• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 The house that Jack built
 The story of Tom the piper's...
 The simple story of simple...
 The bear and the children
 The courtship and wedding of Cock...
 Hans in luck
 Little bo-peep
 Henny-penny
 The fox and the geese
 Maja's alphabet
 Old Mother Hubbard
 The ugly little duck
 The old woman and her pig
 The charmed fawn
 Back Cover






Group Title: treasury of pleasure books, for young people
Title: A treasury of pleasure books, for young people
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003020/00001
 Material Information
Title: A treasury of pleasure books, for young people beautifully illustrated with colored plates
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Absolon, John, 1815-1895 ( Illustrator )
Sheldon, Blakeman & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Sheldon, Blakeman & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1858
Copyright Date: 1858
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1858   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1858   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1858   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1858
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: In prose and verse; some with separate title pages.
General Note: Contains illustations by John Absolon and Harrison Weir.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003020
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA3670
notis - ALH9221
oclc - 47291850
alephbibnum - 002238699

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The house that Jack built
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The story of Tom the piper's son
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The simple story of simple Simon
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The bear and the children
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The courtship and wedding of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Hans in luck
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Little bo-peep
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Henny-penny
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The fox and the geese
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Maja's alphabet
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Old Mother Hubbard
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    The ugly little duck
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    The old woman and her pig
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    The charmed fawn
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Back Cover
        Page 165
        Page 166
Full Text




The Baldwin Library
Univenity
.~[~lm o I


I


-Alh5mv- arkluan










A TREASURY
OF

PLEASURE BOOKS,

FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED WITH COLORED PLATES.














NEW-YORK :
SHELDON, BLAKEMAN & CO., 115 NASSAU-STREET.


S8 8.















CONTENTS.




I. THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

II. TOM THE PIPER'S SON. SIMPLE SIMON. THE

BEAR AND THE CHILDREN.

III. COURTSHIP AND WEDDING OF COCK ROBIN

AND JENNY WREN.

IV. HANS IN LUCK.

V. .LITTLE BO-PEEP. HENNY PENNY.

VI. THE FOX AND THE GEESE. MAJA'S ALPHABET.

VII. OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER DOG.

VIII. THE UGLY LITTLE DUCK.

IX. THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

X. THE CHARMED FAWN.








THE HOUSE


THAT


JACK BUILT.


ILLUSTRATED
ELEVEN COLORED PICTURES
AND HARRISON


WITH
BY JOHN ABSALOM
WEIR.


Publifhed by Sheldon, Blakeman & Co.,
No. 115 Naffau fireet, New-york.




















t ~-jI
'ii


L&.d



J MA LTM








THE H3USE THAT JACK BUILT,


This is the House that Jack built.








This is the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.







This is the rat that ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.






THE HOUSE THAT J/-CK BUILT,


This is the cat
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built,







This is the dog
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt, 'Y
That lay in the house that Jack built.








THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT,

This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.





This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house tha: Jack built.




4 . . I *


This is the man all tattered and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lav in the house that Jack built.
























This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kiLs'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.








THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT,


This is the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


This is the farmer who sow'd the corn,
That kept the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked th priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd: the'dog?,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.








THE H3USE THAT JACK BUILT,


This is the horse, and the hound, and the horn,
That belong'd to the farmer who sow'd the corn,
That kept the cock that crowd in the morn,
That wak'd the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

























AND THIS IS THE END
OF THE HOUSE
THAT JACK
BUILT.




















THE STORY

OF


TOM THE PIPER'S SON,


WHO PLAYED HIS PIPE AND
MADE GREAT FUN.



TOM, he was a piper's son,
He learned to play when he was young;
But the only tune that he could play
Was "Over the hills and far away."










TOM THE PIPER'S SON.


Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
He pleased both the girls and boys;
They'd dance and skip while he did play
"Over the hills and far away."

Then Tom he learned to play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
As soon as he played they began for to dance,-
E'en pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.

And as Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began for to play;
Poor Doll and the cow they danced a lilt,
Till her pail it fell down, and the milk it was spilt.

He met with Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe and she used her legs;
She danced about till her eggs were all broke,
And Tom he thought 'twas a very fine joke.










TOM THE PIPER'S SON.


Tom saw a cross fellow beating his ass,
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass;
He played them'a jig, and they danced to the tune,
And the jackass's load was lightened soon.

