• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Mister Fox (words and music)
 The story of Mister Fox
 Mister Fox: Duet for children (words...
 Mister Fox
 The story of Mister Fox
 Back Cover






Group Title: Good little pig's library - vol. 3
Title: The story of Mister Fox
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003013/00001
 Material Information
Title: The story of Mister Fox
Series Title: Good little pig's library
Alternate Title: Mister Fox
Physical Description: 31 p. : ill. (wood-engravings), music ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Andrew, John, 1815-1875 ( Engraver )
Smith, Daniel T., fl. 1846-1860 ( Engraver )
Hill, George W., 1815-1893 ( Engraver )
Ballantyne, R. M ( Robert Michael ), 1825-1894
Brown, Taggard & Chase ( Publisher )
Alfred Mudge & Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Brown, Taggard & Chase
Alfred Mudge & Son)
Place of Publication: Boston
Boston
Publication Date: c1858
 Subjects
Subject: Foxes -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1858   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1858
Genre: Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: First and last leaves pasted to publisher's blue and red illustrated wrappers. Publisher's advertisement on lower wrapper.
General Note: Probably an anonymous publication of Ballantyne's Mister Fox.
General Note: Poem and two musical versions, a vocal and keyboard score and a duet for children, precede prose retelling of old English ballad.
General Note: Frontispiece and ill. are engraved by Smith & Hill; cover ill. by J. Andrew.
General Note: Cf. Osborne Coll., p. 323.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003013
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002250683
oclc - 20697570
notis - ALK2431
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Mister Fox (words and music)
        Page 4
    The story of Mister Fox
        Page 5
    Mister Fox: Duet for children (words and music)
        Page 6
    Mister Fox
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The story of Mister Fox
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text


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MISTER FOX BEGS OF THE MOON TO HIM 1 LIGHT.







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A STORY I TELL OF ALL THAT BEFELL
A SLY OLD FOX, IN HIS DEN;
HOW HE AND HIS WIFE LED A PILFERING LIFE,
AND HIS LITTLE ONES EIGHT, NINE, TEN.


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A Fox went out in a hungry plight, And he begg'd of the moon to give him light, For


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he'd many miles to trot that night Before he could reach his den, 0, den, 0, den, 0; For










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THE STORY OF MISTER FOX. 5

And first he came to a farmer's yard,
Where the ducks and geese declared it hard
That their nerves should be shaken, and their rest be marred, :
By the visit of Mister Fox O! .

He took the gray goose by the sleeve ;
Says he, Madam goose, and by your leave,
I'll take you away without reprieve,
And carry you home to my den 0!"

He seized the black duck by the neck,
And swung her all across his back.
The black duck cried out Quack quack I quack I"
With her legs hanging dangling down O !

Then old Mrs. Slipper-slopper jumped out of bed,
And out of the window she popped her head, -
"John, John, John, the gray goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den 0 1"

Then John he went up to the hill,
And he blew a blast both loud and shrill;
Says the fox, This is very pretty music still
I'd rather be at my den 0 "

At last the fox got home to his den;
To his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten,
Says lie, "You 're in luck, here 's a good fat duck,
With her legs hanging dangling down 0 1

He then sat down with his hungry wife;
They did very well without fork or knife;
They never ate a better goose in all their life,
And the little ones picked the bones 0




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(DUET FOR OHILDRENM.)
Moderato.

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A Fox went out in a hungry plight, And ho begged of the moon to


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give him light, For he'd ma ny miles to trot that night, Be.
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fore he could reach his den, 0! den, 0! den, 0! For
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he'd ma-ny miles to trot that night, Be fore he could reach his den, O!


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A POX went out in a hungry plight,
And he begged of the moon to give him light,
For he'd many miles to trot that night,
Before he could reach his den 0 !
And first he came to a farmer's yard,
Where the ducks and geese declared it hard
That their nerves should be shaken, and their rest be marred,
By the visit of Mister Fox 0 1

He took the gray goose by the sleeve;
Says he, Madam goose, and by your leave,
I '1 take you away without reprieve,
And carry you home to my den O !"

He seized the black duck by the neck,
And swung her all across his back.
The black duck cried out Quack I quack I quack "
With her legs hanging dangling down 01
Then old Mrs. Slipper-slopper jumped out of bed,
And out of the window she popped her head, -
"John, John, John, the gray goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den 0 1f

Then John he went up to the hill,
And he blew a blast both loud and shrill;
Says the fox, "This is very pretty music- still
I 'd rather be at my den O "

At last the fox got home to his dek;
To his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten,
Says he, "You 're in luck, here's a good fat duck,
With her legs hanging dangling down 01 "

He then sat down with his hungry wife;
They did very well without fork or knife;
They never ate a better goose in all their life,
And the little ones picked the bones O 1





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MIST=E OX AND HIS JOYFUL FAMILY.


