• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: Grandmamma and...
 Chapter II: The lovely walk
 Chapter III: Patty Parsons and...
 Chapter IV: Waste not; or, The...
 Chapter V: "Very clever childr...
 Chapter VI: How to be useful
 Chapter VII: Begin well, and go...
 Chapter VIII: How a little boy...
 Chapter IX: Grandmamma's last...
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 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Grandmamma Wise, or, Visits to rose cottage
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003114/00001
 Material Information
Title: Grandmamma Wise, or, Visits to rose cottage
Alternate Title: Visits to rose cottage
Physical Description: 138, 2 p., <3> leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Knight and Son ( Printer )
Davison (Firm) ( Binder )
Publisher: The Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Knight and Son
Publication Date: <1861?>
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Glory of God -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1861   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Davison -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1861   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Color plates lithographed by J.M. Kronheim & Co.
General Note: Baldwin Libraty copy inscribed date: 1861.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003114
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230801
oclc - 27242633
notis - ALH1166
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Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Chapter I: Grandmamma and the roses
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter II: The lovely walk
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 20a
    Chapter III: Patty Parsons and the plum cake
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Chapter IV: Waste not; or, The village school
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Chapter V: "Very clever children"
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Chapter VI: How to be useful
        Page 76
        Page 76a
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Chapter VII: Begin well, and go on well
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Chapter VIII: How a little boy was lost and found
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Chapter IX: Grandmamma's last words
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text















WISE.


OR


VISITS TO

ROSE COTTA








LONDON:
IHE RELIGIOUS TRACT
56, PATERNOSTER BOW; 65,8
CHURCHYARD; 164, PICCA



.


'-.


















CONTENTS.






I.
PAGE
GRANDMAMMA AND THE ROSES ............... 1


II.
THE LOVELY WALK .......................... 9


III.

PATTY PARSONS AND THE PLUM CAKE ........ 21

IV.
WASTE NOT; OR, THE VILLAGE SCHOOL ....... 41


V.
VERY CLEVER CHILDREN ..................... 55


VI.
HOW TO BE USEFUL ......................... 76










CONTENTS.


VII.
PAGE
BEGIN WELL, AND GO ON WELL............... 89

VIII.
HOW A LITTLE BOY WAS LOST AND FOUND.... 103

IX.
GRANDMAMMA'S LAST WORDS.................. 130













GRANDMAMMA WISE.


I.

GRANDMAMMA AND THE ROSES.

OU did not know
my grandmamma. If
you had known her,
you would have been
sure to have loved her.
She was one of the
kindest grandmammas that ever lived
in the world. Every one who saw her
said so too.
Grandmamma lived in a pretty house.
It was called Rose Cottage. Rose trees
.B 1







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

grew over the door and round the par-
lour windows. In the summer they
were covered with hundreds of buds
and blossoms. They were to me the
sweetest roses in the village.
In one corner of the garden was a seat,
with woodbine creeping over it. Here
grandmamma often sat; and from this
place she could see the valley below, with
a little river that ran into the sea about
two miles away. This seat we called
Grandmamma's Bower.",-
Behind the house was a pond, with
ducks in it; and also a saall orchard,
with five pear, four apple, one red cherry,
and two plum trees. I know the num-
ber well, for I often counted these
trees.
The inside of Rose Cottage was always
neat. The curtains to the windows were
white. The chairs and tables and stoves
2







GRANDMAMMA AND THE ROSES.

were quite bright, and the looking-glass
had not a spot on it. Everything was
in its right place, and was as clean as it
could be.
In the best parlour grandmamma kept
her books. There were a great number
of them on the shelves; but the Bible
was always laid on the table, for she used
to say that she must read that every day
she lived.
My brother Henry and I were never
so happy as when we went on a visit to
dear grandmamma. She always met us
with a smile, and spoke to us in kind
and gentle words. In the summer we
sat by her side in the garden; and when
it was cold and wet we took our place
in the parlour near to the fire. You
would have much liked to have heard
all the kind words and pleasant stories
grandmamma told us; but though I
3







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

cannot repeat them all, you shall hear
some of them.

It was on a half holiday in June that
we went to Rose Cottage. We found
the dear old lady in the garden, making
two nosegays of some sweet roses. We
knew for whom they were as soon as we
saw them. "That is right, my little
dears," she said, as we met her at the end
of the gravel walk; I am as glad to see
you as you are to see me." And then
she kissed us again and again.
"Oh, what nice roses!" cried Henry.
"What dear flowers!" said I.
"Yes, my darlings," she said," I am
very choice with my roses. They are
to be seen in my garden in early summer,
and when the fruits of autumn hang upon
the trees. Who ever said,' Do not give
me a rose, for it is old-fashioned, and
4








GRANDMAMMA AND THE ROSES.

I am tired of it?' Not one. Young
and old, rich and poor, are fond of
roses."
I will tell you something about one of
the roses that will please you: at least I
hope so, for it very much pleased me.
Grandmamma gave me a large white rose,
from the bush that grew near to her
bower. There was a paper tied to the
stalk of it. I saw there was some writ-
ing on the paper. What could it be
about ? You may be sure that I was not
long in looking to see what was on the
paper. I soon found these lines:-

"Live like the rose-so bud, so bloom;
In growing beauty live;
So sweeten life with the perfume
That holy actions give.

Die like the rose; that when thou'rt gone,
Sweet happy thoughts of thee,
Like fragrant rose-leaves, may be strown
Upon thy memory."
B2 5







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

Grandmamma wrote these lines. She
said she was not a poet, but I thought
that she was. Hardly did I know which
I liked best, the large white rose or the
lines she had written for me on the
paper.
I laid down my rose on the garden
seat, that I might not crush it, and ran
to find Henry, who had gone down by
the myrtle bush to look at the beehive
which stood by its side. I wished him
to see both the flowers and the lines. He
at once came with me to the place where
I had laid the rose with the paper tied
to it; but when I took up the lines they
were not what they were before. I could
not tell how this was.
"What is the matter?" said grand-
mamma. Is there a wasp or a grub in
the rose, that you look so strangely
at it?"
6







GRANDMAMMA AND THE ROSES.

No, grandmamma," said I; the rose
is just what it was when I left it on the
seat, but the lines are not the same."
"Well," said grandmamma, what
are the lines now? Let me hear them."
I then read them. They were these:-

"Enjoy the rose, but bless His hand
By whom the flower was given;
The Maker of the sea and land,
And Lord of earth and heaven."

Just then I lifted up my eyes, and saw
dear grandmamma, with a smile on her
face, looking at me. All at once it came
into my mind that she knew all about it,
and that she had changed the verses while
I had gone to seek for Henry. She was
quite pleased with her little trick upon
me; and I was pleased as well, for I had
not only my sweet rose, but also three
little verses instead of two. The verses
7




1







THE LOVELY WALK.





II.

THE LOVELY WALK.

T was early in the summer
that Grandmamma Wise took
Henry and me for a walk.
"Take one another by the
hand, my dears," said she,
"and I will walk along with
you as well as I can. Let us
go abroad into the fields while the sun
shines above our heads. The bee is
there, and the butterfly, the young
lambs, and the clear-running brook.
God is there in his goodness. You may
see him in his wonderful works, look
where you will.
9







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

"The smallest green leaf that waves
about in the wind, the bird hopping
among the branches of the trees, the
wild flower blooming under the hedge,
will alike show forth the praises of
God.
"It was only a few weeks ago, and
spring came to us with a light foot, and
dressed the earth with a sweet robe of
green. Its breath was as sweet as a
bank of violets.
The first thing that spring did was
to take away all the pinching frosts, and
to fill the brooks and the river. Then
it clothed the naked trees with leaves
and blossoms, and sprinkled the corners
of the fields with primroses.