Once a dog got a piggy fast hold by the ear,
The piggy squall'd murder, and Tom, being near,
He played them a tune, and they didn't dance bad,'
Considering the little tuition they'd had.


Tom met with a Farmer in a sad, dirty place,
Where he made him to dance (he had so little grace);
He danced in the dirt till he danced in a ditch,
Where he left him in mud as thick as black pitch


Some little time after Tom slept on some hay;
The very same Farmer was passing that way-
He took poor Tom's pipe, and bade him prepare
To answer his crimes before the Lord Mayor










TOM THE PIPER'S SON.

To the Lord Mayor he took him, and told all Tom's
art,'
How he made people dance with a sorrowful heart;
Begg'd he'd send him abroad, and there teach to
dance
All the men and the women and children of France.


Says Tom, I am willing to go into France;
Only give me my pipe, and I'll give them a dance:"
They gave him his pipe-be began for to play,
And the Farmer and Mayor they went dancing away.
a


















THE SIMPLE STORY


OF

SIMPLE SIMON.



SIMPLE Simon met a pieman,
Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
Let me taste your ware."


Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
Show me first your penny;"
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
Indeed I have not any."










SIMPLE SIMON.


Simple Simon went a-fishing
For to catch a whale;
All the water he had got
Was in his mother's pail.


Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He prick'd his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.


Then Simple Simon went a-hunting,
For to catch a hare;
He rode on a goat about the street,
But could not find one there.


He went to catch a dicky-bird,
And thought he could not fail,
Because he'd got a little salt
To put upon its tail.











SIMPLE SIMON.


Simon made a great snow-ball,
And brought it in to roast;
He laid it down before the fire,
And soon the ball was lost.


And Simon he would honey eat
Out of the mustard-pot;
He bit his tongue until he cried-
That was all the good he got.


He went to ride a spotted cow,
That had got a little calf;
She threw him down upon the ground,
And made all the people laugh.


He went to shoot a wild duck,
But wild duck flew away;
Says Simple Simon,. I can't hit him,
Because he will not stay."











SIMPLE SIMON.

He went for water in a sieve,
But soon it all run through;
And now poor Simple Simon
Bids you all adieu.


















THE


BEAR AND THE CHILDREN.




I WILL tell you a circumstance which occurred a
year ago, in a country town in the south of Ger-
many. The master of a Dancing-Bear was sitting
in the tap-room of an inn, eating his supper; whilst
the Bear, poor harmless beast! was tied up behind
the wood-stack in the yard.
In the room up stairs three little children were
playing about. Tramp, tramp! was suddenly heard










THE BEAR AND THE CHILDREN.


on the stairs;-who could it be ? The door flew
open, and enter-the Bear, the huge shaggy beast,
with his clanking chain! Tired of standing so long
in the yard alone, Bruin had at length found his
way to the staircase. At first the little children
were in a terrible fright at this unexpected visit,
and each ran into a corner to hide himself. But
the Bear found them all out, and put his muzzle,
snuffing, up to them, but did not harm them in
the least. He must be a big dog, thought the
children; and they began to stroke him familiarly.
The Bear stretched himself out at his full length
upon the floor, and the youngest boy rolled over
him, and nestled his curly head in the shaggy black
fur of the beast. Then the eldest boy went and
fetched his drum, and thumped away on it with
might and main; whereupon the Bear stood erect
upon his hind legs, and began to dance. What











THE BEAR AND THE CHILDREN.


glorions fun! Each boy shouldered his musket;
the Bear must of course have one too-and he
held it tight and firm, like any soldier. There's
a comrade for you, my lads! and away they
marched-one, two-one, two !
The door suddenly opened, and the children's
mother entered. You should have seen her-speech-
less with terror, her cheeks white as a sheet, and
her eyes fixed with horror. But the youngest boy
nodded with a look of intense delight, and cried,
" Mamma, we are only playing at soldier's!"
At that moment the master of the Bear ap-
peared.











THE


COURTSHIP AND WEDDING

OF

COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.



WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE

DOLEFUL DEATII OF COCK RIO!,IN.



ILLUSTRATED
WITH SFVFN DI)RA\'.\ "
JIARRI ;()N






Pub hl n d i)b S Abi. :, .....
1 13 NAS3. L S I'., N..


























TIIE MARRIAGE

COCK ROBIN AND JENNY


WREN.


