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 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
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Group Title: Hewet's illuminated household stories for little folks - 3
Title: Puss in boots
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003017/00001
 Material Information
Title: Puss in boots
Series Title: Hewet's illuminated household stories for little folks
Physical Description: 4, 26 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hewet, Henry W ( Publisher, Printer )
Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Thwaites, William H ( Illustrator )
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: H.W. Hewet
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1855
 Subjects
Subject: Cats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courts and courtiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ghouls and ogres -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1855   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1855   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1855
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illuminated with ten pictures.
General Note: "With illustrations by W.H. Thwaites." -cover.
General Note: Cover imprint: New York : D. Appleton & Company, 1855.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in oil colors by H.W. Hewet.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by N. Orr.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003017
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002250717
oclc - 12844762
notis - ALK2468
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



























WITH
IL I'ST RATION S
BY
W 11. THVWAITES.
ENGRAVED BY TIIE BEST ARTISTS.



PUSS II BOOTS.

SVOL. III.




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THE MILLER ON ITS DFATTIBFD BEQUYATIT TO HIS TI IER
CII1LDIEN HIS MILL, HIS A"S, AND HIS CAT.

PUSS IN BOOTS.


SERE was once a miller, who, at

Shis death, had no other legacy to

bequeath to his three children

than his mill, his ass, and his cat. The property


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w. s soon divide without the interference of a la-
Syer, whlio. ighlt have soon brought their little for- |
Stune to nothing in law expenses. The eldes.t son '1!
Stook ,,posessiion. of the mill; the second L r,;oter con-
sidered himself entitledI to the ass; while tle shll:tre
) allotted to the youngest consisted( of nothing lit tlhe '
Scat, who seemed more likely to prove a burden than .i
a boon to his new mlasterj. 'IT latter could noCt,
'": therefore, refrain from thinking himself rather un-
S fairly treated, and lie said, naturally enough, My
I -brothers will lbe all) to earn an honest livelihood :
by going into partnership, but as for imyseltf, when I
shall have killed my ceit, and sold his skin, I Imust
illevitab:ly be reduced to (lie of hunger" b
Tlie cat, whlo iadl overheard these words, without "
seeming to (do so, now ca:ne up to his master, and
said to himl, with a very serious, sober air, Nay,
dear master, do not be downcast t your future pros- ;
pects. Only give me a bag, and get me a pair of



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t PUSS IN BOOTS.
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boots made, so that I may stride through the brain- '
bles, and you will soon see that you have a better i 0
bargain than you think for. Sir, I love you. You '
never stroked me the wrong way. You let me sleep! I
quietly in the sun; anl when your brothers wanted
to tease me, and carried m into the dark in order ',
to see sparks from my back, you always opposed it.
I will inow sl(how my gratitude for all this. You
must no)t, however, look on me as faithless, as other t
meii do, ftr, in truth, I am not so. The race of cats,
it is true, has got a 1,ad name, because we do not
clioose tamely to )put upI with all that men do to us,
like the dog. We late slavery, and ,preserve our .
indep,,(lendnce; and, opposed to all o)pp'ession, we do (
not show forth our talents at Coll1mmnd. For thlis
reason you have remained ignoranit hitherto of my /i
power of speakingg. You have manvy (other things ,
yet to learn about me. I make only one condition
-that you put unlimited confidence in nme."
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PUSS IN BOOTS.

S Although the cat's new master did not put mucch
faith in these promises, yet he lhad seen him perform i
so many clever tricks in catclhing rats and mice, such n !
Sas hanging by his hind legs, and concealing himself "'
in the meal tub, to make believe he was dead, that d,. .,
he did not quite despair of his helping him to letter
his fortunes.
' A fe\ days after, the shoemaker brought the
7I boots. Puss tried them on with great satisfaction,
. and the shoemaker put on his spectacles to admire f i :
their excellent fit. Thereupon the cat's master
Shook the last shilling out of his purse to pay for i ,
them. His two brothers turned him into ridicule l
for having ordered boots to be made for a cat; aindo f
the eldest in particular, as is the usual practice of l
elder lbrothers, rated him soundly for his folly in m
throwing away his last penny upon a cat, who would
soon take to his heels, without scruple, and carry off
the boots with him.