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A fox went out in a hungry plight,
And he begged of the moon to give him light;
For he'd many miles to trot that night
Before he could reach his den 0 1

" fO, you bad, naughty, long-tailed creature, I
will not give you a single beam of lig~i
The moon said this with a good deal of anger in
its tone, and immediately became very sulky, and
stuffed its head behind a cloud.
"Ah! dear, good moon," said the fox, looking
up, with a pitiful face, pray do not abuse my
poor tail. Now do, like a good old thing, take-
that cloud off your face, and light up my path; for
I have a long, long way to go, to-night, before I
get home to my den. Besides, I have to pay a
visit to one or two farm-yards, in order to find a
supper for myself and my family."
The moment the moon heard of the fox's family,
it put out its head, and said, "0! you've got-;
family, have you ?"




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


Yes, indeed," replied the fox, with a sigh,
SI've got a wife and ten little ones at home, and
very hungry they all are; for I have had an attack
of an old complaint, which laid me up for the last
three days, so that I have not been able to go out
a-hunting.
The moon's angry face became a little milder
when it thought of the hungry little foxes; so it
threw some more light over the country, and
said, -
An old complaint, eh ? what was it, Mister
Fox ?"
I believe that it is called 'laziness' by men;
but Madam Fox and I call it 'lassitude.' "
"Hum never heard of it before," said the moon.
" Very bad complaint, I suppose; eh ?"
O,.shocking !" replied the fox.
"Well, then, get along with you," said the
moon, throwing a flood of light over the whole
country; and see that you don't do more mischief
than you can help. You're too fond of mischief,
Mistei Fox. Indeed, I have often said I would be
glad to see you hanged. But I have a feeling of
pity for your hungry little ones; so get along, and
I'll show you a light."
"Thank you very much, dear moon," said the
fox.
Then, with a whisk of his bushy tail, he galloped
far away over the hills, and fields, and meadows.






































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THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


And first he came to a farmer's yard,
Where the ducks and geese declared it hard
That their nerves should be shaken, and their rest be marred,
By the visit of Mr. Fox O !

"It's too bad; yes, it is really too bad that we
should be so often disturbed by that naughty fox,"
said the gray goose to her sister. "I was just
dropping off into a comfortable dose. I declare I
would be very, very angry, if I was not very, very
frightened."
"Squeal! grunt! 0 squee-e-e-e-e-e-eek! there
he comes again, mother; 0 dear! squeal-eek !"
cried a little pig, the moment it caught sight of the
fox.
The big sow gave a low grunt. "Hold your
squeak, silly thing!" she said; "what are you
afraid of? Is your mother not big and fat
enough to protect you ? "
"Co-co-co-coo! quiet, you monster!" cried a hen,
angrily; you '11 waken up all my ickens if you
make such a-" At this insta ehe fox sneaked
up to the yard, and the chickens started up all at
once so violently that they nearly tossed their
mother on her back. Then they rushed out, and
opened their eyes in astonishment; but no sooner
did they see the fox than they uttered one loud
"quee-quee-quee-co-chickalum-doo!" turned round,
and fled under their mother's wings again; for
these wise chickens knew that there was no




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


place of safety equal to their own dear mother's
bosom.
4" Why, what's the matter with you, my dear
creatures ?" said the fox, with a quiet smile, as he
came up to the yard, and rested his fore feet on
the paling, quite close to the big sow. As the fox
spoke, and begged them to make less noise, one
of the little pigs ran forward, and, sitting down on
its haunches, just under the fox's nose, looked up,
and said, in a quick, sharp voice, Squee-e-k !"
Then it paused a little, drew a long breath, and
cried, passionately, Squee-e-e-e-e-eal! Go away,
bad fox; go; nobody wants you here; squeal -
get along; squeak go, I say; go away; eek !
squeal !"
Very pretty, indeed," said the fox, with a sav-
age smile; very sweet voice, but a little, just a
leetle, too-"
Sque-e-e-e-eal !" interrupted the pig.
My dear child," said the fox, let me
speak -" Squeal!" "Only listen for a-"
" Squeak!" "Pray do wait till 1 have -"
" Squeal!" My dear little pig, just allow-"
" Sque-e-e-e-eek!"
The fox could bear this no longer. With one
bound he leaped the fence. The next moment the
ducks, and geese, and pigs, and hens, and chick-
ens, were flying in all directions, and screaming
with terror.