Lord, how thy wonders are displayed,
Where'er I turn my eyes;
If I survey the ground I tread,
Or gaze upon the skies.
10








THE LOVELY WALK.

There's not a plant or flower below
But makes thy glories known;
And clouds arise, and tempests blow,
By order from thy throne."

Just as grandmamma finished these
verses we came to Elm Lane. Of all the
green lanes I ever knew, I loved Elm
Lane the best. In one part of it there
were nice mossybanks, where wild flowers
grew. The piefinch built her little round
nest in the thorn bush, and the redbreast
in the thicket.
In one part of the lane was an old elm
tree, quite hollow, with great crooked
roots above the ground. Sometimes we
sat on these high roots, and heard the
songs of the birds and the cawing of the
rooks.
But it was not the wild flowers, the
mossy bank, or the hollow tree that
.made me love Elm Lane as I did; it
F 11








GRANDMAMMA WISE.

was because I often walked there with
Grandmamma Wise.
God gives us all things, my dears,"
said she: surely we should have thank-
ful hearts. The sparkle in your eye, the
colour in your cheek, and the beating
of your pulse, tell me that the walk has
done you good. It used to be so with
me; but you know that I am not so
young as I was forty years ago.
"How glorious the sun is! See how
it gilds the church spire, and its rays
sparkle in the splashing waters of the
mill stream. It adds to the beauty of
the scene, and to the pleasure of our
walk. 'All thy works praise thee, 0
Lord.'
The blue part of the sky is clear and
bright, and the clouds gently pass along
like moving hills of snow. Never, surely,
was the breeze fresher and purer than it
12







THE LOVELY WALK.
isto-day. If it had passed over clover
fields in blossom, it could not have been
cooler and more sweet. How prettily it
ripples the miller's pond! how gently it
waves the heads of the tall poplars! and
how softly it whispers among the dry
reeds of the brooks! Praise be given
to God for the blue sky and the pure
breezes.
Those who are fond of the singing
of birds should listen to what we now
hear. The lark does her very best in
the air; the thrush makes the valley
ring again; and the song of the black-
bird is heard in the grove. Surely we
ought to praise God for the singing of
birds.
What proofs are flowers of God's
goodness to man! The mountain and
the moor, the hill and the valley, the
meadow and the highway, are sprinkled
C 13

Ki, ,








GRANDMAMMA WISE.

with flowers. We may now see many
thousands of them. How they add to
the pleasure of our lovely walk! Then
look at the soft cool grass, which is spread
over the earth like a carpet. How good
is God to give us all these things so
richly to enjoy!"
Henry and I now went on smiling
and talking; now running on before, and
then stopping for grandmamma to get
up to us. Soon we came to a wild rose-
tree in the hedge, which we stood to
admire, and before we left it we plucked
some of its flowers. Then we came to a
clear spring or fountain, and we all
drank of its pure water. At last we
came to the field where the lambs were
at play; and here we stood for some time,
gazing at their gambols.
When we were tired, we sat down on
a dry green bank; and I took out from
14







THE LOVELY WALK.

my little velvet bag a new book which
had been given to me on my last birth-
day. The sight of my book set my
grandmamma talking again.
", How thankful we should be for good
books! There was a time when they
could only be got at a great price. A poor
man perhaps seldom or never saw a book.
There were no little works for the
young; now they are in every cottage.
How dull would life be if we had not
got any books to read!
But there is one book that is the
oldest, the wisest, and the best, for it is
God's book. Pray for the grace of the
Holy Spirit that you may love it, and
that it may make you wise unto salva-
tion.
"The Bible! the Bible more precious than gold:
How bright are the glories its pages unfold.
The Bible! the Bible blest volume of truth,
How sweetly it smiles on the season of youth!
15







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

"We have seen God's works, now let
us read God's word."
Here she opened her little pocket
Bible, and read to us a few texts, talking
to us now and then about them.
In our walk we have seen the bright
and beautiful sun: let us see if we can
find anything about the sun in the Bible.
Oh! here is a text that will do: 'The
Lord God is a sun and shield; the Lord
will give grace and glory: no good thing
will he withhold from them that walk
uprightly," Psalm lxxxiv. 11.
I ran and gathered some roses from
the hedge. "Grandmamma," I said,
" I think I can find a text about a rose.
Yes, here it is in the middle of the
Bible: I am the Rose of Sharon, and
the Lily of the valleys,' Sol. Song ii. 1.
This, I know, was spoken of Jesus our
Saviour."
16







THE LOVELY WALK.

You have not forgotten," said grand-
mamma, 1" the fountain or spring where
you drank the water. I have a passage
here about a fountain: I will give unto
him that is athirst of the fountain of the
water of life freely,' Revelation xxi. 6.
We are well supplied with water in our
country; but in other lands it is very
scarce. Water is not given away, but
is often bought for a good deal of money.
But God gives his blessings without
money and without price.
"We very much enjoyed the sweet
grass as we walked along the path, with
the wild flowers that grew among it.
Well, that brought to my mind the
solemn text, 'All flesh is grass. The
grass withereth, the flower fadeth,' Isa.
xl. 6, 8. In the eastern parts of the
world the great heat of the sun quickly
withers away the grass. This reminds
02 17







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

us that we also shall soon be cut down,
and fade, and die.
The last text must be about a lamb;
for we saw how prettily the little lambs
played in the field. Here is the text:
'Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh
away the sin of the world,' John i. 29.
Jesus is the Lamb who died for us; it is
his blood only that can take away our
sins. We must go to him in faith, and
we shall then find that it can cleanse us
from all our guilt.
"You see, my dears, that while the
power and goodness of God are seen in
the green earth and the bright sky, he is
more clearly made known to us in his
holy word. There we learn his love and
grace to man. It is only for us to look
for him to find him. He is in his works
and in his word; he is here, he is there,
he is everywhere."
18







THE LOVELY WALK.

As we returned home, the western sky
was glowing with all kinds of colours,
and the sun was setting behind the hills
in a blaze of light. The cattle in the
valley were on their way to the rick-yard;
the rooks were seeking their nests in
the high trees; and the sweet song of
the nightingale was heard in the distant
wood.
"Let us praise the Lord," said grand-
mamma; "let us bless his holy name.

Now with our cheerful voice and heart
A goodly song we raise,
And gladly yield to God on high
Our evening hymn of praise.

May Divine grace draw our hearts to
him, that by a true faith in him, and
in Jesus Christ as our Saviour, we may
sing his praise on earth, and then praise
him for ever and ever in heaven."
19







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

As we lifted the latch of the garden
gate at Rose Cottage, on our return
home, both Henry and I thanked dear
Grandmamma Wise for having taken
us with her in such a lovely walk.


































































I, i s







PATTY PARSONS.




III.

PATTY PARSONS AND THE PLUM
CAKE.

a FTER we had enjoyed
our tea in the best
parlour, my brother
and I made up our
minds to ask grad' :
ma to tell us a
ory.; and we *t$
began to make our request.
"Tell us a story, grandmamma--one
of your nice stories."
"And what shall it be about?"
Oh, you know best. Tell us about
something that took place when you
were a little girl."
21







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

We knew very well that grandmamma
was always fond of talking of things that
happened when she was young; and we
knew, too, that she was ever ready to
please us; so we made quite sure that we
should have a tale about other days.
And a story she did tell us, which you
shall hear; and I hope it will do you as
much good as it did us.

What a happy little girl was Patty
Parsons; when, with a basket on her
arm, she set off on a visit to her grand-
mother-for, you know, there were kind
grandmammas in the days of which I
speak. Her little dog Tozer ran by her
side, or sprang before her, playing and
barking as he went.
About an hour before Patty left the
cottage, her mother gave her an'account
of a sad fire which had taken place in
22




F,,." -., --.


