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Group Title: Good little pig's library
Title: Remarkable history of five little pigs
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00003002/00001
 Material Information
Title: Remarkable history of five little pigs showing the adventures of one little pig who went to market, of a second little pig who stayed at home, of a third little pig who got roast beef, of a fourth little pig who got none, and of a fifth little pig who cried "wee, wee, wee," all the way home
Series Title: Good little pig's library
Physical Description: 31 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brown, Taggard & Chase ( Publisher )
Alfred Mudge & Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Brown, Taggard & Chase
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Alfred Mudge & Son
Publication Date: c1858
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1858   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1858
Genre: Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Citation/Reference: NUC pre-1956,
Citation/Reference: Baldwin Library,
General Note: Frontispiece and p. 31 pasted down.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements p. <4> of wrappers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00003002
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA3426
notis - ALK2427
oclc - 14771685
alephbibnum - 002250679

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Full Text





















jY


A


- -


THE FAMILY PARTT.


40
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to Y *


The Baldwin Lbary I

t71a nie~


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V 7?ft^- w


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A^TOf
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$jotoing tibt bbtntnrts
OF
ONE LITTLE PIn wrO WENT TO MARKET,
OP A SECOND LITTLE PIG WHO STAYED AT HOME,
OF A TFIRD LITTLE PIG WHO OOT ROAT BEEF,
OF A YOURTT LITTLE PIa WHO GOT NONE,
AND OF A FIFTH LITTLE PLO WHO CHIRD WER, WEE, iE,"
SALL TIE WAY HOMT


BROWN, TAGGARD & CHASE, 25 & 29 CORhmuL, BOSTON.


A /o







FIRST PIG.


TIIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET.






REMARKABLE


HISTORY OF FIVE LITTLE PIGS.


FIRST PIG.

THERE was once a fam-i-ly of five lit-tle pigs, and Mrs.
Pig, their moth-er, lov-cd them all ver-y dear-ly. Some of
these lit-tle pigs were ver-y good, and took a great deal of
pains to please their moth-er. But the best of all was the
eld-est pig. He was so use-ful and ac-tive that his moth-er
and all his broth-ers call-ed him Mr. Pig. He was a fine,
strong, broad-back-ed fel-low, with a large, smi-ling ftee,
and ver-y long brown ears. One day his moth-er told him
to go to mar-ket, with the don-key and cart fill-ed with


veg-e-ta-bles. She told him to be ver-y care-fil with Rus-ty
-for that was the don-key's name as he had a ver-y bad
(5)






ter-per. The cart was soon fill-ed, and Rus-ty hav-ing
been put in har-ness, a-way went Mr. Pig, to mar-ket, at a
gal-lop. Eus-ty went on ver-y well for a-bout a milc-and-a-
half, but then lis bad tem-per be-gan to show it-self First
he drew himn,-self up on his hind legs, then he fix-ed his
fore-legs firm-ly in the ground, and be-gan kick-ing away
at the front of the cart When he had quite tir-cd him-
self out, le made a great noise with his moutl and
nos-trils, and came to a stand-still. All the coax-ing and
whip-ping that Mr. Pig gave him could not in-duce him
to move a step. Mr. Pig saw a number of lit-tle pigs play-
ing in a field by the road-side, so he went up to them, and
ask-ed them to as-sist him. A rope was ti-ed in front of
J.. --r-'




~-`-4
... 5-* ,












Rus-ty, and the lit-tle pigs drag-ged him and the cart a-long,
while Mr. Pig gave Rus-ty a good whip-ping from be-hind.
At last all the kind little pigs who were so will-ing to






as-sist Mr. Pig, were tir-ed out.
for-ced to quit their hold of
the rope, till ait last poor Mr.
Pig found him-self a-lone,
and at a long dis-tance from
the mar-ket.
As per-verse Rus-ty would
not drag the cart, Mr. Pig
took him oft of the shafts,
and sat down by the road-side
think-ing wliat he should do.
But he knew that he would
nev-cr get to mar-ket in that
way.
So he start-ed up, and
pla-cing him-self in the shafts, ,
pull-cd a-way by him-self,


