• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The waking of the spring
 The life of the birds
 The imprisonment
 The release
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Little bird red and little bird blue : a tale of the woods
Title: Little bird red and little bird blue
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003111/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little bird red and little bird blue : a tale of the woods
Physical Description: 48 p. : col. ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Betham-Edwards, Matilda, 1836-1919 ( Author, Primary )
Macquoid, Thomas Robert, 1820-1912 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Bone & Son ( Binder )
Sampson Low, Son & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Sampson Low, Son & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1861
 Subjects
Subject: Birds -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Nature -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Bone & Son -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by M. Betham Edwards ; illustrated by T.R. Macquoid.
General Note: Illustrations engraved and printed by E. Evans.
General Note: Poetry within very decorative floral border.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003111
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222165
oclc - 03299367
notis - ALG2402
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The waking of the spring
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The life of the birds
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The imprisonment
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The release
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








































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Some c, !.'-l boy a snare has laid,
I,, .],- Bird Blue i. p .i* -,*,,- rn,.-..

































B3Y


TJLU RATED 1

H@X, Nkq'I[ Cm-1



A L@I T. L@;V, -

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THE Story of little Bird Rled and little Bird Blu3n" is

ndapotd, with some ailtertions, from the German of an
unknown Author, anid we fool nssured that little Englis.h

renlderl will be cuiial to make s., pleasant an nequaintance.

















THE WAKING OF TIE SPRING.



FI- rST A.CT.



FIST SCENE.



THE SNHw IM) fl,'.
IT was the sun, my mother, spoke,
In the ildarksone night,
WVitli gentle vuice, yet I aiwo'ke,
Out otf slumbers li'lt ;
Olit ut '(rc11lIs which W(l'e SO brightt,
Of lovely tilW i.S i lol 1 i,
Anid little .siingini., birds in i.gt']
As if the Sp1riji; had come.
But 11now my luv]ly d 1r5aam is o',
And I am ill mncwt once more,-
Benlletli this ica\ snow and ico
M13y little hlead lso hLeas \) lies;
Will it ever wholl i*'i- ?Y


7--- -- ....i' .^. .' .
^^~~~~~~~ i)-.-^-.^ *"^ ^.














THE VIOLET.
I hear a rustling sound hard by,
I '11 just peep out and see,-
Behold, my sister Snowdrop stands
And whispers soft to me!
I must in bed no longer stay,
But haste to meet her in the way.

SNOWVDKOP.

So early, sister Violet ?
All others slumber soundly yet.

VIOLET.
They may have been more tired than we,
Let them enjoy their peaceful rest;
The fitting time fbr them to wake,
The sun, our mother, knoweth best.

SNOWDROP.
Our sister Iaftflil, but see,
Hath lifted up h(er golden head!
And fain to be, with you ;and me,
Would leave her cosy little bed.

D. AIL 1 ) IL.
t1ardly a minute 'twas ago,
Our mother stooped and kissed my brow-
So tenderly, yet I awoke,
,' And heard the last words that you spoke.












THE SUlN.
My little children, all arise,
And open wide your little eyes
Icy Winter now is past,
And sunny Spring returns at
last.
Valley lilies, spotless white.
Hyacinths and tulips bright.
Primroses so fair and meek,
Listen to the words I speak : \ \
Green n]ight-dresses cast aw:a\y.
Put on garments for the day :
Be happy as the birds of air.
I will give you love and care.
Cornflowers, make the Eartlh
look gay,
its holiday begins to-day.
Leaves, array the woods inj
green,
Already arc the swallows scene '
('berry-trees, bloom out in
white;
Ye larks, sing up to heaven'
height;
Frisk,]ittleFroggies,in the rills:
Fly. Butterflies, across the hills:
Cockchafers, buzz amlid the treee'
1 lBegin to work, yu little BIe' !L'













Come, all ye little children, come,
Come out into the woods, and sing !
See what a lovely world it is,
Praise its Creato, Maker, k King !

SONG OF TIE CHILDREN IN Till, U'OUil.
Ye little lovely tender flowers,
Who made ye all so bright,
That ye should give our hearts anld (cvI'
Such deep and pure delight?

THE FLOWERS.
And who to you, ye children, gave
Your eyesight fine and clear,
That ye can come, with merry hearts,
And view us blooming here ?

TIIE CHILDREN.
The great good God did give us that.
Our Father up in Heaven;
By Him we 're kept from every harm.
From Him all joys are given.

THE FLOWERS.
The same great God, who gave you eyes,
And fills your hearts with mirth,
Hath placed us here, to bloom in joy
Upon His beauteous Earth.