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j PUSS IN BOOTS. J
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1 ,agj rouIi ll i lieck, lh took holld of the twvo striking
with iis fore-)aIws, nid set of1 f:r at warren plenti- i
i fully stocked with raILl)its. Havin;i' filled his l:gi i
With bran and p)arsley, he stretclhed iiinself out as
-stiff as though he had 1)een dead, and waited a-
"',' tiently till some yo'ung raIb)it, uinl-ed to worldly .
S snares and wile-, should le lured into the ,ag y 1 _.y
Sthe l)ro,.ect of a fea. st.
Dear ime !" said a young ra)lhit, wy, hre i a
)oor' ded:tl cat, !" and "look!" said the older on es,
I Iere is nic palisl ey!"
"Yout 11:1 e :t parsley if you p lease," said the l
oldest ralit of all, but mind, (1.and do not go ne9ar A.7!
tile ent-.
lie had scarcely lain a few 1(moments- in am11ush .
before a, ithoughitless young r'a],lbit ('aught at the 1y1
Ia)lit, and: went hieaodlong into the 1a2eg, where pon
the cat drew the strings, and inimediately strangled
the imprudent creature. -
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The cat was vastly proud of his victory, and im-
nmediately went to the palace, and asked to speak to
the Kiing. The fierce soldiers refused to let him in
at the gate, but he shouted, and said he came from
the Lord Marquis of Carablas! and would see the
King, if he staid there for a week !
The King, who wa.s out of his bed, heard the noise
in the court-yard, so he put his lead out of the cham-
ber window, and said,
"Soldiers! show that cat into my lib-rary, and
when I am shaved and dressed I will hear his
message."
The King in his robes went into the room where
puss waited, and the cat made a very low bow, and
laid the game at his feet.
Heaven bless your dear majesty! and long may
you live to reign over us 1My master, the Lord
Marquis of Carabas, heard you were ill, and lie sends
you some game. He sends also his worship to the


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SPUSS IN BOOTS.
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beautiful princess your child, and says he will always t'"N
serve you both in peace and in war."
The gracious King shut his mild gray eyes. and |i
smiled. 'A
"Tell your master," he replied, "I thank liim with
Smy whole soul for his honest words. I shall not t'
sleep for thinking of him."
S The officer with the golden staff took the cat into
*' the marble hall, and put a table near the fire, with
.oC. plenty of meat and a jug of ale; so he fed and
Stalked, and talked and fed, and the soldiers, and
even the lords and the gentlemen, listened to his
Stroll tales, and to his praise of his master, the Lord
Marquis of Carabas. Puss filled a glass, and made
them all drink to the good, the graceful, the kind,
the rich, the brave Lord Marquis of Carabas! ()
All this while pussy listened to what the servants i
talked about; then he set aside the ale and meat,
and went into the court-.yard, as if he had been



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SPUSS IN BOOTS.
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/ born a great lord, and there he found a carriage
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PUSS IN BOOTS WAITS UPON TIE KING WITU A PRESENT OF GAMI.


Another time the eat went and concealed himself
in a corn-field, and held his bag open as before, and
very shortly after two partridges were lured into


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SPUSS IN BOOTS.

Sj the trap, when he drew the string.., and made them | l f
Both prisoners. He then went and presented them
-j to the King, as he had done the ralbbit. The King i
received the partridges very raciously, and ordered C
Sthe messenger to be rewarded for his trouble.
During two or three months, the cat continued to
Scarry game every now and then to the King, which
Swas supposed to be the produce of his master's
<.J 'sport.
One day, when he happened to hear the King was .-
)going to take a drive on the banks of the river, in
company with his daughter, who was the most beau- 'B'"
tiful princess in the world, he said to his master: '
"If you will but follow my advice, your fortune
is as good as made. You need only go and bathe i
in the river at the spot that I shall point out, and 'i :
leave the rest to me."
Puss took his young master to the river side, and
made him strip off his clothes and go into the water
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I | 7 PUSS IN BOOTS.