PATTY PARSONS.

the next parish. Farmer Giles had a
very careless servant, who, in passing
along the fold-yard the last thing at
night, knocked off some sparks from the
candle which he had in his lantern.
These sparks fell among some dry straw.
The man went into the house, and
thought no more of the matter. But
the sparks soon set one piece of straw on
fire. The little blue flame crept quietly
along this straw until it met with two
or three other straws, which were set on
fire also. The flame now got bigger and
Brighter, and soon reached a heap of
straw which lay against a pile of sticks.
These sticks were shortly in a blaze.
While this was going on, Farmer
Giles and his family went to bed; and as
the barn stood between the house and
the pile of sticks, the fire was not seen
until the barn itself was in a flame. But
23







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

no sooner had the wooden barn caught,
than the sparks flew about on all sides;
and in about a quarter of an hour the
thatch of the farm-house was all on fire.
"You can imagine the alarm and dis-
tress of Farmer Giles and his family,
when they were awoke from their sleep,
and found first the barn, and then their
house, in a flame. They had only just
time to escape with their lives; but the
farm-house was burned down, and all
their goods were lost.
Now, Patty's mother had told her
again and again how these sad things
often take place from the most trifling
causes. My dear Patty," she said, I
hope you will never be so foolish as to
throw sparks in a place where straw is
lying about; but I wish you also to
know that there is a danger even worse
than that.'We are all liable to trifle
24 i







PATTY PARSONS.

rv4ith sin; and, if we are not watchful
over its beginnings, it will spread worse
and worse. Sin is indeed like the sparks
of fire" in the farm-yard. At first, you
know, they might have been put out;
but this was not done, and Farmer Giles
was ruined. Remenfber, Patty, that the
very momentvwe see a temptation, or
feel sin mi our heart, we must strive
against it. But we must strive, not in
our o-wn strength, for we are weak.
Wemust pray to God with all our heart
for his help. We may be certain of this,
that sin is the worst thing in the world;
and if we do not flee from it, it will
bring us to a fearful end. But it is our
comfort to know that-God has said, that
if we ask him he will give us grace and
power to resist all evil. Remember, too,
Patty, that if we fall into sin, we should
repent and ask God to forgive us for the
D 25







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

sake of Jesus Christ our Saviour, who
died on the cross for us."
It was only about an hour after
Patty's mother had given this account of
the fire, that the little girl took up the
basket, and set off on her errand. In
this basket there were six new-laid eggs,
a large ball of worsted, and a nice plum
cake, besides a few other things. Over
the whole there was laid a clean white
cloth. i;
'How thoughtless some children are!
The good advice that is given to them
soon passes out of their mind. One
would have thought that Patty would
not have forgotten, for the whole of that
day, about the fire, nor what her mother
had said to her about sin. But it was
seen in a short time what a foolish child
she was.
At first Patty went skipping along, as
26




,...


i I


PATTY PARSONS.


happy as the lambs in the meadows, or
the birds in the air. She had a mile and
a half to go to her grandmother's cottage,
and she would soon be there. But she
stopped longer than she should have done
in picking some buttercups, and in look-
ing at the crows as they flew around the
old trees in the park.
Patty was not finely dressed, but
she was as clean and neat as became
a little village girl, and clean clothes
always add much to the tidiness and
comfort of the wearer., :
As Patty went along she said to her-
self, "The ball of worsted will please my
grandmother, for I know she wants it;
I heard her say so; and she cannot
finish the sock she is knitting without it.
Then she is very fond of fresh-laid eggs;
and as for the plum cake, I never saw
one look nicer in my life." At this
27







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

moment she lifted the white cloth from
one end of the basket, that she might peep
at the cake. There it lay very snug in
the corner, with its nice brown crust,
speckled all over with currants. One
of the currants stood up, quite high
above the rest. Indeed, it seemed as if
it were ready to fall off. "I should like
to have that currant," she thought: if
I take it, it will not be missed."O
Oh! Patty, Patty! how soon had you
forgotten all about the fire, and tempta-
tion, and sin. If you had known the
sorrow that you were about to bring on
yourself, you would not have taken it
for all the plum cakes in the world.
All sin will at last bite like a serpent."
That little currant tempted an evil
heart; and the taking of it was the first
step in the downward road of evil.
Patty bit the currant, and she thought it
28







PATTY PARSONS.

was very nice and good; so you will not
be surprised when you hear that she
looked if there were another that was
ready to fall from the brown crust. Yes;
she soon fancied there was a second,
which might be taken without it being
noticed. This she took; and then a
third, and a fourth currant. She now
covered over the cake with the cloth,
and tripped along, trying to sing as she
went. But she did not feel quite happy,
and could not sing the pretty hymn she
had learned at the Sunday school.
In a little time Patty once more drew
the cloth aside, and began again to look
at the cake. Then she picked it, until
a piece broke off from the corner. She
looked rather sorry when she had done
this; but she said to herself, It is such
a small bit, it does not much matter."
Thus it is in every sin, we try to deceive
D 2 29







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

ourselves, and go on from bad to worse.
When Patty had once tasted the cake,
her desire to take more became stronger;
and piece after piece was taken, until
nearly half of it was gone.
Some persons would not have supposed
that a child like Patty Parsons, who had
been brought up by pious parents, and
sent to a Sunday school, would act in
such a bad way. But so it is; the
heart gets more bold, and sin gets more
strong, until naughty children will do
those things without fear which they
once would have not dared to think of.
When this foolish girl found that one
half of the cake was gone, she sat down
on a low stile, and this wicked thought
came into her mind: I may as well be
scolded for eating it all, as for taking
only a part of it." The bad thought soon
grew into a bad deed. She broke off
30







PATTY PARSONS.

another piece and ate it. But did she
enjoy it? No; she knew all the time
that she was doing wrong; and she feared
that her sin would be found out, and she
would be well punished for it. This
spoiled all the pleasure she would have
had in eating the cake.
Those who go on in sin hope to find
only what is sweet; but they meet with
what is bitter. Fear and shame follow
in the steps of the sinner, and he cannot
be quite happy. It is written in the
Bible, "The wicked flee when no man
pursueth: but the righteous are bold
as a lion."*
Patty now thought what she should
say to her grandmother. She formed
many excuses; but she could not find
out any one that would do. "It shall
not be found out," she said; for I will
Proverbs xxviii. 1.
31







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

hide the rest of the cake, and say no-
thing about it. Grandmother does not
expect a cake, and she need not be told
that one was sent." Oh Patty, Patty!
did you not learn that text at your Sun-
day school, "The heart is deceitful above
all things, and desperately wicked: who
can know it?"*
/When Patty put down the basket on
the ground, she saw two men coming
along the road, which put her into a
fright lest they should see what she was
going to do. No sooner had they gone
by, than she hid the piece of cake in a
thick hedge. But there were so many
crumbs at the bottom of the basket, that
she had to take out the eggs and the ball
of worsted, that these crumbs might be
cleared out and thrown away. She was
in a great flurry, so that in putting back
Jeremiah xvii. 9.
32







PATTY PARSONS.

the eggs she let one fall on the other,
and they were both broken. Oh, in
what a sad plight were the large ball of
worsted and the white cloth now I
Everything seems to go wrong when
we do what is sinful. However this may
be with others, it was certainly so with
Patty Parsons; for she now found in
her basket a letter for her grandmother.
She did not before know that it was there;
and she felt certain that there was in it
something about the plum cake. This
quite upset her plan; and soon another
-wicked thing was thought of. She made
up her mind to keep back the letter.
Patty was now like a man who gets into
a boat in fair weather, but is caught in a
storm. X At first there seems no danger,
but soon the boat is carried by the waves
away from the land. Then the wind
begins to roar, and the sea tosses the boat
33


;.. ''