THE CHILDREN.
Oh everything says plain and clear,
He hath created me,
The same great God, who rules in love
Far over land and sea."
How great, how wonderful art Thou,
0 God, who reigns above!
To Thee we lift our little hearts,
In gratitude and love!



SECOND SCENE.

LITTLE BIRD RED.
Never before, little Bird Blue,
Have I seen a bird of such lovely hue.
LITTLE ID1) BILI'E.
Little Bird Red, in my own countrio,
Never a Birdie lied you see.
LITI'LE I'IIRD RED.
I am quite a stranger here,
Therefore, little Birdie, tell.
Are there many Blue Birds here?
For your look has pleased me well.















LITTLE jRl; IIBL.'E.
So lue as I am, there are none,
But once I was not thus alone;
I had two little sisters fair,
A father's and a mother's care:
The Griffin Bird-that cruel thief-
Caused all my loneliness and grief,
For one day, ere we saw him come,
He darted down upon our home,
And in each savage claw seized two,
And ate them up before my view;
He could not carry more away,
Or I should not le here to-day,
LITTLE BIRD RED.
Poor little Bird thou grievest me,
And yet 'tis well he slew not thee.
LITTLE BIIR BLUE.
Alas! I wish I too were gone,
It is so hard to live alone!
True, I have little friends, with whom
I sing and chirp now Spring is come;
But still I never can forget,
My parents' and my sisters' fate;
Without them. I so timid feel,
The hours so slowly, sadly steal!
And when the weary day is past,
And quiet night hath come at last-
QT 'When all the lirds fly home to rest,
7 I seek my little lonely nest.


10


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As it it ci uld inot be til one,
Which formerly belonged Hn


I Ti 'li' E 111 UllD ClI.
IPoor little Bird, how sad tI on
art :
'1'liy tale (of' grief hath toucli d
imy heart!
I cin feel for tliee, for I, too,
A darling little sister knew.
We loved each other- oh. so
well!
And always would toget her.
dwell;
From loedTge to hedge, from tree
to tree.
She flew the livelong day with

The'lin eame the Winter ciold and
dreary.
Making tihe woods so brown and

'To 'get r \ae aIill nvtit iAw\' I.
,'jo selek a hom uiiti the' Mirv ;


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By day, by night, towards the sun.
With little rest, we hurried on,-
When suddenly my sister grew
So ill, she could no farther go,
But sad and sorrowful, she sank
Upon a sunny cactus bank;
And, drooping low her little head,
She could not swallow drink or bread,
But looking forward, kept quite still,
And, ere I thought, was dead and chill.
There, far away o'er land and wave.
I made my little sister's grave.


LITTLE BIHD BLUE.I..
Poor little Bird! it makes me sad,
To think her life had such an end;
It would have made my heart so glad.
Could she have been my little friend
But well it is that you remain,
To greet the rising Spring again.

LITTLE BIRD aI1 .
What use is health and strength to one,
Who must go home to live alone ?
S For now the hands of Spring are seen,
Decking the meadows out in green,-
But who will help to mild my neIt,
To choose the spot I love the best ?


K. -
















LITTLE BIRD BULUE.
Dear little Bird, why go away ?
Will you not here consent to stay ?
I know a nook, so snug and warm,
So safe from every schoolboy's harm;
There you can build a cosy nest,
And I to help will do my best.
LITTLE BIRD RED.
When the flowers are all in bloom,
Then must I be going home;
But so dear art thou to me,
That I cannot part fiom thee.
Dear little'Bird, thy pretty dress,
Has pleased me much. I must confess;
But thy eyes, so bright and clear,
Are a thousand times more dear.
LITTLE 1BR1D 1Pl'E.
Rosy Red Bird, why ngze on me.
As if my inmost thoughts to see?
LITTLE 1 1111 ED.
Loved little Bird. so pretty and blue,
The love of my heart is all for you;
Will you marry me, and become
The dear little mistress of my home ?
LITTLE I.TlD MLUE.
Blue little women, they oft tell me,
To blue little men should wedded be.














S LITTLE BIRD RED.
tWith those whose love is tender and true,
Such as my love is now for you,
No matter what their country and hue,
,' LITTLE BIRD BLl'E.
Till now, of all the birds I 've met,
I've never loved one truly yet.
Fly home--and I will follow thee,
Where thou art, ever will I be;
And so, in love and sweet content,
STogetlier shall our lives be spent.
Over the meadow gaily flew,
I The Red Bird and his mate so blue;
Far over land and sea they sped,
With merry sunshine overhead,
And now and then, in the heat of day,
They sang as they rested on their way.
So, many and many a day was passed,
Till sweet, sweet home was reached at last.


