• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The jackdaw and the pigeons
 The fowler and the blackbird
 The wolves and the sick ass
 The old man and death
 The one-eyed doe
 The ass, the lion, and the...
 The fox and the bramble
 The husbandman and the stork
 The thief and the dog
 The man bit by a dog
 The fox in the well
 The ass and the lion's skin
 Hercules and the carter
 The two crabs
 The peacock and the crane
 The fowler and the ringdove
 The wolf and the crane
 The wind, the sun, and the...
 The horse and the loaded ass
 The angler and the little fish
 The old man and his sons
 The jackdaw and the sheep
 The two pots
 The oak and the reed
 The lion and the mouse
 The ass eating thistles
 The gardener and his dog
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Picture fables in verse : by the author of 'Rambling rhymes'
Title: Picture fables in verse
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002977/00001
 Material Information
Title: Picture fables in verse
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1856
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1856   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1856   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1856
Genre: Fables   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: By the author of "Rambling rhymes."
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002977
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235848
oclc - 11845465
notis - ALH6312
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The jackdaw and the pigeons
        Page 3
    The fowler and the blackbird
        Page 4
    The wolves and the sick ass
        Page 5
    The old man and death
        Page 6
    The one-eyed doe
        Page 7
    The ass, the lion, and the cock
        Page 8
    The fox and the bramble
        Page 9
    The husbandman and the stork
        Page 10
    The thief and the dog
        Page 11
    The man bit by a dog
        Page 12
    The fox in the well
        Page 13
    The ass and the lion's skin
        Page 14
    Hercules and the carter
        Page 15
    The two crabs
        Page 16
    The peacock and the crane
        Page 17
    The fowler and the ringdove
        Page 18
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 19
    The wind, the sun, and the traveller
        Page 20
    The horse and the loaded ass
        Page 21
    The angler and the little fish
        Page 22
    The old man and his sons
        Page 23
    The jackdaw and the sheep
        Page 24
    The two pots
        Page 25
    The oak and the reed
        Page 26
    The lion and the mouse
        Page 27
    The ass eating thistles
        Page 28
    The gardener and his dog
        Page 29
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text









Ail
u -R

Ow
]-,4
ICT iN
P/t I






P IC-- TU

PICTU


FABLES IN


T TElE
AUTHOR OF RAMBLINGN


'* S^ -7


RE


V:


G RHI


.1


)I
if i


ERSE.




lh
;I I


T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON; EDINBURGH.
AND NEW YORK.
M DOOCLVI.






















THE JACKDAW AND THE PIGEONS.
'-, DISCONTENTED chattering Daw,
Was filled with envy when he saw
Some neighbour Pigeons live so well,
And longing much with them to dwell,
lie washed his sooty feathers white,
And to the dovecot took his flight,-
But held his tongue and crammed his maw,
And none found out the false Jackdaw.
But soon as he began to chatter,
Away they drove him with a clatter!
Back to his former friends lie flew,
But none the whitened recreant knew.





















THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD.


i 'FOWLER once while laying snares
STo trlp his victims unaares,
A Blackhird all the process viewing
Mildly inquired what lie was doing.
Said lie, I build a city fair
For all the songsters of the air,
Friom every evil to defend them,
Where peace and plenty may attend them.'"
The bird believed the flattering strain
And quickly in the toils was ta'en,
Where liberty through lies was lost,
As men and birds find to their cost.

-- ^ ^ 00






















THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS.
N sickness sore an Ass was laid,
' '. While far and near the rumour spread,
That, ere another night should pass,
Grim Death would carry off the Ass.
Some Wolves, who solemn faces wore,
Came rapping to the stable door,
And sought, with looks of great concern,
The patient's hapless state to learn.
The Colt, who watched his parent's bed,
Came softly to the door, and said,
" My mother begs you will retire,
She's better far than you desire/"





















rHE OLD MAN AND DEATH.

r, Ic-,N Old Man, with a load oppressed.
C .. Sunk down o'erburdened and distressed,
And in his trouble called on Death
To end his woes and stop his breath.
'The King of Terrors heard the cry,
Alnd, to his horror, soon drew nigh,
]Demanding, with a visage grim,
The reason why le called on hlilm.
Said he, I let my bundle fall,
'Which made me for assistance call.
l humbly crave your worship's pard on,
And beg you'll help to lift my burden."
























THE ONE EYED DOE.

''1- N Y L I 1'D... ..] .1 Ira


',.... a" 'In l lr .'n it 1, 1t '.' J1.1 ll *l,,[n
"' ., I., h I Ir lil ,l *r 1,. I,, \! l ,,;: ,,.i.' .Li,
l't L[ t. in I r'. Ii al ,.l.hlil r' I,.






. |l'[ i I. I I [i lLU %r .i' : l l I.lit a [l L




flat = :11sIll..I Illsit bii~l iar~l~lw= isrd:11:~1s


~


























THE ASS, THE LION, AND THE COCK.

-''.. N Ass and Cock together fed,

y When, startled by a Lion's tread,
With clarion shrill, bold chanticleer

Scared him away in panic fear.

The Ass, courageous at the sight,

Pursued the Lion in his flight,

But found too far his courage bore him,

For round the monarch turned and tore him.

('oward.s who thits provoke their fate,

Like the poor Ass may find, too late,

IThat courage false leads on to danger,

When on thenl turns the bold avenger.