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

on its high waves. The man now thinks
he will return, but it is too late; He is
driven onward till he is washed over,
and sinks in the deep waters. Or, she
was like one who runs down a steep hill,
and who rushes on till he falls, and is
sadly hurt or killed. '
When Patty came to the cottage, she
found her grandmother reading the para-
ble of the prodigal son in the fifteenth
chapter of the Gospel of St. Luke. Sit
down, Patty," she kindly said, "and
you shall hear me read this beautiful
chapter." The old lady then rea it
slowly, and when she had done she closed
the holy book, saying, "You see, dear,
what sorrow and trouble we bring on
ourselves when we wander from the right
way. The young prodigal was in a sad
state as long as he lived in sin, and was
away from his home; but when he went
34








PATTY PARSONS.

to -his father, and confessed his folly, he
heard these loving words: 'Bring forth
the best robe and put it on him; and put
a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet;
and bring hither the fatted calf, and kill
it; and let us eat, and be merry: for this
my son was dead, and is alive again; he
was lost, and is found.' And that, too,
is a sweet saying of our Lord,' There
is joy in the presence of the angels of
God over one sinner that repenteth.' If
ever my dear Patty should feel that she
S has done wrong, I hope she will not
delay to confess her sin, and to seek par-
don; for until she does so, she can never
know peace of mind."
When the grandmother peeped into
the basket, she saw that things were in
a sad condition there. Patty looked very
pale, and began to tremble. "What is
the matter?" said her grandmother.
35


i j
In ,. .';




*I


GRANDMAMMA WISE.

"Something has surely come to the child;
or she has fallen down, and so the eggs
have been broken." She did not scold
her, but said all she could to comfort
the little girl.
Patty was not easy at the cottage;
she could not sit still, nor enjoy the gar-
den, nor play with the kitten. She did
not feel as at other times. She was not
happy; for she knew she had tried to
deceive her grandmother, and that she
was acting a lie. The mild looks and
gentle words of the good old woman
only made her the more wretched, You
may be sure, then, that she was glad to
get away, and yet she was not in a hurry
to get home. As she was on her way
back, she could not forget about the
prodigal son, and the duty of confessing
our sins. The words she had heard
seemed to sound in her ears all along the
36








PATTY PARSONS.

road; yet she made up her mind not to
tell what had taken place.
As Patty went slowly along, just as
she turned the corner of the road near
the finger post, who should she see but
her mother. She was walking vry
quickly, and seemed in a great flurry
Patty's mother had thought that her little
girl had been a long time away, and as
it was getting dark she came out to meet
her. As the mother quickly stepped
along, she saw a letter lying on the side
of the path. What could it be? Why,
it was the letter to grandmother, which
careless Patty had dropped, at the very
spot where she had hidden the cake.
"Patty! Patty -cried she, "where have
you been? and how could you lose this
note which I placed at the bottom of the
basket?" The wicked child was about
to add to her other faults by telling a lie,
E 37


- -.4,; -1. _. I --- A ,C.. -,_,dMMMfi"







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

when her little brown dog began to pick
up the crumbs that lay along the path.
And then he jumped towards the hedge
wagging his tail with joy, for he had
smelt the cake. Soon it was dragged
out to view, and it was not long before
the little brown dog had eaten it all up.
The note on the path, the cake in the
hedge, the stains of the eggs on the bas-
ket, and Patty's confused looks, told the
whole tale, and a sad tale it was.
JI cannot say whether Patty felt more
shame and sorrow than her mother did
/ on finding out the bad conduct of her
little girl. Late as it was, Patty was
taken back to her grandmother, and then
all came out that had been done. fThe
naughty child now fell on her knees,
hid her face in her pinafore, and wept
aloud. Her mother sobbed and wept
too; while her grandmother lifted up
38







PATTY PARSONS.

her hands in prayer, that God would
forgive the sins of the girl, and grant
her his Holy Spirit, to create within her
a new and clean heart.
/qThat night Patty went to bed with
her eyes red with crying, and it was a
long time before she could get to sleep.
I am glad to say that Patty never for-
got that sad walk to her grandmother's
cottage. It pleased God to hear the
prayers that were offered for her, and her
own prayers. From that time she began
to watch whenever she was tempted,
lest she should again be overcome. She
was always quick to confess her faults,
and thus she spared her friends much
S trouble and sorrow. I knew Patty for
some years after she had grown up to be
a woman, and I am happy to tell you
that she lived as a humble servant of
Jesus Christ, seeking to be like him, and
39



1-







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

looking, through faith in his merits and
precious blood, for mercy and eternal life.

Grandmamma, after she had ended
her story, talked about the great evil
there is in sin, and the many ways in
which children may be led into it.
" Whenever you are tempted," she said,
"do not forget my little account of Patty
Parsons and the plum cake.'


I 40 iI







WASTE NOT.




IV.

WASTE NOT; OR, THE VILLAGE
SCHOOL.

OWN a lane, by the
side of Rose Cottage,
was the village school
for girls. The boys'
school was near the
common. On fine
sunny days in summer, Grandmamma
Wise allowed the girls, now and then,
to bring their needlework, and sit in her
orchard. I need-not say that they were
always glad to be there. It was a plea-
sant sight to see them, seated in rows,
and busily engaged in their work, be
neath the shade of the fruit trees.
E 2 41
a...: **







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

As some of the girls came a long way
to school, they brought their dinners with
them in little baskets. And on the days
they were allowed to visit grandmamma,
they dined on the dry green grass.
It was a very happy time to the little
girls, for in their dinner hour they could
laugh and romp, and be as merry as they
pleased, so long as they were not rude,
and did not pluck the fruit or flowers.
Grandmamma, with her knitting or a
book in her hand, often came into the
garden, from whence she could look
over a low hedge into the orchard. She
dearly loved to see their play, and to
listen to the sound of their merry voices.
One bright day, about the time when
the apples were ripe, the girls were un-
usually lively and happy, not only be-
cause the sun shone so brightly, and the
air was so soft and sweet, but because
42







WASTE NOT.


their teacher had been pleased with the
way in which they had learned their tasks
in the morning, and had spoken a word
of praise for them to grandmamma. To
encourage them the dear old lady had
promised to give them a few of her
ripest apples.
When the fruit was brought out on a
large tea-tray the girls set up a loud shout.
They then sat down first to eat their
dinners, and the contents of their baskets
were soon spread out on the grass. They
were, for a short time, too busy in eating
to think of anything else.
Among those who had brought their
dinner was a little wild-spirited girl,
named Betsey Jones. She was very fond
of playing tricks; but often her fun was
foolish and naughty. It was so on this
day; for after she had eaten part of her
dinner, she took some of the pieces of
43







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

bread and threw them at the other girls.
Mary Green, who sat behind a pear
tree, began to laugh as she saw the girls
dodge their heads to avoid the bits of
bread, when Betsey threw a large piece,
and with a good aim, so as to hit
Mary on the cheek. All the girls gave
a shout, and some others-not all, I
am happy to say-began to throw too;
and there was a general firing of bread
and apple cores. And soon the grass
was well strewn with the fragments or
pieces.
Now that the fun was over, Betsey
and Mary began to be afraid that they
had done wrong, when just at this mo-
ment they saw grandmamma peeping
over the low hedge. Hey-day! what
is the matter now?" she cried. She saw
at once that they had not been behaving
as they should have done. Could she
44







WASTE NOT.

allow such conduct to pass over? No;
she thought it was a proper time to
teach them a lesson. And this she
did in a way so wise and gentle and
kind, that I should think they never
forgot it.
"Now, come and sit around me," she
said, as she placed herself on a chair.
"You may go on with your sewing,
and I will talk to you while you
work."
The girls were always ready to hear
grandmamma speak or read to them;
and in a short time Betsey Jones, Mary
Green, and the rest, after a little bustle
in taking their places, were all seated
around her.
My dear children," she began, you
know it gives me great pleasure to see
you happy, when you are good. You
may talk and jump, and be as merry in
45


