0.46 2 29 74 1.063
Hendry 160 1.750.699 0.01 2 9 145
Hernando 2.808 190.711 1.47 25 43 64 561
Highlands 3.141 737.094 0.43 8 35 74 348
Hillsborough 20.387 2.182,594 0.93 155 228 4RO 2.409
Holmes 18 210.400 0.01 26 3 1.S6 o
Indian River 3.081 747.904 0.41 6 23 104 425
Jackson 1.458 682.516 0.21 9 40 60 3.802
Jefferson 999 202.940 0.49 10 32 40 1.294 z
Lafayette 30 57.573 0.05 I 3 3 460
Lake 14,066 2,409.161 0.58 96 180 425 1.981
Lee 1.365 724,676 0.19 20 32 56 582
Leon 1.259 245.681 0.51 18 41 35 1.576 .
Levy 117 114.980 0.08 2 50 69 900 -
Liberty 42.196 0.00 4 3 13 272
Madison 653 329.014 0.20 5 67 50 1.428
Manatee 11.390 1.412.950 0.81 69 175 172 911
Marion 8.744 1.286,277 0.68 63 10' 212 2.175
Martin 543 234,309 0.23 8 13 39 180
Monroe 226 20.070 1.1I 5 2 4 43 :
Nassau 763 278.454 0.27 16 26 is 403
Okaloosa 998 168.922 0.59 3 17 7 981 '
OkeechoDee 411 84.565 0.49 I 30 26 269
Orange 39.050 2,127,637 1.64 289 231 535 1.608
Osceola 3.130 268,069 1.17 20 23 64 497
Palm Beach 10.197 1.396,201 0.73 128 26 169 874
Pasco 1.848 403.834 0.46 29 51 102 783
Pinellas 15.827 1.350.349 1.17 134 147 270 745
Polk 46,869 4.934,336 0.95 298 129 793 4,667
Putnam 8.506 961.335 0.89 38 129 195 1,000









Table 43 (Continued)


Percentage of
Expenditures


County


lectr c
motors


Thl1phones Dwellings
Lighted


arms


Electric
Light and
Power


rarm
Expet.ditures


911.806
713,649
224.232
559.854
2,430.280
390.987
250.476
62,129
183.650
1.093.583
28.482
151.052
126,384


73 348
63 394
9 1.151
49 254
500 780
89 799
32 1,774
4 423
27 607
305 1.013
4 348
22 1.129
18 1.119


St. Johns
St. Lucle
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusla
Wakulla
Walton
washington


0.54
0.24
0.21
0.61
0.7'
0.71
0.41
0.29
0.50
1.51
0.00
0.42
0.60


,.901
1.705
473
3.424
18,261
2.796
1.026
181
924
14,652

630
752








THE UTILIZATION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY 63

SUMMATION FOR COUNTIES


The accompanying Table 44 shows, in addition to the population and
population density, the number of communities served, the amount of elec-
trical energy used in manufactures, the amount paid for electrical energy
by farmers and the amount paid per farm.

All of this information with exception of that on population and pop-
ulation density is contained elsewhere in this bulletin, but it was decid-
ed to retabulate it in this form so it could be better compared. The
values under the column on the amount paid for electrical energy per farm
were arrived at by dividing the amount paidby farmers for electrical en-
ergy by the total number of farms. The dataon the electrical energy used
in mines and quarries shown in Table 39 is not tabulated here because of
the relatively few counties in which mining is a major industry.







Table 44


The ManJfocturing and farming Use of Electrical Energy
in Florida: By Countles, 1929


Population Population
Density--
Persons
per Square
Mile


34,565
6,273
12,091
9.405
13,283
20,094
7.298
4.013
5.516
6.859
2,883
14.638
142,955
7,745
6,419
155,503
53.594
2.466
6,283
29.890
4. 137
2,762
3,182
9.454


57.9
10.6
15.5
32.3
15.0
16.6
13.7
5.8
8.9
11.2
1.4
18.5
70.3
12. 1
9.0
198.3
81.5
5.3
11.5
55.4
11.8
3.6
5.7
17.9


