• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Mother's song
 Good-night
 My little one
 Nursery song
 Little tot
 Washing the baby
 What I love
 Dr. Watts' cradle hymn
 Naughty baby
 Learning to walk
 Baby's toys
 Feeding the fowls
 Baby eating breakfast
 The stick-horse
 The alphabet
 Going to bed
 The afternoon visit
 My pussy
 Baby's complaint
 The April shower
 Gone a fishing
 Aspirations
 Hop's song
 The new doll
 My tame squirrel
 Cradle song
 The cut finger
 Pouting Jennie
 Why Dolly can not read
 Calling names
 Haste to school
 My little sister
 Robbie and his hobby-horse
 Swinging
 The little coward
 The old watch-dog
 My child's hymn
 The little boy and the stars
 Willie Winkie
 Little Abby's hymn
 The brown thrush
 The sleighbride
 The Christian child's resolve
 Who would use tobacco?
 The boy who was good all day
 The mice
 Bessie and her lamb
 Child's prayer
 Learn your lesson
 The school bell
 Good-night
 The best dress
 The jolly old crow
 Home
 The old hat
 Children at prayer
 The peacock
 The discontented mouse
 The crust
 The bee
 Popping corn
 How to be a gentleman
 Flies on the window
 The dirty boy
 Cold water
 Chimney-sweep
 The mechanical powers
 The child's prayer
 The robin redbreasts
 The cruel little fisherman
 One thing at a time
 The lady weaver
 The iron monster
 One by one
 Arthur's bedtime
 A pleasant sail
 The rabbits
 The truant
 The bonnie wee birdie we love
 My mother
 All the year
 The little black girl
 Charlie; and the robin's song
 The safe child
 Kindness to animals
 Merry raindrops
 What I heard as I came to...
 The child's wish
 The drunkard's boy
 I can't
 The bird's nest
 The lambs of Jesus
 The butterfly
 The turtle-dove's nest
 Spring
 Christ our example
 Humility
 The blacksmith's song
 The little one
 The family
 Swedish mother's lullaby
 Jesus
 The two little captives
 The sick child's prayer
 Up and doing
 To a colored child
 The minutes
 Little Mat
 An example to children
 Children of the light
 A magic word
 Close of the day
 Children
 The use of flowers
 The Christian mother and her...
 Don't fret
 Heathen lands
 Noah's dove
 Morning thoughts
 The picnic
 The angels in the house
 Be thou the guide of my youth
 Wow can a child be saved
 The best book
 Deeds of kindness
 Quarreling
 Our Mary
 Christ's example
 Katie's treasures
 Who made the flowers
 The bird's nest
 Retrospect
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Songs for my children
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003140/00001
 Material Information
Title: Songs for my children
Physical Description: 192 p., <2> leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Chaplin, Jane Dunbar, 1819-1884
Holland, Andrew ( Printer )
Kilburn & Mallory ( Engraver )
American Tract Society (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Geo. C. Rand & Avery
Publisher: American Tract Society
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Geo. C. Rand & Avery, Electrotypers and Printers
Publication Date: 1861
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1861   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with numerous illustrations.
General Note: Without music.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Kilburn-Mallory and printed in colors by A. Holland.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003140
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237727
oclc - 04889845
notis - ALH8219
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Mother's song
        Page 7
    Good-night
        Page 8
    My little one
        Page 9
    Nursery song
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Little tot
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Washing the baby
        Page 14
    What I love
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Dr. Watts' cradle hymn
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Naughty baby
        Page 20
    Learning to walk
        Page 21
    Baby's toys
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Feeding the fowls
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Baby eating breakfast
        Page 26
    The stick-horse
        Page 27
    The alphabet
        Page 28
    Going to bed
        Page 29
    The afternoon visit
        Page 30
        Page 31
    My pussy
        Page 32
    Baby's complaint
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The April shower
        Page 35
    Gone a fishing
        Page 36
    Aspirations
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Hop's song
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The new doll
        Page 41
        Page 42
    My tame squirrel
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Cradle song
        Page 45
    The cut finger
        Page 46
    Pouting Jennie
        Page 47
    Why Dolly can not read
        Page 48
    Calling names
        Page 49
    Haste to school
        Page 50
    My little sister
        Page 51
    Robbie and his hobby-horse
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Swinging
        Page 54
    The little coward
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The old watch-dog
        Page 57
        Page 58
    My child's hymn
        Page 59 (MULTIPLE)
    The little boy and the stars
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Willie Winkie
        Page 62
    Little Abby's hymn
        Page 63
    The brown thrush
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The sleighbride
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The Christian child's resolve
        Page 68
    Who would use tobacco?
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The boy who was good all day
        Page 71
    The mice
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Bessie and her lamb
        Page 74
    Child's prayer
        Page 75
    Learn your lesson
        Page 76
    The school bell
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Good-night
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The best dress
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The jolly old crow
        Page 84
    Home
        Page 85
        Page 86
    The old hat
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Children at prayer
        Page 89
    The peacock
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The discontented mouse
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The crust
        Page 94
    The bee
        Page 95
    Popping corn
        Page 96
    How to be a gentleman
        Page 97
    Flies on the window
        Page 98
    The dirty boy
        Page 99
    Cold water
        Page 100
    Chimney-sweep
        Page 101
        Page 102
    The mechanical powers
        Page 103
        Page 104
    The child's prayer
        Page 105
        Page 106
    The robin redbreasts
        Page 107
    The cruel little fisherman
        Page 108
        Page 109
    One thing at a time
        Page 110
    The lady weaver
        Page 111
    The iron monster
        Page 112
    One by one
        Page 113
    Arthur's bedtime
        Page 114
    A pleasant sail
        Page 115
    The rabbits
        Page 116
    The truant
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The bonnie wee birdie we love
        Page 119
    My mother
        Page 120
    All the year
        Page 121
        Page 122
    The little black girl
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Charlie; and the robin's song
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The safe child
        Page 128
    Kindness to animals
        Page 129
    Merry raindrops
        Page 130
    What I heard as I came to school
        Page 131
    The child's wish
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The drunkard's boy
        Page 134
    I can't
        Page 135
        Page 136
    The bird's nest
        Page 137
    The lambs of Jesus
        Page 138
    The butterfly
        Page 139
    The turtle-dove's nest
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Spring
        Page 142
    Christ our example
        Page 143
    Humility
        Page 144
    The blacksmith's song
        Page 145
    The little one
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The family
        Page 148
    Swedish mother's lullaby
        Page 149
    Jesus
        Page 150
    The two little captives
        Page 151
        Page 152
    The sick child's prayer
        Page 153
    Up and doing
        Page 154
    To a colored child
        Page 155
    The minutes
        Page 156
    Little Mat
        Page 157
        Page 158
    An example to children
        Page 159
    Children of the light
        Page 160
        Page 161
    A magic word
        Page 162
    Close of the day
        Page 163
    Children
        Page 164
    The use of flowers
        Page 165
        Page 166
    The Christian mother and her child
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Don't fret
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Heathen lands
        Page 171
    Noah's dove
        Page 172
    Morning thoughts
        Page 173
    The picnic
        Page 174
    The angels in the house
        Page 175
    Be thou the guide of my youth
        Page 176
    Wow can a child be saved
        Page 177
    The best book
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Deeds of kindness
        Page 180
    Quarreling
        Page 181
        Page 182
    Our Mary
        Page 183
    Christ's example
        Page 184
    Katie's treasures
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Who made the flowers
        Page 188
        Page 189
    The bird's nest
        Page 190
    Retrospect
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Back Cover
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Spine
        Page 195
Full Text












~1111 1


1 ___










I


AMERICAN ThiCT SOCIETY
0 SBOSTON -


~
r


C;


Ll













SONGa



FOR



Y CHILDREN.




WITH I










- F.\1- -a

PUBLISHED BY THE
.RIZCAN TRACT SOCIETY.
t1 CORNHILL, BOSTON.


bl .mr~CIIP~F27Fh~i: 7~~ ^-~-Tlr~VTP-~~I~ ~~










^---^^--- i.




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by the
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.










IN the preparation of this work, it has been our aim to

Give to the little ones a book of home songs; simple and
playful enough to supersede all "mother-goose" litera-

ture, yet grave enough to instruct and profit. May it

prove a source of delight in many thousands of happy

homes. J. D. C.