~in-'-s;---p-~~-rPIL~--~~--w~,,,~,, ~,l.,r- _,~~--Lr;Ljr.~~.~-..rl~.,,.., -.~..l.t,.ii.~..r. ._,.n--ir ...~Y.~j,;







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

your play hours as you like; but I was
sorry to find that you have been rudely
throwing at each other; and was still
more concerned to see that you should
waste any of the good food your parents
gave you."
The young folks at these words looked
both sorry and ashamed; for they knew
that grandmamma did not like to find
fault, and that she would rather praise
than blame them. Betsey Jones, the
wildest of all the school, and always the
first in mischief, had been visited by
grandmamma at the time she was ill
and could not go to school, and she felt
that she ought to love her for all her
kindness; so she now hung down her
head, and tears stood in her eyes..
Seeing that they looked sorry, grand-
mamma went on to say, I really be-
lieve you did not think you were doing
46


-:~p~-








WASTE NOT.

wrong when you wasted your food, but
I hope what I am going to tell you will
teach you that it is a sin to waste food,
and that you will not again act as you
have done to-day."
Her kind words made the girls feel
more at rest in their minds, and they
listened very orderly while grandmamma
spoke thus:-
"More than eighteen hundred years
ago there lived on the earth One who
was great and powerful, so that all who
saw his deeds and heard his words were
filled with wonder. He might have been
rich, and have lived in a palace, and have
had everything at his word; but he chose
to be poor. He used his great power to
do good to others. He was always kind
to those who came to him. His heart
was full of love; so that, instead of seek-
ing to please himself, he went about the
47








GRANDMAMMA WISE.

cities and villages of the land that he
might make others happy."
Grandmamma had not gone far in her
story before the girls saw who this good
One was. They knew that she was
speaking about our Lord Jesus Christ.
But they only smiled at one another, and
did not interrupt her.
He lived in a country far away from
our land; and with a few men, whom
he chose for his friends, he walked
about the fields and roads, and even by
the sea-shore and in desert places. The
people used to bring to him their sick
children and friends, that he might make
them well and happy. When the blind
came to him, he gave them their sight,
and they looked upon the bright sky, and
the green earth, and the faces of their
friends- some saw for the first time in
their lives. Then the dumb were made to
.48
.. 48


I*ai~g-r-._ ,.~~~~~ulr~.. ~....~-- --c~L-dCZT~uLYlau,~,q~l-I~LC-.-C~~'.~~







WASTE NOT.

speak, the deaf to hear, the lame to walk,
and the sick and dying were made strong
and healthy. And all these things were
done without any money to be paid, or
any pain caused, or any delay in the cure.
We need not wonder that crowds of poor
and sick went to him to be healed.
One day a great number of men,
women, and children followed him to a<
desert-some to be made well, and
others to see what he would do. When
he saw them he had pity on them, for
he saw they were like sheep that had no
shepherd. He then sat down, and began
to teach them many things which they
did not know, but which if they would
learn would make them happy. They
stayed so long in listening to his wise
and holy lessons, that when it grew quite
late in the day there they were sill, far
away from their homes, and wi
F







GRANBMAMMA WISE.

to eat. He then told his friends that all
these people must have some food; and
that he would give it to them.
LWhere,' said they, 'shall we find
enough to give to so great a number of
people, here in this desert place?'
"He asked them how much they
had with them; and they said they had
among all the people only five loaves of
bread and two small fishes. The people
were then told to sit down upon the
grass, and they were placed in rows or
ranks, while they all looked to see what
he was about to do.
"Then he broke the loaves in pieces,
and gave them to be shared among the
people; and when he broke them up,
the supply so increased that all that great
crowd of men, women, and children had
as much as they wanted, and more than
enough; for when they had all well
50







WASTE NOT.

feasted, there were some baskets full of
the pieces that were left.
"Now, what did he do with those pieces
that were over? Perhaps you think he
said-' Throw them away, or let them
remain on the grass for any hungry men
or beasts that may come this way, for you
have all been filled; you need not trou-
ble yourself about what is left over from
the feast. I can by my power provide
you with food at any time, and give as
much as you want.'
But no; he turned to his friends, and
said, 'Gather up the fragments, that
nothing be lost.' Just as if he had told
them, 'You see I can easily give you all
you need at any time, but all that I
make and give you is for some use, and
I will not have you throw any of my
gifts away. If you do not value them
and take no care of them, you must not
61







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

expect that I will give you more at
another time.'
"So they did as he told them, and they
took up twelve baskets full of the frag-
ments.
"And now,"said grandmamma," when
she had spoken this story, "can any of
you tell me who that Person was who
did such things?"
Betsey Jones, Mary Green, and the
other girls had read at school the ac-
count of the great things our Saviour
did when on earth, and they all replied,
"It was Jesus Christ."
Yes," said grandmamma; "and since
he taught us that food should not be
wasted, must it not be wicked in us to
throw about our bread? What would he
have said to the people, if, after he had
supplied all their wants, he had seen
them throw the fragments at each other
62







WASTE NOT.

in sport? And what would he now say
to you? I do believe you are willing to
learn, and are sorry when you offend.
What you did was done without thought,
and in play; but you will, I hope, not
act so again. I wish that you should
always try to do what is right, even in
little things. Always obey God, and
fear nothing so much as doing what
he forbids. He is the Giver of all we
enjoy. There is not a crumb of bread
but is his gift. Let us, then, show our
gratitude and love for all his benefits;
and do not forget that those who waste
are often brought to want the food
which they once cast away.
Now put up your work neatly, and
then run and gather up all the fragments.
I dare say the chickens will be glad of
them. We will take care that they are
not wasted."


F 2


53








GRANDMAMMA WISE.

That night the little girls went to
their homes wiser and better children
from the lesson they had been taught at
Rose Cottage.


64







p-"----1--^--"---~*-*-----~--
VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.






V.

VERY CLEVER CHILDREN."

MONG those who were often
at Rose Cottage was Aunt
Mary. She was a dear,
kind aunt; but I fear
that the way she used to
indulge me, and speak of
me, was not the wisest and best. If I
had lived with her always, I think I
should have been quite spoiled. Only
fancy to yourself a little girl, with not
much knowledge, and only a small share
of talent, being told several times a day
that she was very clever."
65







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

I suppose it was the foolish fond-
ness of my aunt that led her into the
error of praising me; but so it was, that
-everything I did was looked upon by
her as something quite uncommon. Not
a scrawl could I do with my pen or
pencil in the shape of a drawing, and
not the most common tune could I tinkle
on the piano, without some word of
praise. So sure as she saw the one, or
heard the other, so certain was she to
say that it was "quite clever."
It was the same when any one called
at the cottage. Whatever else she talked
about, she was sure to manage to speak
about my doings; so that hardly a day,
or even an hour of the day, passed with-
out my hearing how "very clever" I
was.
Some of the young people who now
and then came to grandmamma's knew
66







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

even less than I did. This only raised
me in Aunt Mary's esteem. Again
and again was I compared with them;
so that my being "very clever" was a
settled thing in the mind of my aunt,
and indeed in my own.
It was well for me that my grand-
mpmma was not only Wise by name, but
that she was indeed a wise and prudent
woman. I could tell that it was her
opinion that I really knew very little,
and that I was in danger of growing up
to be a vain and conceited girl. It was
plain that I caused her much grief; but
as it was more pleasant to me to be
praised than to be corrected, no wonder-
that I often turned a deaf ear to grand-
mamma, and was glad to listen to the
words of Aunt Mary. From the one
the. only praise I could get was, "Pretty
well, my dear; go on with care, and
67 i

i______ _~







GRANDMAMMA_ WISE.