S up to his chin. Then pss hid the shalbby clotlles
S nider a stone. The poor inmasteri sliivered with cold, 1
.'1i and wondered what it could nmclan.
HIave patience !" said tli cat. "I heard some-
Sthling yesterday. The King will drive the prin ce-
in his coach by the water side in a few lninutes.
); Look! here he comes, with the servants in gold lace,
and with hins six ,lack lIorses."
The coach came very near.4"
S Old puss stood on the Lank, and cried, "IIelpl!
S help !" and Tliieves thieves !'
So the King sent a servant to see what was the
r' 11matter. ,
S "Run back," said tlie cat; "tell his majesty that
my master, the Lord Marquis of CaraLas, LJathed in
this river, and thieves have taken his rich clothes ic
away. He can't come out, and if hle stops in longer, \<
he will catch his deatl of col'd."
The King immediately ordered the gentlemen o f
11

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PUSS IN BOOTS. i

his wardrobe to go and fetch one of his most sump- 1
Stuous dresses for the Marquis of Carabas.




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" j.PTTSS IN BOOTS. T.E "EAPES, .
to sooner bad this order been executed, and the
lmarqi suitably attired, than he looked to such








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PUSS IN BOOTS.

S- to Lim while the
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S.... pincess was so
struck with his ap-
<"r ; " *"-"- "pearance, thliat she t
f ,- '
Became over head
San es i ve


,,The King i united
O' il his Qettingi into
Sthe carria'lt fandll(l

taking a drive with
them.
The cat, highly
< delighted at, the
turn thlirgs


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T1HE OGRK0 I1 OBLIGE PlS9 IN BOOTS. FIRST TI'RNS IIIMSEIF INTO A LION, AND TIIEN INTO
A MUIUSE.
13







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PUSS IN BOOTS.
IAt

Were taking now, ran on, and having reached a \] |
m ineadow where some peasants were mowing the 1
Grass, he thus accosted them:
I say, good folks, if you do not tell the King,
when he coes this way, that the field you are mow-

ting lelongs to the Marquis of Caralas, yon shall all
; l ,e ch,,lpedl as fine as miniicemieat."
Ki, The Kini, as he passed by, did not fail to inquire
J of the mowers to whom the meadow belonged. Si
To the -Mar(iqis of Caralas, please your majestyy" -
Ssaid they in a breath, for the cat's threats had fright- t,
ened them mightily. '
Upon my word, iarquis," observed the King, ,
"that is a fine estate of yours.""
Yes, sire," replied the marquis, with an easy air; ,
"it yields me a tolelrable income every year .." .I
The eat, who continued to run on before the car-
rilge, presently came up to some reapers.
"I say, you reapers," cried he, mind you tell the
14


.... .. .-- -









PUSS IN BOOTS.

King that all this corn belongs to the Marquis of
Carabas, or else you shall every one of you be-
chopped into mincemeat."
The King passed by a moment after, and inquired
to whom those corn-fields belong ed.f
"'i To the Marquis of Carabas, please your majesty,"
S replied the reapers.
I, Faith, it pleases our majesty right well to see our
/beloved marquis is so wealthy," quoth the King.
And the cat kept still running on before the car-l "
Sriage, and repeating the same instructions to all the
laborers he met with, so that the King was astound-
ed at the vast possessions of the Marquis of Carahbas, !,
and kept congratulating him, while the new-made
noeleman received each fresh compliment with so
great a degree of fashionable indifference that no-u
body could have believed his title was of such recent
creation. l
At length the cat reached a magnificent castle 1he-






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K i PUSS IN BOOTS. :1

longing to an ogre, who was immensely rich, since I
all the lands the King hIiad been riding through were
K,;. a portion of his estate, when he sent in a message to
request leave to jay his respects to hiim. ,
S The cat took care to learn every particular anl)out '
S. thle nlgician, and what he could do, and then asked ''.
'' to speak with him, saying, as he entered the room
in which he was, that he could not pass so near his L "
.T castle without doing himself the honor to inquire-
after his health.
1 Making a very humble oeisance, lpuss said, "I
Sam a man of science oi my travels, alnd take tile j
liberty to iltrloduce myself to your excelleiiy, in
Order to make the acquaintance of one whose tfaime ,J
has extended all over the The magician smiled maliciously, !-out being rather
flattered 1y this compliment froii a brother sav:.ant,
he allowed the cat to proceed.
"I have been told," said the c;t, "'that vou have


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the power of traisforming yourself into all sorts of
n- ls, such, for instance, as a lion or an elephant; fi




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but the KiniCs 1)utler say. you are a cliat, and can( r an
do no such thing, and I laid himl a wager you could
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<'So I have," rel]ied tlie ow-re father abruptly,


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PUSS IN BOOTS.