GEO. C. RAND & AVERY,
ELECTROTYPERS AND PRINTERS.









11


COITTETRTS,.+
' .


ir, Childat Home, . 121
Ifod, .. ... S.. Advocate, ... 162
j Cehildren, ........ .... 159
L.. ....... 115
S .. summer Song., 141
*, * Summer Songs, .. 37
t" .. .............. 26


'mb, .................. 74
eG)Uide'of my Youth, Child at Home, 176
B, .. Original,....... 49
tithe Robin's Song, Child at Home, .. 126
S. . Summer Songs,. ...16
it Payer; ... Child at Home, 89
ye, ... ; .. .... ....... 75
tth ght, Child at Home, ... 160
Wep,..... . . ....... 101
txample,.. ...............143
a le, ..... . ........184
SDay . summer Songs,....163
. .....................100
g, ... .. .From the German, 45
e s, ..................180
t ... ..Anne Taylor, . 169
OrCtadle Hymn, ..... ......17
owl ...... Or gnal .. ..... 24
Widow, .. .. iftsfor the Nursery,. 98


i.;]











IV CONTENTS.


Going to Bed, ........ .Aunt Effle's Rhymes, 29
Gone a Fishing, ... Mrs. Goodwin, . 36
Good-night.. ................... .8
Good-night,............... ........ 79

Haste to School, ................... 50
Heathen Lands, ....................171
Home,............. Child at Home, ..... 85
Honor God's Name, ...... ........ ... 152
Hop's Song,. ....... .Merry's Museum, ... 39
How to be a Gentleman, ........ ..... 97
How can a Child be Saved? . . . .. 177
Humility, .................. ..... 144

I Can't,.........................135

Jesus, ........................150

SKatie's Treasures,..... Child at Home, .... 185
Kindness to Animals, ... ........... .129

Learning to Walk,. ..... Original, ........ .21
Learn your Lesson, ... ............. 76 A
Little Abby's Hymn, ................. 63
Little Tot, ..................... 12
Little Mat, ......................157
Merry Raindrops, ...... .Aunt Effe's Rhymes, .. 130
Mother's Song,. ...... .W. Ferguson, ...... .7
Morning Thoughts, ................ .173
My Child's Hymn, .................. 59
My Little One, ....................9
My Little Sister, .. Home Songs, ...... 51
My Mother,......................120
My Pussy,......... Original,........ .32
My Tame Squirrel, .................. 43

Naughty Baby,.. . Summer Songs, ...20
Noah's Dove, ........ Juv. Miss. Herald, 172
Nursery Song,......... Mrs. Carter, ...... 10
.M ..::= -










:" CONTENT 8. V


Alphabet? .... Merry's Book, ... 138
S..... .... Original, ... 113
tlme, .. 110
S. ... Child at Home, .183
Harper's Magazine, 96
.........Original, ... 47
~~. .. ... ... .... 181
.-. . Summer Songs,. .. 191
Siltobby-hore, ............. 52
S ....... .. ........... 59
.... 142
illlaby, Miss F. Bremer, 149
..........Original, ... 54
Vit, ... Child at Home, ... 30
0 0...... a... *........ 28
ia the House,.. ...... ...... .175
hover, . ... Merry's Museum, .35
.......... l. Book of Songs,. 95
l iBook, ................... .178
SDrei, . Child at Home, 81
rs Nest,. ...... .Blades and Flowers, 187-
lf' Nest,; ............... ...190
mth's Song, .... Rev. C. H. Bulkley,. 145
I ree Birde we love,. Marion Keith, .. 119
I'y who was Good all day,. Child at Home, 71
Mnftsy, ". ... ... .Blades and Flowers, 139
SPayer, ...... .... . .105
Md'l Wish, ....... .Child at Home, .132
istiN Mother and Child,. Dr. Huie, . 167
el Little Fisherman, . . ...108
t,' ................ .. .. 94
Singer,... .. . . . 46
l y Boy, ......... Jane Taylor, .... 99
,Mea&tented Mouse, .............. 92
.m.mrs Boy, .. ................. 134
E& .. .
Bpr 8S^- ---- ^









st---- --- -
VI CONTENTS.


The Family, ........................ 148
The Iron Monster, ........ Summer Songs,. .112
The Jolly Old Crow, .................. 84
The Lady-weaver, ........ Stor.for Little Folks, 111
The Lambs of Jesus, ................. 138
The Little Coward, . Original, ..... .55
The Little Boy and the Stars, Aint Effe's l.hymes, 60
The Little Black. Girl, ..... Original, ..... 123
The Little One, .................... 146
The Mechanical Powers, ..............103
The Mice, ....................... 72
The Minutes, ............. Jane Taylor, ... 156
The New Doll, . .. Original, ...... 41
The Old Watch-dog, ................. 57
The Old Hat, ..................... 87
The Peacock, .................... 90
SThe Picnic, .. ........ Summer Songs,.. 174
The Rabbits, ..... ...... Blades and Flowers, 116
The Robin Redbreasts, ..... Aunt Effie's Rhymes, 107
The Safe Child, .. . Hymns for Inf. Sch., 128
The School-bell,................... 77
The Sick Child's Prayer, .............. .153
The Stick-horse, ......... Original, . 27
The Truant, ....... .... .......... 117
The Turtle-dove's Nest, .. .. Aunt Effe's Rhymes, 140
The Two Little Captives, .............. .151
The Use of Flowers, ...... Mary Howittt, .165
To a Colored Child, ................ 155

Up and Doing, ...................... 154

Washing the Baby, ........ .. Rodgers, ... 14
WhatI Love, .......... Child at Home, 15
What I heard as I came to School, A. D. IH.,..... 131
Who made the Flowers? :..... ...... .188
Who would use Tobacco ?. ...... . . 69
Why Dolly can not Read, ....... ... ... .48
WillieWinkie, .................... .62
^ -^..4.


V 'V


Ow \


r























rr- FOR
XYT CHILDREN.


TV s3 Saong.
o: i 0nowr, my darling,
A He on my breast,
:ir that's the soft pillow
'lBy baby loves best;
''"~r Tests on thine eyelids,
-'A swieetly they close;
.ares of to-morrow
i w break thy repose.


N


--T--A


:- ..-"".. .li








8 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

What dreams in thy slumber,
Dear infant, are thine ?
.Thy sweet lips are smiling,
When close prest to mine!
All lovely and guileless,
Thou sleepest in joy,
And Heaven watches over
My beautiful boy!

Oh, would thus that ever
My darling might smile,
And still be a baby
My griefs to beguile!
But hope whispers sweetly,
Unbroken shall be
The tie that unites my
Sweet baby and me!




GOOD-NIGHT, little darling, good-night, go
to bed;
Lay on the pillow your dear little head;
Sleep all night, as still as a star,
Wake in the morning, and kiss mamma.
'_ j .'__









9


MY LITTLE ONE.

kL. -l "


ANOTHER little wave
Upon the sea of life;
Another soul to save,
Amid its toil and strife.
Two more little feet
To walk the dusty road;
To choose where two paths meet, -
The narrow and the broad.
Two more little hands
To work for good or ill;
Two more little eyes,
S Another little will.


t)


-r-








10 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Another heart to love,
Receiving love again;
And so the baby came,
A thing of joy and pain.



0t"sarg Song.
As I walked over the hill, one day,
I listened, and heard a mother sheep say,-
"In all the green world there is nothing so
sweet
As my little lammie, with his nimble feet;
With his eye so bright,
And his wool so white,
Oh, he is my darling, my heart's delight."
And the mother sheep and her little one
Side by side lay down in the sun,
And they went to sleep on the hillside warm,
While my little lammie lies here on my arm.

I went to the kitchen, and what did I see,
But the old gray cat with her kittens three.
I heard her whispering soft;- said she,
"My kittens, with tails all so cunningly
curled,








NURSERY SONG. 11

e the prettiest.things that can be in the
world.
S The bird on the tree,
And the old ewe, she
love their babies exceedingly;
But I love my kittens there,
|'. Under the rocking-chair,-
love my kittens with all my might,
love them at morning, and noon, and night.
ow I'll take up my kitties, the kitties I love,
Ld we'll lie down together beneath the
warm stove." C
t the kitties sleep under the stove so warm,
while my little darling lies here on my arm.