County


Communities
Served with
Electrical
Energy


12
I
5
5
20
7

3

3
I6

I

24
4



2
5

2

5


2
5


KWH
Used in
Manufactares



1,719.282

54,150
4.800
875.951
1.288,278
18,150
516.026

21.400

350,124
14,952,123
933,351
121.000
15.781,765
4.922.097
8,334
177,165
123.000
2. 100
9.793

110.330


Alacltua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
8roward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Coll er
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dlxie
Ouval
Escambta
Flagler
Frank I In
Gadsden
GI Ichrlst
Glades
Gulf
M .t In


Amount Paid
by farmers
for
Elect ril
Energy

$2,606

1,754
1.029
7.614
1.806
70
1,379
250
6,022
200
25
27.015
2,730
108
14,737
4,987
95

1.546
85
48

178


Amount Paid
per rorm
for
Electrical
Energy

$1. 15

8.12
1.12
12.00
1.94
0. 12
14.50
9.97
13.30
6.25
0.02
23.30
5.43
0.74
14.72
4.12
.59

1.12
0.18
0.37






Table 44 (Continued)


County Population Population Communities KWH Used in Amount Paid Amount Paid
Density Served Manufactures by Farmers per Fram

Hardee 10.348 1I.4 5 192.752 $2.015 51.89
Hendry 3.492 3.0 2 235.820 160 1.10 N
Hernando 4.48 10.0 4 88,702 2.808 5.00
Highlands 9,192 9.0 4' 67.240 3,141 9.94
Hlllsborough 153,519 148.2 10 14,176,033 20,387 8.39
Holmes 12,924 27.3 2 IB 0.01
Indian River 6.724 13.5 3 170,740 3,081 7.07 N
Jackson 31,969 34.0 8 232,709 1.458 0.38
Jefferson 13,408 25.3 2 288,050 999 0.77
Lafayette 4.316 7.9 I 30 0.06 :
Lake 23.161 22.1 18 998.806 14,066 7.10 z
Lee 14,990 18.3 4 1.792,069 1,365 3.58
Leon 23,746 32.8 1 499,585 1.259 0.79 5
Levy 12.456 10.9 8 8.505 117 0.13
Liberty 4.067 4.9 I "
Madison 15,614 20.2 3 183,333 653 0.46
Manatee 22.502 27.3 11 386.515 11.390 12.50
Marion 29.578 18.0 20 1,032,267 8.744 4.03 .
Martin 5,111 8.5 8 19,250 543 3.01
Monroe 13.624 12.4 I 274,744 226 5.25
Nassau 9,375 14.9 5 613,619 763 1.89
Okaloosa 9,897 10.4 5 106.955 998 1.02
Okeechobee 4.129 5.5 I 731,865 411 1.42
Orange 49.737 53.5 18 4,249,921 39.050 24.30
Osceola 10.699 7.9 4 85,497 3.130 6.30
Palm Beach 51.781 26.7 15 3.444,870 10.197 1.17
Pasco 10,574 13.8 9 260.393 1,848 2.46
Plnellas 62.149 212.1 20 6,930.723 15.827 21.20
Polk 72.291 37.9 38 5,297,981 46.869 10.00
Putnam 18.096 24.1 B 599.945 8.506 8.50 8









Table 44 (Continued)


Communities KWH Use ir.
Served Manufactueui


County


Amount Paid Amount Paid
by Farmers per Farm


Population


Population
Density

30.7
12.2
13.7
24.2
58.4
18.3
22.7
12.6
30.0
38.1
9.1
13.3
19.6


$4.901
1.705
473
3,424
10.261
2,79F
1.026
181
924
14.652

630
752


$14.19
4.32
0.41
13.50
23.40
3.50
0.58
0.43
1.52
14.50

0.56
0.67


St. Johns
St. Lucle
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
WaltoI
Washington


18,676
7,057
14,083
12,440
18.735
10,644
15.731
13,136
7.428
42,757
5.468
14.576
12.180


2,237,915
1,783.270
39.000
196.286
6.134.545
75.125
67.253
556.240

3,217,812

19.647
214.901







SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION


SUMMARY ANO CONCLUSIONS


1. There is presented in this bulletin forthe first time all the obtain-
able informationon the Municipal and Private Utilities of the State,
showing:

a. A brief history of the development and growth of each
utility
b. The location, typeand capacity of all generating stations
in the State
c. The cities and counties served by each utility
d. The kilowatt-hours of electrical energy generated yearly
by each plant
e. The miles of transmission lines in the State owned by
each utility
f. The geographic location of all plants and transmission
lines, with ownership indicated

2. The installed electric generating capacity in Florida grewmost rapid-
ly during the years 1925-1929. During these years the increase was
322 per cent, while that forthe United States during the same period
was 74.5 per cent. Since that period, however, the growth in Flor-
ida has not been equal to the average growth for the United States.