It was on a merry time,
When Jenny Wren was young,
So neatly as she danced,
And so sweetly as she sung,


I Q






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Robin Redbreast lost his heart:
He was a gallant bird;
He doff'd his hat to Jenny,
And thus to her he said:

"My dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cherry-pie,
And drink nice currant-wine.

I'll dress you like a Goldfinch,
Or like a Peacock gay;
So if you'll have me, Jenny,
Let us appoint the day."

Jenny blush'd behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind:
"Then let it be to-morrow, Bob;
I take your offer kind;







COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Cherry-pie is very good!
So is currant-wine!
But I will wear my brown dress,
And never look too fine."

Robin rose up early,
Just at the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
To sing a roundelay.


_T1






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREI .


He met the Cock and Hen,
And bid the Cock declare
This was his wedding-day
With Jenny Wren the fair.

The Cock then blew his horn,
To let the neighbors know
This was Robin's wedding-day,
And they might see the show.

And first came Parson Rook,
With his spectacles and band;
And one of Mother Hubbard's books
He held within his hand.

Then followed him the Lark,
For he could sweetly sing,
And he was to be clerk
At Cock Robia's wedding.








COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


He sung of Robin's love
For little Jenny Wren;
And when he came unto the end,
Then he began again.


*..'. '
Nt, *






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Then came the Bride and Bridegroom;
Quite plainly was she dress'd,
And blush'd so much, her cheeks were
As red as Robin's breast.

But Robin cheer'd her up:
My pretty Jen," said he,
" We're going to be married,
And happy we shall be."

The Goldfinch came on next,
To give away the Bride;
The Linnet, being Bride's-maid,
Walk'd!"by Jenny's side;

And as she was a-walking,
Said, "Upon my word,
I think that your Cock Robin
Is a very pretty bird I







COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


" .. '* *: :., -.


The Bullfinch walk'd by Robin,
And thus to him did say,
"Pray mark, friend Robin Redbreast.
That Goldfinch. dress'd so gay;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.

What though her gay apparel
Becomes her very well,
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look
Must bear away the bell."

The Blackbird and the Thrush,
And charming Nightingale,
Whose sweet jug nightly echoes
Through every grove and dale;

The Sparrow and Tom Tit,
And many more were there:
All came to see the wedding
Of Jenny Wren the fair.

" Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
Who gives this maid away ?"
"I do," says the Goldfinch,
"And her fortune I will pay:






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Here's a bag of grain of many sorts,
And other things beside;
Now happy be the Bridegroom,
And happy be the Bride 1"

"And will you have her, Robin,
To be your wedded wife ?"
"Yes, I will," says Robin,
"And love her all my life."

" And you will have him, Jenny,
Your husband now to be ?"
"Yes, I will," says Jenny,
"And love him heartily."

Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
"You married are," says Parson Rook,
While the Lark aloud did sing:






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN,


"Happy be the Bridegroom,
And happy be the Bride !
And may not man, nor bird, nor beast,
This happy pair divide."






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


The birds were asked to dine;
Not Jenny's friends alone,
But every pretty songster,
That had Cock Robin known.

They had a cherry-pie,
Besides some currant-wine,
And every guest brought something,
That sumptuous they might dine.

Now they all sat or stood,
To eat and to drink;
And every one said what
He happened to think.

Then each took a bumper,
And drank to the pair,
Cock Robin the Bridegroom,
And Jenny the fair,







COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


The dinner-things removed,
They all began to sing;
And soon they made the place
Near a mile around to ring..






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Th concert it was fine;
And every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin
And Jenny Wren, the Bride.

When in came the Cuckoo,
And made a great rout;
He caught hold of Jenny,
And pull'd her about.

Cock Robin got angry,
And so did the Sparrow,
Who fetch'd in a hurry
His bow and his arrow.

His aim then he took,
But he took it not right;
His skill was not good,
Or he shot in a fright;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


For the Cuckoo he miss'd,
But Cock Robin he killed!
And all the birds mourn'd
That his blood was so spill'd.























AND THIS WAS THE END

'OF THE COURTSHIP

AND MARRIAGE

OF COCK ROBIN

AND JENNY

WRF N.



















HANS IN LUCK.