THIRD SCENE.

ANNIE IN THE G AkR DEN.
' I- How warm and pleasant 'tis to-day!
N ow we can cro nabro;d and play: < >
hzl,,t. Slnowdrops, are ye out so soon ?
Anid do ye know that \Wilter's gone ? {
v Like little brides, so wlitCc and fair. '
Ye stand in modest beauty there, 4 .'


, ,


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And lonely--but the sun will send
To each one soon a little friend;
For see, no sooner does she rise,
Than all the flowers ope their eyes.
Oh with what joy and sprightliness
Each one puts on her suminer dress'
Already iln what bright array
Of blossoms are the borders gay;
As if a miracle had done
The work of many days in one.

Ah! sister Annie, art thou here ?
I have looked for thee far and near.
ANNI:E.
See, Rosy, yon snall snowdrop head.
ROSE,
And are there any in my bed ?
,Sh.C' ,g'.,'s to. 1n1. her bed.
Oh! Annie, hasten, here are more,
By ten times, than your little store;
And can I really trust my eyes ?
Here in the shade a violet lit s;
And look, oh, look scattered alout,
A troop of daffodils peep oult;
Green leaves the half-shult Jbuds enclose
As if each were a little rose.
\


11














) ANNIE.
\'-" If little Roses, they must be, ,
/ .' Surely, my sisters that you see.
ROSE.
And you shall have a flower-name too-
A little Snowdrop I '11 call you.
ANNIE.
And as the flowers together cling,
Through winter, autumn, summer, spring. \
Kissing each other's tears away,
And live in peace the livelong day;
So let us hold each other dear, '
And live united all the year.
ROSIE.
But flowers, though made so fair to see,
Can't love, I'm sure, so well as we.
ANNIE.
Mamma so loves the pretty flowers,
We '11 pluck for her the best of ours.
ROSE.
I '11 pluck the loveliest I can get.
ANNIE.
And I, each purple violet,
i.Andi every cobldeii 1',rim .,:rose too, i
uFor dear 3nliininl,, who loves them so.
ROSE.
We have euoug,-li-come, let us see
Whlo gets in first-of'! one-two-three!


-1_ A

1-,.,, .- .T ,Y


1(;
















THE LIFE OF THE BIRDS.



SECOTD) A.CT.-



FIRST SCENE.


LITTLE BIRD RED.
ITIE:RE att las% .' ve safely come,
To my own old garden home;
C'loose. little mate, which spl)t. is best,
In which to build uinI cosy iest.
Su1pp ,s we take a high oak tree,
Tluo higli for sharl)p-ei-yd cats to see ?
I rITL. 1)1i 1:1 1E 1.
Dear little Bird, build not too hi.gh,
Or if the Grillin dcth i.espy,
We both of us 11l, iid suIly die.

Then to the bIechi. wood we'll go,
And seek a s.pot s-cur,. and low.

... ,. .. ... -"














They tiiil fr',ilhicar.
Little Birdies, near and far,
Where the pleasant copses are,
Gleefiully we fly about,
And singing, flutter in and out;
We shall take no time for rest,
Till we 've made our little nest,
So we search throughout the day,
For downy feathers, straw, aind hay.
And when, at last, the nest is made,
And all the little eggs are laid,
We watch and brood, loving and gay,
All through the fresh and sunny day
And when the sun is gone to rest,
And golden stars shine in our nest,
Then we sleep secure and warm,
For angels keep us all from harm.


SECOND SCENE.


FIRST FROGGY.
Huzza! Winter's past!
SECOND FROGGY.
Huzza! Spriing at last!
THIRD FOGGY.
Old Winter is (gone.
FOLet kRT FnOGGY.
Let us bask in the sun.


18













01.1D FR Ot.
1olV ilnquisitive all the, y oui
folks grow,
They are out already alove tlhe,

TOAD.
Thou stupid old fellow, dost thou
not see,
As I toss 111 myi head, the siiun
shine on me m
< )D FItoi.
In deed! is it true ?-and do the
birds sing ?
1, too, must jump up, if it really
is Spring!
E1DElR-DOWN DUCK.
How pleasant it is to glide
S through the grass,
And bibble the dew-drops as I
pass !

(P'Irrii': if.t hicad out qf the ,w",atcL' ).
Sure 'tis the noonday suni I felt
below.

YouL stul)id creature- what do)
Sishes k-now ?


I9


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FISH,
When the trees bud, and birds begin to shout,
Even we fishes know what 'tis about.

FLILS,
We buzz in the sunshine, and find life so sweet,
If only the birds did not want us to eat!