Sent to the yard, and I saw the old hen
1Go clucking about with her chickens ten.
IShe clucked and she scratched and she
bristled away,
And what do you think I heard the hen say?
I heard her say, "The sun never did shine
On any thing like to these chickens of mine.
You may hunt the full moon, and the stars
if you please,
But you never will find ten such chickens as
these.



L..








9--~----^^^s^^----^
12 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

My dear downy darlings! my sweet little
things!
Come nestle now cosily under my wings."
So the hen said,
And the chickens all sped
As fast as they could to theirnice feather bed.
SAnd there let them sleep in their feathers so"
warm,
While my little chick nestles here on my
arm.
---0-0:4K0-(---



rID you ever see our baby,
Little Tot;
With her eyes so spark-
ling bright,
Si And her skin so lily
white,
Lips and cheeks of rosy
light ?
-Tell you what,
.... ^ She is just the sweetest
baby
In the lot.








S* LITTLE TOT. 13

I she is our only darling,
And, to me,
SAll her little ways are witty;
I.And when she sings her little ditty
Every word is just as pretty
S As can be;-
..Notranother in the city
Sweet as she.

TYou don't think so,--never saw her;
S Wish you could
"See her with her playthings clattering,
Hear her little tongue a chattering, -
Little dancing feet come pattering, -
Think you would
Love her just as well as I do, -
If you could I

Every grandma's only darling,
I suppose,
Is as sweet and bright a blossom,
Is a treasure to her bosom,
Is as cheering and endearing,
As my rose; -
Heavenly Father, spare them to us
Till life's close.
L --.. C3.---


Mtf'; I








14 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.





Mild ~~


HuSH, my baby! what's the matter,
That you're raising such a din?
Well you know 't is sparkling water
Gives you such a shining skin.
Cease your squirming, take your washing,
Then you '11 get your milk and bread;
If you do not quit your splashing,
I may duck you o'er the head!
Now 't is o'er, my bonnie dearie,
There's a skin like driven snow;







t JoVX. 15

littlee fairy,
I'll dress you now.

qtqh your pretty head now,
oiiib your shining hair; --
ls you have fled now,
zound your father's chair.

'A"iny, frisking fairy,
bir trim you are and sleek,
k~afse you brisk and airy,
Biyo6ur eye and paints your cheek.

Ahem's naught like being cleanly!
maliness is more than. wealth;
!ress however meanly,
ailinzeel gives joy and health.





iOVz my dear dolly,
Ai all the world knows;
dfear sister Celia,
makes dolly's clothes;
POP -ac







I


16 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

And dear, darling Helen,
So pleasant and good; -
I always have loved her
As much as I could.

And Eddy and I
Have the finest of play,
Sometimes in the garden,
Sometimes on the hay.

I love my dear papa,
Who takes me to ride;
And, when mamma is gone,
I sleep close by his side.

But, oh, my good mamma I
I hug her all day,
And my heart is most broke
When mamma goes away.

My very good mamma; -
I love all the rest,
But my little heart's certain
I love her the best.




cH----^ ^ -3


,~---l~;-;;-~~~lls-~--~--------~,,







BYMN. 17














.4ear, lie still and slumber,
mjgel. guard thy bed;
,blessings without number
falling on thy head.

ibabe; thy food and raiment,
#i0,home, thy friends provide;
Sjit y care or payment,
wt.are well supplied.

y .is thy cradle;
idard thy Saviour lay,
seplae was a manger,
bed was hay.
477 esp-g ihotnme








18 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Blessed babe! what glorious features,
Spotless fair, divinely bright!
Must he dwell with brutal creatures ?
How could angels bear the sight!

Was there nothing but a manger,
Cursed sinners could afford
To receive the heavenly stranger?
Did they thus affront the Lord?

Soft, my child, I did not chide thee,
Though my song might sound too hard;
'T is thy mother sits beside thee,
S And her arms shall be thy guard.

Yet to read the shameful story,
How the Jews abused their king,
How they served the Lord of Glory,
Makes me angry while I sing.

See the kinder shepherds round him,
Telling wonders from the sky;
Where they sought him, there they found
him,
With his virgin mother by.

See the lovely babe a-dressing;
Lovely infant, how he smiled!







CRADLE HYMN. 19

V When he wept, the mother's blessing
Soothed and hushed the holy Child.

Lo he slumbers in the manger,
Where the horned oxen fed;
Peace, my darling, here's no danger,-
There's no oxen near thy bed.

'T was to save thee, child, from dying,
Save my dear from burning flame,
Bitter groans and endless crying,
That thy blest Redeemer came.

Mayst thou live to know and fear him,
Trust and love him all thy days;
Then go dwell for ever near him,
See his face and sing his praise.

I could give thee thousand kisses,
Hoping what I most desire;
Not a mother's fondest wishes
Can to greater joys aspire.


-J pi I








20 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.




BABY, baby Charlie,
Naughty in his play,
Slapping little sister,
Pushing her away;

Patting with his soft hands,
Laughing in his fun;
Slapping with such good will
That the tear-drops run.

Do not cry, dear sister,
Wipe away the tear;
Keep away from Charlie;
Do not come so near;

Or his little hands will
Pull your curly hair.
Peep at baby, sister-
Peep behind the chair.

Kiss the baby, darling, -
Kiss the little one;
He is only playing
In his baby fun.







LEARNING TO WALK. 21










ien ing f a lk.
i-





HUMPY-DUMPY, short and small,
Humpy-dumpy got a fall;
All the wisdom in the land
Can not teach the babe to stand.
- Humpy-dumly is too young
To use his feet or use his tongue;
When he holds his mother's hand,
Only can the baby stand.
Humpy-dumpy tugs and tries,
Bumps his curly head and cries;






'-I-i _______________________


SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


Mamma kisses off his tears,
And he soon forgets his fears.
Humpy-dumpy dreads no fall,
Leaning againstt the parlor wall;
Wait till he is stronger grown,
Darling then will walk alone.



Sweet baby, you may make a noise,
With whistle, drum, or rattling toys;
But we'll keep still -we great big boys -
Lest our dear mother it annoys.
Yes, you may take our top; the ball
We '11 bounce for you upon the wall;
The kite's too high for you to hold;
You're little yet, my baby bold!
These painted toys you must not touch,
Because 't would hurt you very much
If you should suck the green or red;-
What should we do if you were dead ?
Here is a pretty marble cat,
Now try your pearly teeth on that;
And sister's newest china doll;
Be careful, do not let it fall!


6"122







p BABY'S TOYS. 23

Poor, silly babe! He wont be pleased,
But seems to think he's sadly teased
Because he can not have a knife,
Nor beat poor Sissy with the fife!
His hands o'er all the playthings pass,
And reach out for the looking-glass!
And oh, one day it was such fun
To see him try to reach the sun!

How sadly would our darling fare
If there were none for him to care!
We '11 make you happy, if we can,
And then, sweet pet, when you're a man,
You'll thank us for the pains we took
To give you toy and picture-book
Rather than scissors or a knife,
To make you blind, or take your life.

See now! he's got the china calf;
Dear lamb! do hear that warbling laugh!
It seems to say,' Big boys know best,
So I will set my heart at rest!'
There, Nursey comes, with cup and bib;
She wants to put him in his crib;
Now each one take a honey-kiss, -
SWas ever babe so sweet as this!
------ ^ ^ S < ^ -------


I'








BONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


CHICK, chick, chick!
Here are plenty of crumbs to pick!
Mother-hen, you need not scratch
While you have a chick to hatch.
Chick, chick, chick!

Goose, goose, goose!
Don't be making such a fuss;


_ =-- -I-----


rt~-~-------~-~-c`""""-----~-----


24


t'-








FEEDING THE FOWLS. 25

B' Sure you'll always get your share,
SThough a hundred fowls be there.
'Goose, goose, goose!

Duck, duck, duck!
SYou are surely born to luck!
Y .our broad bill is shoveling in
.Meal, while others make the din;
Duck, duck, duck!