HANS had served his master for seven long years,
when he said to him: Master, my time is now up;
so please to give me my wages, as I wish to return
home to my mother." The master answered: You
have served me like a trusty, honest fellow, as you
are, and such as your services have been, so shall be
your hire."
And thereupon he gave him a piece of gold as
large as Hans's head. Hans took a cloth and rolled










HANS IN LUCK.


up the lump of gold, and slung it over his shoulder,
and began to trudge home. As he went along, and
kept setting one foot before the other, he happened
to come up with a traveler, who was riding- at a
brisk pace on a lively horse.
Oh, what a delightful thing it is to ride !" cried
Hans, aloud. It is every bit as good as sitting on
a chair; one doesn't knock one's toes against the
stones, and one saves one's shoes; and yet one gets
on, one hardly knows how."
The man on horseback having heard these wise
reflections, cried out to him, Nay, then, Hans, why
do you go on foot ?"
Why, you see, I am obliged to carry this lump
home," replied Hans; "and gold though it be, it
bothers me sadly, as I am obliged to hold my head










HANS IN LUCK.


on one side, and it weighs so heavily on my
shoulder."
"I'll tell you what," said the rider, stopping his
horse, we can make a bargain. Suppose I were to
give you my horse, and you were to let me have
your lump in exchange."
"That I will, and thank you too," said Hans;
"but I remind you that you will have to drag it
along as best you may."
The traveler got down from his horse, and took
the lump of gold, and then helpecd.Hans to mount!
and having placed the bridle in his hand, said to him,
" When you want to go very fast, you have only to
smack your tongue, and cry, Hop hop !'"
Hans was in great delight, as he sat on the horse,
and found he rode along so easily and so pleasantly.










HANS IN LUCK.


After awhile, however, he fancied he should like to

go a little quicker, so he began to smack his tongue,
and to shout "Hop! hop!"
The horse set off at a brisk trot, and before Hans
had time to collect his thoughts, he was pitched into
a ditch that divided the main road from the adjoining
fields. The horse would have cleared the ditch at a
bound, had he not been stopped by a peasant, who
was driving a cow along the same road, and happened
to come up with the luckless rider just at this mo-
ment. Hans crawled out of the ditch as best he
might, and got upon his legs again. But he was
sorely vexed, and observed to the peasant that riding
was no joke, especially when he had to do with a
troublesome beast that thought nothing of kicking
and plunging, and breaking a man's neck; and that










HANS IN LUCK.


nobody should ever catch him again attempting to
mount such a dangerous animal. Then he concluded
by saying, How far preferable a creature is your
cow! One can walk quietly behind her, let alone her
furnishing you with milk, butter, and cheese, for cer-
tain, every day. What would I not give to have
such a cow for my own!"
"Well," said the peasant, if that's all, I should
not mind changing my cow for your horse."
Hans agreed most joyfully to such a proposal, and
the peasant leaped into the saddle, and was presently
out of sight.
Hans now drove the cow before him at a quiet
pace, and kept ruminating upon the excellent bargain

he had made. If I have only a bit of bread-and
that is not likely to fail me-I shall be able to add










HANS IN LUCK.


butter and cheese to it as often as I wish. If I feel
thirsty, I need only milk my cow, and I shall have
milk to drink."
On reaching a public house, he stopped to rest
himself, and in the fullness of his joy he ate up his
dinner and supper all at one meal, and spent his two
remaining farthings to purchase half a glass of beer.
He then went his way, and continued driving his
cow towards his mother's village.
Towards noon, the heat grew more and more op-
pressive, particularly as Hans was crossing a moor
during a full hour's time. At length his thirst be-
came so intolerable that his tongue cleaved to the
roof of his mouth. The remedy is simple enough,"
thought Hans, and now is the time to milk my cow,
and refresh myself with a good draught of milk."










HANS IN LUCK.


He then tied his cow to the stump of a tree,
and used his leather cap for a pail; but do what he
would, not a drop of milk could he obtain, and as he
set about attempting to milk the cow in the most
awkward manner imaginable, the enraged animal
gave him a hearty kick with her hind leg, that laid
him sprawling on the ground, where he remained
half-stunned for a long time, and scarcely able to
recollect where he was.
Fortunately there just came by a butcher, trundling
a wheelbarrow, in which lay a young pig.
"What on earth is the matter ?" asked he, as he
helped the worthy Hans to rise.
Hans related what had happened, when the butcher
handed him his flask, saying, There, man, take a
draught, and it will soon bring you round again. The










HANS IN LUCK.