;NATS.
Hither and thither we dance in the light,
Ever ready to sting, ever ready to bite,-
No mii tter whether a beast or a man,
Though we know they will kill us as soon as
they can.
OL.D SPARROW,
Come hither, ye sparrows, and let's chat to-
gether
SO (OND 31,A)ZHOW.
Ah! cousin, there's nought to speak of but the
weather.
THIRD S Akt RlOW.
Wisely spoken, dear uncle, there's no news to
tell.
FOlUIITI SP'AIROW.
Of course not-the reason I know very well-
If birds keep at home till the end of their days,
How cani they know much of the world and its
ways ?


2!1
















But here comes our Aunt, who has travelledu'
abroad:
I've no doubt, with wonders her mind is well
stored.
A INT' SPARROW.
Well met, old friends and neighbours! how d'ye
do?
I 've got a little piece of news for you,-
I never was surprised so in my life,
Little Bird Bed has got a foreign wife;-
And what 's more strange, from head to foot
she's blue!


Dear Aunt, what do you say ?-canl this be true ?

Tli11111 SPI.\ l11 VW.
Sliame on his impolitenless! had he tried,
'Mongst his own kin, le could have found a
bride.
FO IITH SP.111'I1W.
He could not find a wife so pre'ttiy loere,
But still, to take a st;ranger des look queer.

SECON ) SPi' II 1 'V.
SBesides, it is not ri.iht that ioe so red, -
Unto a little Blue Birdl si-,ho1uld 1e w-Id..

'* ^^. ^ > i ^/


2'1















.FOURT11 SPARROW,
,Now tell me, is she really pretty, Aunt?
FIFTH S'PA O110W,
SSome think her so, but I collfess I can't.
SIXTH SPARROW.
Who will go with me to the wedded pair ?
ALL.
Off to the woods we 11y-thelir home is there.



j TH1IIRD SCENE.


7 LARK.
Sver"'iy bid ll)I'sts into ,loom,1,
S7Every flower slhd.,s .swcct pi-rvfitme;
Sirdls fly gldly through the air,
'ilce joy of Sp'ing is ("v\- ryw rll,''.
Let oldl 1iid yUlIIL'. let great a;d! sniimal,
Rijoice in Him wN1 sends us al1l.

In the sillslhjil in tlie shdllw,
I\/^ In the wood, andi in the ni .aldw, '
Si All nround g;ld voices sg,

HI 'II' -_'S' l'l l
3 "Be joyful in tfle plcasa ut, Sprinigi."
K)^-^'' F, "(; E- S- -1.- ].. ow. ,' ,
SG ladsoime echoes sm to fill
Every valley, every hill. 7


2-



22












S in one great chorus. all lr',-
claim
l igih of the Clretol-

"GR- ENFINCI.
Even the wee ones, in thliir

! l' Praise God before they go ii,
Ki i' E.
We little bees are husy ever.
.1Fromn making honey restingl

BUTTERFLY.
(Onr life is sort, but full of

A N'T.
Vo aints each nin n>cut 1nt1st
Slemploy,
S In bearing, ea'th from every
111)mo11nd11,
To build a house with, unider-
S glrouild.
FutST CnOCKCInLF.uE. liii
J Such Ilnnning, l )(huzzilngl ali
\ ) thic (day!, 1 v I
ii iEnoug t' drive on wi awy.














l'. N).\i> (U. ]K h I A t 1.1i
Y01 '11 not much ihelp, 1Y griiilillhg so,
A 11 the work you have to Ii,'.


D)ea
Un
\Vh
\VWh

Ben
An


See

N e'
A .B
Her





Wh


SAlo

..y So
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111011N i FI)UB It V.1S i
r little Swallow, tell, I 1pray
der the s:haow oof tl.e eaves
y dost thou build. so far away,
en we build always 'midst green leaves ?
SWALLOW.
teat a root, we 're snug and warmi .
1 saf, fie' iom every thunder-stornm.
IIl,')(;l -Sl'Al\i! 0. l
I1 Bird Red, early and late,
ks fo-od for limsinielf aandt pretty r 11,1.
LINN F'. 1'
er has it lieen my tfte to see
ird so beautiful as she;
Sfe'thlieTs are so shining blue,
1 then slhe sings so swe -ly too,
hl tunleftl notes, I've never liea,,d.
L(ittli H1 Red1,. f i, .1.s olt
linnetT.
at! hast thou not one little word
give thy 11 trielnd by the way ? )
1 l1 1.E lili) REID
friiedl, jiI.st now I c'ainot stay;
ie at ihone, nmy little mate
inxi].isly 1t,' me doth wait;



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Five little eggs already there
She broods upon with tender care.
Farewell! I have no chatting leisure,
And without her can take no pleasure.
SWALLOW.
Fly away-we too will haste.
Each one to his little nest.