Turkey, turk, turk!
Do not come with such a jerk,
Tossing up your haughty head,
S As if you earned your honest bread;
Turk, turk, turk!
Run, run, run!
Seek your business or your fun;
Cluck and hiss and quack and gobble,
Off, as fast as you can hobble!
Run, run, run!
-----o~poo-----

As step by step the hill we mount,
As one by one we learn to count,
So word by word we learn to spell,
And line by line to read quite well.






26 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.





HERE 's my baby's bread and milk,
For her lip as soft as silk;
Here's the basin, clean and neat,
Here's the spoon of silver sweet,
Here's the stool, and here's the chair,
For my little lady fair.

No, you must not spill it out,
And drop the bread and milk about,
But let it stand before you flat;
And pray, remember pussy-cat,-
Poor old pussy-cat, that purrs
All so patiently for hers.

True, she runs about the house,
Catching now and then a mouse;
But, though she thinks it very nice,
That only makes a tiny slice;
So don't forget that you should stop,
And leave poor puss a little drop.








--HE STICK-HOS-E--.


C-0
rA, I


L I i1 c
p ,1I


0






RICKETY, rickety, rack!
Whoa, till I mount your back;
Now get up on th' good old track;
That's the way, my honest Jack;
Rickety, rickety, rack!

Rickety, rickety, ro!
Neither lazy nor slow;
No, no, little pony, no;
How the fire flies when we go;
Rickety, rickety, ro!

L.-^ -------- ag^T i~e ----- -4-F


ia.


THE STICKE-HORSE.


27







28 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Rickety, rickety, ree!
Wish my father could see
How, like the telegraph, we
Fly over land and sea;
Rickety, rickety, ree!

Rickety, rickety, run!
Wearily, now, the sun
Sinks to sleep, his journey done;
Jack and I will end our fun;.
Rickety, rickey, run!





COME now, my darling, I must see
How you can say your A, B, C;
Go get your book, and come to me,
And I will hear your E, F, G,
When you have said your A, B, C.

A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P,
Q, R, S, T, IT, W, V,
X, Y, Z, & oh, dear me,
I'll try to say my A, B, C.
(----- ^ t------







GOING TO BED.


night my mother comes up stairs,
waits to hear me say my prayers;
while I'm sitting on her knee,
always kisses little me.

!Before she takes away the light,
:;he tucks the blankets smooth and tight;
And round about my sleepy head
S:he draws the curtains of the bed.

I see her walk across the floor,
I hear her close the nursery door;
And then I call with all my might,
"Good night, my sweet mamma, good night."

That dear mamma, so sweet and mild,
I hear her say, God bless my child!"
.And always when she goes away,
These are the words I hear her say.

.Oh, what a happy child am I,
I When in my little crib I lie,
aest by a tender mother's love,
d by the holy God above!


6zxog fio jgtbr.


29





I


80 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.









wt f ftfrmTnt Wisit
RING-A-LING! ring-a-ling goes the front bell;
Here's little Hattie, whom Mary loves well;
"I've brought my dolly to visit with me,
Mamma has said that I might stay till tea."
"Now to the play-room let's scamper away,
Here are the dollies, and what shall we play?
This one well dress in her flounces of lace,
That in her cloak, with a veil on her face.

"See the bright pictures put round on the
wall,
And this china wash-bowl and pitcher so
small;
Here are the dishes all ranged on the shelves,
Let us have tea all alone to ourselves .


-~t~;r~lo~;~fi;i*,r~,~,~L,_;i~L~~ ~J-~ h-~~PL-~~-1JybjjiC~~LIYC L ~k ~ .I~~ +i~L--TL~~L( ~4L~i-~ ~~~Cir~RI 1I~LL~U:Ci-*I


*






S THE AFTERNOON VISIT. 81

XMamma will give us some sugar, I know,
Milk and some bread just as white as the
snow;
OuAhittle dishes we 'll set on the stand,
This tiny teapot holds water at hand.

"Piedes of apple for sauce we will take,
Pieces of bread we will pass round for cake,
* Baby, to join in our frolic, we'll bring,
And for our music the birdies shall sing.

" Here comes dear mamma to smile on our
play,
We are not happy when she is away;
Now she will tell us the stories we love,
Sing us sweet songs about heaven above.

"Gentle and kind we will both try to be,
For Jesus, who blessed little children will
see;
Then, when 't is night, and our prayers we
have said,
Beautiful angels will watch round our bed."


e^B^







32 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


OH here is Miss Pussy;
She's drinking her milk;
Her coat is as soft
And as glossy as silk.

She sips it all up
With her little lap-lap;
Then, wiping her whiskers,
Lies down for a nap.

My kittie is gentle,
She loves me right well,
And how funny her play is
I'm sure I can't tell.


..di


4- P*SQ?.e --- -







BABY'S COMPLAINT. 33

Now under the sofa,
Now under the table,
She laughs and says "bo-peep"
As well as she's able.

Oh, dearly I love her!
And you never did see
Two happier playmates
Than kittie and me.



ahmja Complaint\t

O MOTHER, dear mother, no wonder I cry!
More-wonder, by far, that your baby don't
Sdie;
No matter what ails me, no matter who's
here,
SNo matter how hungry the "poor little dear,"
No matter if full, or all out of breath,
She trots me, and trots me, and trots me to
death.

I love my dear nurse, but I dread that great
knee;
I like all her talk, but woe unto me


U 1 0 "'







34 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

She can't be contented with talking so
pretty,
And washing and dressing and doing her
duty;
All that's very well, I can bear soap and
water;
But, mother, she is an unmerciful trotter!

Pretty ladies, I do want to look at your
faces,
Pretty cap, pretty fire, let me see how it
blazes;
How can I? my head going bibity bob,
SWhile she trots me the harder, the harder I
sob;
0 mother! do stop her; I'm inwardly sore,
I hiccup and cry, but she trots me the more.

Oh! thank you, dear mother, for taking my
part,
And clasping your little one close to your
heart;
Here baby may rest and just look about,
And laughs up at sister, who peeps in and
out,
And gaze upon all the strange things that I
see; -
Sure none is so happy as mother and me!







E'S- ----^.^<.f--~------
THE APRIL SHOWER. 35

Oh dear! is that nurse? is she coming so
soon ?
She's bringing my dinner, with teacup and
spoon;
She'll hold me with one hand, in t'other
the cup,
And as fast as it's down she'll just shake it
up;
And thumpity thump with the greatest de-
light,
Her heel is kept going from morning to
night;
All over the house you may hear it, I'm
1 sure,
Trot, trotting! Just think what I'm doomed .
to endure.






PATTER, patter, let it pour!
Patter, patter, let it roar!
Down the steep roof let it rush,
Down the steep roof let it rush,
'T is the welcome April shower,
Which will make the sweet May-flower.
ebZM .









36 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


NW^, ^\ '^ N \ \ ^S\

ount a fishing.

ON a Monday morning,
Cold and blustery,
Was n't it a funny
Sight for one, to see
Little cousin Harry,
.'Mid the kitchen din,
Fishing in the wash-tub
With a bent-up pin ?


,
'i I
.i







ASPIRATIONS. 37

Dignified and patient,
There the angler stood,
Not a whit disturbed by
Betty's fretful mood;
While she scrubbed and scolded,
He, in mute delight,
Watched his fishing-tackle, -
Waiting for a bite.


While against the windows
Drives the frozen rain,
With a thread of cotton
Tied to papa's cane,
In the great blue wash-tub,
With a bent-up pin,
Little Harry's fishing,
'Mid the kitchen din.

---0-0:4x0.0---




I AM four years old this birthday,
So I'm getting very big;
I am never frightened, -never, -
No, not even by the pig.


-+'dl)







38 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

When I'm a little older,
I'm to have a beaver hat;
Not a white one, with a feather, -
Such a baby one as that!

And shall I go to college, too ?
How pleasant that will be!
And may I fight the boys, mamma, -
I mean, if they fight me ?

And I shall learn my lessons,
Not with letters on the floor,
But in great books, like papa's,
And be a dunce no more.

Oh, I wish that I was bigger!
Do you think I'm growing tall?
Will you measure me, mamma,
If I stand against the wall?

For I'm four years old this birthday,
So I must be brave and bold,
And take care of little children,
Since I am grown so old.






-q I-- -- J -,


HOP'S SONG.


f HXp^ $Ong.-

I AM an honest toad,
Living here by the road;
Beneath a stone I dwell,
In a snug little cell.
Hip, hip, hop.