cow has no milk to give, for she is an old animal, only
fit for the yoke, or to be killed and eaten."
Lord, now! who would have thought it ?" said
Hans, stroking his hair over his forehead. It is,
to be sure, all very well to have such an animal as
that to kill, particularly as it yields such a lot of
meat; but then I don't much relish cow's flesh-it
is not half juicy enough for me. I'd much rather
have a young pig like yours. The flesh is far more
tasty, to say nothing of the sausages."
"I'll tell you what, Hans," quoth the butcher,
"I'll let you have my pig in exchange for your cow,
just out of kindness."
"Now, that's very good of you, upon my word,"
replied Hans, as he gave him the cow, while the
butcher took the pig out of the wheelbarrow, and










HANS IN LUCK.


put the string that was tied round the animal's leg
into his new master's hand.
As Hans went along he could not help marveling at
his constant run of luck, which had regularly turned
every little disappointment to the very best account.
After a time he was overtaken by a lad, who was
carrying a fine white goose under his arm. They no
sooner bid one another good-morrow, than Hans re-
lated how lucky he had been, and what advantageous
bargains he had struck. The lad told him, in turn,
that he was carrying the goose to a christening dinner.
"Only just feel how heavy it is," continued he, taking
the goose up by the wings; it has been fattening these
eight weeks. I'll be bold to say, that whoever tastes
a slice of it when it comes to be roasted, will have
to wipe away the fat from each comer of his mouth."










HANS IN LUCK.


Ay," said Hans, as he weighed it in one hand,
"it is heavy enough, to be sure; but my pig is not
to be sneezed at either."
Meanwhile the lad was looking all around him with
an anxious air, and then shook his head as he ob-
served, It's my mind your pig will get you into
trouble. I have just come through a village where
the mayor's pig was stolen out of its stye; and I'm
mightily afraid it's the very pig you are now driving.
It would be a bad job for you if you were caught
with it, and the least that could happen to you would
be a lodging in the black-hole."
Poor Hans now began to be frightened. For good-
ness' sake," cried he, do help me out of this scrape;
and, as you know this neighborhood better than I
do, pray take my pig in exchange for your goose."










HANS IN LUCK.


I know I shall run some risk," replied the lad;
"yet I haven't the heart to leave you in the lurch

either."
And so saying, he took hold of the rope, and drove
away the pig as fast as he could into a by-way, while
honest .Hans pursued his road with the goose under
his arm.
"When I come to think of it," said he to him-
self," I have gained by the exchange. In the first
place, a nice roast goose is a delicious morsel; then
there will be the fat and the dripping to spread upon.
our bread, for months to come; and last of all, the
beautiful white feathers will serve to fill my pillow,
and I'll warrant I shall not want rocking to sleep..
How pleased my mother will be !"
As he passed through the last village on his way










HANS IN LUCK.


home, he saw a knife-grinder busily turning his
wheel, while he kept singing,

Old knives and old scissors to make new I grind,
And round turns my wheel e'en as swift as the wind."

Hans stopped to look at him, and at last he said,
"Your trade must be a good one, since you sing so
merrily over your work."
"Yes," replied the knife-grinder, "it is a golden
business. Your true knife-grinder is a man who finds
money as often as he puts his hand into his pocket.
But where did you buy that fine goose ?" "I did not
buy it, but exchanged it for my pig." And where
did you get piggy from ?" "I gave my cow for
it." "And how did you come by your cow?"
" Oh, I gave a horse for it." And how might you
,have obtained the horse ?" Why, I got it in ex-










HANS IN LUCK.


change for a lump of gold as big as my head."
"And how did you come by the gold ?" It was
my wages for seven years' service. "Nay, then,"
said the knife-grinder, since you have been so clever
each time, you need only manage so as to hear the
money jingle in your pocket every time you move,
and then you will be a made man." But how shall
I set about that ?" inquired Hans. "You must turn
knife-grinder, like myself; and nothing is wanting to
set you up in the trade but a grindstone-the rest
will come of itself. I have one here that is a trifle
worn, but I won't ask for anything more than your
goose in exchange for it. Shall it be a bargain ?"
"How can you doubt it ?" replied Hans; "I shall
be the happiest man on earth. Why, if I find money
as often as I put my hand in my pocket, what more










HANS IN LUCK.