13




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


He took the gray goose by the sleeve;
Says he, Madam Goose, and by your leave,
I 'll take you away without reprieve,
And carry you home to my den O !"

And, saying this, he seized the poor goose
by the thick feathers on her white breast, and
gave her a dreadful shake. But the goose
was a strong bird. She tore her sleeve out
of the fox's grasp, and gave him such a ter-
rible blow on the snout with her wing that it
nearly blinded him, and obliged him to sit down,
for a few seconds, to wipe his eyes with his
tail.
While the fox was thus engaged, the hen ran
into a corner, where her chickens gathered round
her and said, "( Quee! quee! quee! 0, dear me !
chikalum-kee what's to be done, mother ? where
shall we go ? "
The poor hen was terribly frightened; but she
endeavored to look calm, and said, "Do not
fear, my little ones. Keep under my wings, and
if Mister Fox comes, I will try to defend you.
Even if he does kill me, I think he will spare
you."
On hearing this the chicks were comforted, and
nestled under their mother's soft wings. Mean-
:while, the fat sow stood gasping, in another corner
of the yard, to which she had fled, followed by her
little pigs.




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


What shall we do ?" said one little pig, with
a mournful squeak.
"Ah! yes; what shall we do?" said another
little pig, with a subdued yell.
"Do!" cried the little pig who was so im-
pudent to the fox when it first arrived. I
vote that we catch the fox, and hang it, or
stick it on the pitchfork; and nobody could
do it better than yourself, mamma." The little
pig uttered a passionate squeal, and wriggled
its tail violently. But the old sow gave a grunt,
and said that they who chose might catch the
fox, but for her part she would have nothing to
do with it.
Now, when the fox recovered from the blow
on the snout, he looked about for the gray
goose, and soon spied her hiding in a corner.
"Aha! Madam Goose; you are there, are you?
And, by your leave, I'll carry you off to my
den 0! whether you will or not." So saying,
Mister Fox made another rush at the gray
goose, caught her by the sleeve, and tossed her
up in the air. Then, when she came down, he
worried her to death. At sight of this the black
duck became so enraged that she could not help
quacking forth her anger. Ho, ho! madam !"
said the fox, since you are quite brave and .
noisy, I think I must take you also. So come
along."


15








































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TILE GRAY GOOSE IS KILLED. (6





THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


He seized the black duck by the neck,
And swung her all across his back.
The black duck cried out, Quack I quack quack I
With her legs hanging dangling down 0!

Having done this, Mister Fox then seized
the gray goose in his mouth, sprang with them
both over the paling, and ran away, to the
amazement of the moon, who burst into tears,
and said it had never shone upon such an impu-
dent, cruel, and wicked fox, since the world
began.
Now, although the black duck was carried
off with her legs hanging dangling down O!
%he was not dead, but continued to quack!
quack! quack! so fast and so loud that you
would have thought she wished to do as much
quacking as possible before she died. This
made the other birds and beasts in the farmer's
yard very sad, and they all began to howl and
scream so loudly, that the fox thought the whole
country side would be roused out of their beds
to give him chase, and once or twice he thought
of dropping his burden; but when he thought
of the hungry little foxes in his den, he resolved
to do his best to get safely home with their
supper.
Hold your noisy tongue, will you ?" he said
to the duck, in a voice of rage.
"Quack! qua-a-a-a-ack!" The duck stopped
''s :,"? *





THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


rather suddenly, for the fox caught it by the
neck, and thus shut up its mouth forever. In
short, he killed it! Then, picking up the
gray goose, which he had let fall, he galloped
away again. But the cocks, and the hens,
and the ducks, and the geese, and the pigs
in the yard, continued to crow, and scream,
and yell, and squeal, so loudly, that the noise
at last awaked old Mrs. Slipper-slopper, the
farmer's wife, who sat up in bed to listen.
"John! John!" she said, grasping her hus-
band by the head and shaking it.
Sno-o-o-o-re !" replied John.
"John! I say," quoth the wife, giving his hai4
such a pull that he sprang up with a loud roar.
"Eh? what? where? 0, let go! diar me!
what is it ?" exclaimed John.
"What is it, indeed!" retorted the wife.
"There are you, sleeping and snoring, like a
lazy fellow, while there is mischief going on in
the yard; listen."
John turned his ear to the window, and lis-
tened; but being overcome with sleep he only
winked, like an owl, once or twice, and then,
closing his eyes, fell back again upon the
pillow.
At this moment all the little pigs gave a
squeal that might have been heard two miles
distant.


