you will do better next time;" but with
the other I was always very clever."
One day, after I had been playing a
tune to my grandmamma and aunt, I
went to walk in the garden, and then
sat down near to the open window. It
so happened that I could hear what was
said. Aunt at once began, How well
Fanny plays, does she not?"
Mary," said grandmamma, how is
it that you can act so cruel a part to little
Fanny?"
Act cruelly to Fanny?" replied my
aunt; "what can you mean? Why, I
dearly love the child. She is my darling
niece; and besides that, she is so wonder-
fully clever."
Wonderfully clever !" said my grand-
mamma; "and so because you think she
is so, by your constant praise you help
to fill her young heart with pride."
58







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

My aunt was silent, and grandmamma
went on thus:-" The truth is, that you
do not know so much about children as
I do. You have too high an opinion
of little Fanny. Instead of calling forth
her powers and improving her mind,
you are in danger of spoiling her with
praise. I am glad to see her make
progress in her studies; I do all I can
to encourage her; but I am sorry to see
that she does not improve so much as I
could wish. She is very backward for
her age in learning. And then, too, she
does not know so much as she ought of
her Bible."
"Fanny is very young," replied my
Saunt; she will attend to that when she
is older."
"Why wait till she is older?" said
grandmamma. "Are you sure that she
will have a long life? God's holy word
59







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

says, Remember now thy Creator in
the days of thy youth;'* and, I love
them that love me, and those that seek
me early shall find me.'t I do not know
that there is a single text that says any-
thing about a child waiting to be older
before reading and loving the Bible. I
am afraid that the praise so often given
to Fanny will neither prepare her for
the duties of this life, nor lead her to
think of the world to come."
Unwelcome as the words of grand-
mamma were to me, I could not but
feel that there was much truth in them.
They were spoken, too, in her usual
kind way, and they sank into my heart.

If my Aunt Mary took the way to
spoil me, by calling me a clever girl, it
was not so with my Uncle Jacob. He
Eccleaiastes xii. 1. 1 Proverbs viii. 17.
60







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

was elder brother to Aunt Mary; and
as he lived a long way off, he was not
often at Rose Cottage.
My Uncle Jacob was one of those
persons who seem as if they had been
everywhere, and seen everything, and
knew about everybody. I am sure he
used to think that I was a vain child;
and sometimes he used to cross me in
such a way, that I have called him a
tiresome uncle, though it was not right
for me to have so spoken.
I remember that once I worked a
cover for a music stool. It was a rose
pattern; and that it might look very
showy I had made the flowers double,
the size they were usually made. My
aunt said it was beautiful, and that she
had never seen the like before; but my
uncle advised me to call it the red
cabbage pattern, for that my flowers
G 61







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

were much more like red cabbages than
roses. Now, was not this too bad?
I was once playing a piece of music
called the "Battle of Prague" on the
piano to my aunt, when my uncle came
in unseen by me, and sat down behind
me. How I did look when I saw him!
Aunt asked him if he did not think I
had a style of my own? I do think
so," said he; "for though I have heard
the Battle of Prague played a good many
times, I never heard it as Fanny plays it."
I could tell by his smile and the curl
of his lip what he meant; for it was
just the way he used to vex me. Oh, I
thought, you are indeed a tiresome old
uncle.
After this, I was sitting at table with
two young friends, Rosa Smith and
Annie Abbott. Grandmamma had given
us some fruit to eat. There were two
62







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

plates of dates and figs before us, so I
told one of the little girls, in a low voice,
that Barbary dates came from Barbary,
and Turkey figs from Turkey. I did not
think uncle would hear me, but it was
as though he heard everything.
Can you tell me, Fanny," said he,
"in what part of the world the Arabs
live ?"
I replied that I did not know, for I
had never been abroad.
Well," said he, as you happen to
know that Turkey figs come from Tur-
key, and Barbary dates from Barbary,
I rather wonder that you should not
know that the Arabs live in Arabia."
I was sadly vexed that I could not an-
swer his question; but I said, I cannot
think of everything all in a moment.".
After we had taken our tea, my aunt
did not fail to call upon me to play over
63







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

the few tunes I knew. She then, in a
whisper, said to Rosa Smith, "Is she
not very clever ?"
But Uncle Jacob heard what was said,
and lifting up his head from the book he
was reading, he said, "You very clever
girls should know everything." He
then put questions to me about grammar,
history, geography, the sun, moon, and
stars, and the Bible; not one in ten of
which I could answer. But this was
riot all; for when I could not reply to a
question, it was put to Rosa Smith aiid
Annie Abbott, who gave a good answer
almost every time. Oh, how I did
blush I I could have run out of the
room, and have wept for shame.
My aunt, who sat very uneasy, tried
to help me, by asking me to show my
best drawings; but, in the same moment,
my uncle asked Annie to show some of
64







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

hers, which he had told her to bring
with her. Both of our drawings were
on the table at the same time. Mine
were sad daubs, but Annie's were pretty,
and done with care and taste. As I
looked at them, I bit my lips, and hung
down my head.
Uncle Jacob now asked Rosa to play,
and handed her to the piano. The first
run with her fingers over the keys showed
me what she could do. She then played
in a manner which showed that she had
been well taught.
I thought that tears would flow down
my face before them all. Not a remark
was made by my aunt when Rosa had
finished; but my uncle smiled, and
thanked her.
There was silence for a few minutes,
when my Uncle Jacob said, "Well, dear
girls, since you have tried to please me
G 2 65







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

by showing me your drawings, and play-
ing on the piano, I will attempt to please
you by telling a story about the son of
a friend of mine.
Clement Baines was a smart boy of
his years, but he had one sad failing: he
was vain and proud of what he knew,
and loved to show off before those who
knew less than himself. His father had
tried many ways to cure him of this
fault, but without much success. He
stood high in the opinion of his school-
fellows. His brother Basil, who was
younger, looked upon him as a sort of
wonderful boy. Oh, how silly is self-
conceit how foolish is vanity I
Farmer Robson held some land
under Mr. Baines. One day be had
a message to send to the latter, and his
son Ralph was the bearer of it.
When Ralph arrived, as Mr. Baines
66







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

was busy, Clement and Basil filled up
the time in talking to Ralph, whom they
called 'the farmer's boy.' This gave
much delight to Clement, who was just
in the humour to let the farmer's boy
see a little of his clever ways.
"Ralph was asked into the parlour
with Clement and Basil, though he
would much rather have waited in the
kitchen.
"And now Clement was in all his
glory. He talked to Ralph Robson
about music, painting, and drawing, and
French and Latin; every now and then
asking him questions that he knew he
could not answer. Then he placed on
the table a pair of globes, and turned
them round and round, now talking
about this country, and then of another.
Next he spoke about the single stars
and double stars, and planets and comets.
67







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

Basil felt quite proud of his clever bro-
ther; while poor Ralph, finding himself
at a loss, blushed with a colour like a rose.
It was just at the moment when
Clement was making Ralph stare with
surprise, by telling him how many years
it would take a ball, fired from the
mouth of a cannon, to reach one of the
stars, that Mr. Baines came in. He saw
at a glance by Clement's boastful look,
by Ralph's red face, and by one of the
globes on the table, how matters stood,
and in a very short time he brought
round quite a change.
After asking Ralph about the health
of his father and mother, and hearing
the message he had brought him, he
began to talk about the farm. After a
few kind words Ralph felt more at ease.
"Mr. Baines asked Ralph how they
managed about the different sorts .of
68t







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

lands: when the latter told him that wet
land was worth but little until it was
well drained; that cold, clayey lands
had lime and other manures cast on
them; while light, dry lands were often
made better by mixing them with marl
and clay. In short, he seemed to know
almost as much about land as if he were
an old farmer. Mr. Baines then asked
his son Clement what he knew about
these things, but he knew nothing.
When Mr. Baines talked about
ploughing, sowing, drilling, and reaping,
Ralph seemed to know all about these
kinds of work. Clement was asked also,
but again he said he did not know any-
thing of farming.
Next, when Mr. Baines spoke of the
produce of land, Clement never so much
as opened his lips, while Ralph gave
such an account of the different kinds of
69