need I care for '" And he handed him the goose,
and took the grindstone. "Now," said the knife-
grinder, picking up a tolerably heavy stone that lay
on the ground by him, "here's a good solid stone
into the bargain, on which you can hammer away,
and straighten all your old crooked nails. You had
better lay it on the top of the other."
Hans did so, and went away quite delighted. I
was surely born with a golden spoon in my mouth,"
cried he, while his eyes sparkled with joy, "for every-
thing falls out just as pat as if I were a Sunday child."
In the meantime, however, having walked since day-
break, he now began to feel tired and very hungry,
as he had eaten up all his provisions in his joy at the
bargain he had made for the cow. By degrees he
could scarcely drag his weary limbs any farther, and










HANS IN LUCK.


was obliged to stop every minute to rest from the
fatigue of carrying the two heavy stones. At length,
he could not help thinking how much better it would
be if he had not to carry them at all. He had now
crawled like a snail up to a spring, where he meant
to rest, and refresh himself with a cool draught; and
for this purpose he placed the stones very carefully
on the brink of the well. He then sat down, and
was stooping over the well to drink, when he hap-
pened to push the stones inadvertently, and plump
into the water they fell! Hans no sooner saw them
sink to the bottom of the well, than he got up joy-
fully, and then knelt down to thank Heaven for
having thus mercifully ridded him of his heavy bur-
den, without the slightest reproach on his own con-
science. For these stones were the only things that










HANS IN LUCK.

stood in his way. There is not a luckier fellow
than I beneath the sun," exclaimed Hans; and with
a light heart and empty hands he now bounded
along till he reached his mother's home.









L, LITTLE


B O-PEEP.


Also the Story of


HENNY-PENNY






ILLUSTRATED
WITH SEVEN DRAWINGS BY
HARRISON WEIR.




PUBLISHED BY SHEI.DON, BLAKEMAN & CO.,
I15 Nassau-ftreet, New-York.






LITTLE BD-PEEP.


LITTLE BO-PEEP'S LOSS.


LITTLE Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone,
And they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.








LITTLE BO-PEEP.


LITTLE BO-PEEP'S DREAM.


Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating,
But when she awoke
She found it a joke,
For they were all a-fleeting.







LITTLE BO-PEEP.


LITTLE BO-PEEP'S DETERMINATION.


Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them indeed,
But it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind 'em.















LITTLE BO-PEEP'S DISCOVERY.

It happened one day as Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espy'd their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.







LITTLE BO-PEEP.


LITTLE BO-PEEP'S REMEDY.


She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks went race-o;
And tried what she could,
As a shepherdess should,
To stitch again each to its place-o.
















_7 1 "7


HENNY-PENNY.

ONE fine summer morning a hen was picking
peas in a farm-yard, under a pea-stack, when a
pea fell on her head such a thump that she thought
the sky was falling. And she thought she would
go to the court and tell the king that the sky was
falling : so she gaed, and she gaed, and she gaed,
and she met a Cock.
And the Cock said :-









HENNY-PENNY.


Where are you going to-day, Henny-penny ?"
And she said,-
Oh, Cocky-locky, the sky is falling, and I am
going to tell the King."
And Cocky-locky said,-
I will go with you, Henny-penny. "
So Cocky-locky and Henny-penny, they gaed,
and they gaed, and they gatd till they met a Duck.
So the Duck said,- -
"Where are you going to-day, Cocky-ocky and
Henny-penny ?"
And they said,-
Oh, Ducky-daddles, the sky is falling, and we
Are going to tell the King."
And Ducky-daddles said,-
I will go with you, Cocky-Iocky and Henny-
penny."
So Ducky-daddles, and Cocky-locky, and Henny-
penny they gaed, and they gaed, and they gaed
till they met a Goose.
So the Goose sail,--
Where are you going to-day, Ducky-daddles,
Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny ?"
And they said,-
Oh, Goosie-poosie, the sky is falling, and we
are going to tell the King."



























And Goosie-poosie said,-
I will go with you, Ducky-daddles, Cocky-
locky, and Henny-penny."
So Goosie-poosie, and Ducky-daddles, and
Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny, they gaed, and
they gaed, and they gaed till they met a Turkey.
So the Turkey said,-
Where are you going to-day, Goosie-poosie,
Ducky-daddies, Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny ?"
And they said,-
"Oh, Turky-lurky, the sky is falling, and we
are going to tell the. king."


*^







HENNY-PENNY.