Just listen to my song:
I sleep all winter long;
But in spring I peep out,
And then I jump about,
'Hip, hip, hop.


89







40 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

When the rain patters down,
I let it wet my crown;
And now and then I sip
A drop with my lip.
Hip, hip, hop.

And now I catch a fly,
And now I wink my eye,
And now I take a hop,
And now and then I stop.
Hip, hip, hop.

And this is all I do,
And yet they say 't is true,
That the toad's face is sad,
And his bite is very bad.
Hip, hip, hop.

Oh! naughty folks they be,
Who tell such tales of me,
For I'm an honest toad,
Just living by the road,
Hip, hip, hop.




i __IC -___th






TH E DL.4


DEAR doll, how I love you!
Your form is so fair,
Your eyes are like diamonds,
And curly your hair;
I never get weary
Of seeing your face;
And you are so lovely,
I call you "Miss Grace."
My kind mamma bought you
One day at a fair,
All dressed out so gayly,
And wrapped up with care.
She gave me a workbox,
Cloth, scissors, and thread,
To make tiny sheets
For your neat little bed.
Here's silk for your dresses,
And ribbons to trim;
I'll make you as fine as
My wax Dolly Prim."
My mamma loves order,
So, Gracie, you see
If I don't keep my workbox
As neat as can be.


41


THE NEW DOLL.







42 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

No silk shall be raveled,
No spool shall be lost;
I'll obey her, no matter
What labor it cost
I'll take tiny stitches,
And hem every skirt;
Nor scollop with scissors,
Like wild Kitty Flirt!

And thus I'll be learning
To make my own clothes,
S And help mamma sew
For our sweet baby Rose.
For mind you, Miss Gracie,
I shan't always play
With dolls; I hope I shall be
A tall woman some day.

Then I hope to make garments
Much larger than these;
Warm hoods, gowns, and cloaks,
That the poor may not freeze;
And then, if I'm asked where
I got all my skill,
I'11 tell them 't was making
Your dress, cloak, and frill!







MY TAME SQUIRREL.


43


I HAVE a little squirry,
His step is quick and light,
His tail is long and furry,
And his eyes are large and bright.
He burrows neathh my pillow,
And curls himself to sleep;
Or in my basket willow
He slyly loves to creep.

It's of no use to scold him,
He always has his way,
Though oft and oft I've told him
To be quiet in his play.


SLiM- -----3s-- 3 -+


we-----~E~i-




I


^--5---;---^k
44 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

But bolder still and bolder
He grows with every week;
He springs upon my shoulder,
And frisks across my cheek;

He builds his nest aloft there
Behind a barricade;
And none can tell how soft there
The little crib he's made;

What piles of snowy cotton,
S What balls of worsted bright,
What skeins of silk forgotten,
Or left within his sight.

And none can tell what bunches
Of hazel-nuts are stored,
What dinners and what lunches
Are in that secret hoard.

0 Squirry, nimble Squirry!
I love thy merry ways,
And never feel it weary
To watch thee in thy plays.


5^ ______ -____ t








CRADLE SONG. 45



raxdh Sznf,

EVENING is balmy and cool in the West,
Lulling the golden bright meadows to rest;
Twinkle like silver the stars in the skies,
Greeting the two little slumbering eyes.
Sweetly sleep! sweetly sleep !
Thy watch the good angels in Paradise keep.

Now all the flowers are gone to repose,
All the sweet incense-cups peacefully close;
Blossoms rocked lightly on the evening's
mild breeze,
Drowsily, dreamily, swinging the trees.
Sweetly sleep! sweetly sleep!
Thy watch the good angels in Paradise keep.

Sleep till the flowers are opening once more,
Sleep till the lark in the morning shall soar,
Sleep till the golden bells' heavenly chime
Festally welcomes the morning's prime!
Sweetly sleep! sweetly sleep!
Thy watch the good angels in Paradise keep.


-- -----









SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


t Eui f Qngn.

WELL, what's the matter ? what a face!
Why! have you cut a vein?
And it is-such a shocking place!
Come, let us look again.

I see it bleeds; but never mind
That tiny little drop;
I don't believe you'll ever find
That crying makes it stop.

^___^S^M-----y-


iL I I I i 1


A I


S46


/" /n


r








POUTING JENNIE. 47

'T is sad indeed to cry at pain,
For any but a baby;
If that should chance to cut a vein,
We should not wonder, may be.

But such a man as you should try
To bear a little sorrow;
So run about and wipe yodr eye;
'T will all be well to-morrow.





Miss JENNIE'S in her nightclothes,
And sitting quite distressed,
A-pouting in the nursery,
Because she won't be dressed.

What shall we do with Jennie ?
The breakfast's piping hot;
Her chair's beside the table;
Shall we wait for her, or not ?
Oh, no indeed!" says papa;
"The child who loves to pout,
And wont come down to breakfast,
Must be made to go without!
^ .-i^^ T&








48 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Send off her nice warm portion
To poor old Molly Gray,
And keep my little Jennie
In her nightclothes all the day."






DOLLY, can you read ?
Now pray tell me why
You can not I 'm sure
You are older than I.

Here's a beautiful book,
You have pretty bright eyes;
Come, now, let us see
If you really are wise.

You have eyes, but no mind;
I have eyes and mind too:
A hint let me take
To do better than you.








CALLING NAMES.


.3 f


Ihalfinrk 4amts.

A VERY little puppy, once,
While strutting proudly round,
Saw a brood of downy chickens,
With their mother on the ground.

The pup began his barking,
The chicks in terror flew;
"Be off!" he cried, "you shall not live,
Such tiny things as you!"

__4---


49







50 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

But now one little chicken,
Much braver than the rest,
Turned round and faced the puppy,
And raised her yellow crest.
She stamped her tiny clawfoot
With all a chicken's pride:
"Be careful how you call hard names,"
With dignity she cried.
"I don't dispute your greatness, -
You are a clumsy elf;
But, sir, although you're bigger,
You're a baby, like myself/"


aha to sriaal
TROT, trot, trot! whether cold or hot!
Give me quick my books and slate,
Or at school I shall be late;
Trot, trot, trot! rather go than not!
Run, run, run! How I like the fun!
Though the sun is burning o'er me,
There's the school-house straight before
me;
Run, run, run! --school will soon be done.
r--- .







MY LITTLE SISTER. 51

Haste, haste, haste! time I must not waste;
For the supper will be ready,
And-they must not wait for Freddy;
Haste, haste, haste! here's my home at last!
Sleep, sleep, sleep! soon in slumbers deep,
Close beside my little brother,
With the soft kiss of my mother;
Sleep, sleep, sleep! till the morning peep.




EAR mother, look at baby,
i See how she jumps and
crows;
IThat 't is her little sister,
: I really think she knows.
And do you think she loves
me,
And wants me by her
side,
To gather up her playthings,
And teach her how to ride;
And place her in her cradle
When she wants to go to sleep,
IX119








52 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

To rock it softly when she stirs,
And by its side to keep?
I'm sure I love her dearly,
And hope that she will me,
When she comes to know more clearly
How dear she is to me.
And every night to God I'11 pray,
On his bright throne above,
To make me dear to baby,
And worthy of her love.




ROBBIE'S on the hobby-horse
His dear, kind papa bought;
Oh, I am sure 't would make you laugh
To see the change 't has wrought.
He has forgot that Robbie is
Our darling baby boy,
And thinks he is a grown-up man;
He's almost wild with joy.
"Get up! get up! get up! whoa! whoa!"
He cries till he is hoarse;
And Hobby more obedient is
Than any living horse.
-----3 -9








^ .-t---g--------
ROBBIE AND THE HOBBY-HORSE. 53

Sweet babe! he longs to be a man;
He shakes his curly locks,
And says, "I want a jacket now,
My papa don't wear flocks!
Go 'way, old bib, and baby-shoes,
My apron, and all that;
When I go out to ride, I'11 wear
A pair of boots and hat !"
"Get up! get up! get up! whoa! whoa!"
The darling baby cries;
And whips his horse, when, o'er his head,
With pitch and bump he flies!