3. The installed kilowatts per capital also increased most rapidly during
the 1925-1929 period, but in 1930 the installed kilowatts per capital
in Florida was still slightly over eight per cent below the average
for the United States.

4. Practically all electrical energy in Florida is generated by fuels
(coal and oill, less than eight per cent being produced by water
power.

5. The kilowatt-hours per capital generation of electrical energy in-
creased most rapidly in Florida during the years 1925 to 1929, but
in 1930 it was still only 59.8 per cent of the average for the United
States.

6. The generated kilowatt-hours per installed kilowatt in 1930 was 1819
for Florida, while the average for the United States was 2876.

7. Item three indicates that more capacity is needed, but items five and
six refute this, the 1930 per capital generation and generated kilo-
watt hours per kilowatt indicating that there is still a small per-
centage of excess capacity in the State.

8. During the period studied the wealth and population of Florida in-
creased less than percent, while the consumption of electrical en-
ergy increased over 400 per cent.

9. One county in the State has no distribution system for electrical en-
ergy and fifteen counties have only one system.

lo. During the period 1919-1929 the horsepower of motors in manufactures
using purchased electrical energy increased 298 per cent in Florida
and 129 per cent in the United States.

11. In 1929 electric motors using purchased electrical energy drove ap-
proximately 46 per cent of the power machinery of the manufactures of





THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Florida. The corresponding figure for the United States was 51 per
cent.

12. On a horsepower basis approximately 60 per cent of the manufactures
of Florida were electrified in 1930. The average for the United
States on the same basis was 82 per cent.

13. Ice manufactures in 1929 had the greatest amount of installed horse-
power of electric motors 'riven by purchased energy.

.4. Lumber and timber products manufactures in 1929 had the greatest
amount of installed horsepower of prime movers.

15. Four counties ICollier, Gulf, Holmes, Libertyl in theState purchased
no electrical energy for manufacturing purposes in 1929.

16. In 1929, 54 per cent Ion a horsepower basis) of the power equipment
of FLoride mines and quarries was driven by motors using purchased
electrical energy. The average figure for the mines and quarries of
the United States was 64 per cent.

17. During the decade ending in 1929 the horsepower of electric motors
using purchased electrical energy in Florida mines and quarries in-
creased over a3oo per cent. The average increase for the United
States was 186 per cent.

18. On a horsepower basis, approximately b4 per cent of Florida mines
and quarries in 1929 were electrified. The corresponding figure for
the United States was 83 per cent.

19. Despite the large amount of power machinery installed in Florida
mines and quarries during the 1919-1929 period, the number of wage
earners decreased only slightly more than 9 per cent and the number
of salaried employees increased 18.5 per cent.

20. Polk County used in its mines and quarries more purchased electrical
energy and more fuel oil than the rest of the State's mines and quar-
ries combined.

3. The phosphate rock industry has the greatest amount of power equip-
ment of Florida mines and quarries. Florida produces almost 75 per
cent of the phosphate rock mined in the United States.

23. The farmers of five counties of Florida did not pay anything to the
power companies for electrical energy during 1929. Low population
density and lack of industries contribute to this situation and indi-
cate a low living standard.

23. During the five year period, 192b-1932. the number of Florida farms
receiving electric service increased go per cent. The corresponding
increase for the United States was 57 per cent, indicating that elec-
trification was going forward more rapidly in Florida than in the
United States as a whole. However, inr 1933 only 9 per cent of Flor-
ida farms had electric service as against 11.5 for the United States.
California and Rhode Island show 60 per cent of their farms having
electric service and six other states show over 50 per cent.