And Turkey-lurky said,-
"I will go with you, Goosie-poosie, Ducky-
daddles, Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny."
So Turky-lurky, and Goosie-poosie, and Ducky-
daddles, and Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny they
gaed, and they gaed, and they gaed, till they met
a Fox.
So the Fox said,-
"Where are you going to-day, Turkey-lurky,
Goosie-poosie, Ducky-daddles, Cocky-locky, and
Henny-penny ?"
And they said,-
Oh, Mister Fox, the sky is falling, and we are
going to tell the King."
"And the Fox said,-
Come with me, Turkey-lurky, Goosie-poosie,
Ducky-daddles, Cocky-locky, and Henny-penny,
and I will show you the road to the King's house."
So they all gaed, and they gaed, and they gaed,
till they came to the Fox's hole, and the Fox took
them all into his hole, and he and his young cubs
eat up first poor Henny-penny, then poor Cocky-
locky, then poor Ducky-daddles, then poor Goosie-
poosie, and then poor Turkey-lurky ; and so they
never got to the King to tell him that the sky had
fallen on the head of poor Henny-penny.














THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


THERE was once a Goose at the point of death,
So she called her three daughters near,
And desired them all, with her latest breath,
Her last dying words to hear:

"There's a Mr. Fox," said she, that I know,
Who lives in a covert hard by,
To our race he has proved a deadly foe,
So beware of his treachery.

"Build houses, ere long, of stone or of bricks,
And get tiles for your roofs, I pray;
For I know, of old, Mr. Reynard's tricks,
And I fear he may come any day."










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Thus saying, she died, and her daughters fair,-
Gobble, Goosey, and Ganderee,-
Agreed, together, that they would beware
Of Mr. Fox, their enemy.

But Gobble, the youngest, I grieve to say,
Soon came to a very bad end,
Because she preferred her own silly way,
And would not to her mother attend.

For she made, with some boards, an open nest,
For a roof took the lid of a box;
Then quietly laid herself down to rest,
And thought she was safe from the Fox.

But Reynard, in taking an evening run,
Soon scented the goose near the pond;
Thought he, "Now I'll have some supper and fun,
For of both I am really fond."










TH E FOX AND THE GEESE.


Then on to the box he sprang in a trice,
And roused Mrs. Gobble from bed;
She only had time to hiss once or twice,
Ere he snapped off her lily-white head.

Her sisters at home felt anxious and low,
When poor Gobble did not appear,
And Goosey, determined her fate to know,
Went and sought all the field far and near.

At last she described poor Gobble's head,
And some feathers, not far apart,
So she told Ganderee she had found her dead,
And they both felt quite sad at heart.

Now Goosey was pretty, but liked her own way,
Like Gobble, and some other birds;
"'Tis no matter," said she, "if I only obey
A part of my mother's last words."










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


So her house she soon built of nice red brick,
But she only thatched it with straw;
And she thought that, however the fox might kick,
He could not get in e'en a paw.

So she went to sleep, and at dead of night
She heard at the door a low scratch;
And presently Reynard, with all his might,
Attempted to jump on the thatch.

But he tumbled back, and against the wall
Grazed his nose in a fearful way,
Then, almost mad with the pain of his fall,
He barked, and ran slowly away.

So Goosey laughed, and felt quite o'erjoyed
To have thus escaped from all harm;
But had she known how the Fox was employed,
She would have felt dreadful alarm;










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


For Gobble had been his last dainty meat,-
So hungry he really did feel,-
And resolved in his mind to accomplish this feat,
And have the young goose for a meal.

So he slyly lighted a bundle of straws,
And made no more noise than a mouse,
Then lifted himself up on his hind paws,
And quickly set fire to the house.

T'was soon in a blaze, and Goosey awoke
With fright, almost ready to die,
And, nearly smothered with heat and with smoke,
Up the chimney was forced to fly.

* The Fox was rejoiced to witness her flight,
And, heedless of all her sad groans,
He chased her until he saw her alight,
Then eat her up, all but her bones.










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Poor Ganderee's heart was ready to break
When the sad news reached her ear:
"'Twas that villain, the Fox," said good Mr. Drake,
Who lived in a pond very near.

"Now listen to me, I pray you," he said,
"And roof your new house with some tiles,
Or, you, like your sisters, will soon be dead,-
A prey to your enemy's wiles."

So she took the advice of her mother and friend,
And made her house very secure:
Then she said,-" Now, whatever may be my end,
The Fox cannot catch me, I'm sure."