And now the open mouth and eyes,
In terror Robbie sees;
And, lest he should be eaten up,
To mamma's arms he flees.
"I 'm not a man! I'm mamma's boy!
Go 'way, you naughty hobby;
I'11 show Papa, when he comes home,
The bump you gave his Robbie!
The corner is your stable, Hob,
You shall not have an oat!
I never want to be a man,
To wear a hat and coat!"








54 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


SWING, swang,
swung!
To the highest
beam 'tis hung
By two hooks of
iron strong, -
Made of rope
both thick and
long,
I With the barn
\ roof overhead,


--e-







^--- ----- ^<==-- -----"
THE LITTLE COWARD. 55

And soft hay beneath us spread; -
We may swing both fast and high,
For there is no danger nigh.
Swing, swang, swung!
Through the barn their laughter rung;
Grandpa did not mind the noise,
He remembered childhood's joys.
Father Time had not the power
That dear heart to chill or sour;
So his grain he winnowed but,
Answering to their merry shout.

(4 Nifth dfobarbr#
I KNOW a great boy,
His name is Will Howard,
Who, I 'm sorry to say,
Is a sad, silly coward.
If bade by his father
To drive home the cow,
He shrinks from the pasture,
With pale cheek and brow.
So seven years' Sammy
Goes off in his place,
And soon with old Moolly
Comes running a race.
^ ^~







56 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

When Willie grows sleepy,
Nod, nod goes his head;
For he dares not go up stairs
Alone to his bed.
He's afltaid of the cricket
That chirps in the dark;
And shakes at gray dawn,
At the song of the lark.
He's afraid of the garret,
The cellar, the tomb;
And thus poor Will Howard
Lives always in gloom.
Forgetting the Father
Who watches o'er all;
Without whose permission
No sparrow can fall.
The holy book tells us
How wicked men flee,
When the righteous are bold as
The lion can be.
Let us think of the eye
That ne'er sleepeth, above,
And lie down to rest
On the bosom of love.