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

wheat, barley, oats, rye, beans, turnips,
grass, and hay, that little Basil looked
up with wonder, and began to think, by
,the looks of his brother Clement, that
he was not quite so wise as he had taken
him to be.
"Clement was indeed in a pitiable
condition, for he found that he had
looked down on 'the farmer's boy,' as
he called him; and he felt, too, that he
was losing ground in the high opinion
of his brother Basil. He had brought
trouble on his own head, and his vain
heart had to be yet further humbled.
"Afte: talking of hops, hemp, and
flax, sheep-shearing, rick-making, and
Sapple-picking, Mr. Baines asked Ralph
about the live stock of a farm; and this
led the lad to speak of horses, cows,
calves, sheep, and pigs, as well as of
turkeys, geese, ducks, and fowls; and
70







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

this he did in so plain and modest a way,
that it was quite clear he knew what he
was talking about. Once more, Clement
was asked for what he could say; but a
red face and a downcast look showed
that he knew nothing.
"Ralph had now a large slice of cake
set before him, for he had walked a long
way, and needed some food. Mr. Baines'
kind words and attention had made him
much happier than he was when Clement
was showing off about French, and
painting, and the stars. When he left
the house it was with a friendly feeling
towards Mr. Baines and his sons.
Nor did that hour pass away with-
out Clement having learned a useful
lesson. He found that all do not gain
the same kinds of knowledge. The
farmer's boy knew what was of ser-
vice in his station of life, though he
S71
5..







GRANDMAMMA WISE.


knew nothing of painting or French.
Clement saw that while some branches
of study were suited to adorn and please,
there were others that were of use to the
cottage, and all those who have to labour
for their daily bread. It is hoped, too,
that from that time he was led not to
think of himself more highly than he
ought to think-a lesson which it be-
comes us all to learn."

When my Uncle Jacob had finished
his story, I saw that it was meant as a
gentle reproof to me. Though it was
certainly kind of him to speak about
boys, so that Rosa and Annie might not
suspect his object, while he wished that
I should see my fault plainly, he did not
intend to expose me before my young
friends.
I was very glad, as soon as Rosa and
72







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

Annie had gone home, to get alone. I
went and sat by myself in the garden;
but who should follow me there but my
uncle. He placed himself by my side,
and took me by the hand; and as he
gently pressed it, he thus spake to me:-
"My dear Fanny, as I am to leave
Rose Cottage in the morning, I wish to
talk with you before I go, with the hope
that what I say may do you good. Since
we met I have crossed you in many
things. I fear that your temper is vexed,
though I did not wish that it should
be. I would not have acted as I have
done, if I had not seen too plainly that,
though you know but little, you are
in great danger of becoming very vain.
You may perhaps have thought yourself
to be better than others; I wished you
to feel that there are some as wise, at
least, as yourself.
HI7


H


73







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

It is not to be supposed that all who
are called clever children become clever
men and women. They may be praised,
and spoiled. The promise of early years
is often nipped in the bud, just as you
have seen the blossoms fall off the trees
before the fruit is set. The most clever
boys and girls, if they do not continue
to apply to their studies, will soon get
behind others who are not so clever as
themselves, but who are diligent and
attentive.
"While I wish you, my dear Fanny,
to grow in wisdom and- knowledge, I
desire you to become meek and humble.
As Christians, we are to be of a lowly
mind. The Bible teaches us 'not to be
wise in our own conceit, but to esteem
others better than ourselves.' Believe
me, my dear girl, if you have attended
to the lesson you have learned this day,
74







VERY CLEVER CHILDREN.

while your vanity will be less, your self-
respect and comfort will be the greater.
And I am sure you will be more lovely
and beloved. That this may be the
happy result, pray that you may become
more like the blessed Saviour, who was
'meek and lowly in heart.' Take what
I have said kindly, and a time will
come when you will be thankful for the
advice I have now given you."


75







GRANDMAMMA WISE.


VI.

HOW TO BE USEFUL.

NE day, my brother
Henry found Grand-
mamma Wise seated
in her front parlour,
knitting a pair of
warm socks for a
little boy who had lost his mother. As
'Henry looked at the quickly moving
knitting needles, and the half-finished
socks, he said to her, I wish I were as
useful as you are, grandmamma. If I
grow up to be a rich man, I will do a
great deatlof good in the world."
"Henry may do some good," said
76




























































































. .~ .1 I







HOW TO BE USEFUL.

grandmamma, in her quiet way, "before
he is a man; and he need not wait to be
rich before he begins to be useful."
What can boys and girls do? Rich
people have money, and they can give
away as much as they like; but I can-
not think what a little boy can do, who
has only a new sixpence in his pocket."
"There are many ways of being
useful," replied grandmamma, "besides
giving away of money. It is not the
rich only who are of use, or who can do
deeds of kindness. There is work of
this sort for all. I saw two little acts
performed this week by poor children,
which told me that there are more ways
than one of doing good."
"Can I be useful now?" asked Henry.
"Listen, and you will learn. I have
often looked at old Jonas Briggs. The
poor man is very feeble. His thin locks
H 2 77







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

of hair are very white, and his body is
bent with age. His children died long
ago, and he seems left alone in the
world. But there is little Willie Smith,
one of the kindest boys in the village.
He knows that poor Jonas cannot go by
himself to the house of God, so he asks
his teacher at the Sunday school to allow
him to run to the cottage just by, and
help the-old man along the road. I
have seen how gently he guides him to
the seat; and how he points to all the
places for him to read in the service.
And then he looks up so kindly into the
face of poor Jonas, that I am. sure he
feels glad to do anything that will make
the old man happy."
"But all that, grandmamma, is a very
little thing," said Henry.
"Well, Henry, you know that Jesus
said that a cup of cold water given in
78







HOW TO BE USEFUL.

his name should not be forgotten by
him. Do you not remember, too, how
our Saviour took notice of the two
mites that the poor widow cast into the
treasury at the temple?" r
Grandmamma then went on to say-
" Susan King is another kind and useful
child in the village. There is no one
that gives more attention to the sermon
than little Susan. When she returns
home, she repeats all she can of it to her
blind and bedridden aunt. Then she
sits and reads a chapter of the Bible;
and seems never tired of waiting on her.
The poor woman says that she learns so
much from Susan, that it is almost as
good as if she heard the sermon herself,
and could see to read the Bible."
GranImamma saw that Henry was
listening to every word she said, so she
did not stop, but said-
79







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

"While we should be at all times
willing to do good to strangers, we must
not forget that there are ways of being
useful and kind at home. Try, my dear,
the effect of little acts of love and duty
there. To draw up the arm-chair when
father comes home; to see if anything
can be done to please mother; and to
be gentle towards a sister or brother,
are little things, but they help to make
home a happy place.
"A little brother has a hard lesson
given to him at school, and his teacher
asks him if he thinks he can learn it.
He hangs down his head, but in a
moment he looks up brightly, and says,
'I have got a kind sister at home, who
will help me.' That is right, sister; help
your young brother, and it will bid him
in love to you as long as you live.
"'I do not know how to do this
80







HOW TO BE USEFUL

sum,' says a little girl, 'but my brother
will teach me.' That is right, brother;
show your sister that you love her, and
she will be sure to love you in return.
Sister, I have dropped a stitch in
my knitting,' cries another little girl: 'I
have tried to take it up, but it has run
down. Do come and help me.' Oh!
I am so glad,' she says, as she takes it
again from the hands of her sister all
nicely put to rights; 'you are a good
girl, that you are.' Surely it was better
to do as the sister did, than to say,
'Go away, do not tease me,' or to scold
the little one all the time she was being
helped in her work.
In every family there is a time and
place for some little acts of love. To
give up something that another wishes
to have; to yield, instead of showing a
stubborn temper; to take an ill word or
81







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

a cross look, and not show anger, are
among the ways of doing good. Then
to seek out an old person who would
gladly hear the Bible read, or to give a
few flowers to a poor sick child, may be
useful works for a little boy or girl to
perform.
"The sunshine, my dear Henry, is
made up of tiny beams of light. So
gentle words and loving acts, flowing
from a loving heart, help to make many
a sunny, happy life. If we wait till we
can do some great deeds, we may wait
a long time; and while we wait, our
hearts may grow very selfish and hard.
"You know that Jesus went about
doing good. He was rich, yet for our
sakes he became poor. He had not
money to give, and was without a place
to lay his head; yet his whole life was
full of deeds of love and mercy. We
82







HOW TO BE USEFUL.

should seek to be more and more like
him; then we may hope to put a smile
on many a tearful face, and remove a
pang of sorrow from many a sad heart."