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I31ISTER FOX RUNS OFF WITH EIS SUPPER it.
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THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


Then old Mrs. Slipper-slopper jumped out of bed,
And out of the window she popped her head-
John, John, John, the gray goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den 0 !"

John did not require a second bidding, for the
noise that came through the window, the moment
it was opened, waked him up completely. With
one bound he was on the floor; with another
he was at the window, where his wife leaned
so far out that it was quite a wonder she
did not fall over. She flourished a candle
in her right hand, and shook her fist at the
flying fox, while her eyes sparkled and her
cheeks flushed with anger. The candle was
of little use indeed, for, in her rage, she
struck it against the window-sill, which put
it out, broke it across the middle, and sent
the snuffers tumbling down into the garden.
But this did not matter, for there was no need
of a candle Nwle the moon was shining brightly
in the sky, and laughing at Mrs. Slipper-slopper
till it nearly cried.
As for poor John, he could do nothing but
gaze with amazement at the. irgudent fox,~
which could be clearly seen, galloping as fast
as it could over the fields, with the gray
goose in its mouth, and the black duck across
its back.
In a few minutes Mrs. Slipper-slopper bounced


20






































































MRS. LIPPE-BLOPER ISANGRY


_ ___ __ s __




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


back into the room, and, in doing so, gave
John such a hard punch on the breast that
it caused him to trip over a chair and fall head-
long to the floor.
"My dear Mary-" said John.
"Dear Mary!" cried the old woman, "don't
dear me! Dear goose and duck, indeed!
Get up, quick, and run after them! Do you
hear ? "
Now, John said nothing, but he thought that
if his wife had been less passionate and more
patient, it would have been better for them
both. All her rage did not stop the fox; but it
was the cause of the snuffers being tossed over
the window, of the candle being broken, and
of John being tumbled on the floor. Then, as
the candle was out, John lost some time in
finding his breeches, and when he did find them,
old Mrs. Slipper-slopper hurried him so that he
.put them on the wrong way, and had to take them
off again. At last the old lady lost all patience,
and would not allow John to put on anything
more except a pair of old slippers. Taking him
by the shoulders, she thrust him out of the house,
and, putting a hunting-horn into one hand and
a broom ij o the other, bade him fly for his
life. John instantly started off, and, as the fox
was far away by this time, he ran with right
good will.


22

















































































THE CHASE.


(23)


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TIHE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


Then John he went up to the hill,
And he blew a blast both loud and shrill;
Says the fox, This is very pretty music still
I'd rather be at my den 0 I"

And well might the fox say so; for if any
one had seen John, with his braces, and the
strings of his breeches,- and the end of his
night-cap flying in the wind, and the broom
whirling round his head, he would have been
very much inclined to run away from him.
The moon, being high up in the. air, and
consequently out of all danger, was greatly
amused at the sight, and laughed, and roared,
and wagged its head in a most reckless
manner. The only other eyes that saw John,
as he flew over the hill like a greyhound, were
those of an old rabbit, which lived in a hole
at the top of the hill, and put out its head
to see what could be the matter. This rabbit
was extremely old, and had been a great-
great-grandmother for many years. More-
-ver, it was very grave, and had been only
known to laugh once, and that was one day
when sixteen little rabbits were playing and
rolling over each other on the hill-side, and
a little dog pounced into the middle of them
with a loud bark, which caused them to fly
in a moment; and the last that was seen of
them was sixteen little tails as they vanished




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


into sixteen holes, and left the little dog
looking very foolish indeed! When this old
rabbit saw John scampering over the hill in
such haste, it gave a peculiar smile, and shook
its head slowly.
"Ah me!" said the rabbit, "what strange
creatures men are! That stupid farmer is run-
ning after a fox which he will never catch, and
the only thing he is sure to catch is a bad
cold. Well, well; if it was for some great
prize one would not wonder, but when it's
only for a gray goose and a black duck--
ah -" The rabbit could not find words to
express her feelings, so she laid her ears down
flat and went to sleep.
Meanwhile the fox got far ahead of John, and
John began to pant for breath. Then both his
slippers fell off; then the head flew off the
broom, and the spectacles fell from his nose.
" Ho dear!" gasped John. As he said this the
strings of his night-cap broke, and it flew off.
Then he dropt the horn, and, last of all, he
tripped over a stone, rolled like a tub down the
hill, and fell headlong into a ditch, where his nose
poked a deep hole in the mud. Of course it
was of no use chase the fox any longer.
Indeed, TJ' could not run another step, so
he. gathered himself up and returned slowly
home to console his poor wife.