TIRE OLD WATCH-DOG. 57















Bow, wow, wow!
Hear the old dog now;
I know him well by his bark; -
Bow, wow, wow!
He makes a great row,
When he hears a step in the dark.
Not a breath can stir,
But he's up in a whir!
And a loud bow-wow gives he;
With his tail on end,
The house he'll defend,
More safely than lock and key.


~~~_ |







1


'--7- g c .


)----Ig ..-----.-


dr


58 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

When we're sleeping sound,
He 'll make his long round,
A sentry, to drive thieves away.
Through the long dark night,
'Till broad daylight,
He keeps them all at bay.

Through the long bright day,
With the children he '11 play,
And frisk about in the sun;
On his back, astride,
They may safely ride,
For well he likes the fun.

His share of meat
He will grateful eat,
As he wags his curly tail!
Both well and quick
A bone he will pick;
At eating he never will fail!

By all he is kenned
As a faithful friend;
No flattering tongue has he;
And we all may learn
From the old watch-dog
Faithful and kind to be.








HYMN. SING, CHILDREN. 59



I AM a very little child;
I'm very young and very wild,
And, sometimes, naughty too.
I 'm led by many a foolish thought
To do the things I never ought
To think of, or to do.
But God, the holy God above,
Is very kind and full of love
For little ones like me;
And he will hear me if I pray,
And he will help me every day
A better child to be.




WHO shall sing, if not the children ?
Did not Jesus die for them?
May they not with other jewels
Sparkle in his diadem?
Why to them were voices given, -
Bird-like voices, sweet and clear; -
Why, unless the song of heaven
They begin to practice here ?








60 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.
60 SONGS FOR MY CHIILDJREN.


YE pretty twinkling stars, that shine
Above my head so high,
If I had but a pair of wings,
I'd join you in the sky.


I am not happy sitting here,
Without a book or toy,
For I was sent away because
I was a naughty boy.







THE LITTLE BOY AND THE STARS. 61

If you will listen, little stars,
I'll tell you all I did;
I only said I would not do
The thing that I was bid.

I'm six years old this very day,
And I can write and read;
And not to have my own way yet,
Is very hard indeed.

Does anybody say, "Be still,"
When you would dance or play?
Does anybody hinder you
When you would have your way?

Oh tell me, little stars, for much
I wonder why you go
The whole night long, from east to west,
So patiently and slow.

- We have a Father, little child,
Who guides us on our way:
We never question when he speaks
We listen and obey."


I~L~~~.?~-l-~;-~s- .. -1- I ._~i.








SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


LITTLE Willie Winkie
Runs through the town,
Up stairs and down stairs,
In his nightgown.
Knocking on the window,
Calling at the lock,
"Are the children all in bed ?
For it's now ten o'clock."

"Hey! Willie Winkie,.
Are you coming then ?
The cat is curled upon the hearth,
Sleeping is the hen;
The dog is stretched upon the floor,
He does not give a peep;
But here's a wakeful laddie
Who will not go to sleep."

"Any thing but sleep, you rogue!
Gazing at the moon!
Rattling in your porringer
With your silver spoon;
Pulling at the cat's ears
As she purring hums -
^____^^^I____


\I V-"


1 62








LITTLE ABBY'S HYMN.


63


Hey! Willie Winkie!
See, here he comes!"
Weary is the mother
That has a wakeful wean;
A little noisy run-about,
Heard whenever he's seen;
Who has a battle aye with sleep,
Before he 'll close an e'e; -
But a kiss from off his rosy lips
Gives strength anew to me.




THE little flower that opes its eye
To gaze into the sun-lit sky,
And the little bud that sweetly sings
Till all the wood with music rings,
Are God's; He made them, and they share
In his protecting, kindly care.
And will not God from danger keep
His little one, awake, asleep ?
Will he not hear an infant's prayer,
And fold her in his loving care ?
Dear Saviour, guard me in thy love,
And train me for thy home above.
C---


_ _~ _ii








64 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


184 |Ordun 94rns%

THERE'S a merry brown thrush sitting up
in the tree,
"He's singing to me! He's singing to
me!"
And what does he say, little girl, little boy ?
"Oh, the world's running over with joy!
Don't you hear ? Don't you see?
Hush! Look! In my tree,
I 'm as happy as happy can be!"
__^__








THE BROWN THRUSH. 65

And the brown thrush keeps singing, "A
nest do you see,
And five eggs hid by me in the juniper-
tree ?
Don't meddle! don't touch! little girl, little
boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I'm glad! now I'm free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me."

So the merry brown thrush sings away in
the tree,
To you and to me, to you and to me;
And lie sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
"Oh, the world's running over with joy;
But long it won't be,
Don't you know ? don't you see?
Unless we are as good as can be ?"



Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the heaven above.





..... .......








66 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


DIIG-DONG, ding-dong, ding-dong bell;
Trot on, Jacky, brisk and well;
We must take our tea to-night
At grandma's hearthstone warm and bright.
Jingle, jingle, ding, dong, dong;
Cheer the way with merry song!

Kind old pony moving fleet;
Snowballs flying from his feet
I- ^~e__ s







~- -
THE SLEIGHRIDE. 67

As, o'er sparkling snow he goes,
Jack Frost bites our ears and nose.
Jingle, jingle, ding, dong, ding;
Bells make music while we sing!

Draw the reins, down hill we go;
What care we for wind or snow ?
Both are flying in our faces,
As with yonder nag he races.
Jingle, jingle, jingle, jingle,
Hear the bells and voices mingle!

Mount the hill, we're here at last;
There's the gate; don't drive him past;
SGrandma's waiting at the door,
Clasps us in her arms once more!
Jingle, jingle, free from harm,
We are at the dear old farm!

Don't forget old Jack to-night;
Wrap his blanket round him tight;
Give him oats and meal and hay,
Listen to his grateful neigh!
Jingling bells, now cease your noise;
Within doors we'll find our joys!








68 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.




I NEVER will speak a wicked word;
An oath from my lips shall never be heard.
I never will break the Sabbath day,
Spending its hours in work or play.
I never will dare to disobey
My parents, or wish to have my own way.
I never will, I never will,
By God's good help, I never will.

SNo anger nor hate I'll keep within;
To murder 't will lead, that dreadful sin.
I never will do an impure deed,
Or think or say what to vice will lead.
I never will take what's not my own,
Nor wish for the thing, though all alone.
I never will, I never will, &c.

I never will tell or act a lie,
Forgetting that God is always nigh.
I never will do a thing that's wrong,
Though Satan may tempt me hard and long.
I never will shun the thing that's right,
And holy and just in God's pure sight.
I never will, I never will, &c.


____________________-idTiiiTui_____________________:






^t f------^^%^p^--- -- ,^
WHO WOULD USE TOBACCO? 69


WM4o kulkb usE &Gharoa ?

"HERE, Carlo, will you take a smoke ?"
Asked little Tommy Carr,
As in Sir Doggy's mouth he put,
The end of a cigar.












"Bow, wow," cried Carlo, "master dear,
You surely mean a joke;
I never knew a dog so lost
To shame, that he would smoke."

"Then I will give it to the pig,"
Said Little Tommy Carr;
And at the sty he offered her
The end of the cigar.
.; =:








70 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.









The dignity of Mrs. Pig
Was sorely wounded now;
"Ugh, ugh my little man," she cried,
"No dog, nor pig, nor cow,

"However hungry they may be,
The dirty weed will touch;
How folks with reason smoke or chew,
I wonder very much!"

I'11 run and wash my hands," cried Tom,
And never, never more,
Touch a cigar, though uncle drop
A.dozen on the floor!

If from tobacco, senseless brutes
Away disgusted turn;
That 't is not fit for human mouth
We can not-fail to learn.







THE BOY WHO WAS GOOD ALL DAY. 71


T Ixag W4.6 fWas (Szjot all ag,
A BEAUTIFUL boy with forehead fair,
And earnest eyes, and dark brown hair,
Arose with the early morning light;
His soul was filled with calm delight,
And he said to himself, as he knelt to pray.
"I am resolved I '1 be good to-day."

Not a selfish act, not a look of hate,
Not an unkind word to his young play-
mate,
Did the angels hear through the livelong
day.
Oh no, the record they bore away,
When they sped to heaven in the soft twi-
light,
Was written in letters of golden light.

And when, as the busy day was done,
And the twinkling stars rose, one by one,
The little boy knelt once more by his bed,
With a happy heart he softly said,
"My Father, thou'st helped me be good
to-day,
Oh, may I be holy and pure always "








72 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

And thus, dear children, if you would do
right,
And wish to be guarded by angels of light,
You must kneel every morning in earnest
prayer,
And ask your heavenly Father's care.
And then, every evening, with joy you may
say,
"I'm happy because I've been good to-
day."




THE merry mice stay in their holes,
And hide themselves by day;
But when the house is still at night,
The rogues come out to play.
They climb upon the pantry shelf,
And taste of all they please;
They drink the milk that's set for cream,
And nibble bread and cheese.
But if they chance to hear the cat,
Their feast will soon be done;
They'll scamper off to hide themselves,
As fast as they can run.
P_ t
C f- ----- --- a 9 ^ =-------- ^







I~ _ __ _ -


THE MICE.


73


Some tiny mice live in the fields,
And feed on flies and corn;
And in a pretty hanging nest
The little ones are born.















When winter comes, they burrow holes
And line them soft with hay;
And while the snow is on the ground,
They sleep the time away.

All living creatures like to be
As free as you and I;
They love the fields, the woods and hills,
They love the sweet blue sky.








74 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

^^me nbn Jaer amnrt,
LITTLE Bessie has eaten her supper
Of milk and wheaten bread;
And now her pretty pet Daisy,
Her little white lamb, must be fed.
So she fills her small brown basin
With new milk fresh and sweet,
And breaks in it tiny pieces
Of bread for the lamb to eat.
Then she carries it out on the grass plat
In front of the cottage door,
And looks around for her playmate,
And calls her o'er and o'er.
And as soon as Daisy catches
The well-known welcome sound,
She leaves her sport in the meadow,.
And springs with an eager bound;
Gamboling round her mistress
With many a frolicsome freak,
By which to express the gladness
Her dumb lips can not speak.
And after her supper is eaten,
They merrily romp and play,
Till the twilight melts into moonlight,
And Bessie is called away.
I.----- 3=^r~ B 1^ ---- S








CHILD'S PRAYER. 75

I wonder if- little Bessie
Has ever yet been told
That she is a lamb, not like Daisy, -
But of the Good Shepherd's fold.
I wonder if she loves him,
And knows and hears his voice,
And to follow his heavenly guidance
Has early made her choice ?
Let us try, my little children,
His dear commands to keep,
So he will be our shepherd,
And we shall be his sheep.





JEsus, Saviour, Son of God,
Who for me life's pathway trod,
Who for me became a child,
Make me humble, meek, and mild.

I thy little lamb would be
Jesus, I would follow thee;
Samuel was thy child of old,
Take me, too, within thy fold.



W OW. |-----=i-----








76


I SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


Pamn gonr lesomL

YOU'LL not learn your lesson by crying,
my man,
You '11 never come at it by crying, my man;
Not a word can you spy,
For the tear in your eye;
Then set your heart to it, for surely you can.

If you like your lesson, it's sure to like you,
The words then so glibly would jump into
view;


,e i 1 4;t-


--- f)-


'I








THE SCHOOL BELL. 77