24. The average amount paid by Florida farmers for purchased electrical
energy during 1929 for the farms served was slightly less than eight
dollars per month per farm.







SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION


No survey of this type would be complete without some mention of the
work that has been done and is being doneby the Federal Power Commission.
Most people are already familiar, in part at least, with the recently pub-
lished material on electric rates which showed that Miami had the highest
rates in the country for bills of 15, 25 and go kilowatt-hours of electri-
cal energy, and that Jacksonville was the highest in the country forbills
of loo kilowatt-hours. The influence of the study can be understood read-
ily when one knows that all these rates either have been revised or are
under consideration for revision.

The fact that a rate is high, however, is no indication that it is
not just. Many factors influence the rates in every locality and it is
only by the correct weighing of these elements that a just rate can be
determined. For the benefit of those less familiar with the elements of
rate making, those most influential in the determination of rate sched-
ules, as given by the Federal Power Commission in its Electric Rate Sur-
vey are listed below:

1. Competition

2. Tradition and inertia

3. The fact that energy cannot be stored, yet must always be
available

4. Density of population

5. Diversity of requirements as to load and the time of day

6. Geographic conditions accessibility to fuel or water

Another recent publication of the Commission is the Interim report,
Power Series No. of the National Power Survey. This report contains
a large amount of very valuable information concerning the present status
and the immediate future of the electric light and power industry of the
country.

The following excerpt from the above publication gives a brief sum-
mation of the importance of the electric light and power industry to the
economic welfare of the nation:

"Control of power is a social as well as an engineering
and economic problem. If the flow of electricity should sud-
denly cease, it would beanational catastrophe of unimaginable
magnitude. Our homes, streets and highways would be in dark-
ness. Street cars, subways, elevators and conveyors would sud-
denly stop and even railroad transportation would be impossible
at night without electric signals.

"Radios would cease to function and the ships on the high
seas would be immediately endangered. Factories would be forced
to shut down, modern bakeries would cease to produce bread, the
water supply of cities would be interrupted by the failure of
electric pumps, and perishable foods would immediately deter-
iorate for lack of refrigeration. There would be no fire alarm,
no burglar alarm, no telegraph, no telephone, and few newspa-
pers. Electric light and power has come to be almost as essen-
tial an element in our daily lives as the bread we eat and the
water we drink. Modern civilization would collapse with the
failure of the sources of electric light and power.





THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


"The national safety and welfare, the productivity of our
industries and the comfort and convenience of our homes are
thus dependent upon the maintenance at all times of an abund-
ance of electricity available at rates which will permit its
use wherever it is needed. Ve mast, therefore, not only pro-
vide for our immediate requirements but must also plan for con-
tinued improvements and expansion of the nation's electrical
systems to meet the demand that may be reasonably anticipated
for the future.

"Complete engineering knowledge of the existing electric
industry, our probable future require.-nts for power and our
available resources are necessary to sound planning either by
the government or private industry."

Finally, it should be pointed out that this State is much more de-
pendent upon manufactures than the general public is prone to believe.
fhe Agricultural Experiment Station and associated organizations toget-
her with the federal government have done and are doing much for the di-
rect benefit of the farmer, and indirectly for the benefit of the entire
State. If, however, the State is to continue to progress, it must have
a well-balanced program benefitting not only the farmer but also the man-
ufacturer. This industrial program should be vested in an engineering
experiment station whose duty it will be to direct and aid the manufac-
turer in the discovery and development of new resources, new products,
new uses for old products, and in attracting new interests to the State.



BIBLIOGRAPHY


Electrical World No. 1, Vols. 91. 93. 95, 97, 99. 101; 1928-1933; lcGraw-
iill Publishing Company.
Noody's Nanual of Investments. Public Utility Section: 1918, 1919, 1925.
1928. 1929. 1930. 1931. 1932. 1933.
Poor's Public Utility Volume; 1925, 1926, 1927.
U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census Twelfth and Fifteenth
Censuses of the U. S., 1905, 1930.
U. S. Geological Survey, Water Supply Poper No. 579; 1928.
Federal Power Commission National Power Survey, Interim Report; Power
Series No. 1; 1935.
Statistical Bulletins N.E.L.A.; 1929-193a.
World Almanac. 1930.




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