THE IMPRISONMENT.


T3--:IL:ED A.CT.


FIRST SCENE.


FIRST YOUNG B110).
SEE, my feathers are so strong,
I shall learn to fly ere long,
Over hill and vale and mead,
What a pleasant life I'11 lead!
LITTLE 1J11RD BLUE,
You must wait- a few days longer,
Till your wings are soCwhaLt stronger;


25














Then you shall fly from tree to tree,
But not at first lose sight of me.

SECOND YOUNG BIRD.
In every tree will I be seen,
Flying 'mid the leaves so green.

THIRD YOUNG BIRD.
-I' 1 find out berries red and sweet,
To earn myself each meal I cat.

1o0 Til YOU1NG 1I1RD.
How bright and blue lmy feathers are
I 'mn glad to be so like 3Mamma!

SECOND.
And I, like dear Papa, am red,
With a small tuft upon my head.

FIRST.
IPnpa went out into the wood,
To find us berries if he could.

SECOND.
How long will he be gone, MIamma ?

THIRD.
SAh! there you are-you good Papa !

FIRST.
S. Papa has thought of us, I see,
S, And brings us berries home for tea.
V: --









I L,| 'TIil. Him -n.


Here is 1 b trent foin very one
Now eat away till ill are done.
I st;ay with you, whilst mother
deny
("nlI fly amid the thicket near;
She 'll like, I know, to flit about.
And find the fresh wild straw-
berries out.
.LI! 1 IFrTLI: nuIl U LrI'B .
Farewell 1 '11 bring you 11oa,
the best,
Ad\ soon be back. to go to rest.



SECOND SCENE.



() c; GiF what, have I lived to


Speak out-what, has befclleul
thlee ?
s W \1 1.0I %1.
mime icruBl y a 'ioore h -s laid
Little Bird Blue is prisonier nindo.














J.INNE'I.
You see that boy who's running there
'Tis he who took her from the snare.

Il ELDGE-S. PA 1 OW,
Alas I what will her husband do,
withoutt his little helpmate Blue ?
S\.' .LL( >\ .
How the poor little ones will cry !

G(;II. NFINCII.
And she, I fear. will surely die.

IMII11 N.
Ah! that such misery should befall
Her, who was loved so by us all!
Wl REN.
Alas! how heartless they must be,
Whlo will not leave us sate and free-
Our children. mate. ald happy nest,
All that a little bird loves best.

little, Bir'd Rto alppia is in tfh ,ista(ncf, rnOi .i/ .t',,
the rood. lIain flies towards him.
I() IIIN.
Alas poor friend, we weep to see
The sorrow that has come to thee'















We fear thou'It never. never N
find.
Thy little wife. io good. ald
kind,
F'or down anmourg the hazels
there
She has beein taken in a s.lre.
LITTLE BIRD lD.
A sre! Oh! tell me 'tis not
true-
My heart would break of sucli
a woe.

Ah! friend, I know it but to(,
well;
Tis hard to have such news to
tell.
''11he boy who caught her firoi
the trapl,
Took her to town hid ill his.' c;ap.
LirTLE BIRD RE D.
0 bitter grief' -0 misery !
Why have I lived this dvy to
see ?
ly joy, 11iy plrid, Ily my rlilg
ile Cl l
'l'Tc sweet compiol, of m lif..















Must she no longer, free and giy.
Through the green forest wing her way ?
And shall I never see thee more,
Or hear thee warbling at our door.?
What joy can glades- or corntield.s give.
If thou, my mate, hast ceased to live ?
And oh! my little lovely brood.
Who watch for mother in the wood,
How will ye cry, and cry in vain,
To find she does not come again!
0 bitter grief! O misery !
Why have I lived this day to see ?



THIRD SCENE.

I,;ttle Rose appears at the window with a ca'jc o!-
taining Little Bi,'1l Bl7c.
1(5os.'.
.s happy as a little Queen,
'Midst vines that cluster cool and green,
And flowers that pleasant fragrance give,
My pretty Bird shall always live.
Ah! do not hang thy little head,
There's nothing now to make thee dread;
The cruel boy is gone away,
Who only took thee for his play;
But thou art dearer far to me,
SAnd I will feed and wait on thee.