Grandmamma having finished one of
the socks, laid aside her knitting needles
to have a little rest from her work. Seeing
that Henry was not tired of listening, she
again went on with her kind words.
"I have just been thinking," said she,
"of a text I read this morning in the
Bible. I will soon find it. There it is.
Listen to it, Henry. 'In the morning
sow thy seed, and in the evening with-
hold not thine hand: for thou knowest
not whether shall prosper, either this or
that, or whether they both shall be alike
good.' This verse has a sweet lesson
for children, as well as for the husband-
Ecclesiastes xi. 6.
83








GRANDMAMMA WISE.

men of the times in which it was
written, and the preachers of every age.
Those who seek ways of being useful
belong to the blessed class who sow
the seed in the morning of life, and in
its evening too. One person may sow
the seed of truth in the pulpit, another
in the Sabbath school, another in the
family, and still another by the way-
side."
"But, grandmamma," said Henry,
".little boys like me cannot preach nor
teach in the Sunday school, nor in the
family. I do not know how to teach
anybody."
"Did I not hear you one day teaching
your mother's servant to read?"
"But Ann is only one; that is doing
such little good in a world full of
ignorant people."
"We should be thankful, Henry, if
84


-17"PN ---*R~-r- a3








HOW TO BE USEFUL.

we can only teach one. But there are
many other ways of sowing precious
seed besides teaching. Children can
scatter around them little seeds of love,
as they move on in their lowly way. I
know a little boy who is learning to sow
such kinds of seed in the morning of his
days."
"Have you seen any of the seed
spring up, grandmamma?" asked Henry.
"Yes, my dear boy, and the fruit
thereof has cheered my heart."
Why, what does he do?"
"Oh, sometimes he speaks a gentle
word, or does some humble act of kind-
ness. He gives up a walk cheerfully,
or lays down a nice picture book, when
his mother wants him to do any little
thing for her. He waits upon his feeble
grandmother when he goes to see her,
and walks slowly by her side, when it
I 85


f..







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

would be, perhaps, pleasanter for him to
walk fast, or to have a run over the
field."'
"Those are very little seeds indeed,
grandmamma."
"Yes, but he is not old enough to
earn money with which to feed the poor,
or to send the gospel to the heathen, or
to do anything which you would call
great. I hope, however, he has the
seeds of better things in his heart,
planted there by the Holy Spirit, from
whom all good thoughts and holy desires
proceed. And should he live, I pray
that, by the blessing of God, he may
bring forth much fruit. The constant
acts of love of even a child will amount
to a great deal in a year."
"Still I cannot see any fruit such
tiny seeds as those the little boy sows
can bring forth."
86







HOW TO BE USEFUL.

"Well, I will tell you, Henry. I once
heard a servant in the family say, 'My
work is so hard, that I think I must get
an easier place; but I have always met
with rude and unkind children wherever
I have lived before, and the little boy
in this house is so kind and well behaved
that I will stop for his sake.' Then his
grandmother once went to live at his
father's house for some months. She
left a cottage covered with roses to
dwell in a town where there were only
high brick houses. But she soon forgot
her cottage home, and was happy to live
with the little gentle grandson. Instead
of feeling that she was a burden in the
family, she was soon set quite at her ease.
Her darling boy loved to scatter the
seeds of love in her pathway."
"That grandmother was something
like you," said Henry; "for you know
87







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

you came from the country to live in
the town with us; and if you come
again I will try to make you as happy as
that boy did his grandmother."
Grandmamma smiled, for she saw
that Henry did not see as his own the
picture which she had just drawn.


88







BEGIN WELL, AND GO ON WELL.





VII.

BEGIN WELL, AND GO ON WELL.

MONG the young friends
of my early days was
/ my cousin Mary Mills.
Mary had many good
qualities, but there was
Sa bad one which gave
much trouble to her friends, and cast
a dark shade over her name. It was
this: she had a foolish habit of putting
off any duty she had to do, and which
should have been done at once. Instead
of setting about it without delay, she
would say, in a peevish manner, "I will
1 2 89







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

do it in a minute." But her minutes
were often as long as hours.
If I tell you of what took place in
only one day of her life, you will see the
folly of the bad habit she had formed.
Mary was on a visit at Rose Cottage
at the same time that I was. We rose
early, that we might walk in the garden.
When breakfast was quite ready, we
were called to come in-doors. "In a
minute," said Mary, and then went on
with her walk among the flowers.
After some delay, she ran into the
house, and found that breakfast was
almost over. My grandmamma told her
that she must then wait till we had
done, before she could be allowed to sit
down, as this habit of coming late to the
table must be put an end to. Mary was
very sorry to be chided by her kind
grandmamma; and one would have
90







BEGIN WELL, AND GO ON WELL.

thought that she would not have given
way again to her old practice of waiting
a minute, at least for that day. But bad
habits, when firmly fixed, are not easily
cured. For this reason, then, children
should be very careful not to form them.
During the morning, Rosa Smith and
Annie Abbott called for us, to take a
walk with them; and we soon set off in
high spirits. Our path lay through the
fields, till we came to a brook. It was
so narrow that we could almost, but not
quite, jump over it.
Just then, a farmer's boy came' that
way; he had a board under his arm,
which he was carrying to mend the old
barn. As he saw we wanted to get
over the brook, he kindly laid the board
across it for us to walk over.
While the other girls were stepping
across, Mary skipped to a corner of the
91







GRANDMAMMA WISE.

field to pick some wild blue flowers,
which grew there.
"Come along, Mary," I cried; "we
are all waiting for you."
"In a minute," she shouted, as she
started after some yellow flowers which
caught her eyes in another part of the
field.
The farmer's boy waited for some
time; when Rosa Smith called out, "Do
come, Mary, or we shall go on without
you."
Well, I will come in a minute, as
soon' as I can get those red flowers
yonder," said the tiresome girl, as she
ran still further away.
At last, when she had plucked a
handful of the blue, yellow, and red
flowers, she went back to the brook; but
the farmer's boy had gone away, and
had left her to get over the brook as she
92







BEGIN WELL, AND GO ON WELL.

.could. She was a lively girl, and thought
she would step upon a large stone, that
stood just above the water, and then
jump over. This she tried to do, but
the stone slipped aside, and she nearly
fell into the brook. As it was, she got
much splashed; her dress was soiled with
clay from the bank; and her hands were
scratched by a thorn bush which she
caught hold of in order to save herself.
She did not again try to get across, but
was glad to return to Rose Cottage, and
thus she lost her morning walk.
In the afternoon a party was made
up to visit the sea-shore, which was
about two miles from grandmamma's
house. But just before we started, I
said to my cousin, "Mary, you have not
put a cover to the book that Susan Wall
lent you. The cover is blotted and
torn, and you said that it could not be
93


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