Sand to prove the truth of what I say, you shall see
me become a lion."
When the cat beheld a lion standing before him,
he was seized with such a panic that he clambered ,(
ip to the roof, although it was no easy job, owinJg
o his boots, which were little calculated for walking ".
jver tiles.
After a time, the cat perceiving that the ogre had -
'eturned to his natural shapejcame down again, and 't.
'onfessed that he had been very much frightened,.
"I have also been told," said the cat, only I really .
cannot believe it, that you likewise possess the power
3f assuming the shape of the smallest animals, and 4
that, for instance, you could change yourself into a '
rat or a mouse; but this I take to be quite impossi-
ble,
"Impossible, indeed!" quoth the ogre, now put
upon his mettle, you shall see !"
So saying, he immediately assumed the shape of a
18






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PUSS IN BOOTS.

1 imouise, iand 1 egan frisking a,)out on the floor, when i
the cat p'oincedl uponl him, and eat him up in a t
11 inonl iit.
By this time the King had reached the gates of
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the ogre's iiill;l'ificellt castle, alnd expressed a wish '
1 to enter so splendlid a Lmildin-g.
1, 3 The cat hearing~ the runlmling of the carriage across C
T," eat b n.5
the drawbritldge, ran out to imett tel King, saying,
Your majesty is welcome te t the Marquis of
.<, Caralas's castle. ".
"And is this splenldid castle yours also, my Lord i
Marquis of Carabas ? I never saw any things more
stately than tlle uil(dilng, or more beautiful th:an the '
park and pleasure-grounds around it. No doubt
the castle is no less magnliflcent within than without.
Pray, my lord marquis, indulge me with a siglt of
it." ii
The carriage stopped, the King and his attendants
got out, and there on the steps stood the cat, and '
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IP; USS IN BOOTS i

S said--" Gracious sovereign you are welcome at the jl
castle of my master, the marquis, who will feel hon- ,
< ored for the rest of his life by this visit."i
"Ni At the same time he politely offered his paw to '
;-l the princess, and handed her up stairs.
\ i" The cat's master as yet did not dare to offer her
his armi. He felt quite ali,'shl(ed, ani did not know
-] what to make of all that had occurred. He looked ,
inquiringly towards puss, as if to ask whether he
Might reIally trust Ilis ears, and whether all this
really 1)eonged to him.
The King clapped him on the ,ack, and said- -
"Upon my word, marquis, you have got a noble
estate, and your castle is alimnost more splendid than.
my own palace, and our dolmains join each other in
the most convenient mannerr" Then he mnuttered ,i i
to himself, "What an excellent match for my lovely i ,
daughter !"
As for the princess, she was a little dissatisfied
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PUSS IN BOOTS.

1 i that the handsome and wealthy marquis persisted
in giving her such short answers, and that he paid
Sher so little attention.
S They all entered a vast hall, where they found an
( elegant collation, which was spread ready for some
h of the ogre's friends.
6'2 The ogre's men, dressed in liveries of green and
cloth of gold, waited at the King's table. Silk ban-
ners waved from the walls. The sun shone down
u. upon tons of gold and silver. The wine was poured
out in buckets full, and the sweetest music played.
All joined in a d;nic'e, from the King down to the
Little humlp-l1acked kitchen boy.
When the King was tired, he walked into the
garden to cool himself, and he found the princess
and the marquis walking arm-in-arm together.
"What a handsome couple!" said puss.
"Do you think so ?" said the King.
"Upon my honor, I do !" replied the cat. "Such
22


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was never before seen. They were born to be man
and wife. They must be married."