.36















SMy Birdie, wilt thou not, ere long,
Sing me one little grateful song ?
And, by-and-by, be kind, and eat
Out of my hand the grains of wheat ?
She goesout. Little Bird Red comes flying to thi'

LITTLE BIRD RED.
Oh! little helpmate, do I see,
Or only dream, that it is thee ?
My heart beats high with joy and pain,
I feared we ne'er should meet again.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Alas my husband, and I, too,
Have had no hope to cheer my woe:
But now captivity will be
Easy to bear, since cheered by thee.
LITTLE Ri1D) RED.
Oh! that I had the strength of those,
Whom. though we hurt not. are our foes,
Then would I break the bars in twain-
What joy to take thee honie againil
LITTLE BII1i) BLUE.
My helpless birdlings, how are they?
And did they weep much yesterday?
Ah! would that I had never flown,
So far away by night, alone !

-^ /--~~.^^C













BuV just below the shady yew,
Such tempting purple berries grew,
I could not help from picking some,
To take the little birdlings home;
But whilst I plucked so gaily there,
I stepped upon the fatal snare.
I tried to fly-till, weak and worn,
With one poor leg all hurt and torn.
I fell despairing on the ground,
And there by some rude boy was found.
LITTLE BIRD RED.
And was it he who brought thee here ?
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Oh, no; a little girl was near,
Who bought me of that tyrant boy,
And took me home with pride and joy;
'Twas she who kindly placed me here,
I trembling every limb with fear.
LITTLE BIRD RED.
Poor little prisoned mate of mine,
Would I could change my lot with thine!
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Ah! weep not for me, husband dear,
Go home, our little ones to cheer;
The sun already sinks to rest,
They will feel lonely in the nest;
Oh! haste, or some fierce bird may
S stray,
S And eat them up, whilst thou 'rt away.


32













T['ll them they must no long "
Weep),
But patientlyy take rest and sleep.
Farewell! I, too, will try anl(d

_My eyes, and dream away my
WOS. .
LITTLE BIRD IRED.
Farewell! forget thy grief and
palln
Soon shalt thou see me here
again!


FOURTH SCENE.

lITTlE, I B I1) BILUE.
When all the world is gone t,,
rest,
And, in its happy, peaceful nest,
Each little bird doth pelacefIil
S sleep,
LI sit alone, a-nd sadly weep.
My little mate, my children, dear,
Oh wlhy must I be exiled lhen ?
So hopeless is my nlisery,
'TI : I could almost gl(lly dio.
Air Alas will no one pity me,
And break my bars, and set me
fiee 1














I cry in vain-no help is near,
And I must die, a prisoner here.
NIGHTINGALE IN THE SHRUBBERY.
I hear a sad sweet song below,
Sure 'tis some prisoner's note of woe.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Ah! what sweet strains respond to mine ?
Sweet little Bird, do you too pine,
Away from all the ones you love ?
NIGHTINGALE.
Ah! no, I still in freedom rove,
Though in the copse I love to stay,
And sing the evening hours away.
Nightingale sits under the window.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
But, tell me, little Bird, I pray,
Why sing by night instead of day ?
Or has my bitter song of woes
Broken your tranquil night's repose ?
NIGHTINGALE.
Because my voice is never heard
By day, like that of every bird,
But only when night's shadows veil
The earth-I'm called the Nightingale.


34












f' i some cliohamiber still alld dim
A siek man lies, 1 ig to hiI:
I' it' som- heart is _owed willt
grief.
I sing till tears bring sweet re-
lief .:

Many and imaniy a one il wo
I 've soothed to rest and coinfort

LiTrTLE 1111.0 BLIE.
All that I once injoypossessed-
My children, mate, and little ,
nest-
The love so sweet, the life so fre',,
For ever now are lost to me.
Aih! how the dark and solemn,

Fills me with sadness alnd
af1iigbht !
But, could I ever listen so,
Unto thy singing, sweet antd low,
My grief, I think, would alniost
wane,
And peace come to my heart
gtain.
NIGIITINGAI.E SONG.
S1Cnd heart. I brinlg thee
A alml for tlly w1 es:
Softly I sing tljhee(-
To sweetest reose,. ,l












The little ones sleeping,
Dream in their snug beds;
Kind angels keeping
Watch over their heads.
No breeze is shaking,
The leaves on the bough,
The winds even takilln
Their holiday now.
Cast off thy sorrow,
Take rest, weary heart
Perhaps on the morrow
Thy grief may depart



THE RELEASE.


FOXTITET E- A.CT.

FIRST SCENE l


Little Bird Red ,un!s to w,' bin-ging willb flowers in it, bo7,'.
An sleep little mate,
G guarded by me;
Early and late
Watch I by thee.