He called at her door the very next day,
And loudly and long did he knock,
But she said to him,-" Leave my house, I pray,
For the door I will not unlock;










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


"For you've killed my sisters, I know full well,
And you wish that I too were dead;"
" Oh, dear," said the Fox, I can't really tell
Who put such a thought in your head :

" For I've always liked Geese more than other birds,
And you of your race I've loved best;"
But the Goose ne'er heeded his flattering words,
So, hungry he went to his rest.

Next week she beheld him again appear,
Let me in very quick," he cried,
"For the news I've to tell you'll be charmed to hear,
And 'tis rude to keep me outside."

But the Goose only opened one window-pane,
And popped out her pretty red bill,
Said she, Your fair words are all in vain,
But talk to me here if you will."










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


" To-morrow," he cried, there will be a fair,
All the birds and the beasts will go;
So allow me, I pray, to escort you there,
For you'll be quite charmed, I know."

"Many thanks for your news," said Ganderee,
But I had rather not go with you;
I care not for any gay sight to see,"-
So the window she closed, and withdrew.

In the morning, however, her mind she changed,
And she thought she would go to the fair;
So her numerous feathers she nicely arranged,
And cleaned her red bill with much care.

She went, I believe, before it was light,
For of Reynard she felt much fear;
So quickly she thought she would see each sight,
And return ere he should appear.










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


When the Goose arrived she began to laugh
At the wondrous creatures she saw;
There were dancing bears, and a tall giraffe,
And a beautiful red macaw.

A monkey was weighing out apples and roots;
An ostrich, too, sold by retail;
There were bees and butterflies tasting the fruits,
And a pig drinking out of a pail.

Ganderee went into an elephant's shop,
And quickly she bought a new churn;
For, as it grew late, she feared to stop,
As in safety she wished to return.

Ere, however, she got about half the way,
She saw approaching her foe;
And now she hissed with fear and dismay,
For she knew not which way to go.










THE EOX AND THE GEESE.


But at last of a capital plan she bethought,
Of a place where she safely might hide;
She got into the churn that she just had bought,
And then fastened the lid inside.

The chum was placed on the brow of a hill,
And with Ganderee's weight down it rolled,
Passing the Fox, who stood perfectly still,
Quite alarmed, though he was very bold.

For the Goose's wings flapped strangely about,
And the noise was fearful to hear;
And so bruised she felt she was glad to get out,
When she thought that the coast was clear.

So safely she -reached her own home at noon,
And the Fox ne'er saw her that day;
But after the fair he came very soon,
And cried out in a terrible way:-










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


"Quick, quick, let me in! oh, for once be kind,
For the huntsman's horn I hear;
Oh, hide me in any snug place you can find,
For the hunters and hounds draw near."

So the Goose looked out in order to see
Whether Reynard was only in jest;
Then, knowing that he in her power would be,
She opened the door to her guest.

"I'll hide you," she said, in my nice new chum :"
"That will do very well," said he;
"And thank you for doing me this good turn,
Most friendly and kind Ganderee."

Then into the chum the Fox qudcily got;
But, ere the Goose put on the top,
A kettle she brought of water quite hot,
And poured in every drop.










THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Then the Fox cried out, Oh! I burn, I burn,
And I feel in a pitiful plight;"
But the Goose held fast the lid of the chum,
So Reynard he died that night.




MORAL.

Mankind have an enemy whom they well know,
Who tempts them in every way;
But they, too, at length shall overcome this foe,
If wisdom's right law they obey.






















MAJA'S ALPHABET.



A is for Ann, who is milking a cow;
B is for Benjamin, making a bow.
C is for Charlotte, gathering flowers;
D 's for Dick, who is one of the mowers.
E is for Eliza, feeding a hen;
F is for Frank, who is mending his pen.










MATA'S ALPHABET.


G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
0
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V


's Georgiana, shooting an arrow;
is for Harry, wheeling a barrow.
's for Isabella, gathering fruit;
is for John, who is playing the flute.
's for Kate, who is nursing her dolly;
is for Lawrence, feeding Poor Polly.
is for Maja, learning to draw;
is for Nicholas, with a jackdaw.
's for Octavius, riding a goat;
's for Penelope, sailing a boat.
is for Quintus, armed with a lance;
is for Rachel, learning to dance.
's for Sarah, talking to the cook;
is for Thomas, reading a book.
's for Urban, rolling on the green;
's named Victoria, after the Queen.




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