1 it shall be done !"
All were willing, so that very day they were
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It was a pleaforant seen. They we assure you, to see n
Sand bride to the abbey, where the nuptials were





to be celelbrated. In the fore part of the company
m hav e pe" s eieid the ing. If my child is willing, ded
by tall th e le of o. Before him was

born All were eptrwilling, th e sword, and the wax-taper





as symbols of his power, his justice, and his wisdom.
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HeIt was followed by tht, we can assure you,win to see i:-





crowd only the tops of their lances appeared in
view. Puss, as his ride to the bbey friend, walked beside the nuptials were
y to brtideroom. In the fore prt of the nu er of new
an you might have perceived the old King, surrounded to:.
j by all the rulers of Ills ];iingfdonm. Before him was ,.


as symbols of his power, his justice, and his wisdom.
tHe was followed by the armny, but owing to the i-'|ji
crowd only the tops of their lances appeared in Tf
view. Puss, as his b-osom friend, walked beside the iPi
young bridegroom. HIe noticed a number of new \'{':%
and old acquaintances in the crowd, and bowed to '



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{ PUSS IN BOOTS.

them most condescendingly. Dogs alone must not i
come in his way. He had given strict orders to i
.j have them kicked out. This was his only failing.
I When the miller's son had thus become a rich 'A
man, and married the King's daughter, his first C'
thought was to send for his poor half-starved broth- i
i. ( ers. They paid him the compliment of attending
Shis summons; and when they had arrived, and were f
-. asked what they desired in the way of wealth or
honors, the eldest said he would sooner grind corn
Sin his shirt sleeves than sit in a soft chair to nurse a
monkey and hear fiddles playing; alnd the other "1
said he loved his dear brown donkey and the old .
broomi upon the moors better than a velvet cloak
with a spangled star upon it: so they took a sack of i
money, and went their ways. ,
All lived happily, and when the King died, the
miller's son became King of the whole country. He
lived a jolly life, and his dear cat lived near to him. '
4 .


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V PUSS IN BOOTS.

Puss was made a nol])lelnan and wore a Turkish
smoking-cap with a gold tassel, and put his toes into




yellow niorocco slippers, when he smoked his long
Silver pipe.
,,,, ,,






























The last ti"me we heard-hini seak, lie was just
,*} X he on ot
1 7 j' P. IN iC1L


J -1






:2 ot
.., .. 05 -
)R ~ ., .Y I'., ,",




~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~. -,.,-- ..----""4 ,"








( < ^- =." .i .. :.. -" z^ -"" x ,.... -,, -- .. ... ...," .-.- \ ,-,^ ........

PUSS IN BOOTS.

Sets thanked for doing good, hang me! if it is not
better than finding a lump of gold."
% There's not a thing upon the earth so mean,"
said the great Marquiis of Caraas, but that can
T prove of service to a friend, if we only treat it prop-
early. My Lord Puss-in-Boots, your health !"
26
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/ I, 1



ILLITMINATE'D

S HOUSEHOLD STORIES
FOIL
LITTLE FOLKS.

rTills serict of" F Illv I Sroni.s lhnq for pl 'ne-
rat ions t i .l ieln .. 10io 1 reno l I,.v It'lplil en
I book have lailhI Ito) tn' trd t d Iin.
T he ex rt 'a ,,t tnce o f the .t the at-



S ;l'tr> ilfli(t e w ill ellieI lal i ., iIs lipi lii, il in
1 tie I' i ealir i t of fcl tl' tr, lenderit' Iliim
S0 1 i'ie nfll-'y tpI' to i.,' ne' 'hi ldr ltn 1

t .h i alt" 1he ftoto tio ,, f titml thi.-. li.
S ev. li i -,ination.ll.
"Thl_. principle. that good exnmples only
N I f.l I it I n ilrftel Ii, hn- h .e ii .I t .-I tiiCnt (11 ill
Ih Iin t int o m niiz l li.llo intl l Ant. o thl.e ltie11
la J 1r S iorie-. inp tlc e asst mpisift on
t'1t:0 i'ldi U rent pie'l t'it" :te good elot'01'. hl
II iv fir- i 'nres., inm l r,[ A rt to (' ildsii' .
\.. k". .1 I i U I .- ille, int -thl iu le lt ill \ iihi l t'l :i in.m
t ld, bu. t 1lie falmicy of thi, fl ,rna, ).,(-,
wish-ll ending no one uponl re(.flecion n ill
'I'lThtr thi edition of Ith.e strikes lny Ihe
iY irs l'lecI ItIhan aRTV oiher ext:stll. Iht ;Ilt.,
I,-Iae ix. enmhellihhell it with eVNtWisili.' -1e
lh"in.. oa high Victln iil Art. t'rm ilhich
'h;idiren ma% derive Ifu l- c orlI :dc- is I lia t
will matmt. inio the heva tilul :and grand.




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