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX,


At last the fox got home to his den;
To his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten,
Says he, You 're in luck, here's a good fat duck,
With her legs hanging dangling down O "

Hooray! shouted a fat little fox, dancing on
one leg before the gray goose.
Hooray! screamed another little fox, leap-
ing on to its mother's side, and extending its
paws to catch it.
"First-rate! cried a third; "here's a back
to anybody that wants one."
Capital! 0 we shall feast like princes!"
shouted another little fox, joyfully; "hold your
head down and shoulders up; that's it," and,
with a race and a squeal, it went leap-frog
over its brother's back and landed beside the
black duck, which was being almost torn
in pieces by two other little foxes, one of
which took hold of it by the leg, while
the other seized it by the neck. The noise
in the foxes' den was quite tremendous, -
at least so said the moon. The two little
baby foxes were the only quiet ones among
them,-they being fast asleep in their mother's
arms.
"Ah! my dear husband," iid Madam Fox,
"how good you are to fetch us su.h. a nice
supper!"
Ho! ho!" chuckled Mr. Fox, "isn't it a




THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


rare one, love? and won't we have a right good
feast, eh ? I took them both from Farmer Slipper-
slopper."
"Papa," said one of the little foxes, in a voice
so grave that all the others stopped to listen;
Papa, when you take what is not yours, is not
that stealing ?"
"Yes, my dear, clever little foxy-it is."
And is n't it very wrong to steal?"
What a wise little dear it is! Yes, my son,
it is wrong for men, and women, and children,
to steal; very wrong indeed; but it is not wrong
for foxes to do so."
All the little foxes stared in silent surprise; then
they winked at each other, and, bursting into a
loud laugh, sprang up, and rolled, leaped, tumbled,
wriggled their tails, and whisked about with
shrieks of delight, so that it seemed as if there
were at least fifty little foxes there instead of ten.
Suddenly they all stopped.
I say, Papa," cried one, "may we all steal,
then ?"
Yes, my children, you may."
And are you quite sure and certain that it would
be very naughty in little boys and girls to steal ?"
Quite sure, my dears, and certain." Again a
yell of delight filled the cavern, and the little foxes
Danced and twirled until their father, with a loud
voice, bade them be quiet and prepare for supper.
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27







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MISTER FOX AND HIS JOYFUL ]


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THE STORY OF MISTER FOX.


He then sat down with his hungry wife;
They did very well without fork or knife ;
They never ate a better goose in all their life,
And the little ones picked the bones O 1

No doubt supper is an excellent thing if one
does not eat too much of it. Some people,
indeed, think that it is better to eat no supper;
but the foxes do not think so; and, from the way
in which they enjoyed it, no doubt it did them
much good. They had neither knives, nor forks,
nor spoons. In fact they had nothing but their
teeth and claws, which, however, served very
well to tear the goose and duck in pieces.
They had no napkins to wipe their paws on, so
they used their tails instead. This was rather
a curious thing to do; but it showed a desire
to have clean paws, which was very proper, for
dirty paws are extremely disagreeable, and so
are dirty hands, dear children.
Now, while Mister and Madam Fox were
eating, the little ones sat round in a circle,
waiting till their parents should have finished,
that they might get the bones to pick. But
one very little, very round, white, and fat fox
kept staring eagerly at a leg of the goose till
it could not resist the temptation; so it snatched
iup the leg and ran away. Instantly all the
others flew round the cave after it, tumbled over
it in confusion, and brought it back, sobbing,
; t


29






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"THE LITTLE ONES PICK THE BONES 0!"


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-. S *
S". ; .': OF MISTER FOX. 31
S THE STOI
hg in nouth and the tears in -its
with the eg its aken from it, and Madam
eyes The leg was -
eyes. The legwa deas, learn this lesson,-
SFox said, Now, n ,
whenFox sad, Now, o have a thing, don't look
when you are n otSo 'saying, she gave the little
at it too eageron the nose, and vent on with
fat fox a buihen they had finished the goose
Sheer suppe..re given to the little foxes, who ate
- the bones in a ery short time. The little fat
hem a could iot begin til It had begged
. white /of its riGher for eigbad;, but, after
Spardt felt so n ilch ha at it ate with
St4uble appetite, find st ui telf to such an,
i nt that it become broader than it was i)ng.
-tflier all was ov; 'they lay down on a feather
bed at one a -' of the den, and fell s6iun~
asleep. Th rno,on, with a grave smile on it
found fic; retired behind a cloud .nhd werid
o t. thick mist then settled down upon '~
o f so that Mister Fox and Madam Fox
the ten little foxes were never seen again. ,




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