One by one, they were.






and be-ing a ver-y strong and brave pig, he went along in
this man-ner till with-in sight of the mar-ket-place.
When he got there, all the big and lit-tle pigs be-gan to
laugh. They call-ed Mr. Pig a great many names, say-ing


what a fool he was to drag his cart to mar-ket, in-stead of
mak-ing his don-key do so. But they did not laugh so loud-ly
when Mr. Pig told them all his strug-gles on the road. Some
of them e-ven went so far as to curl their tails in an-ger at
the bad con-duct of Rus-ty. Mr. Pig lost no time i sell-ing
off all his cart-load of veg-e-ta-bles.
Ver-y soon af-ter, Rfisty came trot-ting in-to the
mar-ket-place, with his ears thrown for-ward, and eye-ing


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hA


wit a deal of seem-ing pleas-
ure the emp-ty cart. Mr.
Pig at first thought of giv-
ing la-zy Rus-ty a sound
whip-ping. But he thought
al-so, how much he was
want-ed at home, and as
Rusty seen-ed will-ing to
take his place in the cart,
he thought it would be bet-
ter to start for home with-
out de-lay. "When he got
home, he told Mrs. Pig all his
sto-ry, and she pat-ted him on
the back, and call-ed him her
best and most wor-thy son.








SECOND PIG.


THIS LITTLE


PIG STAYED AT HOME.


(10)




11


SECOND PIG.

Tms little Pig want-ed very much to go with his eld-est
broth-er, the stead-y Mr. Pig, to mar-ket, and be-cause his
moth-er would not al-low him to do so, he cri-ed very much.
But he was such a naugh-ty pig, and so fond of mischief,
that Mrs Pig knew it would not be safe to trust him so far
from home. She had to go to the mill-er's to buy some
flour, for she want-ed to make some nice cakes for Mr. Pig and
his four broth-era Be-fore she went out, she told this lit-tie
pig to keep up a good fire to bake the cakes by when she
came home. But when he was left a-lone, in-stead of learn-
ing his les-sons, he be-gan to tease the cat He pull-ed her
ears, and put her paws on
the bars of the grate, and did
ma-ny cru-el things, such as
only so bad a lit-tie pig
would think of Then he --
dress-ed up Miss Puss in his
moth-er's cloak and cap. and
put a pipe in her mouth. '
Af-ter tells, he found his moth-
er's birch, which he made
Puss hold in her paw. When
he was tired of thus play- .
ing, he got the bel-lows, i
which had for a ver-y >--
long time been a puzzle to
him. He could not tell ..-''




12


how it was that the wind came from the pipe, and al-so
where the wind came from. So he thought he would
see the in-side of the bel-lows, and judge for him-self
Up-on this he took a knife and cut through all the leath-
ern por-tion, quite spoil-ing it.
When he had done so, he could not find out at all what
he wanted to know, so he be-gan to cry. He thought he


would a-muse hirn-self with his broth-er's toys, so he took
down his broth-er's fine large kite, and big drum, and splen-
did horse with the black and white spots on its back. But
he soon got tir-ed of mere-ly play-ng with them, and
then his hab-its of mis-chief be-gan to show them-selves.
He for-ced the drum-sticks through the parch-ment of the
big drum, tore off the flow-ing tail of the large kite, and
broke one of the hind legs of the s4tted horse, after which




13


he pul-led off its head from .!
its bod-y.
This ver-y naugh-ty pig
af-ter this went to the cup-
board, and find-ing out his
moth-er's jam pots, half emp-
ti-ed most of them. He did
not e-ven wait to look for
a spoon, but for-cing his paws
in-to the jam, ate it in that
way. Even this was not
e-nough mis-chief for himn
Tak-ing the po-ker, he made -
it red hot, and with it burnt
more than ten great holes in
the hearth-rug, and al-so burnt
holes in his moth-er's fine new
car-pet. When Mrs. Pig came
home from the mill-er's with,.
the flour, she sat down by
the fire, and be-ing ver-y tir-ed
she soon fell a-sleep. No I
soon-er had she done so,
than this bad lit-tle pig, 1
get-ting a long hand-ker-chief,
ti-ed her i her chair. But -
it was not ver-y long be-fore
she a-woke. Ver-y quick-ly --
she found out all the mis-
chief that this lit-tle pig had
been do-ing.




*s .




14


She soon saw all
the dam-age he had
done to his broth-er's
play-things. Quick-
ly, too, she brought
out her thick-est and
heav-i-est birch. The
naugh-ty lit-tle pig
ran all round the
room, and cri-ed and
beg-ged of his moth-
er to for-give him.
But all this did
not a-vail him in




15


the least, his moth-er took him by the ear, and ap-pli-ed the
birch to his back and sides till they tin-gled and smart-ed
in such a way that he did not for-get for a long time.


ri t






















F -
I -
Ia









THIRD PIG.


j I Ir




THIS LI ROAST-BEEF.










'JB ^ T I (
I



II




I






1-


THIS U~TTLE PI HAD ROAST-BEEF.
(1O)




17



THIRD PIG.

TiIS lit-tle pig who had roast beef was a ver-y good and
care-ful lit-tie fel-low. He gave his moth-er scarce-ly any
trou-ble, and like his eld-est broth-er, Mr. Pig, al-ways took a
pleas-ure in doing what she bade him. Here you see him
sit-ting down, with a clean face, and well-wash-ed hands, to
some nice roast beef. His broth-er who was i-dle, and would








1


not learn his les-sons, is cry-ing on a stool in the cor-ner, with
the Dunce's cap on. And this is the reason why the good




18
lit-tle pig had roast beef, while his broth-er the i-dle pig had
none. le sat down qui-et-ly in the cor-ner while he learn-ed
his les-son. Hav-ing gone o-ver it ma-ny times, say-ing one
line af-ter an-oth-er to him-self, he ask-ed his moth-er to hear
him re-peat it. And lie did so from the first line to the
ver-y last, with-out a sin-gle Tmis-take. Mrs. Pig strok-ed
him on the ears and fore-head, and call-ed him a good lit-tle
pig. Af-ter this he ask-ed her to al-low him to as-sist in
mak-ing the tea. He brought ev-c-ry-thing she want-ed, and
lift-ed off the ket-tle from the fire, with-out spill-ing a drop,
ei-ther on his toes or the car-pet.













-

By-and-by he went out, after ask-ing his moth-er, to
play with his hoop. He had not gone far, when he saw an
old blind pig, who, with his hat in hand, was cry-ing at the
loss of his dog. That naughty dog had brok-en the string
by which his mas-ter held him, and had run a-way. He felt in






his pock-et, and found he had a half-pen-ny, which he gave to
the poor old pig, like a kind and thought-ful lit-tle pig as
he was. Not ver-y long af-ter this, he saw a great strong,
spite-fil pig, who wore a ver-y short jack-et, and had a large
green cap on his head, beat-ing one of his lit-tle broth-ers.


Go-ing up to the .big pig, he told him what a shame it was
that he should so ill-treat a poor lit-tie pig so much small-er
than him-self, and who had done him no harm. The great-
stu-pid pig did not seem quite a-ble to make out what this
wise pig said to him, but he ran off His poor lit-tie broth-




20


er had been knock-ed down,
and bruis-ed, and one of his
eyes was red and swol-len.
So he took out his hand-ker-
chief, and ti-ed it o-ver his
broth-er's face. Then he, in
the most care-ful and ten-der
man-ner, led the beat-en lit-tie
pig home to his moth-er's
houie. He pla-ced one of his
paws un-der his own arm, and
so they went a-long. They
were a long time get-ting
home, for the poor pig who
had been so sad-ly treat-el




21


was lame, and cri-ed a great deal with the pain











But when they got home, the care-ful lit-tle
him some nice hot mut-ton broth, and took it up t
for him to sip it. It was for such good, kind, tl
con-duct as this that his moth-er al-most ev-e-ry w
this lit-tle pig roast-beef.





.W,..i


his eyes


)ig made
Shis bed
loughtful
eek gave







FOURTH PIG3


4 I'I I


I


THIS LITLxE vIG


HAD NONE.
S


(22)


L --- --- - II
- ---'---




23


FOURTH PIG.

UN-LIKE his broth-er, the lit-tle
pig who had roast beef, this
was a most per-verse and wil-
ful lit-tle pig. No won-der, I
then, that while his good broth-
er had roast beef, lie had
none. Hils moth-er lad set .
him to learn his les-son, but no
soon-er had she gone out in-to
the gar-den, than lie tore his \
book in-to pi)-ces. le took the .
po-ker and for-ced the leaves .__ 'l.i""
through tile bars of the grate,
and held the po-kcrin his hand -Istd i-
till they were all burnt, laugLh- .
ing all the time. When his



-7 I .
I I



aI.-.-' I m,- ,, -


.... ---




24


moth-er came back he did not let her know what he had
done. But when she had fidl-en a-sleep, he ran off in-to the


71








streets to play with oth-er i-dle lit-tle pigs such as him-self
He was very fond of jump-ing o-ver the backs of
r lit-tle pigs. Some-times when
an-oth-er little pig would re-
y" fuse to al-low him to jump
o-ver his back, or would not
lend him his top, he would
S, beat the poor pig in a ver-y
spite-fll way. And so it
Would hap-pen that a num-ber
of the lit-tle pigs lie had so ill
N Itreat-ed would fall up-on him
to-geth-er, as you see here.
SNot hav-ing a ball of his own
to play with, he thouglt he
? would take one a-way from a
weak lit-tle pig who crniM




25


not re-sist. But ver-y shortly two of the big-ger brothers
of the lit-tle pig he had so rob-bed came up and gave him













was too late, that he had not
stay-ed at home and read
o-ver and learn-ed his les-
sons. He was a-fraid to go
home, too, though ie felt ver-y
tir-ed and hun-gry. So he s
stray-ed a-bout till it was -
quite dark and cold, and hav-
ing lost his cap, he caught -
a cold in his head. Mrs. Pig
at home was quite an-gry at
first at his run-ning atway.
So she went in search of him,
as dit also Mr. Pig and an-
oth-er of his broth-ers. It
as &[ aso oMr.Pig nd n- ---




26


was ver-y late in-deed when they found him, and at a great
dis-tance from home, for, in his ter-ror and fright, he had
lost his way. But tley brought him home, and he was put
to bed. The doc-tor came to see him, and left a lot of
very nas-ty phys-ic, which he had to take. He was in
much pain, and had to lie in bed for more than a week,
which nev-er would have hap-pen-ed had he stay-ed at home
and learn-ed his les-sons in-stead of run-ning off af-ter de-
stroy-ing his books. And this is why he had no roast beef
giv-en to him.




FIFTH PIG.


THS LITTLE PIG CRTED F WEE, WEEo ALL THE WAY HOME

ONE day in the sum-mer time, Mrs. ig told all her sons,
the five lit-tle pigs, that they might go out in-to the coun-try
for a whole day. Mr. Pig, the eld-est son, ask-ed his broth-
(27)




28


ers wheth-er they would rath-er spend the day with him,
than en-joy it a-lone, each one by him-self. They all a-greed
to go with him. All but one at least, this lit-tle pig that
you see cry-ing "Wee! wee!" all the way home. This
little pig had bought a new fish-ing rod and tac-kle, and he
was anx-lous to try to fish for the first time. He had
made up his mind to fish in a stream that was close by, and
so he said he iould spend his hol-i-day by him-self Ver-y
well," said Mrs. Pig, but you must not go in-to Far-mer
Grum-pey's grounds, for he is a ver-y se-vere man, and he
car-ries a great heav-y whip." The lit-tie pig told his moth-
er that he did not in-tend to fish in this far-mer's part of
the riv-er. A-way he went, but he told his moth-er a sto-ry;
he di in-tend to go in-to Far-mer Grum-pey's grounds. When




,- *






he got there he threw his line in-to the water, and watch-ed
the float for a long time. After a while he saw the float
bob-bing a-bout un-der the wa-ter, and ver-y soon after he
drag-ged an im-mense fish to land. Pig-gy took him up




29


in-to his arms, and started to-wards home with him.


But


he soon found the fish wa- too heav-y to be car-ri-ed in that
way. So he sat down to re-fresh him-self and to think how


-V %.,
lt-5


H' ---w





30





S1I --







he was to get the fish
aong. He had on-ly
been thus think-ing a
S -- Short time when he
heard a great. gruff
r" voice shout-ing out
-- and soon af-ter he saw
the dread-ful Far-iner
S- Grum,-pey, wvltl his
3' heav-y whip in his
Sand, on a hill ver-y
oa .. near hin. So he
jump-ed tip, caught
the great fish in his
arms, and ran off as
S- fahst as lie could. Far-
S- er Grum-pey ran too,
S" crack-ing his whip and
shout- ing out, fol-




31


low-ed by one of his men.
Pig-gy found that they were
over-ta-king hinm,so he drop.-
ped his fish, and ran fastrcr.
But it was no use, poor
Pig-gy was caught by the .
strong and rough far-mer, --
who said he would cut his :iL
back for fish- inrg in his
grounds with-out his con-
sent. So he Ild llis strong
whip over Pig-gy's back for
some time, af-tr which this .-
poor Pig-gy ran off, cry-ing i -
out in great pain, Wee! .,
wee !! wee !!" all the way /
home.

THE END.
, V a
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I7 3rmnwn, Lgsaqqa

JS AND 29 CORNE
Prun8imn T




WHICH WILL BE COMPLETED
TP TIHEK WILL AK TWKLV Vdllr.- AND Al.l. IL' 1.ITI'
N NUMBE;
REMARKABLE HISTORY 0


& haste,


IILL,
11'1,'


BOSTON, a


AR Y,.
AB FAST AB POBOIALE.
LE FRIENDSi ML'T CiLKTAINLYT HAVE A MIET.


R 1.


F


FIVE


40 Illustrations.
NUMBER 1!.
THE WONDERFUL HISTORY OF THREE
WHO LOST THEIR MITTENS. 8


NUMBER 3.
MISTER FOX. 8 Illustrations.
NUMBER 4.
THE FROG WHO WOULD A WOOING GO.
17 Illustrations,
NUMBER 5.
THE GOOD LITTLE PIG'S PIrTURE ALPHABET.
30 Illustrations.
OTHER VOLUMES WILL FOLLOW SOON.


-Zr --- ---.- 7_;


MESSRS. B. T. & C. ALSO 4UBIISIH BEAUTIFUL SERIES OF


AP A E


DOLLS.


SNo. L CARRY, with Dresses complete.
P No. 2 ALICLE with Dresses complete. ,
No. 3. CHABEY, with Dreses complete.
No. 4. LITrLE FAIRY LIGHTFOOT, with lreses complete.
SNo. 5. BETTY, THE MILKMAID, and all her Pets,
comprising uppw~rd of 50 Animals.
s No. 6. JACK AD HIS PONY.
Alo. THE MAY QUEEN AND SHEPHERDESS.
PA AAAAAA, AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA..AAARAA.A9


AhWd maEip Sm bn Patrtc. W6 IwWN l0 amafn.


I,


LITTLE PIGS.


LITTLE 1TTENS
IUustrationm.


'S,. r
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