Wild flowers I bear thee,
From thy loved wood,
That they may cheer thee
In thy sad mood.
Their perfume shall greet thee
Like a dear voice,
Recalling so sweetly
Old woodland joys.
From thy children and mate,
They say unto thee,
"Have patience, and wait-
Thou shalt be free !"

SECOND SCENE.

Little Bird Blue wakes up.
Ah me how sweetly I have dreamed,
Just like reality it seemed;
Forgotten was my grief and pain,
I was at home and free again.
Alas! I wake, the joy is gone,
And I am here with grief alone!
WILD FLOWERS.
Children of the woods are we,
Bringing messages to thee;


37












From thy mate and children dear
Have we come, to see thee here.
.MAY-BELLS.
Little silver bells are we,
Ringing morning chimes to thee.
Canst thou not come out, and dwell
In the woods thou lov'st so well ?
WILD BiOSES.
Beautiful though roses arc,
Love is nobler, better far.
FORG ET- ME-NOT.
Clear and deep as heaven's blue,
Friendship should be pure and true.
PRIMROSE.
We yellow flowers, like stars of gold,
Declare God's kingdoms manifold.
IVY.
We green leaves are never sere,
But are fresh throughout the year;
Thus we're made by God to show,
Hope should ever flourish so.
Soon the forest-le av-s will fall-
Hope is always left to all.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Who brought ye here, ye pretty flowers,
F. Friends of my former happy hours ?
W ILI) FL) I\Vl-I;S.
Your mate has br ouLh it us from the wood,
v. -T' To cheer your prison's solitude.
\ x r














LITTLE BIRD BLtLE.
Little Bird Red-ah! could it be,
He came, and never wakened
me?
Oh! can I trust my weary eyes,
Ah! yes, 'tis he who hither flies.
My grief and woe I feel no more,
I never loved him so before.
Oh! husband, quickly, quickly
tell-
My children, are they safe and
well ?
LITTLE BIRD RED.
Thy little ones cry still for thee,
And fain to-day would follow
me;
They spread their little wings,
and try
Already from the nest to fly;
For me-I feel no grief or pain,
When I my darling see again.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Ah! last night how I sighed and
wept!
I think I never should have
slept,
Unless the gentle nightingale,
Hearing the lonely prisoner's
wail,














Had soothed me with her sweetest strain,
Into forgetfulness of pain.
LITTLE BIRD RED.
I also, wakefiul and distressed,
Could take no linlppy sleep or rest.
Alas! that cruel men should come,
And spoil our little happy home !
No sooner dawned the morning red,
Than I to thee have straightway sped.
LITTLE BIRD BI.LE.
My little mistress means it well,
But, oh if she could only tell,
How very hard it is to me,
When all the other birds are free,
In prison-house so close and drear,
To pine alone and wretched here.-
C'ould she but know the bitter pain,
With which a mother yearns to see,
Her little children once again.
I know-I feel-she'd set me fiee '
Alas! our wrongs we cannot speak.
Although our little hearts should break.
LITTLE RI1I1D I:Ii.
Ah! could she only know my pain,
To hear our birdlings cry in vain,
'To be divided fiom my wife,
And miss each happiness of life















Could she but feel for you and me,
To-day, I know, she'd set you free.
But birds may supplicate all day,
Man understands not what they say.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Yes, could she feel with us, I know,
She'd ope the door, and let me go.
LITTLE BIRD RED.
A sudden thought has passed my brain,
The woods shall see you free again.
I'll try, at least, the best I can,
To carry out my happy plan.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
What new idea has made him go
Towards the wood, and leave me so ?
LITTLE BIRD RED
At the Skirt of the Wood.
All ye birds in field and dale,
All ye birds in wood and vale,
Hither come, and work with me,
To set my little prisoner free.
Birds fly.from the Wood.
BIRDS.
Willingly, from far and near,
To assist we gather here.


41















LITTLE BIRD RED.
At the bars gnaw hard and fast,
They will come apart at last.
SWALLOW.
All our biting is in vain,
Iron will not break in twain.
ROBIN REDBREAST.
Poor little Bird! and must it be,
That all our help can't set thee free ?
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
Alas! 'tis pity you should take,
Dear friends, such trouble for my sake.
The staves are far too hard to split,
You never can succeed in it.
BIRDS.
No, we will daily use our strength,
Surely we shall succeed at length;
Steadfast love and patience are
Even match for iron bar.


THIRD SCENE.