Each one to its place
All the others would chase,
Till the laddie would wonder how clever
he grew.

You'll cry till you make yourself stupid and
blind,
And then not a word can you keep in your
mind;
But cheer up your heart,
And you'll soon have your part,
For all things grow easy when boys are
inclined.
-------o~o-o



DING, dong, bell!
I love school so well,
I would not be seen
At play on the green,
When others are there
At their morning prayer.
My teacher so kind,
Would be grieved to find
Me breaking the rule
She'd made for the school.








78 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Ding, dong, bell!
I love your music well;
With bright, happy face,
I'll be in my place;
My lessons I 'I learn,
A sweet smile I'11 earn,
'T will give mother joy
If I'm a good boy;
And win me the love
Of the Father above.
Ding, dong, bell
When I read and spell,
When lessons are done,
We '11 have sport and fun.
Soon school will be out,
And home with a shout
Will fly the glad boys
To seek other joys,
At bat, ball, or kite,
Till closes the night.
------o=oo-----
Every hour that passes slowly
Has its task to do or bear;
Luminous the crown and holy,
If thou set each gem with care.







'^----^---^~
GOOD-NIGH'. 79



"GOOD-NIGHT !" said the plow to the weary
old horse;
And Dobbin responded, "Good-night!"
Then with Tom on his back, to the farm-
house he turned,
With a feeling of quiet delight.








"Good-night !" said the ox, with a comical
bow,
As he turned from the heavy old cart;
Which laughed till it shook a round wheel
from its side,
Then creaked out, "Good-night, from my
heart !"

"Good-night!" said the hen,when her sup-
per was done,
To Fanny, who stood in the door;
^==MEE







SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


"Good-night! ", answered Fanny, "come
back in the morn,
And you and your chicks shall have
more."


"Quack, quack!" said the duck, "I wish
you all well,
Though I can not tell what is polite."
"The will for the deed,"' answered Benny
the brave;
"Good-night, Madame Ducky, good-night!"


The geese were parading the beautiful green,
But the goslings were wearied out quite;
p


-I +


1 80


I


V


^\ ^


L








THE BEST DRESS. 81

So, shutting their peepers, from under the
wing,
They murmured a sleepy good-night!"
Now the shades of evening were gathering
apace,
And fading the last gleam of light;
So to father and mother, both Fanny and Ben
Gave a kiss, and a hearty "Good-night!"










@I MQt m
OH! the little birds woke early with their
voices all in tune,
And they sang a joyous carol on that sunny
morn in June;
For the Sabbath bells rang clearly through
flower-scented air,
And the sweet breath of the roses floated
upward like a prayer.
^ _________ =~-90 n-2^ ____ 4








82 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

"I must wear my dress of shining silk," said
little Bell, with pride,
"And my bonnet from the city, trimmed
with flowers on the side;
Where's my bracelet ? clasp it quickly; was
I ever dressed so well?
Ah! how all the girls will stare, and say,
'Just look at lady Bell!"

I am glad I have a dress to wear," thought
gentle Nelly Gray,
For I could not bear to stay at home this
lovely Sabbath day;
And I'm glad I have a bonnet, with its
pretty strings of blue,
For the sweet sky and the violets, they love
that color too.

"To be sure I have no jewels, but that gives
me little care,
For my Father has an ornament his children
all may wear;
'T is a meek and quiet spirit; may I choose
that better part:
Father, dress me like thine angels, make, oh!
make me pure in heart."
^.M -9
cLi --- "cr ^ -- Jj








LOVE ONE ANOTHER. 83

So the little maidens went to church, and
entered side by side,
But Miss Bell regarded Nelly with a
haughty look of pride;
And the color flushed her rounded cheek,
and triumph lit her eyes,
As she marked her schoolmates' eager look
of envious surprise.
When the Sabbath service ended, all the
girls sought lady Bell;
They were proud to walk in company with
Sone who dressed so well;
But the smile of God was resting on a
sweeter far array,
And through all that summer Sabbath an-
gels walked with Nelly Gray!


LITTLE children, love each other,
Nevergive another pain;
SIf your brother speak in anger,
Answer not in wrath again.
Be not selfish to each other,
Never mar another's rest;
Strive to make each other happy,
And you will yourselves be blest.
i-. --.----








84 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.
















CJ^e HadL db Crnbx,
ON the limb of an oak sat a jolly old crow,
And chattered away with glee, glee, glee,
As he saw the old farmer go out to sow;
And he cried, "It's all for me, me, me.
"Look, look, how he scatters his seeds
around;
He's wonderful kind to the poor, poor,
poor;
If he'd empty it down in a pile on the
ground,
I could find it much better I'm sure, sure,
sure.







I ------ --(8-- ---- --,
HOME. 85

"I 've learned all the tricks of this wonder-
ful man,
Who has such a regard for the crow, crow,
crow,
That he lays out his grounds in a regular
plan,
And covers his corn in a row, row, row.

"He must have a very great fancy for me;
He tries to entrap me enough, enough ,
enough ;
But I measure distance as well as he,
SAnd when he comes near, I'm of, of, of."





LITTLE child, come, leave your play,
Sunset clouds have passed away;
Twilight shadows thickly spread
Gauzy mantles o'er your head.

'T is quite time you were at home,
Safe beneath your father's dome;
Lest both heart and feet should stray
From the "pleasant narrow way."

f j







^t~------"^`6 --- ^
86 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Resting from his day's employ,
There he waits to greet his boy;
While your mother's winsome smile
Will your little cares beguile.

There the dog will leap and bound,
At your footstep's welcome sound;
And the cat to pur begin
When he sees you coming in;

And the baby jump and crow,
As towards her you laughing go;
Clasping both her tiny hands
Round your neck, like silver bands.

And the table will be laid,
And the evening grace be said;
After which some story rare,
Hymns and verses, and a prayer.

Then the good-night kiss you'll give,
Hoping through the night to live;
And to ope your eyes to-morrow,
Free as now from tears of sorrow.


^_______^ .^ ^_______ ^ 9


l~ 'r ~ -~. .'~L:w.i A l, a. ... :...._- ,-LaG Ci .. .. ... ..... .. ... ..m"







THE OLD HAT. 87













JUST look at this hat! 'Tis not fit to be
seen,
All battered and tattered and torn!
I can not go out to get an ice-cream;
I declare it's not fit to be worn!
Master Robert called yesterday, dressed up
in style,
And asked me to go out to ride;
But I had to say no, for a terrible sight
This old hat would have been by his side I

Miss Emma came also, that sweet little girl,
And I wanted to see her home so, -
With her nice little bonnet all trimmed up
with blue;
But how shabby I looked for a beau I







88 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

Now, mother, you need not be shaking your
head,
And looking as much as to say,
You think I am careless,-and all about
that, -
In your solemn but good-humored way;
For I'm sure that American hats are not
strong,
Or they never would wear out so fast,
But here I must wear it till Christmas, you
say;
I don't think the old thing will last!
To be sure- I have kicked it about for a ball,
'- And stuffed it with gingerbread too;
And once let it fall into Bennet's millpond,
Ybhn paddling in William's canoe;
And once I was hunting with Dinah for eggs,
And gave it a terrible thump;
And one summer's day, when I felt very dry,
I just filled it up at the pump!
That hole in the top was an accident, ma;
That cut in the side was another;
That stain was the medicine you gave me
one day;
That bump I got playing with brother!

C-catw/








CHILDREN AT PRAYER.


I must now stop at home when the rest
go abroad
To visit, or wonders to view;
Oh, mother! if once I get rid of this hat,
I mean to take care of the new!



CJilbrmu ad |rager.

'T Is the silent hour of evening,
'T is the children's hour of prayer;
S Down beside the little trundle,
See the dear ones kneeling there.
Round each mouth a smile still lingers,
Trembling lids veil eyes so bright;
Each young sunny face turned heav'nward,
And the small hands clasped so tight.

Now in whispered wotAs-s leading,
Murmurs low each qgeitT tone;
Yet 't is heard by the All-Father,
On his far-off heavenly throne.
Theirs is not a heartless offering,-
It is born of trusting love,
Rising sweet, like precious incense,
To the Mercy Seat above.


" it-


89






___________^ I
90 SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.













-. __ 'c ll. .l" ] "


COME, come, Mr. Peacock, you must not be
proud,
Although you can boast such a train;
For there's many a bird more highly en-
dowed,
Not half so conceited and vain.
Remember, gay bird, that a suit of fine
clothes
Is a sorry distinction at most;
And seldom much valued, excepting by
those
Who only such graces can boast.
c ---- = ----- y







THE PEACOCK.


91


The Nightingale certainly wears a plain
coat,
But he cheers and delights with his song;
While you, though so vain, can not utter a
note,
To please by the use of your tongue.

The Eagle can't boast of a plumage so gay,
But more piercing the glance of his eye;
And while you are strutting about all the
day,
He gallantly soars in the sky.

The Dove may be clad in a plainer attire;
But is she thus selfish and cold?
Her love and affection more pleasure inspire,
Than all your fine purple and gold.

Thus you see, Mr. Peacock, you must not
be proud,
Although you can boast such a train;
For many a bird is more highly endowed,
And not half so conceited and vain.


rn- ,_ ---


1 V







I 1~-l


S92


SONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.


A QUIET old lady they called "Mrs. Mouse,"
Took up her abode in a nook of our house;
-The mansion was large, and the lady was
small,
So nothing was said, there was room for
us all.
But weary of living entirely alone,
And being o'er fed, Madam saucy had grown;
She moves in her family, and compliments
sends
T' invite to a feast all her sleek little friends.
The hole proved too small; a drawing-
room grand
She must now provide for the gathering
band;
So she left the dark cellar, and led them in
pride
.To the larder well filled, so neat and so wide.
Here they fed and they feasted one night
very high,
On bread, cheese, and bacon, cake, pudding,
and pie;
They made such a racket the cook they
awoke,
Who rubbing her eyes thus angrily spoke:








THE DISCONTENTED MOUSE. 93

"I know very well, my clean larder below
Will, by light of the day, be a terrible show;
I'll set every trap till not a live mouse
From cellar to garret be found in this
house."
















Now, poor Mrs. Mouse was the very first
caught,
And looking around saw the mischief she 'd
wrought:
"If I'd been content"- alas! 't was too
late-
We all had been saved from this niiserable
fate!"
"Vo -,--poor--- rs. Mous was the----ery first








94 sONGS FOR MY CHILDREN.

From the fate of the mice a lesson we'll
take,
Nor e'er the good rules of strict honesty
break;
Be content with your lot, nor encroach on
a friend,
Lest, like these, you should come to a
shameful, bad end.





I MUST not throw upon the floor
The crust I can not eat;
There's many a hungry little one,
Would think it quite a treat.

My parents take the kindest care
To get me wholesome food,
And so I must not waste a bit
That may do others good.

The corn from which my bread is made,
God causes it to grow;
How sad to waste what he has given;
He would both see and know.
--:





^f~------"------^
THE BEE. 95

"'Tis wilful waste brings woful want;"
And I may live to say,
"Oh! how I wish I had the bread
Which once I threw away."












9e Nte.
SEE how the little honey-bee
Both late and early flies;
Each flower she visits carefully,
And every blossom tries.
Busily goes she far and wide;
And with industrious care,
Doth in the sunny summer tide
Her winter food prepare.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs