• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Chapter I: What all the world and...
 Chapter II: The first journey
 Chapter III: Sinbad's second...
 Chapter IV: Sinbad's third...
 Chapter V: Sinbad's fourth...
 Chapter VI: Sinbad's fifth...
 Chapter VII: Sinbad's sixth...
 Chapter VIII: Sinbad's seventh...
 Chapter IX: The last lecture -...
 Chapter X: The last lecture of...
 Sinbad's guide to Wonderland
 Chapter XI: Telescopic, homiletic,...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The Sydenham Sindbad : a narrative of his seven journeys to wonder-land
Title: The Sydenham Sindbad
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003108/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Sydenham Sindbad a narrative of his seven journeys to wonder-land
Uniform Title: Sindbad the sailor
Physical Description: <8>, 311 p., <8> leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: C., M. A ( Binding designer )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905
Meadows, Joseph Kenny, 1790-1874
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Meadows, Joseph Kenny, 1790-1874 ( Illustrator )
J. & C. Brown & Co ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Publisher: J. & C. Brown & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: W. Clowes and Sons
Publication Date: <1861?>
 Subjects
Subject: Voyages, Imaginary -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Jealousy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History, Ancient -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Art -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
National characteristics -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
M.A.C -- Signed bindings (Binding) -- 1861   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Signed bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Summary: Fred, like Sinbad of old, entertains his friends with tales of his marvelous journeys carried by a Roc to ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, a formal garden, Weissnichtwo, ancient Rome, Moorish Spain, and Ninevah. He also presents them with a "Guide to Wonderland" which contains a list of art exhibits gathered from all over the world.
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated with drawings by Kenny Meadows ; engraved by Edmund Evans.
General Note: Binding design signed: "MAC"
General Note: Baldwin Library copy inscribed date: 1861.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003108
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238269
oclc - 13448058
notis - ALH8766
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
    List of Illustrations
        Page vii
    Chapter I: What all the world and his wife know, and what they do not know till they hear it
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Chapter II: The first journey
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Chapter III: Sinbad's second journey
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
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        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Chapter IV: Sinbad's third journey
        Page 60
        Page 60a
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
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        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Chapter V: Sinbad's fourth journey
        Page 76
        Page 76a
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
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        Page 84
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    Chapter VI: Sinbad's fifth journey
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Chapter VII: Sinbad's sixth journey
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 98a
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        Page 101
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    Chapter VIII: Sinbad's seventh journey
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
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        Page 119
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    Chapter IX: The last lecture - but one
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
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        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
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    Chapter X: The last lecture of all
        Page 166
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        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
    Sinbad's guide to Wonderland
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
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        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Greece and Rome
            Page 241
            Page 242
        Italian portrait gallery
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
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        The French portrait gallery
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
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            Page 259
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            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
        German portrait gallery
            Page 271
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            Page 273
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            Page 283
            Page 284
        The English portrait gallery
            Page 285
            Page 286
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    Chapter XI: Telescopic, homiletic, and valedictory
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




-/7


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FRONTISPIECE.

l 1711`- 1'


Adr


FRED RELATING HIS WONDERFUL ADVENTURES.-P. 6.


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THE


Spbnlaa $inlbbabi;



A NARRATIVE OF HIS SEVEN JOURNEYS


TO


"Know'st thou the Land? Know'st thou that pillared pile?
Bright are the halls, and fair the chambers smile,
Where marble statues stand."-GoETB.


3[Iusatratli tol I~rathng~ bl t*nntr n lealotos,
nctnrabt bu fEtmunv btane.




LONDON:
J. & 0. BROWN & CO., AVE MARIA LANE.














































































LONDON: PRINTED BY W. CLOWES AND SONS, STAMFORD STREET,

















CONTENTS.




. V OAPTEBR I.-WHAT ALL THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE KNOW, AND WHAT THEY
S- DO NOT KNOW TILL THEY HEAR IT .. .. .. PAGE 1

CHAPTER II.-THE FIRST JOURNEY .. .. .. 7

S CHAPTER III.-SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY .. .. .. .. 31

CHAPTER IV.-SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY .. .. .. .. 60

CHAPTER V.-SINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY .. .. .. 76

CHAPTER VI.--INDBAD'S FIFTH JOURNEY .. .. .. 86

CHAPTER VII.-SINDBAD'S SIXTH JOURNEY .. .., .. 96

S %fEa VS -INDBAD'S SEVENTH JOURNEY .. .. 109

CHAPTERBIX.--THE LAST LECTURE-BUT ONE .. .. .. .. 121

CHAPTER X.-THE LAST LECTURE OF ALL .. .. .. 166

BIINDBAD'S GUIDE TO WONDERLAND .. .. .. .. .. 207

CHAPTER XI.-TELESCOPIC, HOMILETIC, AND VALEDICTORY .. 309

















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





PAGE
VIGNETTE.-FRED ON HIS JOURNEY.

FRONTIBPIECE.-FRED RELATING HIS WONDERFUL ADVENTURES.

EGYPT AND THE EGYPTIANS 9

THE GRECIAN COURT -32

SINDBAD'S OBSERVATIONS UPON GARDENING 60

BINDBAD'S JOURNEY TO WEISBNICHTWO ("DON'T KNOW WHERE") 76

THE COLISEUM.-GLADIATORIAL SHOWS 90

SPAIN.-THE ALHAMBA 99


idwil-












THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.



CHAPTER I.

WHAT ALL THE WORLD AND'HIS WIFE KNOW, AND WHAT THEY DO NOT
KNOW TILL THEY HEAR IT.
ALL the world knows how Hindbad, lamenting with a loud
voice his poverty underneath the windows of Sindbad, was over-
heard by that great traveller, and invited into the house, in
order that he might hear the recital of Sindbad's marvellous
journeys by sea and by land. All the world knows how
Hindbad, in listening to the story of the wealthy Sindbad,
learnt that his riches were not got by an Open Sesame or a
lifting of the finger, but by many laborious voyages and in the
teeth of many perils. All the world knows how Sindbad
travelled with a Roc whose egg was as large as the dome of
Saint Paul's; what terrors he encountered in the Valley of
Diamonds, in the island of the Cannibal Ogre whose eye he
poked out with red-hot meat-skewers, in the country where they
bury living husbands with dead wives and vice vers&, and from
the embraces of the horrible Old Man of the Sea, till that dis-
bgreeable individual made himself tipsy and fell off his back.
All-fhe world knows, in brief, how Sindbad won his wealth, how
-Hindbad was edified by knowing that not he alone, but others,
had had to work and fight for their most valuable possessions,
.and how Sindbad made him comfortable every evening, during
B








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


the period which the narration of his wonderful voyages occupied,
by a present of a hundred sequins. These things all the world
knows perfectly well; but there are things which neither all the
world, nor you, nor all the world's wife, know anything about
at present. I know them. I could keep them to myself if I
chose. But I do not choose. On the contrary, it is my inten-
tion to communicate them to you in the first instance, trusting
that all the world and his wife may hear of them through your
kind instrumentality, and be as much obliged to me as you will
be. And there is to be no delay about it; I shall begin this
very minute, this very moment
This is what all the world and his wife do not know, till I tell
you, and you tell them:-
In the reign of the mighty sovereign whose image is on the
half-crown your grandpapa put into your teacup last birthday
morning, there lived in London, exactly as Hindbad lived in
Bagdad, only in a more comfortable way by far, a little boy
whose name was BoB; not a letter more, not a letter less.
Bob he was, and Bob you will please to call him. I cannot
put two syllables into his name, because Hindbad's name had
two. Nor can I make him a porter, because Hindbad was one.
Bob was a young gentleman at home for the Midsummer
holidays, but at present on a visit at the house of a schoolfellow
who lived in a beautiful country about four miles from the
General Post Office, Saint Martin's-le-Grand, called Clapham.
During this visit, Bob,-who was a fine, cheerful fellow, but
rather rackety, and also a little apt to play out of playtime, and
let his books get dusty when they were not forced into his hand,
--our dear Bob had been much struck with the superior infor-
mation of his schoolfellow FRED, aid he felt, once or twice, just
for a moment or two, half inclined to envy Fred the opportunities


CHP. I.








INTRODUCTION.


his larger attainments seemed to give him of cultivating the
acquaintance of his elders. Fred was listened to whenever he
spoke; Bob was not. Fred talked freely with his seniors who
wore stand-up collars and tailed coats, and they listened to
hini, and answered him again, and went on conversing; Bob
could only get a casual remark in here and there, with a stroke
of the head, and a laugh, and perhaps a romp in return. But,
what was sadder than all, and went right through Bob's heart
and came out on the other side like an arrow, was the circum-
stance that Fred's company was always sought by his own
cousins Amy and Bella, and by Bob's sister Hetty, who would
walk arm-in-arm with him, and seem glad when he would
talk with them, and clap their hands when he was to accom-
pany them anywhere, "because," said Amy, and Bella, and
Hetty, "Fred can explain what you see and hear so nicely;"-
while to Bob they behaved quite differently, though very kindly
indeed. They would take him by the hand, instead of leaning on
his arm, and rather show him things than ask him to show them
things, and never ask him questions as they did Fred. All this
was very painful to the feelings of Bob, and once or twice,
during his stay, he let a big tear fall on the hoop he was
trundling side by side with Hetty, and wiped his eye with the
:end of his stick first and the cuff of his jacket-sleeve afterwards.
Jacket-sleeve, indeed! The cup of our dear Bobby's sorrow
was not yet full. One day, Fred, in Bob's presence, was
sumoned from the garden by the housemaid, with an air of
mystery which betokened something fresh and important in the
wind, to say nothing of the dignified step with which Fred
returned, after the lapse of ten minutes or thereabouts, to the
p lay-ground. Bob looked hard at him, and so did Amy and
Bella and Hetty,-harder indeed than Bob, being ladies and
B2


*CHAP. I.








THE SYI)PNIA1V StNDBAD.


having more curiosity-with that inquisitive beseeching look
which means asking a question without a word being spoken;
but Fred maintained a solemn silence, and went on with the
game they had been playing. As they were returning to the
house at dusk, Hetty went close up to Fred, and whispered in
his ear. At first, Fred only shook his head and pretended to
push her away; but, after a little coaxing, he whispered in her
ear too, something which made her clap her hands and look very
pleased. "Ah!" thought Bob, "he has told her the secret-I
wonder if I shall ever know it!"
Bob's wonderment did not last very long. In exactly five
days it came to an unexpected end. Fred was missing from
the morning game in the grounds. Suddenly he was espied,
arm-in-arm with Hetty, walking on a gravel path not far
off, in-a surtout coat! Tears rushed into Bob's eyes, and
he was a melancholy boy for the rest of that day. At
bed-time he got a few minutes all to himself, in which to
bewail his jacket, and to say in his mind, "0, if I knew as
much as Fred, perhaps I might have a surtout in a year or two,
and take Bella to the Polytechnic, instead of Bella taking me
and buying me Banbury cakes as she would for a baby !" So
Bob, who had been reading Robinson Crusoe, went to sleep and
dreamt that he was wrecked on a desolate island; that Friday
came to see him in a surtout coat and a stand-up collar; that
he lived in a hut like a diving-bell, with Bella in the corner
munching Banbury cakes all day long, and repeating what
'Fred had told her when they went to the Polytechnic, only she
did not speak plainly because her mouth was so full of puff-paste
and jam.
The next day, Bob, unable to surmount his trouble, and
pining for a surtout and a stand-up collar, walked solitarily


CHAP. T.








CHAP. I. INTRODUCTION 5

about the garden, instead of complying with Fred's invitation to
stay in-doors and hear him tell curious stories to Amy and
Bella and Hetty. But dear little Bella kept paying such a
divided attention to Fred's instructive and entertaining speeches
that, at last, that young gentleman stopped short, and said he
wouldn't tell any more nice things unless Bella listened.
Bella observed, rather tartly, that "she wanted Bob."
"Then," said Mr. Fred, "go and fetch Bob, and make
haste about it, or else we '11 go on without you." So Bella went
out to fetch Bob, putting on one of her pleasantest smiles,
because she feared he was offended about something,
Now Bobby was drawing a garden-roller about for amuse-
ment, and looking very warm indeed, when he saw Bella tripping
his way; but he took out his handkerchief, and wiped his
face, and freshened himself up, and made himself fit to speak to
a lady, by the time she got close to him. "Bobby, dear," said
Bella, laying her little hand on his arm in the most winning way,
" why don't you come in and hear Fred talk ? He's going to tell
us all about his travels, just like Sindbad the sailor I What is
the matter with you, Bobby mine ?"-This, you will remember, is
just the way the servants of Sindbad came out to Hindbad when
his soliloquy had been overheard. Now Bob was ashamed to
say, I'm sulky because I haven't got a surtout coat;" so he said
"O Bella, I wish I knew as much as Fred does !" and lifted his
cuff to his eye, in a manner that cut poor little Bella to the
heart. But she- cheered him up, and smiled sweetly, and put
her arm round his neck, saying, Is that all, my Bob?
Why, come and hear Fred say what he knows; and then, of
course, you'll know it too, and perhaps your pa will give you a
surtout like his I"
"0," thought Bobby, "O, what a wonderful girl is Bella







6 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CAP. I.

She has divined my most secret thought II will go with her, and
listen to Fred, and see how soon I can know as much as he
does." So Bob walked along with Bella towards the house
in a little better humour. When they got inside the room,
Bella said, "Now then, Sindbad, strike up! Tell us all your
travels; and this is Hindbad come to hear you, see !"
"Bella," said Fred, "do ygu imagine that is the way
Sindbad's servants addressed him when they introduced Hind-
bad? Did they tell Sindbad to 'strike up,' think you? If
this is to be an Arabian Night's Entertainment, please to behave
something like an Arab, Miss Bella. The Orient, dear, is the
land of courtesy."
O, Fred, don't be too serious," replied Bella. I am like
an Arab-a wild Arab!" Now it was not in our good-
natured Sindbad to resist this; so he began as follows, little
Bella keeping close to Bob out of good-nature, because he
appeared dull and low-spirited.








-lAP. II. THE FIRST JOURNEY. 7




CHAPTER II.

THE FIRST JOURNEY.
"I HAVE,' said Fred, not the least desire to exaggerate or
to magnify what I have done, but it certainly does appear to
me that my travels are far more wonderful than those of Sind-
bad, or Robinson Crusoe, or Ulysses, or Marco Polo, or Robert
Knox, or Busbequis, or Captain Cook, or Mrs. Ida Pfeiffer.
More wonderful, considered both as to what I have seen, and
the time, and the space, and the means for seeing it. Call me
Sindbad then, if you please, but be prepared to hear stranger
things than any related by the Sultaness Scheherazade; and note,
at the same time, that whatever I tell you is strictly true, and
that you can follow my example almost any day you please.
"It was on a fine afternoon last holiday-time that, not being
disposed to read, and having nothing particular to do, I made
up my mind, instead of idling about, to go to EGYPT, and be
home to tea."
This made them all titter, and Bella and Bob laughed out
aloud.
"To go to Egypt, and be home in time for tea," resumed
Fred, in a stern voice; and if you girls don't keep the peace,
without interrupting me again, I'11 write a note to the Great
Sphinx, who is my particular acquaintance, and ask her just to
come and eat you up, as she did the people who couldn't solve
the riddle about the animal that walked on four legs when young,
on two when mature, and on three when old! To go to Egypt
before tea, I say; and, in pursuance of that intention, I placed








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


in my pocket a magical talisman bought by papa, made out of
a piece of card, on which were inscribed mysterious ciphers in-
telligible to certain parties; and, feeling very fresh and strong,
struck out on foot in the direction of Dulwich. As I did not
go into the College there, founded by Alleyne the player, I
cannot now tell you anything about the picture-gallery, or about
the quality of the ale and bread-and-cheese the inmates still
supply, as bound by the Founder's will, to the hungry and
thirsty traveller. Nor will I rebuke the incredulity of those
who do not believe in the Man in the Moon, by stating the
conversation which I overheard, in passing, between the con-
ductor of an omnibus and the Man in the Half-Moon. Leaving
these matters, I will simply state that I had a very pleasant
walk of about five miles, through a richly-wooded country, and
that at last I had to ascend a steep hill, from which the eye
commanded a very beautiful prospect indeed. After resting a
moment at the summit, I proceeded-by a road which I need not
particularly point out now, as a better one is open to future
travellers-to a certain barrier, which gave way upon my pre-
senting the talisman, and allowed me to make the best of my
way to Egypt, which I did by keeping to the left till I reached
it, having accomplished the whole of the journey in about an
hour and a half, without undergoing the smallest inconvenience,
and in the boots which I have on at the present moment.
"Standing in the doorway of the Temple which lay before
me, I devoted a few minutes to reflection and observation.
How could I forget that I was in the country where Joseph had
fed his brethren during the famine in Canaan; where little
Moses had been found wailing in the green rushes on the banks
of the blue river by the good-natured princess, Pharaoh's
daughter, and rescued from his intended grave; where that


COAP. II.













j;f-.*
vyT


EGYPF AND TI1E EGYPTIANS.-P. 9.


I


a








THE PIRST JOURNEY.


same Moses had grown up, learned in all the wisdom of the
Egyptians, to be the leader and deliverer of those Jews who
had built the pyramids, being denied straw to bind the clay of
which the bricks were made; the land to which Plato the wise
came for wisdom, and Antohy the brave to lose his empire-
a vast, solemn, mysterious, changeless land, EGYPT, the mother
of the nations ? Something of the serenity and mystery which
belong to all that is Egyptian stole over me as I stood-and
I was only roused to look about me by the discordant noises
which assailed my ears in different directions. On the one
hand I heard a party of mourners keeping up their howling
lamentations over a dead body; and on the other the songs of
the Nile boatmen, some of whom, however, were quarrelling
and making a very disagreeable screeching noise; while, cer-
tainly, I cannot venture to put their songs in comparison with
what is told of those of the Venetian gondoliers.
"Stirred from my trance by these sounds, I began to look
about me, and found I was on an elevation from which I could
command a view of the whole country as far as the eye would
carry me. It happened to be the period of one of the Nile
inundations, and I saw a sight which would have frightened
Bella a little, I fancy, as she is so timid of the water. What
do you think it was? Why, a party of Egyptian boys and
girls, swimming from one village to another, in the gayest
manner-kick, kick, splash, splash, shouting and hollaing, and
playing pranks with each other, just as if the ichneumon had
not been munching the crocodile's eggs on the muddy bank;
just as if the crocodile himself were not close by with his long
scaly back and horrible teeth See what use does. Bella is
frightened of an ox in the street. A little girl about her age
in Egypt pinches her little sister for fun, and pulls her hair,
B3


CHAP. II.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


while the crocodiles are skulking about ready to make mince-
meat of them! What was stranger still was to see a couple of
the men who make swimming a pursuit tie their feet together,
and float along the water upon their backs, each man holding a
pipe in one hand, and a cup of coffee in the other I We Eng-
lish boys have to learn to swim; but, I suppose, in a country
which is so often under water, it comes quite natural, as it does
to tittlebats."
"Say stickle-backs, Fred," interrupted Amy.
"Amy, don't be pedantic," replied Fred. "I don't know
whether little boys go fishing for tittlebats in the Nile, with
bottles and rods, as they do on the New River and the River
Lea; but they have some curious fish in that river of theirs
over and above what you might expect. There are herrings,
and mullets, and salmon, and so on; but there are, besides,
two or three fish of a deadly sort. For instance, the Schielar,
which has fins that cannot be eaten, because they are poisonous;
and the Fahaka, which is said to be poisonous altogether, in
addition to a stinging or venomous quality in its skin. But I
should not have thought to mention fish, if it had not been for
tittlebats.
"My great regret was that I was too early this trip for the
Grand Nile Carnival, which takes place at Cairo in August.
That is a fine sight, I can tell you! The waters of the Blessed
River are allowed to glide into the city, the embankments being
cut away, amid the acclamations of the people and the salvos
of cannon. The city is illuminated, and, as the festival is held
in the dusk of the evening, not even the light of the lamps
and fireworks can always keep the mad populace from losing
their lives in plunging into the water after the coins which are
then thrown in to be scrambled for. This is part of the cere-


CHAP. II.









CHAPn. IL.


I


mony, and it often results in the drowning of several persons;
so that the ceremony, as at present performed, does not differ
so very much from that of ancient days, when a human sacrifice
was offered up to the god Serapis. I would rather be one of
the people in the boats, as they float into the city with the
tide of the released river, whose welcome waters glide into the
open places, freshen up the trees, and make Cairo sweet and
clean for a time at.least. Well may the townsfolk come flock-
ig:forth as they do on these occasions, drinking the water,
bathingin it, and calling on Allah, if the water of the Nile
be, as some one has said, to other waters what champagne is
.to other wines, There is a mad Arab poet who sings that if
Mahomet had tasted the waters of the Nile, he would have
begged leave of Allah to keep out of Paradise and stay here
to drink it for ever I But then, the Egyptians do not make
their river a nasty, dirty, town ditch. They worship it, and we
ought, I think, to have more respect for Old Father Thames
than to serve him the shabby tricks we do.
Well, I was too early for this great festival of the Kalige, as
it is.called, for it was spring; But I could see and admire the
beautiful lotus-flower, their waterlily, of a fine white and blue
colour. This, like the river on which it floats, and, I suppose,
because it floats there, was ever their Sacred Flower. Turning
round, I could see that the capitals of the columns in the
Temple behind me were shaped like it; and I perceived from
the sculptures and paintings, that its half-opened calyx was the
mwdel for the Egyptian drinking-cup. They could scarcely
have a prettier model as to shape; and what sweeter contrast
of colour than white and blue? It is the very thing which so
delights us in the summer sky.
"The sycamore-tree, from which the ancient Egyptian made


THE FIRST JOURNEY.









THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


his coffin, after making its fruit an article of diet during his
life, was not yet in leaf; but I perceived the quails were begin-
ning to flock in, in anticipation of the harvest. I saw crows,
about the size of sparrows, or a little bigger, picking up scorpions
and insects; swallows, and kingfishers, and wild ducks, just as
on the banks of an English river. Onions I saw in plenty, and
very nice the Egyptian onion is."
"Better than Spanish ?" inquired Amy.
"A great deal nicer, Amy, dear. Nobody can tell how
nice an Egyptian onion is, who has not tasted one. The proof
of the pudding is in the eating, you know. I saw, besides, figs,
olives, grape-vines, and aloes and other medicinal plants; and
also the henna, which does not flower till June or July. Hetty,
let me look at your fingers. There, ladies and Bob, look at
Hetty's finger-ends. What a pretty pinky-white colour under
the finger-nails! But those stupid Egyptians actually liked their
ladies to dye their finger-nails of a muddy orange colour with
a paste made of the pounded leaves of the henna. How different
from the Greeks, who abstained, like wise people, from teasing
and patching the human form divine, and imitated its beauty,
as God made it, in everlasting types of strength and loveli-
ness for succeeding ages! But there is a wonderful heaviness
and tenacity about the Egyptian mind, and the ladies use
henna now just as they did three thousand years ago."
How do we know that they did three thousand years ago ?"
asked Bob.
"Look at the nails of the mummies and you will see. But
I was wrong, perhaps, to call the Egyptians stupid. It was not
respectful, and it was not true."
Never mind, Fred," interposed Amy, with a kind smile.
"We know you meant no harm. I have heard papa say, no


CHAP. II.








THE FIRST JOURNEY.


people are so silly as they who are always wise. We shall
like you all the better if you make a little slip now and then.
Still, I know my papa likes to hear ancient peoples spoken of
with respect. They were part, he says, of the grand chain, and
were often much wiser than we see at a glance. He says it
sounds very priggishly for little boys and girls to be prating about
the 'stupidity,' and 'superstition,' and barbarism of the ages
which produced the men whom all mankind have agreed to love
and reverence."
Just so, Amy," said Fred, looking very pleased-" I'm
glad we are so philosophic. Quite an Academus, I declare.
And the fact is, these Egyptians, with their shaven chins and
almond eyes-"
I remember Joseph shaved himself when he went to in-
terpret the King's dreams," said Hetty.
True. These shorn and shaven Egyptians were not stupid,
after all. Their religion had a great many wise things in it,
and some of their customs were very wise. There was a certain
immobility-a repose-an aversion from change, in the national
character, which prevented what we call progress, at least during
the periods that are historically known to us. But scantily
supplied as they were with some metals, they must have had
immense command of mechanical resources, besides the mathe-
matical genius and indomitable patience which we know them to
have possessed, to have been able to accomplish all they did
in architecture and sculpture. One great advantage they had,
as far as leisure is concerned-they were not forced to be agri-
culturists in our sense of the word. There was no need of
'high farming' in Egypt. The Nile was cultivator and fer-
tiliser all in one. Cast the seed on the waters, and it was
found after many days. So they had plenty of time to build


CHAP. II.







THE SYTDWNU" SINDBAD.


pyramids, to hew tombs in rocks, to erect temples, watch the
stars, cultivate mathematics, and cut other nations in pieces.
All these things they did not neglect; especially they did not
neglect the last. But there is scarcely any art or invention of
modern times of which you cannot find traces in the remains
of ancient Egypt; in sculpture, in painting, or in hieroglyph.
The newest thing of this week which sets all the world staring,
if it had a tongue, might very likely say to us, O, I'm not new
at all; Moses knew all about me-and Thoth, and Tsoph, and
Psammetichus.' But we must not exaggerate upon this subject
either. All our modern conveniences and minor appliances of
comfort and well-being seem to have been common enough. But
in these days of transmarine telegraphs, steam printing-presses,
and photography, we must not forget that the germ of an idea
is a very different thing from the same idea expanded into flower
and developed into fruit. A great many of the ideas which are
proper to modern civilization, and are indeed its pride and
strength, never could expand or develop in any nation of
antiquity, where unequal laws, caste regulations actual ori m-
plied, and incessant warfare, checked private enterprise and the
growth of thought in individual minds. Even in our own day
the first promulgator of a new thing for the benefit of the race has
often to starve and die unrewarded, seeing, with his fast-closing
eye, some one else walk over his body to claim a prize far beyond
his wildest hopes or demands."
"Freddy, dear, you are quite eloquent, I declare! Have
you any invention that you want to bring out, and can't for
want of capital? You speak so feelingly."
Never mind, Miss Amy 1-I was saying that the religion
of the Egyptians had a great many wise things in it, and that
some of their customs were sensible and praiseworthy. For in-


CHAP. II.






THE FIRST JOURNEY.


stance, what a capital plan it was for keeping their rulers in
order, to ordain that no king should be buried in his own tomb,
unless his reign had been a praiseworthy one; that if he had
been wicked or tyrannical the priests and the people might
deny him 'honourable sepulture Only, practically, the deci-
sion of the question whether a monarch had been good and just
or not lay so much with the priests, that the institution was
open to all the influences of regal bribery; and a good many
kings found it much easier to lavish enormous sums of money
nd enormous quantities of human labour upon the adorning of
the temples for the gratification and aggrandisement of the
pontiffs than to be good men. Amy, Hetty, Bella, Bob, all
of you-you have seen Egyptian sculptures in the British
Museum-you remember the faces they give to the sphinxes ?"
I should like to see a live spinx!" cried Bella.
"Say sphinx, Bella, and you shall see one as soon as ever I
can catch it. Well, you remember the faces of the sphinxes
and of the statues you have seen. There is one, for instance,
of Thothmes III. in the British Museum, the Pharaoh who
refused to let the Israelites go-now, call to mind as many
Egyptian faces as you can, recollect the peculiar expression,
and tell me if you think it open, candid, simple ? "
No, no I" said all the voices at once, "they all look as if
they had a secret"
Yes-there is something close, mysterious, reserved, about
the Egyptian character, as about Egypt itself. And some of
the people were terrible liars. Occasionally, antiquaries are
thrown on the beam-ends of their wits, when tracing Egyptian
chronology, by the almost amusing circumstance that some
kings have been naughty enough to strike out the names of
their predecessors upon the tombs, and have their own inscribed


CHAP" II.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


instead Very pretty conduct, was it not ? It is like modern
adulterations. You read COFFEE on the outside of a tin
canister, and inside you find CHICORY. That's the way in
Egypt. 'You read Thoth outside a tomb-inside you find Tsoph,
or Ptha, or some one else. You seldom find a tendency to the
mysterious, in human character, without a tendency to false-
hood also. The Egyptian religion was full of mysteries, and it
is difficult to get at it. Osiris, for whom the Sun sometimes
stands, was GOD, the God of Gods, the good principle, the source
and dispenser of life, light, and grace, and the judge of all men
living and dead. Typhon was his opponent, the Evil One,
darkness, cruelty, barrenness; his emblem was the serpent.
IIorus, the son' of Osiris, is often represented with the head
of a hawk, which was sacred to the Sun, and piercing through
a snake's' crest. Athor was Chaos, or Venus. Isis, the Moon.
The four guardian angels of the dead are drawn with the heads
of a man, an ape, a jackall, and a hawk. Cats, dogs, hawks,
the ibis, the beetle, the onion, the leek, were honoured with
some sort of worship, as emblems of the planets. But we must
remember, with regard to all idols in every nation, and in every
form of religion or superstition, that the kind and degree of
worship paid to 'them would vary perpetually, according to the
character of the worshippers. Some men would kneel to an
image as if it were verily in itself a god; others would feel, or
seem to feel, a real god behind the stone, wood, metal, or clay."
Fred is quite a philosopher," said Amy, in a whisper to
Bella. Bella, seeing Bob look very attentive and serious, said
to him, very softly, so that no one else could hear-" Never
mind, Bob, we'll soon be as clever as he is, won't we ? Bob
smiled, and pressed her hand.
I wonder," continued Fred, "if Peter the Great had been


CHAP. II.








THE FIRST JOURNEY.


an Egyptian, how he would have managed about the beetles,-
which were objects of worship, and were worn as a sort of sacred
ornament or charm in rings and necklaces, and sculptured on
seals, cups, and goblets. And how would Napoleon have got over
the little difficulty of cat worship? He was as frightened of
poor puss as the redoubtable Peter was of the black little insect
that we can kill by the hundred upon our kitchen floors At
dead. of night, once upon a time, his guards, summoned by his
cries'for help, rush into the mighty conqueror's chamber to find
him, bathed with cold perspiration, lunging with naked sword
at a poor little cat in the hangings of the room!"
"' I am sure, after that," said Amy, Napoleon, for one, could
have been no aero to his valet. It takes off the greatness of
some people to see them at home."
Talking of home," resumed Fred,-" turning round towards
the Temple near which I stood, I could not help thinking that
there is no, nation of antiquity whose remains place us so much
at.home with the inhabitants, as Egypt. Although the remains
are intensely national,-although, that is, they have a strong
character of their own, and are not like any other remains,-yet
that very intenseness of character makes haste to impress itself
upon the mind; and then we seem to know all about them.
.This is partly because some of the secrets disclosed by the
Excavations and discoveries of travellers show us that their
:-domestic ways were very much like our own,-more so than
A' e of Roman or Greek,-but also, it is greatly because we
-' iiot i 'ramble long among the remains of ancient Egypt,
without finding traces of old friends, namely, the Jews; with
.who6m in connection with Egypt, our Bibles have made us
Im': iliar from our earliest days. Then, the religion, and the
S'tamblems of the religion, and the temples, and the country, and


eCHAP. II.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


the products of the country, seem to have a deep prevailing
unity about them. Ah, Bella and Bob do not quite see what I
mean by that I Well, I mean they seem all of a piece.
I turned round to enter the temple behind me, and all this
struck me very forcibly. First of all, I noticed that the three
principal colours used in painting the walls, the friezes, and the
columns, and the figures, were the three colours which most
strongly strike the eye in the Egyptian landscape-blue, the
colour of the sky, of the sacred river, and oA the sacred flower;
dark red, the colour of the earth ; and yellow, the colour of the
sand. Then, upon examining the paintings, I saw that the god
Osiris was ever painted blue, and that some pillars or emblems
of apparently a sacred character had blue rims round them;
while mortals, even royal mortals, were painted of the red
earth colour. In the pillars I found the palm, the lotus, the
papyrus, were the models. Osiris was the Sun or the beneficent
river. Typhon was the crocodile. Smaller gods were the
reptiles of the land. Everything was not only in Egypt,
but everything was Egyptian. Grecian architecture, Grecian
sculpture, the emblems of Greek faith, do not seem so exclu-
sively Grecian. A Doric colonnade would scarcely seem out of
place anywhere, and the Apollo, though he is Greek in the nose
and the eyes, is, after all, only a model man-good here, good
there, good everywhere. But I cannot conceive an Egyptian
colonnade harmonising with an English landscape, nor does a
sphinx look well flanking a modern doorway. How strongly
this struck me, as I walked up an avenue of lions into the
Temple I
Egyptian architecture is almost rudely simple, very massive
and solid, and, in keeping with all this, is huge, gigantic, over-
powering, in its proportions. Yet some of the columns before


CHAP. II.







CauP. IIn THE FIRST JOURNEY. 19

me, which belonged to the Ptolemaic period of Egyptian his-
tory, were not without lightness and grace, and they were highly
ornamented. The capitals of the columns were either like the
palm or the lotus; and some of them showed the papyrus in dif-
ferent stages of its growth, from the bud to the flower in bloom.
All over the walls on the outside were representations, in co-
loured bee-reliefs, of a king making offerings to the gods, who,
in return, made grants of long life and stability of empire to
tew wtobippers. Above the columns, there was an inscription
vM chI was enabled to translate, though it was in hierogly-
*ide~ *ad it seemed to me that here was the old trick of
Saminlg n6 monarch's name and substituting another. For
vhatdo you think the inscription said? It said that, in the
beventeenth year of the reign of Victoria, the Ruler of the
Waves, this Temple (or Palace, I will not be sure which,
mind) was erected, and furnished with a thousand statues, a
thousand plants, &c., like as a book, for the use of the men of
all countries.' It was very strange to meet the name of our
own Queen on an Egyptian Temple, and what was stranger
still, I heard, at this very moment, a band playing Rule, Bri-
tannial' All over this part of the Temple I found the names
of our Queen and Prince Albert, and of King Ptolemy, on the
lintels and on the sides. Now, the conjunction of Victoria and
Ptolemy was, you will all confess, very peculiar indeed, and
perhaps you will not know what to make of it, though, after I
have told you I made the journey to Egypt in the very boots I
have on, you will have no right to be surprised at anything.
4' Well I went on and on in this Temple, looking about me;
and the more I saw, the more I was sure I was in Egypt, and
the leas I was able to make the thing out clearly to my own satis-
faction; for the Temple was very small, and yet it seemed a








THLE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


mixture of every period and style and.event in Egyptian history.
I admired the beautiful blue roof between the sunken pillars of
the quadrangle portico, all dotted and sprinkled with golden
stars. I saw a scene in which the sacking of a town was repre-
sented, with scaling ladders, bridges, ditches, towers, and all
coaglete, just as usual. I saw Sesostris the Great--"
Is that the Sesostris of whom the story is told about the
captive king and the chariot-wheel ?" asked Hetty.
"0, I know that story," cried Bob, anxious to contribute
something to the general store. Sesostris had his chariot
drawn by six kings. One of them always kept his eye fixed on
the revolutions of the chariot-wheel. Sesostris asked him what
he meant by that? Sire,' replied the captive king, I cannot
look upon that wheel without being reminded of the changes of
human fortune. What was lately uppermost is soon debased-
the round which was, one ipoment, at the top, is, the next mo-
ment, at the bottom. So it is with subjects and kings in the
hands of the Immortal Gods!' Sesostris was so touched with
this answer, that he gave the king his liberty. At least, so the
story goes."
And we will believe it, my Bobby," answered Fred. It is
always well, if we can, to believe anything kind and generous,
either of the present or the past. Let us always give the living,
and the dead too, the benefit of a doubt! I was saying that I
saw Sesostris the Great trampling on his enemies, stabbing an
Arab soldier in the ribs, and looking more comfortable over it
than I should be, if I had to stick a great thing like that into
a man's side. I saw another scene, in which this same Sesostris
is clutching half-a-dozen poor fellows by the hair of their miser-
able heads, and shaking a dagger over them in a very savage
way, while twelve ambassadors, lower down, are begging hard


CHAP. II.








CHP. I L IRST Ji 1. 1.:N 1,.


for mercy, with ropes round their necks. I saw eight colossal
figures of Rameses the Great, supporting a side wall, and queer
fishes they looked, Bobby boy, with their red helmets and whips,
or flails (whieh I don't know-nobody knows), in their hands,
which are crossed upon their chests. And don't they look stupid,
'sweetly stupid,' as Amy calls it--"
Yes, sweetly stupid; I mean when a man looks as if he
had sucked himself to sleep with a sugar-plum in his mouth.
Did these colossal kings look like that, Fred ?"
Exactly, Amy, you could not have hit it better. Every-
where almost, along cornices, and over doorways, I saw winged
suns painted red, with asps sticking out at the side."
What did that mean ? inquired Bella.
"I think it meant Providence, though it is not very clear how
or why. But I made out that a zigzag line- "
"Crinkum-crankum ?" says Bob.
"Crinkum-crankum. A zigzag line means river-water, a
scroll like a wave means the sea, and a lozenge means a maze.
But what do you think of Egyptian perspective ? It beats the
Roman hollow I They had no idea of foreground, and back-
ground, and vanishing points, and so on; so they made the
principal object, a king for instance, very large. To express
nearness, they put a figure on an object above; distance, below.
If one of the things painted came in the way of another, they
showed the more important of the two, without regard to the
reason and fact of the case. For instance, if a sword happened
to lie across a king's nose, they would paint the nose and leave
out the sword.
"By and by I found myself in a tomb, which looked to me
very like one I had seen at Benee Hassan before; and how it
got there Gracious knew. What business had a tomb in a


CHAP. II.








22 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. II.

temple? Now I knew perfectly well that this tomb was cut
out of the solid rock about the year 1660 B.c., and that its fluted
columns furnished the model for Doric architecture- "
"Which is Doric?" inquired Bob.
"The entrance of Euston-square station is Doric; and there
is a chapel portico in Stamford-street, Blackfriars-road, which
is one of the finest specimens of Doric architecture in England:
it was built by Rennie, and you ought all to see it, because it is
so fine. Well, what did a tomb do in a temple? 1 could not
tell, but there was one comfort about it. The last time I had
seen this tomb I knew that thieves used to sleep-in it of nights,
but they were all turned out now I When I came out of this
tomb, there was another surprise for me-I saw a colonnade from
Philae, and the Antinous of the ancient Egyptians, and a por-
trait of Alexander the Great in basso-relievo, with his name
underneath written in Greek. And how do you suppose we
know the Egyptians did this bas-relief? Why, by the wrong
spelling of the name! What a trifling mistake will sometimes
decide a question of authorship I There is a beautiful poem on
blindness which claims to have been written by Milton; but the
use of the word recognize, which was not current in Milton's
time, settles its modernness. But, above and beyond all other
things, I saw-to my great surprise, as I was not near Alex-
andria-the Rosetta stone. That was a stone indeed! As it
was in a corner here, it might be called a corner-stone; but
I knew that to our countryman Dr. Young, and the great
Frenchman Champollion, it had been a hey-stone to unlock the
closed doors of the Egyptian hieroglyphics; because, beside the
inscription which it bears in the popular and the sacred Egyptian
of the time, it has a repetition of it in Greek, which furnished
the clue that had been so eagerly sought for. The Rosetta







THE FIRST JOURNEY.


stone belongs to the Greco-Egyptian period, and its inscription
is an address from the priests to the then Greek king of Egypt,
Ptolemy the Fifth, praising him, of course, and recording the
fact that directions had been issued to set up the statue of the
king in'every temple, along with a copy of the address; so that
Ptolemy the Fifth was pretty well bespattered with praise.
"(To tell you the truth, I began to feel a little bewildered in
this building with things I did not expect to find there. How
could the Temple of Aboo Simbel, which I knew was cut in a
rodkin Nubia, be here? Or half the Temple of Karnak? But
herQ they swr, beyond question. Fancying I must be in a
d&am, I tan out into the open air to collect my wits. I found
it was getting very hot--stiflingly hot. I then recollected that
in the spring of the year the hot winds come up from the desert
and make. the country almost uninhabitable to Europeans.
L ooing upwards, I perceived the sky was getting black, the
s un had turned of a misty sort of purple colour, the air was
ot fit to breathe for clouds of sand, all the people began to
burry indoor, and the very water looked as if it had been
boiled and were not yet cool. Yes, the Simoom was coming,
bringiig with it the dust of the desert, which the people say is
o. fne and so running that it will get inside an egg, through
thieaSIll I If that were true, it would soon get inside my skin,
and I thought I had better leave Egypt as fast as I could. So,
without troubling the camels, though there were plenty about,
or the steamboats at Alexandria, I came home in my own
fashion, and here I am, safe and sound, to tell you the story of
my travels. I think you will agree with me that the funniest
'part of all was, how I came to see so many things all- in one
spot, and none of the Egyptians caught sight of me. Do any
of you know '?


CHAP. II.







'THi SYDEI9HAM INDIBAD.


I do!" said Hetty.
"I do!" said Amy.
"Then don't tell at present," answered Sindbad.
I should like to go, too, and see it all," said little Hind-
bad, not without some misty idea of the secret.
"Ah cried Sindbad, "you, Hindbad, would not see it all,
if you were to go exactly where I did, and stand in the same
place. Come again to-morrow, and I will tell you all about my
next journey."
"Please, sir,-I mean, please Sindbad the Great,-may a
little girl ask a few questions ?" said Amy, with a curtsy.
"Certainly," replied Fred, assuming the air of a sage.
"Speak on, and do not fear I" How kind of him I
You observed," says Amy, "that the Sphinx was your par-
ticular friend, and that if we were impertinent it was your
intention to write to her complaining of our conduct. Now, I
have always understood that, when (Edipus solved her enigma,
the Sphinx in a rage committed suicide, for good and all.
Now, if you write to her, do your letters go through the Dead
Letter-box? and how does she read them ?"
"Your question, Miss Amy, is a very proper one," said
Fred, stroking his chin, and making a general observation,
to gain time, after the most approved fashion of orators who do
not see their way. But I think," said he, "I can solve your
doubts by telling you

THE SUPPRESSED HISTORY OF MEMNON AND THE SPHINX.

"It is not generally known that there was an intimacy of
the most affectionate kind between Memnon and the Sphinx.
Both of them, the Sphinx in particular, have been celebrated


CIAP. II.








TRE VIRsT JotTxrNE,.


for an immovable passivity of look which has led common
observers to imagine they had no hearts. But they had: there
are romances in stones as well as sermons in stones; and the
friendship of this ancient pair was very romantic indeed. It
is well known that, as soon as the slant beam of the morning
Sun smote the forehead of Memnon, he found a tongue, and
made earth and sky vocal with his hymn of praise and gratula-
tion. In the absence of the light-god the grand old fellow kept
a mournful silence. But he yearned for sympathy. It was not
enough that he could make sweet melody to the Sun; he wanted
itechoed back in those soft, unstartling tones which so delight
the heart which longs for affectionate converse: it is so with
us all-when praise falls dead and our hearts sink inwards, we
sometimes want ourselves rendered back to us in gracefuller
lines, in tenderer lights, in softer touches of linked' melody.
So Memnon, in the sunless midnight hours, kept wakeful silence,
eating out his sublime old heart for sickness and sadness. And
the deep, deep, blue sky looked calmly on, and did not pene-
trate his thought; and the cold stars, as large to the eye in
that pure atmosphere as the largest jewel you ever saw, were
too much occupied with their own music to concern themselves
with the sorrows of anything terrestrial. But the Moon, with
her clear vestal eye and tender woman's heart, at last divined
the grief of Memnon; and when next she met the Sun on the
green rim of the tumbling sea, said, O Sun, Memnon is un-
happy Have I not taught him to sing when I look upon
him? what more doth he ask?' replied the Sun, casting his
golden eye full upon the timid Moon with a glance of scrutiny.
Then she answered, 'Seek, O Sun, of thine own heart what
would be the prayer of Memnon could he speak as well as
sing. How didst thou not yearn for a friend, for another


OUAr. II.








THE SYDE{HAM SINDBAD.


self, till I, thy Moon, was sent up the slope of the skies to give
thee back a part of thy light I Memnon wants a double, a
friend, to yield him his music again. All life seeks-doth it
not ?-to repeat itself. Let thy own soul answer, 0 beautiful
day-god, quickener of all things, light of the world, as thou
art Then said the Sun, 'My Moon, what wouldst thou?
Who shall be friend to this Memnon, and repeat his music to
him, as thou my light unto me; that so his countenance may
shine when I am far off, and his heart be glad in the darkness ?'
Now, the Moon had often looked upon the Sphinx with wonder
at her many cruelties, and had divined very low down in her
heart a little seed of goodness which might flower into com-
passion if it could be reached and lured into the warmth of day.
And the Moon said, 'Grant me, 0 great Osiris (for so was
the Sun named by the Immortals), that I may have what power
I will over the cruel Sphinx, for Memnon's sake.' And the
Sun answered and said, 'My Isis, be it unto thee even as
thou hast spoken.' Then the Moon was very glad, and went
upon her way among the stars with a more shining face, for
very joy.
"Now the Sphinx, pitilessly devouring, day by day, those
who came to answer her enigma and could not, had yet felt
some uneasy gropings of love and pity at the bottom of her
hard, blind heart, when the strain of Memnon had smitten her
ears in the fresh, sweet morning; and she had said, in her
inmost soul, 0 that I might breathe out my life in music too
-perhaps I should iot be so cruel, and I am sure I should be
a happier Sphinx And this the cunning Moon knew by her
woman's instinct. And so, one warm, slumberous night, when
she was riding high in the purple mid-heaven, upon a silver-
white cloud, she looked down upon Memnon, and saw that his


CHAP. II.








THE FIRST JOURNEY.


soul was straying in the borderland of Sleep, led by a Dream,
who held him by the hand and seemed to be trying to repeat
to him his morning lay; upon the Sphinx, and beheld her broad
awake, with her mysterious wide-open eyes questioning time
and space for something which came not. And the Moon
paused for a moment as she passed over, and prayed, 'Now,
now, Osiris, grant my will And, at the same moment, she
shed a flood of her soft luminous breath full on the forehead of
the Sphinx, saying 'SING and so urged her white chariot
down the steep of the sky.
"Then the long pent-up yearnings in the breast of the
Sphinx found speech in music, and the far-stretching desert
heard, and the rippling Nile took up the burthen, till the
lotus-flower trembled on the bank. And Memnon dropped the
hand of his dream-guide, and lifted up his soul from the
shadowy valley of Sleep, and listened in a warm rapture of joy
to his own morning-song to Osiris restored unto him in tenderest
echoes; and he knew it was the voice of the Sphinx and was
glad. But after awhile he slumbered sweetly, and when he
said to the next sunrise 'Lo, I am here Egypt wondered
at the voice of Memnon, and asked from what deeper wellspring
of melody this song,-the same yet not the same, the ancient
tune with a golden thread of conscious life inwoven,-had arisen.
Only the listening Sphinx wondered not, and Memnon knew
that she would hear. And every night, when the moon kissed
bit forehead, she sang back to him his song of the morning,
d he loved her, and there was a better life for them both.
lat still the Sphinx was cruel, only she hated herself, and, save
S .Adthaghts of Memnon, wished that she might die, and so be
eCqLim more for ever.
"Now it befell that one night the moon was eclipsed, and the
c2


CHAP. II.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


waiting Sphinx did not feel the luminous touch on her forehead
at the hour of the rising of Isis upon the sky, and Memnon
listened in vain for the beloved echo. And when the shadow
had passed away from the face of Isis, and she breathed upon
the brow of the Sphinx, no voice answered; for the Sphinx had
said within herself, I am forgotten and despised; I shall
never sing again to Memnon; I will gather to me again the
darkness that once enfolded my heart, and go my way on the
morrow whither even Isis shall not find me with her brightness
should she seek me out. But I must hear once again the voice
of Memnon, for it is sweet, and then I will slay myself, because
life is sadder than I can bear!' Now the Sphinx did not
know, until this night, the secret of her own thought, how she
loved the voice of Memnon, and what a contention in her bosom
was born of her love; and, once failing to find her nightly
tongue for his ear, she had not the patience now to wait until her
love should have had time to grow, and clear her nature of all
its darkness and cruelty, but, mistrusting Isis, resolved to die
and away for ever. Only the knowledge how dear was her
even-song to Memnon might have changed her purpose; but
that she did not wholly know; being still partially blind and
wicked of heart.
And when the morning came, and Osiris touched the lips of
Memnon with the glory which should part them in music,
Egypt stood mazed and doubting, for Memnon sang not. To
have sung on for ever in uncompanioned solitude was possible
if so Osiris had willed; but not even Osiris was stronger than
Love; and now the interrupted new life turned to death and
silence; and only one who stood very nigh heard a low com-
plaining from the lips, as if it were the last moan of one dying
in pain-and Memnon sang to the sunrise no more,


CHAP. II.







THE FIRST JOURNEY.


"Then the Sphinx was more than ever resolute to die, when
she did not hear the voice she had learned to love; and so, when
(Edipus passed by and solved her enigma, she slew herself-
and she sang to the moonrise never again.
But neither Memnon nor the Sphinx knew that in loving they
had taken up the breath of an immortal life, and could not pass
into nothingness. But it was so. And Osiris took Memnon,
Ui Iias took the Sphinx, and they bore them down the slope
Qt tte sy, and deep, deep, deep into the sea, beyond the
x atiw whieh frdwa upon the utmost Mediterranean, and
d pWr, daslp st ; until they reposed in the land of the
submerged Atlantis, which with all its nobleness of life and
glory was sucked down by the cruel ocean thousands of years
before, and preserved in the.lowest sanctuary of silence by the
Eldet Gods, who had loved the Atlanteans. There in halls
fathoms below the furrow of the keel on the upper sea, and still
as death in their deserted beauty,-there, Memnon and the
Sphinx encountered now, to learn that friendship had bestowed
on both a life which could not die, and could only be lived in
one current for ever and ever. And there they remain to this
day, practising the old songs, except when they sing a duetto,
or employ themselves for the good of mankind."
"For the good of mankind In what possible way ? inquired
Hetty.
"Thus, dear," replied Fred. "The Sphinx, deeply regretting
her former carnivorous propensities, which, indeed, she is not
yet quite able to shake off, determined in her Atlantean retire-
ment with her friend Memnon to turn her immortal leisure to
philanthropic account; and did so by rearing the oceanic
plateau w *hh underlies the Atlantic from Ireland to New-
foundland, intending by degrees to re-elevate the Atlantean
c3
L, i


CHAP. II.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


continent, peninsula, or island. When, however, the soundings
were being taken for the Transatlantic telegraph, she changed
her views, and informed me she intended to further the telegraph
by every means in her power. But do not imagine she is quite
reclaimed from her cruelty: it takes a long time for a Sphinx
to get soft, even under water. Once a year she reappears to
men in the shape of the Sea Serpent, and goes prowling about
the upper deep in search of prey, which she secures by wrecking
some ship, if all other means fail her; and as she can assume
that form whenever she pleases, she might be a formidable
enemy of any noisy little girl of whom I might complain to her
by means of- "
"By means of what, Mr. Fred? says Amy.
"I shall explain no further," answered Fred, "until the
close of my narration to Hindbad. So, as I said before, come
again to-morrow, and hear, if you choose, the history of my
next journey in Wonderland. For to-day, this meeting is
adjourned."
So Bella and Bob walked away wondering, and Amy and
Hetty discussing Sindbad's elaborate defiance of Gliddon and
Gardner Wilkinson in this truly absurd Sphinx story, which he
had so quaintly linked with sea-serpents and electricity.


CHAP. II.








CuAP. III. SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY. 31




CHAPTER III.

BINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.
I THrK," began Sindbad, addressing the same audience as
before, on this, the second, occasion, I think the adventures I
S hume to relate to you this time are not a whit less wonderful
thai a*3lI told you of yesterday, and I am sure they will
S nbMl Hindbad that I have had to go through a good deal
b i i;.te time. My journey to Egypt, instead of inspiring
dhie ith any desire to stay at home and rest, had quite a con-
trary effect. Neither crocodiles, nor inundations, nor Simooms,
nor Samiels, nor fatigues of any kind, had abated my courage,
and my thirst for information. As GREECE came next in his-
torical sequence, as it was the nation which took up the thread
of human progress from Egypt, the hand, as it were, to which
Egypt passed the lighted torch, I felt a desire to make my next
journey a journey to Greece. One morning, I put in my pocket
again the talisman for which papa had paid, but I pursued a
course different in other respects from that which I had adopted
in making my Egyptian trip, and proceeded to the Bridge of
London, commonly called London-Bridge. When there, my
attention was attracted to a curious creature with a long body,
which was making strange snorting, whistling noises, and dis-
playing various symptoms of restlessness, besides blowing its
breath out of its mouth and nostrils in great steamy clouds.
It seemed to have an enormous number of fins of an oblong
shape somewhat resembling wooden doors, which were flapping
backwards and forwards, and which opened to cavities in the

!








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


creature's interior. As I observed several of the cavities
filled with human beings, I concluded that there was no danger
to be apprehended from this strange, long, noisy creature's
puffing and snorting, and I myself entered one of the cavities.
I found it very comfortable. The animal's ribs were well
wadded and padded, and I felt quite easy in his interior apart-
ments. I could not help reflecting that this was a very com-
fortable sort of roc, much pleasanter than the one which carried
Sindbad the sailor about; and my good opinion of the animal
was confirmed, when, after half-an-hour or so, he, she, or it-
for I could not determine its sex-made a pause, and dislodged
his fellow-travellers at the foot of a double staircase, ascending
which, and reproducing papa's magic talisman, I speedily found
myself at the goal of my wishes-in fact, in Greece.
It was midnight--"
"Midnight, Fred? Would pa let you be out?" cries
Bella.
Midnight in Greece, Bella, dear-dark midnight. Nothing
could be sweeter or softer than the atmosphere which I now
breathed, and I could well understand how the people who were
born in it, and breathed it always, should find life itself an enjoy-
ment, should fling their happy limbs naturally into postures the
most graceful and alluring for the sculptor, should invent the
loveliest architecture the world has seen, and turn the commonest
events of every-day life into occasions of enjoyment. I was on the
sea-shore. The waves were lap-lap-lapping softly against the
beach, oh! so softly. There was a little moonlight, and the sky
overhead was of the deepest, intensest blue. On a distant hill,
' heaven-kissing,' as Shakspeare says, I saw Mercury step down;
in a grove, a little inland, I caught a glimpse of Diana creeping
softly up to Endymion, and tapping him on the curls; and I


CHAP. III




































T R j3


1IiIE O(ALCIAN COUUI T-1 32.


L 1








CitP. III. SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY. 33

fancied-perhaps I was excited and mistaken-that Socrates or
his ghost passed lightly by me with a drained, inverted cup of
hemlock-juice in his hands, from which a few lingering green drops
Sell upon the ground and turned to laurels. All over the shore
were blazing night-fires, round which were groups of Albanians,
who, having done their evening feast, were now drinking the
red wine gaily and fast, talking, laughing, singing, and making
a very pretty romantic picture indeed. Then they all got up
together, and, with long black hair that streamed down to
their waists, kirtles reaching to their knees, and eyes and faces
gleaming in the red fire-light, they sang together a song of
which here are a few verses:-

I.
Tambourgi, Tambourgi! thy 'larum afar
Gives hope to the valiant, and promise of war;
All the sons of the mountain arise at the note,
Chimariot, Illyrian, and dark Suliote
II.
'Oh I who is more brave than a dark Suliote,
In his snowy camese and his shaggy capote ?
To the wolf and the vulture he leaves his wild flock,
And descends to the plain, like the stream from the rock.
III.
'Macedonia sends forth her invincible race;
For a time they abandon the cave and the chase;
But those scarfs of blood-red shall be redder, before
The sabre is sheath'd and the battle is o'er.
IV.
Thfthe pirates of Parga, that dwell by the waves,
And teach the pale Franks what it is to be slaves,
Shall leave on the beach the long galley and oar,
And track to his covert the captive on shore.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


V.
'Selictar! unsheath then our chief's scimitar-
Tambourgi thy 'larum gives promise of war-
Ye mountains, that see us descend to the shore,
Shall view us as victors, or view us no more !' "

Ah I" exclaimed Hetty, I know something- "
Then, keep it to yourself, Miss," said Fred, hastily inter-
rupting her; and let me go on quietly. We don't want to
know what you know. You came here all of you to hear what
I know, and I'11 trouble you not to interfere."
Of course Fred was only joking. He was not really angry
when he said all this, but he did not want to have his travels
interrupted and his story spoiled for him. So he went on.
This, then, I said to myself, is Greece; and, closing my
eyes, as I leaned against a crag, I repeated to myself Byron's
lines-
'Yet are thy skies as blue, thy crags as wild;
Sweet are thy groves, and verdant are thy fields;
Thine olive ripe as when Minerva smiled,
And still his honeyed wealth Hymettus yields;
There the blithe bee his fragrant fortress builds,
The free-born wanderer of thy mountain air;
Apollo still thy long, long summer gilds,
Still in his beam Mendeli's marbles glare:
Art, Glory, Freedom, fail, but Nature still is fair.
'Where'er we tread, 't is haunted, holy ground;
No earth of thine is lost in vulgar mould;
But one vast realm of wonder spreads around,
And all the Muse's tales seem truly told,
Till the sense aches with gazing to behold
The scenes our earliest dreams have dwelt upon:
Each hill and dale, each deepening glen and wold,
Defies the power which crushed thy temples gone;-
Age shakes Athena's tower, but spares gray Marathon.


CHAP. III.









SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


The sun, the soil, but not the slave, the same;
Unchanged in all except its foreign lord-
Preserves alike its bounds and boundless fame,
The battlefield where Persia's victim horde
First bowed beneath the brunt of Hellas' sword,
As on the morn to distant Glory dear,
When Marathon became a magic word,
Which uttered, to the hearer's eye appear
The camp, the host, the fight, the conqueror's career;
'The flying Mede, his shaftless broken bow;
The fiery Greek, his red pursuing spear;
Mountains above-Earth's, Ocean's, plain below,
Death in the front, Destruction in the rear!-
SBch was the scene-what now remaineth here ?
r What sacred trophy marks the hallowed ground,
Recording Freedom's smile and Asia's tear ?-
The rifled urn, the violated mound,
The dust thy courser's hoof, rude stranger spurns around.' "

As Fred recited very well, Hetty, and Amy, and Bella, and
Bob, all enjoyed these fine lines of Byron exceedingly. Fred
proceeded:-
Curiously enough, when I opened my eyes after repeating
these verses to myself,-it must really have been owing to some
power more magical even than that of papa's talisman- "
I know what the power was 1" said Amy, in a whisper, to
herself, and with a pleased intelligent smile. Fred did not
pause, except to put his finger on his lip, with a smile that
replied to hers.
"When I opened my eyes, by some magical power or other,
I found myself in a street in ancient Athens. It was quite
dark, and, I am sorry to say, to the discredit of the Greeks, the
street was vy dirty. There were no lamps at all, and no
lell-eonstrtfed gutters to drain the streets, into which all the


CHAP. III.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


refuse of the kitchens seemed to have been thrown. Still, as the
Greeks were not such gross feeders as we are, there was nothing
as offensive as what you might find in a low neighbourhood
in our own highly-civilised London. I met one or two Athenians
who were out on some late errand, but, as they did not notice
me at all, I felt convinced that the same power, whatever it
was, which had landed me so suddenly in ancient Athens, had
made me invisible to the people. This was comfortable, for I
could thus go about and see everybody and everything, without
being quizzed in my turn. I found a house quite open to the
street, and determined to enter and explore it, with a view of
finding a sleeping apartment of some kind, where I might pass
the night. The front of the house was ornamented with stucco,
but I noticed that the owner had taken care to avoid any such
ornaments as were customary in the temples of the gods, which
would have been considered irreligious. The doorway was
rather handsome; the root was flat; there was only one story.
Some of the houses in Athens, however, had two stories.
Going noiselessly about, I observed that each set of rooms was
built in the shape of a square, with an open paved court in the
middle, and that in one or two cases there was a fountain in the
centre. Along the sides of every court there were colonnades to
walk under, and from these colonnades you saw the entrances
into the different rooms. From the street-door you went into
a large hall, and from that you stepped into the square or
court, around which were the apartments of the men; for the
most important division of a house in Greece was into the men's
division and the women's division. In this house, there being
only one story, the women's court or quadrangle was at the
back, the men's in front. In the men's quadrangle I saw the
dining-room, drawing-room, and other rooms, where the gentle-


CHAP. III.








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


men met their friends and transacted their business. In the
women's quadrangle were what we should call the living-rooms,
where the family dwelt every day, besides kitchens, store-
rooms, bedrooms, and halls or shops for spinning and weaving,
in which the lady of the house and her maids were accustomed
to busy themselves when not otherwise employed. I noticed
that the fireplaces were open, and that the household gods were
in a niche by the side of the hearth. On one side of the
chimney was hung up the armour of the master of the house.
"I was struck with the essential similarity, as to all the
minor appliances of life, between the articles of comfort and
convenience in use at Athens and those in use in modern times
in our own houses. I remembered, in the Book of Kings, the
house built upon the wall for the man of God, and the table,
and the stool, and the candlestick put there for him by the
Shunammite woman; and I thought how natural and homelike
everything seemed in Greece. At meal-times I perceived the
people sat upon sofas and couches, or rather, reclined upon
them. In an unoccupied room, near the garden, which lay
behind the women's quadrangle, I found an empty bed, on
which was a wool mattress. Here I resolved to pass the night,
and, drawing over me a coverlet of the skin of some Asiatic
animal, I lay down, and soon fell asleep.
"In the course of the night I believe I dreamt-a good long
dream too, and I will tell it you. 'I was, or else I fancied I
was, in a building, which so far resembled the Temple I had
seen in Egypt that it was an incongruous collection of all
sorts of memorials of ancient Greece, both in architecture and
sculpture, without regard to continuity of date or of historical
association.0F
"I saw before me a Temple of the later period of that
D


OHAP. III.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


.Doric order, which, derived from Egypt, preceded all the other
Grecian orders in the line of architectural development. It
seemed to me to be a portion of the Temple of Jupiter at
Nemea, erected about four hundred years before Christ was
born in Bethlehem of Judea. This date was not too late for
the highest qualities of Grecian art, and certainly the columns
now before me, surmounted by a frieze on which were inscribed
the names of the principal Grecian cities and colonies, con-
trasted very favourably, in point of lightness and beauty, with
anything I had seen in Egypt (even with the pillars at Beni
Hassan). Nothing could well be more graceful, and yet they
were very strong, and looked equal to their work; for you
must always note that a good artist harmonises his labour; he
does not sacrifice use to ornament, or vice versd, but combines
the two in a perfect and beautiful whole. Indeed, what is
characteristic in all architecture will be found connected with
its uses, climate and associations considered. Thus, the over-
lapping cornice of Egyptian and Oriental architecture was the
natural growth of climates where a hot, vertical sun made shelter
and shade very necessary features; and the sloping gable roof
of the Goth was eminently adapted to stave off the snow and
rain.
Entering the Temple of Jupiter at Nemea, I was still more
strongly impressed with the mixed character of the place where
I stood, when I found myself in a public agora or market-place.
All around me were the names of the best, the wisest, the most
glorious men of Greece, written in the form of the Greek letter
which was current at the time when they lived. This list
extended from the earliest ages to the latest, beginning with
blind old Homer, and ending with Anthemius who built
St. Soplia-- "




A


CHAP. III.









SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


"At Constantinople I" cries Bob, clapping his hands.
At Constantinople-you are right. I felt a little puzzled
with the blue, red, and yellow colouring all round me, for
I was not prepared to expect it in Greece; but as so many
things seemed all topsy-turvy, it was not worth my while to
spend too much thought about one in particular. Indeed my
surprise was not to end here. The whole world of Grecian art
seemed represented here, within the compass of a few feet. All
at once I was thrilled with the Laocoon, pleased with the
Farnese Juno, and solemnised by the Genius of Death. There
was the Discobolus from which I had been taught to draw, and
which I knew belonged to the Vatican. There was the Vatican
Ariadne. There was the Sleeping Faun. There was the
beautiful Venus of Milo. Well, I didn't know what to make of
it. I stepped into a side court, answering, in the real Agora, to
the Stoa, and what should I catch a glimpse of, but the very
Temple in Egypt which I had seen a little time before
Curious enough. But it gave me a chance of comparing the
dummyish-looking colossi and clumsy three-cornered seeming
paintings of the Egyptians with the beautiful columns and
cornices of the Greek; and I fell into a muse, with which I will
not now trouble you, about the enormous differences in the
genius of different nations. I will only say that it seemed to
me as if the excessive influence of the priests had had a great
deal to do with debasing Egyptian art. Strictly speaking, there
was never a priestly order or caste among the ancient Greeks,
though there were men devoted to the service of the temple
I wish you to notice this, because it is a peculiarity of our own
religion that Chriltians are all' priests unto God.'
Passing into a covered atrium, I noticed the broad, handsome
ante (or square pillars), and the panelled ceiling, which latter
D2


CHAP. III.








TII BSYfENIAMA SINbBA. I.


seemed to me to have come from the Temple of Apollo at
Bassme. Looking out at the back, I saw what seemed to me
the Parthenon itself under a diminishing glass-but, getting
closer, I found it was only a model of the western front. Then,
all above it, and for a distance on both sides of it, was-
wonderful to relate I-the frieze of the building, in a separate
state, only coloured in the same questionable way. Close by me
were the Niobe and the Medicean Venus from Florence, and
the immortal Psyche from Naples. Much more there was here,
more than I can tell you now; but I was not surprised at the
number of beautiful works of art before me, because I knew that
in one of his campaigns the King of Macedonia destroyed
2000 statues, and yet that, when Rome had done her work of
pillaging and carrying away, the city was said to contain more
statues than inhabitants "
"I don't believe it," cried Hetty, tossing her curls in the air.
"Never mind, Miss Hetty-the mere fact that such a thing
was said shows how prolific Greek art was. Even exaggera-
tions mean something, dear girl. There is never smoke but
there is fire, don't you know? However, what really surprised
me was the heterogeneous mixture of architecture and sculpture
in the place where I was. I had a sort of vague consciousness,
as you know we often have in dreams, of the fact that I had
gone to bed and to sleep in a house in Athens-"
"Pretty fact 1" said Amy, in a sly whisper to Hetty.
"Leave him alone," replied Hetty; "he'll make it all out
somehow-he's so clever."
Gone to bed in a house at Athens; and how had I got
here? and how had all these things got hepe ? While I was
wondering and wondering, with my eyes fixed on the Parthenon
frieze, a curious change came over one of the horses and its


CHAP. III.







SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


rider. The horse seemed to swell and swell to life-size, to
dilate its nostrils, and shake its stony mane, and lift its proud
prancing feet, and neigh in the blithe air, and long to step out.
It was not like one of our horses. It had a thick neck and short
legs. It was just like a colt, and not like an Arab racer in
figure. But the stone rider underwent a change as well as the
stone horse. It appeared to me, now, to be Apollo himself,
much as in the Belvedere statue; only with his bow swung over
his shoulder, a cloud of glory round his face and forehead, and
a less scornful smile on his face. He was, certainly, a very
beautiful fellow, and I don't mind telling you I wished I might
be only half as handsome as this god. In a few instants he
opened his divine lips, and spoke in, oh! such a celestial voice,
but, to my surprise, in broad mother-tongue English.
"'Wo! wo! Dobbin! wo!' cried the god, reining in his
horse; 'don't you perceive, Dobbin, I want to speak to this
gentleman?' After this polite expostulation, accompanied by a
little divine patting on the back, Dobbin did as he was bid, and
wo'd. I began to tremble a little, for tie great Mr. Apollo,
who, I knew, served the Python out so savagely, and played the
harp like Chatterton or like Amy, seemed as if he were coming
down from the Parthenon frieze to speak to me! Could I have
got into his bad books by being in this place? Was this his
private lumber-room or studio? Were these objects which I
had seen the real things, or models of the real things, or only
original patterns which Apollo had made, as inspire and patron
of Greek art? I had no time to decide, for the good-looking
god came up to me, and touching his golden forelock, not like a
clown, but like a god, and shaking down the ambrosial odour
from his sweet white brow as he did so, said, in a very
gentlemanly tone of voice-


CHAP. III.








42 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. III.

Good morning, Mr. Bull.'
"' Good morning, sir,' said I, shaking in my shoes-' I hope
I'm not intruding into your-your-your-studio ?'
Studio-studio ? O dear, no I This is only one of my
lumber-rooms, not my studio. Glad to see you here, Mr. Bull.
What's your pleasure ? What do you want?'
'Information about Greece, if you please, sir,' said I, re-
assured by his kind, cosy, comfortable manners.
'Ah, you've come to the right shop, Mr. Bull,' said
Apollo, with a twinkle in his deep-blue eye. Of course, I
know all about it, being connected with the concern. What
might you want to know in particular?'
'Well,' I replied, a doubt struck me, I must confess,
about the colouring of the friezes here, and especially of the
frieze of the Parthenon itself over there.'
To be sure-I dare say-quite right, Mr. Bull. I admire
your sagacity. We did colour our public buildings and statues
in the olden days, but not like that. It is Mr. Owen Jones's
doing. He is a very clever fellow-very-and so I allow him
to take liberties in this little lumber-room of mine. But he has,
I may tell you in confidence, overshot his mark in his manner
of applying colour to the productions of Greek Art. However,
we will not say too much about it. The attempt was praise-
worthy, and you mortals get at truth by little and little,
always.'
I now ventured to make an observation myself. Rome,'
said I, was not built in a day.' It was an unlucky slip of tihe
tongue. The brow of the god lowered a little, and I saw an
angry twitch at the angles of his mouth. Mr. Bull,' he began
again, 'Athens was my studio, and those confounded Romans,
hardheaded and ironhanded, played Meg's diversion with Art.








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


I wish-' But here Apollo drew his hand across his face, and,
dropping a tear, dropped the subject also.
"' Well, well!' lie began again-' we were talking of the
slowness of you mortals to learn. Look at the columns of the
Parthenon there; do you see anything particular ?'
I see great lightness and beauty, exquisite grace, and yet
no lack of strength in the appearance of the columns.'
'Ali, yes! but you observe, I dare say, an almost aerial effect
in the spring or elevation, do you not?-Look again. Now
you see it plainly. Have you heard that it has lately, only
lately, been found out that those beautiful columns-oh, they're
lovely! (what an excitable person Apollo is I thought I)-are
curved? I dare say not. Very few people in your streets,
Mr. Bull, know that. Architects and artists know it, but it
has taken them century upon century to find it out, which is
what I was saying.'
I should never have noticed such a trifle,' said I.
'Trifle!' exclaimed Apollo, with a scorching frown, 'don't
talk of trifles in Art! You would see nothing particular about
the right arm and hand of the Laocoon if it were perfect; but
let me tell you Michael Angelo did not dare to attempt the
restoration. It takes eyes to see with. Now, look at that
statue, there, of myself. Observe the left arm, and compare it
with mine. You see it is a libel on my form. Look again at
the right arm and foot-they are worse still-they have been
mended, and ill mended too. Look at my knees, Mr. Bull!
Do they turn in? No! But the knees of my statue there do.
Turn to the Laocoon-the left leg is the biggest, though you do
not perceive it. Be sure, however, that in Art nothing is a
trifle. In Greece, my people-I mean, the sculptors whom I
patronised by vouchsafing to them a more liberal inspiration


CHAP. III.








THEl SYDENIIAM SINDB.\D.


than usual-took infinite pains. The backs and corners of
statues, and the least observed portions of public buildings, were
all finished off by the chisel with as much delicate accuracy as
if they had been designed for the most public exposure. O
Mr. Bull, Mr. Bull, I wish you modern Britons had a little more
of this spirit in your Art!'
"' I have often wondered,' I replied humbly, how it was the
Greeks were so much superior to us moderns in the devotional
and painstaking spirit of their Art.'
"'\Well, for one thing, a Greek always had the human form
before him; under his nose, as you would say. We did not
drape to the excess of )ou Goths and Barbarians. The type of
beauty being always in sight, at the bath-room, in the gymnasia,
and even in the home and the street, any variation from it
would be unlikely to escape notice. The human form was
universally loved for its own sake, as it will always be where it
is healthily trained and not unduly covered up; and it was an
artist's glory to produce the most perfect imitation. Then, think
of the fine climate, the sweet bounding air; and again, of my
inspiring breath--I mean the genius of the people, as you would
call it. My Greeks were born artists. They were a nation of
ideal imitators. It is no more to be wondered at than that the
Romans (I hated 'em) were a nation of fighters, born under
Mars. Then, Art was closely connected with the religion of
the ancient Greeks. I am afraid, Mr. Bull, they were rather
materialistic in their religious tastes, the Greeks. I mean, they
dealt with their gods through temples and statues and visible
things, while you confine your worship to your hearts and private
feelings- '
And our conduct,' I suggested, bowing to the god. We
are Christians.'


C.mrv. 11.








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


'I stand corrected,' said Apollo. 'I will not quarrel with
you about your chapels and churches, to which you never carry
votive offerings to hang on the walls and lay on the shrines, as
my Greeks used to do. I dare say you have your own proper
ways, and that the world improves as it gets older.'
Here something dropped out of a side-pocket in the scarf of
the god, and I stooped to pick it up for him: it was an oyster-
shell !
Thank you,' said he, with a sad smile-' that is one of
the shells that were dropped into the urn when Aristides was
banished by ostracism. I always carry it about with me, be-
cause I used to like the fellow, though he was so sturdy and
inelegant in his notions. Al! that takes me back to old
times !'
"' I should be particularly indebted,' said I, if you would
please to take me with you "back to old times," as you say. I
should so like to know all about them.'
"' Well,' replied Apollo, very good-naturedly, I don't
mind. Just wait till I have tied Dobbin to one of the pillars
over there-good Dobbin! Wo! wo! There! By-the-by,
Mr. Bull, what a funny coat that is of yours-I can't hely
laughing at it,' said Apollo, leaning on his bow.
"' Is it ?' I replied, a little abashed. It is the celebrated
Milton wrapper, and is very much advertised and admired
now o' days.'
Ah, I knew Milton; he was a fine fellow; but he never
wore a wrapper like that, I can tell you. I'd have cut him
dead for it. Look at me. This, over my shoulders, is the
chlamys- -'
Very graceful indeed,' said I, perceiving that he prided
himself upon his personal appearance.


CHAP. III.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


'Well, I think it looks nice. But the ordinary Grecian
dress for men and women was double. Being a god, I do as I
like; and besides, I've been out shooting-to-day is the anni-
versary of my killing the Python. Men and women used to
wear an under-dress called the chiton, and an over-dress called
the himation. The chiton was loose, made of either linen or
woollen, and had sleeves or holes for the arms. Men wore it
as long as to the knee; women lower. The himation was
something like a Scotch plaid--'
In pattern?' I asked.
"'No, sir,' said he, with a smile, 'but in size and shape;
and it was worn in a similar way. The women's chiton was
fastened round the waist by a girdle, and often made very
pretty. The chlamys, such as I have on now, was the usual
riding-dress, and also the dress of little boys. I am not a little
boy, but the Greeks often sculptured me as one-look at that
beautiful Apollino there, for an example. Well, my fellows
used to wear two or three sorts of caps-a scull-cap and a wide-
awake, made of felt, for instance-but not always; they liked
to go about with uncovered head. Women used to wear caps
and turbans. The hair was grown very long, and not many
people shaved. When a boy got to be eighteen years old, they
cut his hair short, and offered it in a sacrifice to the gods; after
which he wore it short for two years, during which he was
called- '
An ephebus,' I interrupted.
"' Ah, you know, Mr. Bull, I see! An ephebus; and he
wore the wide-awake and the chlamys. As for the feet, some-
times my people wore boots, but oftener sandals only; and in-
doors they wore nothing at all. They did not use any polish-
only a sponge to wipe the shoe or sandal clean. Perhaps you


46


CHAP. III.








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


would like to know something of their eating and drinking
ways? Yes? Well, they were not what country people call
" gormandizers." Sometimes they took bread soaked in wine
just upon getting up in the morning ; but, in a general way, they
had only two meals a day-one, in the forenoon, served for
both breakfast and luncheon; one in the afternoon, for both
dinner and tea; after which people kept indoors and enjoyed
themselves. And, let me tell you, Bull," (was not that familiar
of him ?-Apollo calling me Bull?) "my Greeks knew how to
enjoy themselves without giving the reins to their impulses:
there were no fast men and boys in Greece; and yet they were
a gay people. They used to eat barley and wheaten bread,
sometimes mixed up with wine, oil, and spices,--pork and mutton,
-black puddings,-onions, garlic, cabbages, beans, and all that.
Fish they were very fond of. Then, they had fowl too. Olives,
figs, nuts, honey, grapes, were used as dessert. They had
spoons to eat with, and pieces of bread served for forks. Meat
was generally cut up before it was served at table. The guests
seldom gave way to intoxication, and were not always allowed
to drink as much as they pleased; a master of the feast, like
your chairman at a public dinner, being chosen to keep order.
"' Dinner parties in Greece, called symposia, as you know,
Mr. Bull, were very frequent, and very pleasant. Birthday
parties, sacrificial parties, and bachelors' or young people's parties,
were some of the forms of the symposia.'"
Here Amy broke in upon Fred's narration with the question,
whether Apollo told him "how they used to dress for dinner ?"
He did," said Fred, "listen to his words:-
I have been present at a Feast of the Poets in England,
of which Mr. Leigh Hunt has given you an account, and I was
disgusted at the sombre style of dress in use among you


CHAP. III.


47






1

48 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. III.
islanders.- In Greece, the guests used to come to a dinner-
party dressed in the handsomest and most cheerful manner,
perfumed and anointed, and crowned with flowers. As soon as
a new-comer entered the portal, a slave approached, removed
his sandals, and bathed his feet. Then came the dinner, then
the dessert, and the wine-drinking, and the feast of reason and
flow of soul, under the direction of the symposiarch, who mixed
the wine with water in a great big bowl, and then sent it round
in goblets, into which it had been ladled with a spoon.'
"' Like our punch,' I observed.
As you please,' said the god, I was never a tippler ; it is
a sad thing when a clever dog is too fond of the goblet. I am
not partial to that sort of poet. I make the remark, because I
fancied your allusion, Mr. Bull, pointed to the convivial habits
of too many of my devotees, and I wish you to understand that I
do not admire them: ariston men udor, water is best-that's
my motto, though you wouldn't think it. When I used to be
worshipped, with Artemis and Leto, at Delos-ah! those were
times!-a great many extravagant things were done, and my
Greeks gave way to a good many frenzies; but, on the whole,
I was worshipped in olden days in a much more respectful and
rational manner than by some of your tipsy poets. I was
always a sensible god, and my Greeks knew it. How else
could I keep my head clear for uttering the oracles when all
the world came to Delphos, and hold my bow steadily for the
archery in which I excelled ? However, this is self-praise.'
"I took advantage of a modest pause Apollo made here, to
ask him about the Ancient Mysteries and the Religion of his
Greeks. He told me this :-
"' Of all our mysteries, you know, I dare say, Mr. Bull, the
mysteries of Eleusis, in honour of Ceres, were the most cele-








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


brated. Every Athenian was bound to go to Eleusis.once, to
see them. It was a sort of Confirmation, or grand sacrament of
his religion. There would be a band of pilgrims, and they
walked from Athens to Eleusis, a distance of about twelve
miles. When they got there, they had to undergo ceremonies
of purification, and sacrifices were offered by torchlight. Then,
as we Greeks (as I have told you) were never ashamed of our
mortal bodies, and thought the gods were pleased to see us
keep them in good condition-as, in fact, we admired what
those horrid Romans called the mens sana in corpore sano-the
sound mind in sound body-and thought the gods did too-we
always got up sports and athletic games, in which prizes of
honour were contended for. At dead of night the candidates
for initiation were led into the Temple of the Mysteries, dressed
in fresh, clean raiment, and wearing crowns of myrtle upon their
foreheads. As they passed the sacred portal, they dipped their
fingers into a font of holy water. Soon after, the high priest of
the occasion received them, with stern and awful brow, and told
them that a pure heart was expected of every candidate who
came. Then he read to them, out of a sacred scroll, the
meaning of the Mysteries, and catechised them concerning their
preparation for so august an occasion: had they subdued their
animal passions by fasting? had they resolved to encounter
worthily whatever terror they might meet? and so on. These
questions answered, the Mysteries began, and they contained
many things which I cannot describe to one so young as you,
Mr. Bull, junior. Thunders rolled, and lightning flashed in the
gloom. Earthquakes shook the ground, and fearful rumblings
and mysterious voices made darkness horrible. Daggers
gleamed,-blood flowed, and shades from Pluto's realm passed
whitely through the dark. Then the sad story of the Great


CHAP. III.








THE BYDENHAM SINDBAD.


Mother and her daughter Proserpina was acted over. The
initiated was left overwhelmed with pity and terror, and, after
seeing so much, was supposed to be all his life free from the
power of passion. But, perhaps, you would like to know some-
thing of the procession sculptured on the frieze of the Parthenon
there ? That is the Panathenaic procession, in honour of Athene,
the patron goddess of Athens. It took place once every year,
and also with peculiar splendour once every four years. All
the citizens and sojourners, men, women, and children, went to
this festival on the Acropolis, and the procession bore an em-
broidered robe, which was to be put over the statue. Old
men, with olive-branches, went first; then middle-aged men,
with shields and spears, behind; and beside them went the
foreigners, carrying little boats to indicate that they had come
from afar. Next, the women; then the young men, crowned
with millet and singing the praises of the goddess These
were followed by a beautiful band of patrician virgins of Athens,
carrying baskets and offerings, while the girls from abroad bore
parasols and seats; and the little boys closed the procession.
Then there were games and contests of physical strength, and
dramatic and musical performances.-It was always insisted
that an animal offered to the gods should be sound and healthy.
When it was brought to the altar, its usual food was offered to
it, and it was expected to taste it. Then the priest drew a
knife over its back from head to tail, under which operation it
was expected to stand quiet, as a sign of willingness to be
offered up. The celestial gods were propitiated or offered to in
the morning of the day (though the subterranean or infernal
gods were worshipped at night), and this was the way: the fire
was lit on the altar, which was sprinkled with meal and
water-'


OnC. In.








CHAP. III. SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY. 51

"'You basted the altar; we baste the meat,' said I, ven-
turing on a joke.
"' Then the officiating priest dipped an olive-branch in the
water, or one of the faggots, and sprinkled the congregation.
A sort of crier demanded Who is here ? The people re-
sponded, "Many and good." Then the crier warned the people
present to keep a religious silence, which meant to avoid uttering
any unlucky words; and the priest, after saying, Let us pray,"
delivered a prayer. After the victim had been examined and
tested, as I told you just now, there was another prayer. The
priest took a cup of wine to his lips, sent it round among the
company, and emptied what remained on the victim's head.
Frankincense being spilled into the crackling fire to make it
odorous, the animal was slain, and part burned. While it was
being consumed, another prayer was offered up, and the people
sang a hymn to the music of a flute, and danced around the
altar. The hymn sung in my honour was always called a pcan
-a word which you moderns employ to indicate almost any song
of praise. Often there was a sort of sacred, but cheerful, dinner-
party, and the whole was concluded with a libation of wine,
publicly made, and the pronouncing of a benediction or invoca-
tion at the moment of the outpouring. My Greeks had no
Sunday, as you have, but festival and sacrificial occasions were
frequent, and a man might take or make almost as many
holidays as he liked or could afford.'
I have read,' said I, with a little timidity, as I could not
tell but I might offend Apollo, I have read that the Greeks
had a great many silly, childish superstitions.'
Ah, I dare say you have,' replied the good-natured god.
SBut you must not draw hasty conclusions. No doubt the
Greeks were superstitious, but they were not silly in every case








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


where a modern critic of their rites and ceremonies might sup-
pose them to be so. Time obliterates the reasons and the
meanings of many things, and trifles appear foolish to-day
which had wisdom in the yesterday of antiquity. My Greeks
thought a hare running across the path a bad sign; so do some
of your country people in England. Things which happened on
the right-hand side of the body they esteemed lucky-on the
left the reverse, namely unlucky. It was unlucky to use words
meaning death or ruin,'at certain times, especially during reli-
gious services; and sneezing was sometimes treated as an ora-
cular declaration of the will of the gods. The raven was sacred
to myself, and treated as an oracular bird. Meanings were put
into the turn the smoke took, the noise made by wine in being
poured from a flagon, and numerous other trifles-but perhaps
it was better to wait upon the will of the gods in a mistaken
way than to do almost everything from cold-blooded self-will,
as too many of your excessively enlightened moderns do !'
Your people seem to have taken great delight in their
temples and the images of their gods,' I said.
Yes, truly. Why, do you know the statue of the Olympian
Jove, in the Temple near where the Games were held, was made
of ivory and gold, and sixty feet high I Statues like that, Mr.
Bull, were made by men-not by puny fellows like your artists
now-a-days. Every boy in Athens, clever or not clever, was
exercised in running, wrestling, archery, javelin-throwing, ball,
quoits, and boxing; so, if there happened to be a genius-like
Phidias, for example-he grew up an athletic, manly genius,
and threw off work with some sinews in it. Ah, deary, deary
me! My Greeks knew how to combine grace and strength,
and they did it. My Greeks, Mr. Bull, lived in a country less
than Portugal, not 300 miles long, and not 200 broad, but they


CluAP. III.








SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY.


were fine fellows-fine manly fellows! The poorest citizen
had his daily bath ; good wrestlers were counted heroes; Crito-
bulus said, I swear by the gods I would rather have beauty
than all the power of kings." Look about you, in this little
lumber-room of mine, and see what splendid things the fellows
did. Look at that Venus Victrix there. Look at that spirited
Mercury. Look at that Fortune poised on a globe. Look at
the Antinous. Look at the Adonis with the arrow-shaft in his
hand. Look at that Sleeping Cupid. Look at that Venus
taking out the thorn, when the drops of blood from her white
foot turned to violets on the greensward. And, oh! look at
that glorious Dying Gladiator there--'
Ah!' I interrupted,' has not our Byron sung beautifully
of him ?-
"I see before me the gladiator lie:
He leans upon his hand-his manly brow
Consents to death, but conquers agony,
And his drooped head sinks gradually low." '
"'You needn't quote any poet to me, Mr. Bull,' replied
Apollo. I know 'em all by heart of course. Look, sir, at that
Diana, shielding the sacred fawn with the golden foot from the
pursuing Hercules-look at the elastic spring of her beautiful
limbs, and the wrath of the insulted goddess dilating her glo-
rious eye! Ah, one of your poets, Bull, sang a pretty Hymn to
her in his Cynthia's Revels "-Ben Jonson-(a fine fellow was
Ben, but rather proud, and sometimes rude to his betters, my
Shakspeare for example). Do you know his hymn ?-
Queen and Huntress, chaste and fair,
Now the sun is laid to sleep,
Seated in thy silver chair,
State in wonted manner keep:
Hesperus entreats thy light,
Goddess excellently bright.


CHAP. III.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


"Earth, let not thy envious shade
Dare itself to interpose;
Cynthia's shining orb was made
Heav'n to cheer, when day did close.
Bless us then with wished sight,
Goddess excellently bright.
"Lay thy bow of pearl apart,
And thy crystal shining quiver;
Give unto the flying hart
Space to breathe, how short soever:
Thou that mak'st a day of night,
Goddess excellently bright."

The part of your Byron's verses about that Gladiator which I
admired most, Mr. Bull, was that closing imprecation-

Arise, ye Goths, and glut your ire!"

O wasn't I glad when those Romans were served out! Look,
sir, again, at that Juno,--" ox-eyed Juno" as we called her.
Look at Minerva with her snake-entwined aegis, or her helm of
the time of Pericles (I could weep for that time I). And-look,
sir, at that Boy and Dolphin-did you ever see a sweeter
face?-and at those tipsy, mischievous Fauns there-I am
sure, if-Hark I what is that ?'
It seemed, in my dream, that we heard the sound of a horn.
Apollo started, turned as pale as a god could be expected to
do, and, with a hasty nod, dashed upon the shoulders of Dobbin,
and left me in a luminous, golden smoke of beautiful perfume!
Very surprising conduct, was not it ?"
I dare say," interposed Hetty, as he hated the Romans so,
it reminded him of the Roman horn, and he couldn't bear it.
Poor fellow!"


CHAP. IIL







CHAP. III. SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY. 55

Why, Hetty is almost as clever as Fred," whispered Bob
to Bella. Fred continued:-
"There my dream about Apollo's lumber-room ends. The
only other picture of what I saw in Greece with which I shall
trouble you now is this, of the market in Athens, which I passed
through in the morning, after I awoke. I will paint it in the
words of a famous writer, named Becker. The market-place
was rapidly filling with people when I got into it. Traders
had set up their hurdlework stalls all over it, with their wares
exposed on tables and benches. Here the female bakers had
piled up their round-shaped loaves and cakes, and were pur-
suing with a torrent of scolding and abuse the unlucky wight
who happened, in passing by, to upset one of their pyramids.
There simmered the kettle of the woman who sold boiled peas
and other vegetables; in the crockery-market hard by the pot-
men were descanting on the goodness of their wares; a little
way of, in the myrtle-market, chaplets and fillets were to be
sold, and many a buxom flower-weaver received orders for
garlands to be sent home by her in the evening. All the wants
of the day, from barley groats up to the most dainty fish; from
garlic to the incense of the gods; clear pure oil and the most
exquisite ointments; fresh-made cheese and the sweet honey of
the bees of Hymettus; cooks ready to be hired; slaves, male
and female, on sale-- "
Your Greeks ought to be ashamed of themselves, Mr. Fred,
for keeping slaves," exclaimed Amy, bridling up, and turning
red with virtuous indignation.
My dear girl, that sentiment does you credit; but in Greece
and in the East, slpary was not the horrid revolting thing it is
in America, mind that.-Well,' There were all these to be
found in abundance at their customary stands. There were others






of
66 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. III.

who went about crying their wares, while every now and then a
public crier crossed the ground, announcing with Stentorian
voice the arrival of some goods to be sold, or the sale of some
house, or perhaps a reward for the apprehension of a robber or
runaway slave. Slaves of both sexes, as well as freemen, kept
walking up and down, bargaining and inspecting the stalls in
search of their daily requirements. Several, too, hovered longer
than necessary about a pretty shopwoman, or approached some
fruiterer's basket and commenced a friendly conversation, under
cover of which, while some other person was buying or having a
drachma changed, they would pilfer the fruit.' "
"Then there were thieves in Greece? inquired Bob.
"Thieves, I should think so, Bobby mine 1" replied Fred.
" Lots of thieves. There were housebreakers and footpads there,
as well as in England. In some things, of course, my Greeks
were very different from English people; for instance, the men
and not the women went to market to make the household
purchases, but, on the whole, they were very much like us in
minor matters; for example, gossips and quidnuncs used to go
to the barbers' shops to talk over the news and the scandal, just
as they do here."
"Wern't you very much frightened in your dream, when
Apollo came down on horseback to speak to you?" asked
Bobby.
"Frightened, I should think so I I felt quite excited. But
I tell you I have had to go through a good deal. On my way
from Athens to the place where I had seen the dancing Alba-
nians by the night-fires on the shore, in the blue starry mid-
night, I should have been very hungry if it had not been for a
chapel dedicated to Hecate, which I found by the road-side."
"What on earth did you find in the chapel, then ?"








SIMhhAD'S SECOND SOURNMY.


O, only eggs and Welsh rabbit."
"Welsh rabbit you are joking."
"Not I, Bobby. Rich people put toasted cheese and eggs in
such places for the sustenance of wandering beggars. Well, to
make a long story short, I escaped Mediterranean pirates and
shipwreck in the Bay of Biscay, and, putting papa's talisman in
use, got home by the very same Roc that had taken me thither,
feeling rather tired and very pleased. I must confess the
figures of the Fates, in Apollo's lumber-room, left a terrible
impression on my mind for a long time, and the face of Euripides
was rather awful; but I didn't care. I enjoyed my journey, and
so I did the next, which I will tell you another time, if you
like."
Bobby thought to himself, and, indeed, he said to Bella, If
I'm to wait till I've been and seen all Fred has seen, and can
tell it as well, Bella, before I have a stand-up collar and wear
a surtout, it will not be just yet."
But Bella comforted him with kind encouraging words, and
we shall know, by-and-by, 1 dare say, all about his progress and
the surtout and the stand-up collar. Meanwhile, we must not,
for truth's and goodness' sake, pass by, without a word of pro-
test, the enthusiasm of our genial friend the "lord of light and
the unerring bow." in favour of the palmy days of his Athens
under Pericles. Let me employ, for this purpose, the plain but
forcible words of the Rev. James White, who says that "here,
as in all other instances, the despotism of one degraded the many.
Cimon, with more virtue but less genius, had combined the cha-
racters of leader and improver; but Pericles, unable to contend
in generosity with the richest man in Attica, and yet deter-
mined not to leave him a monopoly of popular gratitude for the


CHAP. III.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


liberality of his gifts, converted the funds of the commonwealth
into donatives to the poor. He paid the populace equally for
being idle and being employed. The works of the city were
carried on by the slaves; the poorer of the free inhabitants had
nothing to do but receive their allowance from the public coffers,
with a further payment for condescending to sit in judgment in
the courts of justice and listen to the noblest oratory that human
lips had yet uttered. Seats in the theatre were free; and there
the masterpieces of human genius were shaking the hearts of
breathless thousands with the terrors of tragedy, or irritating
the passions of a volatile population with the bitterest lampoons
in the shape of farce. Meantime, the porches, the covered ways,
the arcades of temples, and the newly-planted Academe, were
filled with the anxious disciples of great philosophers, listening
to the honeyed words of wisdom, or the cutting tones of objur-
gation and contempt, poured into their ears by the masters they
particularly followed. On every side of them rose wonderful
buildings, consecrated nominally to the worship of the gods, but
acting, in reality, as triumphs of refinement and art. Statues
smiled upon them in the deathless beauty of the Apollo, or
awed them with the grandeur of superhuman power in the
colossal form of Minerva. Nothing was wanting to the develop-
ment of the national intellect or the deterioration of the personal
character. They were a people of critics and lawyers, and poli-
ticians and philosophers; they caught the faintest hint conveyed
in the subtlest language, and perceived the slightest blemish
either in speech or picture; yet they were false and unprin-
cipled-greedy of money, greedy of praise. Pericles had refined
them into judges and connoisseurs, and sunk them into paupers;
he cultivated their tastes and flattered their wildest desires."


CHAP. III.








CHAP. III. SINDBAD'S SECOND JOURNEY. 59

There is truth in this, and it should be remembered by us all
that very great artistic culture, and a fine development of the
human animal, do not at all imply an educated conscience.
Some day you will understand me better when I say that a life
whose be-all and eud-all is Art, is made up of beautiful selfish-
ness, which will react in degradation.








60 THE BYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. IV.




CHAPTER IV.

SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.
LITTLE Hindbad, Bella, Amy, and Hetty, being all ready to
listen as usual, Sindbad began the narration of his third journey
as follows:-
"The Roc which carried me to Sydenham was not only a
comfortable easy-going Roc, you must understand, but it was a
regular, punctual, obliging sort of animal, and admitted me
under one of its fins as often as I chose. I had only to put
papa's talisman in my pocket and go to the place where I had
first seen the Roc, to find my way ito fresh adventures of a very
interesting, if startling, description. If my last adventures sur-
prised you, those I am about to narrate now will surprise you
infinitely more. Yet I shall say nothing for which I have not
good grounds-and thus it was:-
My civil and punctual friend, the Roc, took me under his
fins one day, just as before, and whizzed with me through the
air with the same rapidity, till he landed me in the most beautiful
Garden I ever was in in my life. I dare say you, Amy, and
you, Hetty, know something about gardening, so you will quite
understand all I am going to say.
"In what are called the Middle or Dark Ages, when there
was little going on but fighting and squabbling and thieving
between hostile barons and clans, and people stayed'a good deal
inside their fortresses, gardens were laid out for the pleasure of
high-born ladies and lords within the walled squares of the
castles, and with great art. The space being confined, and























)I vrl


"'- .. ; ,IS


SINDBAD'S OBSERVATIONS UPON GARDENING.-P. 60.


; I






ii ~


r r
r








SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


natural beauty for the most part demanding a large platform, at
least in every form of the landscape, people fell back upon mere
art or invention, and a formal style of treating pleasure-grounds
grew into use, in which cut hedges, trimmed alleys, fountains,
imitation rock-work, statuary, urns and vases, were the dis-
tinguishing features. Art was almost everything, Nature quite
subordinate-although there were some formal attempts, as in
the case of the imitation-rocks, to reproduce some of her bolder
features upon a small scale. This style naturally came to its
climax in Italy, the land of art, the nurse of civilization in the
Middle Ages, and the inheritor of the traditions of ancient
Rome, of whose gardening it was a copy. It is called the
Italian style; and though gardens in Italy are now more after
the English or natural model than they used to be, they are
still laid out in a formal and artificial manner.
It was not till near the time of Shakspeare and Bacon that
gardening became an art in England. Henry VIII. had a
very fine garden at Nonsuch Palace in Surrey, in which he put
a marble pyramid, with holes in it, which escaped notice till you
got pretty close, and then sent out jets of water upon you,
sprinkling you all over in a shameful manner. This was con-
sidered a first-rate joke, and, as it was the joke of a king, it
was very soon imitated all over the country by people who could
afford such a thing in their garden. Then, as you know, there
were the mazes, of which there is one we have all seen at
Cardinal Wolsey's Palace at Hampton Court. Lord Bacon
wrote a very beautiful Essay on Gardens, beginning, God
Almighty first planted a garden, and, certainly, it is the purest
of human pleasures;' and he cried out for the admission of
more pure nature into our gardens; proposing that there should
always be what he calls a heath or desert,' beyond the em-


CHAP. IV,








62 THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD. CHAP. IV

bellished part of the grounds. We can all read his Essay,
when we please, and it is very pretty. In the times of Pope
and Addison all kinds of fantastic tricks' were played with
gardening ornamentation. Trees were cut and trimmed into
the likeness of animals, statues, and what not. We read, in
humorous papers of Pope and Addison, of 'a St. George in
box, his arm scarce long enough, but will be in a condition to
stick the dragon next April;' and a quickset hog shot up into
a porcupine by being forgot a week in rainy weather.' However,
Pope himself, like Shenstone and Cowper, was a man of taste
and a clever gardener, and he laid out his own grounds at
Twickenham in a very beautiful manner.
The Dutch style of gardening is what you might naturally
expect from the dwellers in a flat country, intersected by canals
-a country which has been called a 'ship at anchor;' but
which, in my humble opinion, would be better called a barge at
rest. Dutch gardening is very square-if you look at a piece
of flat ground you instinctively think rather of squares than of
curves-very trim, and full of gaudy flowers, such as tulips and
sunflowers. We all know that at one time in Holland fortunes
were staked, and lost, and won, in the cultivation of tulips.
How beautifully Cowper writes of a garden!"
"I think I could repeat his verses," said Amy, and her
sweet, soft accents were a pleasant change from Fred's grave
tones, as she recited, with gentle modesty, and a little bashful
blush coming and going on her forehead, the fine lines from the
'Task:'-
To deck the shapely knoll,
That softly swell'd and gaily dress'd appears
A flowery island from the dark green lawn
Emerging, must be deem'd a labour due
To no mean hand, and asks the touch of taste.









SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


Here also grateful mixture of well-match'd
And sorted hues (each giving each relief,
And by contrasted beauty shining more)
Is needful. Strength may wield the pond'rous spade,
May turn the clod, and wheel the compost home;
But elegance, chief grace the garden shows,
And most attractive, is the fair result
Of thought, the creature of a polish'd mind.
Without it all is Gothic as the scene
To which the insipid citizen resorts
Near yonder heath ; where industry misspent,
But proud of his unpouth ill-chosen task,
Has made a heaven on earth; with suns and moons
Of closeraimm'ttbones has charged the encumber'd soil,
And fairly laid the zodiac in the dust.
He, therefore, who would see his flowers disposed
Sightly and in just order, ere he gives
The beds the trusted treasure of their seeds,
Forecasts the future whole; that when the scene
Shall break into its preconceived display,
Each for itself, and all as with one voice
Conspiring, may attest his bright design.
Nor even then dismissing as performed
His pleasant work, may he suppose it done.
Few self-supported flowers endure the wind
Uninjured, but expect the upholding aid
Of the smooth-shaven prop, and, neatly tied,
Are wedded thus, like beauty to old age,
For interest's sake, the living to the dead.
Some clothe the soil that feeds them, far diffused
And lowly creeping, modest and yet fair,
Like virtue, thriving most where little seen:
Some more aspiring catch the neighbour shrub
With clasping tendrils, and invest his branch,
Else unadorn'd, with many a gay festoon
And fragrant chaplet, recompensing well
The strength they borrow with the grace they lend.
All hate the rank society of weeds,


CHAP. IV.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


Noisome, and ever greedy to exhaust
The impoverished earth; an overbearing race,
That, like the multitude made faction-mad,
Disturb good order, and degrade true worth."

"Very pretty, Amy, and very prettily said," resumed Fred.
The gardens in which I now found myself, thanks to the Roc,
were an intermixture of the Italian and English styles of garden-
ing, and I should say they covered a couple of hundred acres.
The general effect of the arrangement was symmetrical in the
extreme; and bringing my mathematics into play, I found out,
after careful observation, that the width of the walks, the length
of the terraces, the breadth of the steps, and the other propor-
tions of the whole scheme, were all multiples or submultiples
of the number eight. Beautiful terraces and balustrades,
streams and lakes, arcades, a Temple of Roses, dark cedar-
trees, and white statues, varied the scene; and I could have
fancied I was in an enchanted ground, as perhaps I was,-en-
chanted by-well, never mind by whom or by what !-when, all
on a sudden, a number of fountains sprang into the air, and sent
up the water in white feathery columns that seemed to play
with each other and with the clouds, and ask the Sun to turn
them into rainbows, and then bashfully slip down again, and
away. 0, it was a pretty sight, I can tell you! But even
while I was thinking how pretty it was, the white columns sank,
and I saw a tall, awful, beautiful form emerging from the large
basin; a form which seemed to cover the whole horizon, without
darkening it, and, above all, to be bent upon speaking to me!
It was the grandest figure I ever beheld. Seemingly of female
sex, venerable and yet young, of a grand, sweet, matronly
beauty, the Being sublimely rose from the subsiding water
against the rounded sky, and smiled at me. Her head was


CHAP. IV.








SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


crowned with a diadem of dazzling snow and ice, round which a
halo of coruscating purple hovered in a flashing fitful way, which
made me think of the northern lights, or the electric fluid sent
through a glass tube. Her mantle, of rich, dark green, varied
with autumnal brown, the colour of the ripened fields, was
dotted with flowers,-daisies and roses, lilies of the valley,
and fuchsias; while a few rhododendrons clustered on her ice-
bound forehead. Folded about her in a thousand undulations
was a vast scarf of a lighter green, a clear emerald, fluttering
in the wind, and bordered with the whitest ermine. There
were a few streaks of grey in her floating hair, and a mark or
two of care on her cheek. I thought she seemed anxious to
hide some spots of blood which stained her daisied skirt; and,
as she smiled, and prepared to address me, she pointed solemnly
to an inscription, which I had not before noticed, upon her girdle
-' The EARTH is the LORD'S, and the fulness thereof.' I felt
impelled to ask the awful beautiful stranger who She was,
though I confess I had a notion. So I asked the immemorial
question put to ghosts and burglars by night-
'WHO ARE YOU?'
Graciously bending down her forehead till a breath from
her lips sweeter than the south wind infused courage into my
spirit, she said in accents of softest reproachfulness,-
"' What I do you not know your own Mother ?'
"' Mother I' I exclaimed.
"'Yes, Mother, the great, general mother; bountiful and
strong, and ready as ever to tell her children her secrets. I
am MOTHER EARTH.'
At this moment I could have kissed her feet, so sweet and
loving was her voice-but I only drew in the odour of the
flowers on her robe, and kept silence. She began to speak again.
E3


CHAP. IV.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


I saw you admiring these trees, and lawns, and lakes, and
fountains, and, as I thought you one who likes to know and to
be wise, and I am ever willing to tell my story to such as will
listen, I took counsel with Water, and came up through the
Central Fountain there, to tell you some of my secrets, my most
ancient secrets. It is not usual for a lady to disclose her age,
but as I am ever young, or ever renewing my youth, I don't
mind telling you-and you may tell as many of your fellow-
mortals, children of mine, as you please-that I am millions of
years old, and had a history of the deepest interest before one
of you men trod the valleys. Look at me; do I seem old?
Ah! I see you are admiring my emerald scarf; that is what
you call the Sea, and the foam is the ermine-like border. I
should be glad, sometimes (and here the Being shed a few
tears), if this scarf of mine were wide enough to cover the blood-
stains I so unwillingly bear!'-There was a short pause......
"Looking at Her crown of peaked ice, I couldn't help
shivering, and asked Her if she was not rather cold? She
smiled, and said-
Oh no How should I be cold ? You do n't know how
many coats I have on, my child. And, now I think of it, the
best way to tell you my earliest secrets, will be to take off my
coats, one by one, and show you the curiosities hidden in their
folds. But mind, my dear child, you must not be alarmed, if
some of these curious secrets of mine should seem very ugly and
horrible to you. I have carried them in my bosom for so many
ages that I have become accustomed to their shapes; and, in-
deed, some of them have got cracked and broken, when, in
moments of excitement I have shaken up the folds of my coats,
or drawn my scarf tighter about me than usual.'
"Mother Earth seemed so kind and communicative that I


CHAP. IV.








SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


began to take courage, and to feel prepared to listen to her
disclosures without apprehension. As she seemed to point to a
retired and distant spot in these beautiful gardens, I concluded
that I had better go thither, and that she would then take off
some of her coats and show me the curiosities hidden in their
folds, as she had promised. Thither, accordingly, I went,
when the beautiful Mother proceeded to address me as fol-
lows:-
"' The dresshifch I ordinarily wear in public is only my
superficial'covering. You give it various names in your geo-
logical books. First you have the vegetable soil, then peat,
then gravel, then blue clay. But my interior coats lie lower
down, next in order to the clay. First of all comes the third,
or, as you call it, the Tertiary coat. This is a coat with three
histories, belonging to its Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene periods
of wear. In the plastic clay, flinty limestone, and shelly de-
posits of which this coat is made, you find a good many curiosi-
ties, but they are of a kind which is not extraordinarily remote
from such curiosities as now appear upon my outer coat; croco-
diles, gigantic tapirs, whales, mastodons, ruminant animals,
mammoths, and so on. In my Primary, or unfossiliferous coat,
which is very strong and hard, made of granite and gneiss, and
slate, I have, indeed, some curious things, but they are not of
the kind which I shall now describe to you. At the time when
my second, or Secondary, coat was uppermost-for I did not
always wear the third or Tertiary, only I want more warmth as
I get older and the cares of a family increase upon me-my face
was not like what it is now. Bats almost as long as your friend
Sindbad's roc (you see I know all) were flying about in the hot
air in chase of dragon-flies larger than your bats; crocodiles
and tortoises three or four times bigger than any you see now


CHAP.IV.









were swarming and nestling and crunching and munching and
snoozing in stifling jungles; and, besides these, there were-
but they are amongst the curiosities I have to show you now,
and I shall alight upon them in due time.
S"l Look at this island-it is a cutting from my Secondary
coat. You perceive it is composed of several sorts of stuff
First, there is the Chalk; 2nd, the Wealden; 3rd, the Oolite;
4th, the Lias; 5th, the New Red Sandstone.
You know what Chalk is-it is what your schoolfellows,
when they are rudely playful, mark dance on your back with'
(Here the Great Mother graciously smiled.) And you know,
in addition, that the white cliff of the southern coasts of Eng-
land are very striking specimens of chalk But, considering
how enormous are the masses in which it appears in this coat of
mine, you may be surprised to hear that every atom of chalk
which you see, and many millions you never did and never can
or will see-no, not even when I take you to my boom again
-came out of living creatures and plants, at one time or
another. White chalk is what your chemists call carbonate of
lime, and it is made of dead coral animals, shellfish, &a, re-
duced to this form partly by chemical, partly by mechanical
cause. In the coral-reef, the manufacture of chalk for a future
coat of mine is going on at this moment, against the time when
I shall want it
Well, you are aware that you men sometimes go foraging
about in the folds of my coats; and I have not the least ob-
jection, for I keep all sort of usefl and pretty things there on
purpose for you; coal to warm you in winter; gold and silver
for ornament and for use; iron and steel; and beautiful jewels
for crownsand ring-tosaynothingof salt, andstone and slate,
and gravel, for all which you find a use.







SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


On the borders of the river Meuse, in Germany, some work-
men were once digging deep for chalkstone, when they found
part of a very curious thing indeed, in a dilapidated condition.
A learned doctor, by name Hoffmann, was called in by the
men, and he took great interest in the pieces that he found, and
put them together. But my poor children are very quarrel-
some. They went to law over this curiosity. One of the
canons of the cathedral at Maestricht pretended to have rights
in the soil of the quarries which gave him a title to what the
workmen and Dr. Hoffmann had found, and the law went for
the greedy, stupid canon. But mark the chances and changes
of time! In 1795, fifteen years after the curiosity had been
turned up, the French army poured shot and shell into the
town where it lay, but received strict orders not to hurt the
curiosity, which was carried away and put into the Garden of
Plants at Paris. Look here, I can show you what its head was
like! Four feet and a half long, two feet and a half wide:
sharp-pointed teeth, you see, in the usual place on the jaw;
but, besides these, a row on a bone of the roof of the mouth, as
in some monster lizards. Pretty creature, wasn't it? It was
about thirty feet long altogether-seven times as long as you are
high. I keep this sort of curiosity in the chalky part of my
second coat, and it used to frequent the seas, and catch and
devour all it could. You call it in your books the Mosasaurus,
meaning the Lizard of the Meuse (which in Latin is Mosa).
But some of you have found little fragments of other specimens
in other parts of the chalky layers of my coat; for instance, in
Kent and in America. This is one curiosity out of your Mother
Earth's coat, you see.
But here is another; and this is curious, indeed; one of
the most curious things I have to show you, perhaps. It is not


CHAr. IV.







THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


the animal slain by the patron-saint of your England; but, for
all that, it is a flying dragon, or winged lizard. When you
mortals found it, you called it a Pterodactyle, which is a name
made up of two Greek words, pteron, wing, and dactylos, finger,
because the wings are attached to and borne up by the little or
outer finger of the claws at the end of the fore-limbs. Here,
you see, is one preparing to fly down upon its prey. Here is
another, sitting or squatting, looking something like a cross
between a dragon and a pelican, in the attitude of a giraffe
lying down. The wings of this ancient curiosity of mine were
made of folds of skin, like a bat's, and the body was covered
with scales, like a lizard, and not with feathers, like a bird.
Then, what answered to a beak, at the end of the long neck,
had long jaws full of sharp teeth. The largest of these curious
things were about eighteen feet from tip to tip of the wings;
but they were of all average sizes, from that of a snipe to that of
a cormorant. They had large eyes, and could see by night: they
had claws at the ends of their wings, which fitted them to climb,
to crawl, or to hang from trees; and some of them had tails.
Strange creatures, these, were they not?' said Mother Earth.
I replied that they were, indeed; and, though the two I saw
were as dead as ditch-water, they looked so hideous and so
formidable, that I once or twice felt a shudder run through me
as I gazed. I wondered if the man that drew the willow-
pattern had ever seen a pterodactyle, as he made such funny
birds; and if Milton- "
O, I know what you're going to say," said Amy to Fred;
" you' re going to quote some lines out of Paradise Lost:'-
'The Fiend
O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare,
With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way,
And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.'"


CHAP. IV.







SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


You are right, Amy dear; I was: the passage is in the
Second Book, and it applies very well to this wonderful creature
of the old, old times of Mother Earth, with the wings of a bat,
the neck of a bird, and the head of a crocodile, with its asto-
nishingly large eyes, and its prehensile claws.
"' These pterodactyles,' continued Mother Earth, did not live
exclusively on insects, they used to plunge and wade for fish in
the seas and rivers. But I have so many more curiosities in my
coat to show you, that I must hurry on.
"' We now come to the Wealden, which is made up of stony
clay, sand, &c. Here, you see, is a sort of crocodile, but one
that did not eat animal food. When some of the teeth and
some of the bones of this curiosity were found, your great Baron
Cuvier guessed at once that they belonged to an herbivorous
reptile." You call it the Iguanodon. It looks more elephantine
than you might suppose from my calling it a sort of crocodile,
and I must confess it was not pretty. As a general rule-one
which your Mr. Edmund Burke has said something about in his
book upon The Sublime and Beautiful'-big things are ugly
rather than pleasing, and this curiosity of my younger days was
thirty-five feet long from his nose to his tail, and twenty feet
round the thickest part of his body. His tail only was fifteen
feet long. He used to keep house on the banks and at the
mouths of rivers, and he lived on trees, preferring a vegetable
diet. This, which you call the Hylcosaurus, was a reptile of
the same sort, only he carried his head higher and drier, was
stronger in the rear, and longer-legged. I can't say much for
his beauty either, but he used to enjoy himself in his way when
he was well provided for. Next to the Wealden part of my
second coat lies the Oolite, which you call so because the most
striking thing in it is limestone made up of minute egg-like
grains. Oon is Greek for egg, and lithos for a stone- '


CHAP. IV.








THE SYDENIUM SIBDBA.I).


Are you quite sure," interrupted Bob, that Mother Earth
remembered her Greek when she told you that? because in
John i. 42 it says Cephas means a stone."
Mother Earth was quite right, Bobby, my boy. Don't
you remember litho-graphy,' stone-drawing ? The word in
John i. 42 is Petros, or a rock, and the translators made a slip
in the rendering they have given. Well, Mother Earth went
on:-
In this layer of my coat I keep, among other quaint things,
here and there a Megalosaurus (or Great Lizard-Greek,
megas, great; sauros, lizard), like this. He was a flesh-eating
lizard, a most terrific fellow both for size and for quality. He
was over thirty feet long; he has been guessed at forty or fifty.
His teeth were dreadful to see, and his temper was unamiable.
If you put together a carving-knife, a Turk's sabre, and a saw,
you get an idea of this individual's masticating apparatus, and
he made good use of it, I can assure you. Here, again, are
two creatures you have taken to calling Teleosauri, when any
specimens have been turned up. They were a sort of crocodile,
only better swimmers, fonder of the water, and more a sea-
animal. I shall tell you nothing more about this part of my
coat, except that you find in it, when you pull it about with
your spades and so on, the remains of animals like the opossums
of Australia. Also some sorts of shell-fish and trees, such as
are now found in the South Pacific, as you call it, and which
were once common in your Europe.
"' The next part of my second coat to the Oolite is the Lias,
which is made of limestone, marl, and petrified clay. Out of
this I take, for you to look at, some sea-lizards, which you call
Enaliosauria. Here is an "Ichthyosaurus," looking something
like a cross between a whale and a crocodile, which used to
spend its time chiefly in the water, but partly on shore, so you


CHAP. IV.








SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


call it a fish-lizard (ichthys, a fish). It had no scales, but a skin
like a whale's; a wide mouth, long jaws, and sharp teeth, to
enable it to masticate the animal food, of which, in a partially
digested state, you sometimes find the specimens called coprolites.
This curious lizard-fish had an enormous and powerful eye,
covered with overlapping bony plates to protect the pupil from
the weight of the water above, when it dived for its prey, or was
rising to the surface of the sea.'
Have not some fishes such a protection to the eye now ?"
asked Hetty.
No," replied Fred-" not like that-not so complicated;
only turtles, birds, lizards, and tortoises. Mother Earth went
on with her disclosures:-
'What do you think of this?' said she. Your fellow-
mortals call it a Plesiosaurus. A lizard's head, a crocodile's teeth,
a neck like a serpent, the ribs of a chameleon, the paddles of a
whale. This long-necked sea-lizard was rather an awkward
walker or waddler, from its paddles; and an awkward swimmer,
from its tremendous neck; so it used to skim the open sea,
diving with its neck for its prey, or to lurk in the shoal-water
among the reeds, where its neck again enabled it to reach a
good distance outwards after anything it fancied, without moving
its body. Not being prompt in its movements, and having a
great many enemies in those very predatory times, it was
solitary in its habits, and used to skulk in holes and corners a
good deal, out of harm's way.
'The next and last portion of my Secondary coat is called
the New Red Sandstone, which is above the Lias and under
the Coal in your country. I shall not trouble you with any
curiosities out of this part of my coat but these Frogs-big
enough to chew you into mincemeat and stow you comfortably


CuiAP. IV.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


away. This one is called the Salamander-like Labyrinthodon,
and, I must confess, he is no handsomer than some of the other
curiosities I have shown to you. 0, yes, I had forgotten-I 've
so many things to think of. Here's the Dicynodon, a sort of
sea-reptile, with tusks like a walrus, and some of there with a
head like an owl's. And now you have seen enough for once.
Unless, perhaps, I show you just a thing or two out of my third,
or Tertiary coat; for instance, this Great Sloth dragging down
a tree to eat the leaves, or this Paleotherium, or these Elks.
A comical assemblage, I confess, but they look more na-
tural, and "feasible," and "Christian-like" (if I might say
so), than the curiosities in my other and lower coat, do they
not?'.....
Mother Earth now made a pause, and seeming to give a sign
by a nod of her head, where the pine-trees rose dark against
the snowy mountains, a change came over the scene. The air
became hot and stifling. Tall palm-trees darkened the day.
The great Frog croaked as loud as thunder. The Pterodactyles
flapped their huge wings. The Sea-lizards plunged into the
water and floundered about. The Land-lizards began to fight.
The Palmotherium roared in the distance, and the noise and
confusion were terrible. Still the Gracious Mother smiled
above all, and looked as if she expected me to think of the
Ancient Mariner of Coleridge, when, in the horrors of the
tropical calm,
'Beyond the shadow of the ship
He watched the water-snakes-'
and to sympathise with him-
0 happy living things I no tongue
Their beauty might declare;
Sure, my kind saint took pity on me,
And I blessed them unaware.'


CHAP. IV.








SINDBAD'S THIRD JOURNEY.


But I thought them hideous and frightful, and betrayed by
my uneasiness a desire for a change. The Mother saw it, and,
with another nod of her brow, waved away the whole scene as
if it had never been, and, speaking no word, disappeared into
the fountains. Instead of these pre-adamite deformities, I saw,
as in a vision, smiling cornfields and thronged cities, where men
who were kind and brave, and women beautiful and fond, and
children innocent and gay, lived and loved, and wrought and
worshipped I Pondering what Mother Earth had told me of
her coats, and how slowly she had been prepared for the beauty
and proportion of her matron bloom, I felt in my own coat for
papa's talisman, and again availed myself of the obliging Roe
for my homeward journey; thinking this bird much more useful
than a Pterodactyle, and not half so ugly."
But then," interposed Amy, "the Pterodactyles had their
uses in their day, and there was no Fred to see their ugliness."
Right," dear Amy, says Fred-" Bobby is useful in his
day, and he was made to see how pretty Bella is; but he
doesn't, for he 's fast asleep."
I'm sure I aint!" cried Bob indignantly,-" I was only
hbuttingmy eyes to try if I could see anything like what you
saw, but I couldn't dream it all. I did a little bit though, and
I shall dream more next time I try."
Good Bobby I He dreamed, in that night's sleep, of a Plesio-
saurus in a stand-up collar, and a Pterodactyle in a surtout,
engaged in a fight for the honour of taking Bella .to the Poly-
technic Institution.


CHAP. IV.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


CHAPTER V.

BINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY.

SINDBAD' fourth journey commenced thus:-
"My next journey, performed chiefly with the aid of the
talisman and the Roc, which I found very convenient, was to
Weissnichtwo."
In pronouncing this word, Fred, who was only just beginning
German, made such a noise in his throat, that Bella and Bob
burst into a laugh, for which they were gently admonished by
Amy, who said she knew the place very well, and that Fred had'
given it the right name in German.
"Then, where is it, Miss Amy ?" asked Bob, rather saucily.
"Where? Little boy, it is where Romulus and Remus
were suckled by a she-wolf, and where Goody Two-shoes was
born and bred, and where your Five Senses went when you were
fast asleep last night."
Well, I don't know any more about it, now," said Bob, with
a perverse twinkle in his eye, "and I don't believe you do
either."
Very good, Bobby," says Fred; perhaps we shall know
more about it by-and-by. But, at present, I expect you to
listen to what I am going to tell you about my Fourth Journey.
I went, as I was saying, to Weissnichtwo, and there I saw a
good many more things and people than I can inform you of.
Some of them I will mention, and the rest you can go and find
out for yourselves one of these days. Weissnichtwo is a curious
place, and as full of wonders as Noah's Ark.


CHAP. V.











h ..
-~ c~\
~
~. a


I;'

K1~1


I


SINDBALD'S JOURNEY TO WEISSNICHTWO (" DON'T KNOW W11 ERE").-P. 76.


5' 4








SINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY.


"In Weissnichtwo I found, first, some things and persons
which appeared to me to have come all the way from Central,
and Eastern, and Southern Asia, and the South-eastern Asiatic
Archipelago, on purpose to meet me; and though they looked
unamiable or dirty, and some of them did disagreeable things,
I did not mind so much while they kept clear of positive
cruelty to their fellows. First of all, surrounded by bamboos,
rhododendrons, azaleas, camelias, magnolias, tea-plants, orange-
trees; yaks which had trotted down from the hills, wolves, otters,
tigers, monkeys, rhinoceroses, humped oxen, camels, and what
not (it was just as if the people who brought Birnam Wood to
Dunsinane had brought their farmyard too), I saw some queer-
looking fellows, whom I at once recognized for Mongolians of
Central Asia, broad and high-cheeked, wide between the eyes,
and flat-nosed. I asked these gentry if they knew much of the
exploits of Tamerlane, and they answered me in a confused way
something about worshipping the Grand Lama and the Tsar of
Russia, or the Emperor of China. They looked as if they
could hardly say bo! to a goose, so that it was not easy to
fancy their ancestors great conquerors, under the guidance of
the soldier who carried the fallen Bajazet about in a cage."
"Do you mean to say you can talk Tibetan, Mister Fred ?"
inquired Hetty.
Listen," said Fred, evading the question. "Fustumfunni-
dosrigdumrumidos raratara squarablaraboshyboo squashyboo tan-
tarapol!" That made them all burst out laughing; but Fred
declined to translate his bit of Tibetan, if Tibetan it was; for
you notice, I daresay, that he did not answer Hetty's question;
perhaps because he thought it impertinent.
Mingling with these Tibetans," continued Fred, "I saw some
pure East Indians, of different classes and castes-a few almost


CHAP. V.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


like negroes, except in the hair; a few fairer and more intel-
ligent-looking. These were believers in Brahma and Budh,
and nobody knows what; but I also saw a few Malays, who
were Mahometans, from Malacca or Sumatra; and some who
were Pagans, from Java and elsewhere. These were bolder,
sharper-looking than the Tibetans and Hindoos, and not so
flat-faced. They looked very revengeful Some had filed teeth,
and some stretched ears. Some had had the hair on their chins
and cheeks pulled out by tweezers, or rubbed away by quick-
lime. Some had earrings, some had tremendously-long finger-
nails. These Malays are, you must know, a commercial people,
fond of barter, and fond of the water. They are also fond of
excitement of all kinds, and so fond of gambling in particular,
that a Malay will lose his wife and family upon a fighting-cock,
and then sell himself for a slave to make another bet. One of
the ways in which the Malayan love of excitement shows itself
is well known to be that of 'running-a-muck,' as it is called-
that is, rushing frantically ahead with a dagger, stabbing at
random till fatigue knocks him down; but none of my fellows
ventured on this elegant pastime in my presence.
My attention, as a traveller in this miscellaneous and un-
accountable country of Weissnichtwo, was next called to some
Lubus, Battas, and Nias people, from the long island of Su-
matta. The Battas are, you must know, the only literary can-
nibals in the world. They have books like Christians, and
they eat their prisoners of war and criminals condemned. When
a man is to be eaten, they cover his head with a cloth, tie him
to a tree, and throw lances at him till he is mortally wounded.
When that is the case, they all rush up, and begin to cut slices
from his body, which they dip in a dish of salt, lemon-juice, and
pepper, and then broil a little, before eating them. They be-


CHAP. Y








CHR. V. SINDBAIYD FOURTH JOURNEY. 79

lieve in three gods; and that, when a man dies, his soul escapes
through his nostrils, and goes somewhere else on the wings of the
wind, to a happy or unhappy place, according to the life he has
led. They say that at first the earth was supported on the
head of Naga-padoha, who shook it off when he was tired, so
that the land sank, and only water remained. Then the chief
god Batara-guhu's daughter Puti-orla-bulan came down below
upon a white owl, with a dog at her side; but not being able
to stay for the water, her father let down a great mountain for
her to live on, and from that all the other land grew. The
NiaM folks have a shocking way of killing themselves and their
wives out of hand, when they do not feel comfortable; but they
are a handy people, and know how to use tools of all sorts, and
instruments of art, very skilfully. I suppose Spurzheim would
Bay they have small Hope and large Constructiveness.
You never heard, I dare say, of the Tenggher people in
Java? I saw one of their funerals, and a pretty sight it was-
full of poetic and kindly feeling. They live in a most beautiful
eountryj where the climate and the vegetation are almost
Eutopeah in character. They have no such things as great
brinies mong them, and, when any one does wrong, it is punish-
lieWt bitetigh for the head of the village to give him a scolding."
Hadn't ire better all go and live in that part of Weiss-
hichtwfi as you call it?" slily asked Hetty.
"I think, deary, we'd better all stay where we are and do
our duties-we should, perhaps, corrupt these good people. Or,
if we are adventurous, let us go and try to civilise bad people;
for instance, the fierce Dyaks of Borneo and thereabout,
some of whom I saw. They are very proud and revengeful,
fond of tattooing and of great earrings, and they are respectful
to the dead, whom they bury with great ceremony, first burning








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


torches beside the coffin for a week. The youth are trained in
swimming, wrestling, the sword-exercise, &c., and in some
places a young man cannot win a bride without taking her a
human head, as a specimen of what he can do-but the passion
for heads is dying out now. The manner in which they kill a
victim who is to be offered to the memory of the dead is very
horrible. Just think of making it a festive occasion, firing
guns, and making a sort of fair of it, the victim quietly waiting
in sight of the grave ready-dug, till transfixed by as many
spears as can find room to enter the body, to the music of the
applauding mob! Go away, Dyaks, we don't like the look of
you! Here come some Papuans and Australians. Funny
Papuans! building their huts on piles to keep out rats and
water, and frizzling up their oily hair into such masses that they
are obliged to lie down on pillows for their necks when they go
to bed! Some of them are well-made, handsome fellows, of a
chocolate colour, and clever archers. Much stronger and
better looking than two Australians whom I saw,-miserable,
half-starved, thin-legged creatures, whom it was not pleasant to
look upon. They understand bleeding for the headache, but, as
they are poor in ideas, they have a very poor language. They are
good swimmers, but cannot count more than five. They believe
in a sort of god who lives on fish and comes up from the sea
when he is called; in white angels who keep up in a mountain
in the south-east, who eat only honey, and do good; and in a
monstrous black being named Wandong who does all the mischief
that is done. But this fiend has different names in different
parts. They have various opinions about a future world after
death, all of them being of a low and stupid order. When a
boy comes to about fourteen, they have certain ceremonies for
making a man of him. At dead of night he hears a horrid


CHAP. V









SINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY.


noise in the woods, and is told Bubu is calling for him. Then
he is carried off and taken by his seniors through a course of
dances, sham-fights, and so on, a very barbarous resemblance to
the Eleusinian mysteries of Mr. Apollo's friends the Greeks; to
teach him to be bold, and in all things to behave like a man.
Afterwards, he is to be very particular in what he eats and
drinks, and to live on the coarsest food, till he is considered
quite a man; which is a good many years. When a man has
done wrong, they make him stand punishment;' that is, they
put him in the middle of a ring, with a shield, which he uses for
his own protection, and then the whole tribe throw their spears
at him; sometimes he is only hurt, rarely killed off. I did
not like the looks of these Australian fellows, so I got off to
another part of Weissnichtwo as quickly as I could. I came
across some strangers from the eastern coast of Africa, Danakils,
half-negro, half-Arab, in appearance, looking something like
Jews, and leading a'camel to water. Then some Negroes from
the Niger lowlands, flat-faced, thick-lipped, broad-nostrilled,
with woolly hair and slanting teeth. I saw a negro king, in a
drummer's coat and black hat, wearing a blue cotton hand-
kerchief for the remainder of his dress; along with a group of
women-soldiers before him, singing in chorus-
'With these guns in our hands,
And powder in our cartouche-boxes,
What has the king to fear ?
When we go to war, let the king dance,
While we bring him prisoners and heads !'
I saw some of the Veys, who live near Liberia, and who have
lately invented an alphabet and set up schools, never having
previously reduced their language to shape. I saw, in the midst
of a landscape of thorny shrubs, aloes, acacias, and Cape-lilies,
F3


CHAP. V.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


with antelopes and buffaloes in the distance, some Zulu Kaffirs,
tall and dark, and some Bushmen, shorter and of a lighter
colour. The Zulus were assembled in a conjuring or divining
circle in quest of a thief, with the Fetish-man, who was to find out
the culprit, in the midst. As for the Bushmen, their appearance
certainly did not belie the accounts given of them by missionaries
and others, who describe them as a sensual, lazy, thievish race,
essentially wild men, whom it will take two or three generations
to mend and reclaim thoroughly.
"The next thing which happened in my journey through
Weissnichtwo was that I found myself suddenly cast on the
other side of the Atlantic among the savages of America.
Through the haunts of the stupid-looking penguins, I passed to
the land where the chinchilla, so valuable for its fur, and the
llama haunt the mountain ranges, and fuchsias and petunias are
bright and beautiful in the valleys. Further north I went-
for Weissnichtwo is a large country-intb the Brazils, among
toucans, humming-birds, monkeys, jaguars, pumas, and sloths.
Further north still, among cactuses, aloes, and mighty forests,
where cities in ruins lie buried, and the Victoria lily sleeps upon
the bosom of the lake. Of the southern savages, I saw, and
was not, I can assure you, particularly gratified to see, the
Botocudos, who bear that name (which is Portuguese and means
plugged) because they have invented and put in use the most
utterly hideous and senseless way of abusing the human form
divine' that ever entered into the debased imagination of a
savage. These miserable, bloodthirsty, predatory creatures cut
open their lips and ears, and insert pieces of wood by way of orna-
ment-not chips, but good big blocks. When they fight with each
other, which is pretty often, they, of course, every now and then,
knock out a bit of wood, and leave pieces of torn flesh hanging."


CaP. V








BINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY.


1 O don't Fred I" cried Amy; I'd rather not hear; and you
shan't take me to Weissnichtwo, if that is the prettiest thing to
be seen there."
"W9ell, we will pass on. The Indians of the Amazon are
not much more attractive, from their tattooing and painting so
much, and I will not tell you, because it is so horrible, what the
Mundrucu I saw had been doing with his enemy's skull before
he produced it so proudly upon that pole of his. Nor will I say
much about the Caribs, whom I saw using their blow-pipes and
shooting with their arrows at the fishes; nor about the Red
Ihdians whom I caught in a war-dance, because you can learn
more about them in Mr. Longfellow's Hiawatha and the notes
to it than I could tell you in any short time. Turning my steps
from this part of Weissnichtwo, I could not help thinking of the
mistake those people make who fancy that the savage state is
the natural state of man, or that he is stronger or healthier in
barbarism. The Kaffre and the Red Indian may run down the
deer and other animals; the Hindoo may keep up with the horse
for days; the South-Sea islander may swim comfortably in a
heavy sea where a life-boat would hardly venture; but, taking
one thing with the other, civilized man is taller, stronger, and
healthier than savage man. His strength at the loins, or lumbar
power, as it is called, has been repeatedly shown to be greater,
by actual experiment"
"I'm sure," said Hetty, "I shouldn't be pleased to see you,
Fred, like one of those horrid Botocudos, with a wooden lip
besides the natural one. How do Botocudo papas kiss their
babies, I wonder?"
This made them all laugh; and Fred replied that he should
not like to see Hetty dressed in skins, grubbing about for roots,
or chewing half-cooked buffalo-steak. "But," he continued,
h^__T__,


HNAP. V.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


"after all these disagreeable sights I had pleasanter company
on my way out of Weissnichtwo. I saw a greater number of
bright and beautiful faces of the noble ones of the earth than I
can now recount, though I also saw one or two ugly fellows also.
I saw Aspasia hanging on the arm of Pericles, while Plato
talked to them both. I saw Maximinus, the Roman Emperor,
who was eight feet high, who wore a woman's bracelet for a
ring, and could kick a horse dead at one blow; and oh, at what
a rate the monster was eating I I saw Julius Caesar at his toilet,
combing forward his hair to hide his baldness. I saw Cimarosa,
the Italian musician, who had listened, when he was a baker's
boy, with the dough in his hand, to the singing, at the keyholes
of April, till Aprili caught him at it and sent him to school. I
saw Blaise Pascal, the great Frenchman, who in his twelfth
year, and without previous instruction, demonstrated Euclid's
thirty-second proposition, using charcoal upon the floor, when
books and writing materials were denied him lest he should
overwork his brain. I saw Haydn, who, born of very poor and
humble parents, became one of the greatest of musical com-
posers; and Mozart, not so poorly born, but perhaps greater,
who could play and compose music at four years old. I saw
Grace Darling, the heroine of the Northumberland Lighthouse,
with her sweetly noble face of serenest courage, and wished that
I might some day be as noble. I saw Franklin, the printer's
boy and American Statesman. I saw John Hunter, who was
only a carpenter and could scarcely read at twenty years of age,
but became, before his death, our greatest Comparative Anato-
mist. I saw (listen Amy, and Hetta, and Bella) Mary Somer-
ville, the most scientific lady of our day--"
I shall read her Connexion of the Physical Sciences,' some
time or other, I hope," said Amy.


CaP. V.








SINDBAD'S FOURTH JOURNEY.


Let us read it together," replied Fred. I saw, besides, our
great Faraday, who was the son of a poor blacksmith, and is now
the first electrician in Europe. I saw the glorious Washington,
who not only made his own great, unsullied name, but made a
great nation out of a dependency-"
"What nation ?" said Bella.
Only America," replied Fred, with a kind smile. I saw,
besides, her most gracious Majesty the Queen and Prince Albert,
and took off my hat to them; and-and-let's have the National
Anthem!"
Fred's auditory were a little surprised when he broke off and
gave the first verse of God save the Queen;" but after all his
funny stories there was no accounting for his ways, so they joined
him. The last note was scarcely sung when off he scampered,
calling out, "Come again to-morrow, and I'll tell you more I"
What made him run away like that, I wonder? I fancy
he did not want to be asked any questions about Weissuichtwo,
which is certainly, according to his account of it, a very myste-
rious place indeed! Can you make it out ?


OCAP. V.








THE SYDENHAM SINDBAD.


CHAPTER VI.

SINDBAD'S FIFTH JOURNEY.

" ADJOINING Apollo's lumber-room, as he called it,"-began
Sindbad, in relating his fifth journey,-" I had noticed a sort of
continuation or lobby in which I had no difficulty in recognizing
touches of the Rome to which he was not very favourably dis-
posed. For, first of all, I observed that the statues which were
lying about in it had, many of them, more of the encumbrance
of armour than the Greek habitually gave to his; and, secondly,
noticed the presence of the arch, as an architectural feature.
The early Greek was not a soldier; otherwise than as it was
necessary to be so to defend the fatherland, and to complete
his idea of a man: the Roman was a soldier born, and the
mailed hand which grasped the ever-ready sword for perpetual
warfare had a less graceful command of the chisel of the artist,
in consequence. Then, in the train of conquest, followed luxury;
and the Roman became a mailed, overdressed, perfunctory
animal, whom the Graces visited but seldom, and who stole a great
deal more art and philosophy than he originated. The study of
the human form declined; the sculptor chiselled emperors, em-
presses, and soldiers, draped and armoured, and laden with
insignia, rather than men and women, or gods and goddesses.
Roman art was a debased copy of the Greek; and the noblest
things they produced were the Coliseum, or Amphitheatre of
the capital, which was capable of holding 90,000 people to see
the public shows; and their sewers, aqueducts, and roads.


CHAP. VI.








SINDBAD'B FIFTH JOURNEY.


Still, though they were deficient in grace, they made up as well
as they could in magnificence, and I very well remembered
seeing, through the arched doorway that led from Apollo's
lumber-room to this sequel or out-house,-if I might call it so,-
the walls of rare marble, porphyry, and malachite, with which
the luxurious fellows were glad to adorn their private houses;
somewhat to the neglect of the temples of the gods, and greatly
to the injury of art; the vulgar taste readily accepting magnifi-
cence in place of elegance. Bobby, boy, do you understand
all this?"
Yes," said Bob, with a light over his countenance which
showed that he did,-a little.
Then tell me what is the difference between elegance and
magnificence," replied Fred.
Bob paused a moment or two, bit his lips, blushed, and then,
turning to his little friend, said, "Bella, you know better than I
do; tell him for me, that's a good girl; I know, but I can't
say. I'm afraid of making a stupid of myself."
"Well," answered Bella, "I should say a swan is graceful,
and a peacock is magnificent. A lily is elegant, a tulip is
splendid."
Capital, Bella!" said Fred, and Bobby kissed her hand,
and nestled close to her, more profoundly impressed than ever
with her superior wisdom; but above all with Fred's, and with
the gulf between him and the surtout.
"As for the Arch, which we find in Roman, but not in
Greek architecture, it is a mistake, perhaps, to suppose it
originated with the Romans. The idea has been found just
touched, though not dwelt upon, in architecture more ancient
than that of Greece or Rome. But if the Romans had known
only the Greek way of roofing in,-by a flat block upon


CHAP. VI.




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