LITTLE BIRD BI'E.
7Weary, darksome nigpit is past,
Day and Sulllshine come at last.
Alas! eight days, so long mnd drear,
I've languished now in prison here;


12














But every morning comes my mate,
To cheer my melancholy fate,
And all his comrades brave and strong,
Who work for me the whole day long.
But do I dream --or really see
My children flying here to me ?
FIRST YOUNG BIRD.
Ah mother, we have flown so fast,
And here we come to thee at last!
SECOND.
How long it is since that sad day,
They took thee from us quite away!
THIRD.
But now we can be glad at heart,
Since we need never from thee part.

FOURTH.
What joy to speak to thee once more !
I never felt so glad before.
LITTLE BIRD BLUE.
My little ones, my pretty brood,
My nestlings from the dear old wood,
To haie you with me once again,
Makes me forget all former pain.


43
















FIRST YOUNG I1118).
And now we can fly everywhere;

SECOND.
And dart so gladly through the air;

THIRD.
And on the green bougohs sit and swing;
FOURTH.
And little songs can also sing.
FIRST.
But till thou too art free and glad,
Even this life is partly sad.
Iothetr, we are so great and strong,
Oh, we shall make thee fiee ere long!
LITTLE BIRD B I E.
Thick iron bars to nibble through,
Is not an easy task to do.

SECOND YOUNG BIRD.
Ah! see this thread that ties the door-
A worsted thread, and nothing more.
TI R I lD.
I help-the task will soon be done.
FIRST.
I, too-huzza! the victory's won!
LITTLE BIRD RED.
The door is open-thou art free !
Oh! little mate, fly home with me.
















ALL, W11il
Free, free,
Who so gl


FO



Dear Ann
come,
It seems s
home
And, oh! I
you h
SThe deare
It is so so
I'm sure 't
iBut come
dear,
Its little c
The door i
Some one
free ?

S You faster
sure

IOh. yes !



A ,


ie, I'm so glad you're

o long since you left

Ise Y purchased-have
eaerd --
st little sinnrg-bird;

willbe a pet with you.
towards the window.

age is hanging there.
s open -can it be,
has set my darling llo

ANNIE.
ned it-you feel quite


t.:I















It is but just an hour ago
Since I was here, and left it so.
ANNIE.
But, see! on yonder hazel bought
A small Blue Bird is sitting now.
ROSE.
Oh, little pet! oh, Birdie say,
Why were you not content to stay '
You had a cage so large and high,
I fed you-oh so carefully;
I petted you the whole day long,
And never yet one grateful song.
Or one glad look, you've given me;
Yet, now that you are once more free.
You sit and chirp so blithe and gay-
Were you so glad to get away ?
ANNIE.
But, Rosy, look! she's not alone,
Five other birds have hither flown;
Four pretty little new-fledged things,
And one Red Bird, who loudly sings.
ROSE.
One little Bird is blue and red,
With a black tuft upon its head.
ANNIE.
Ah! sure enough that it must be
Some little woodland tinmily ; I/
And now they sing in such 'glad strain,
STo have the mother free again.




^^^^-S^,^^^^^-^^^^^
i d;~;~~s--_-4-: ^














ROSE.
Ah! though I've lost my little treasure,
It would be wrong to grudge their pleasure.
ANNIE.
If dear Mamma imprisoned were,
Should we not pine and weep for her ?
ROSE.
And she would die of grief, I know,
If she were parted from us so.
ANNIE.
But, see! the parents with their brood
Fly quickly to the beechen wood:
We'll softly follow in their trace,
Perhaps we'll find their hiding-place.


FIFTH SCENE.
In the Beechen Wood.

LITTLE BIRD RED.
Come, all ye birds, rejoice with me,
Join in my gladsome jubilee!
Little Bird Blue once more is come
Unto her own old happy home.


47















Oh, happy, careless woodland life!
Oh, little ones !-oh, darling wife!
I almost feel too blest to sing,
And yet should all the forest ring
With joyful shout and jubilce-
The little prisoner is free!
CHORU OF ALL THE DIRDS.
Happy days have come at last,
All the bitter ones are past;
Think no more of parting paiin,
It shall never come again;
In the wood your life shall be
Glad, and inniocect, and free.
Sing, ye birds, and shalk your throats
With your gladdest, sweetest notes
Let the glad exultant sound
Echo the whole forest round.
All the birds shall henceforth be,
Ever, ever, safe and free.!
CI'T iMl .N IN THEr DISTANCE'.
All the birds shall henceforth be,
Ever, ever, sa;t'c andt frco!
ECHO.
Free, free, free, FILEE ,.






ENGRAVED AN) 'INTL) Y lUND ;VANS, L ET CT,
LNC(IAVED AH-OD I "IyTI;LP .U LISJU.NlV liA UI:T T, k .- .


















































A;






.177-




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