__ ____ 1~~~1~ ~ ~___ ~_ _~i__l_~~_ ~~__~


CI1:
r

























THE FOX AND THE BRAMBLE.

-A I' FOX pursued by hound and horn,
S as sorely by a Bramble torn

While bounding swiftly through a hedge,

\Which threw him into such a rage

lie cursed the Bramble for a foe,
That lie could use a stranger so.

The Bramble boldly cried, You thought

That I would serve your turn for nought!

But know, we of the Bramble line,

Repel such handling, friend, as thine,

For laying hold, time out of mind,
lhas been the custom of our kind."


_I_ ~ ___1~ __II Y__ _~


-~_-;--- --;----------~
























THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK.


,'A HUSBANDMAN whose new-sown corn,
SAway by Cranes and Geese was torn,
A snare to trap the plunderers set,
And caught the robbers in a net.
S A silly Stork among the rest,
S C'aught in the act, was sore distressed,
And pleaded lie might not be slain
As he was neither Goose nor Crane.
"'rThat may be true," the Farner cried,
But you are found with thieves allied;
lRepentance cones a day too late,-
You all must share a columon fate."


.~~ .- .. .-.---. ... .

























THE THIEF AND THE DOG.


'" PROWLING Thief, on lender ,.nt,
To rl a hloule at iiiillillght \wemt,

But roused an honest watchif'ul Dog,

Whose barking much annoyed the rogu-:
With bread he sought the Dog's alliance,
But still he fiercer barked defiance,

As if, by insult more enraged,
lie felt his honour was engaged:
" You dirty scoundrel," barked the brute,
" To think a gift would make me mute!

Men may be bribed, but Dogs disdain

To Darter honesty for gain."


m ILX, -. 1_ -~ l.___ .-.~~~I._-, _..-. .


~ L- --. -I
























THE MAN BIT BY A DCG.


'T FURIOUS Dog had hit a .Man,
S \'Who to a wise old wouan ran.
IlHld for her skill in high repute,
And famed fur curing iian and inrte.
The crone prescrilied a lunmp of bread,
Well soaked into the wound that bled,
WhCich, when the furious log had eaten,
Would cure the man that he had bitten.
-Esop, who heard the sage advice,
Said, "All the dogs will seek a slice;
Y~nir secret keep as well's you canii,
Or eveUry cur will bite a rlan."


-- vPipI-- r n
~ja~~LS;11~11 ~ !


II I rr --------~---------
























THE FOX IN THE WELL.

i -_ FOX, while struggling in a well.
lDown uwicl- bv accident he fell.
| ]_g"ged of a Wolf, who saw his scrape,
To come and help him to escape
lPoor Reynard!" thus began his friend,
Glailly would 1 assistance lend,"
S And 1plrased away in strain provokiig,
while e Reynard in tle well was choking.
Nay, prithee, friend," exclaimed tle Fox,
Y our pity my Imisfortune mocks;
Not words, but deeds, can mend the matter
S When one's up to the chiii in water."

LOJY I -, ,


-I I




















-a-e. mn It t





THE ASS AND THE LION'S SKIN.

.A3 .. N A.s wh~l found a Lion's skinl

i ad nnly I l\raied hlimsel tlerein.
And. scared tie flocks aln herds away

InI consternation and dismay

T tfri-glt his master next he tried,
Who soon his two long ears described,

AndI b)roulght a cudgel o'er his run!,

WVith such a hearty thundering thump,

That made hin rue the rash assumption,

And feel the fruits of his presumption.

That for a Lion he might pass,

IIe made himself a greater a.s!


I~__~_ __~_~ ~ ~i__ 1 ~ _~ ~__~~ _~l;/__ri7_ ~~;~_ ~i~l_~~_r_~ ~__~_~_1


_ I I_ ~ ______ _~~~_ ~__~





















HERCULES AND THE CARTER.

F COUIN TI. Y Clown once drove his cait
So deep a among the mire and dirt,
'T'liie buried wheels defied tie horse
To drag them out with all his force. ,
On IHercules the Clown then called
For instant, lelp, and prayed and bawled.
On hearing all the clainour loud,
The god beheld him from a cloud:
Said lie, You lazy, stupid lout,
Just try your strength to pull them. out; H
And ere you thus for lelp appeal,
Put your own shoulder to the wheel!"
If It f













2i









THE TWO GRABS.

i PARENT Crab once left the water
To take an airing with her daughter,
And as thley sauntered crab-like, backward,
Reproved her child for motions awkward
" A slhamiling, sprawling, graceless creature,
IThat moves against the laws of nature'"
" .Iy dear manlnia," the Crab replied,
" To walk like you I've always tried
But if you would example show,
And teach o.ine other way to go,,
\With backwardness I'll never tease you,
lilt do mIy very best to please you."

07_ -
.3.. ... .




















THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE.
i; T5 PEACOCK, of his plumage vain,
SE1counltered once a l illeile Ciaie;
A iin strutting past in all his prid.le,
\ itl scorifiil look 1is neighlibour eyed.
lice Craine, his pride to mortify,
S servedvd he need not look so highly;
No doubt he was a splendid beau,
So far as gawdy plulles could go,
IBut plainer birds, with wings to fly,
\Who soared above the clouds on high
4 Were nobler, in his estimation,
'u Tlhla strutting things of ostentation.


" I ai- 94,





emma


THE FOWLER AND THE RINGDOVE.

( 1 1; CRU EL Fowler, sljting o.amel,
Sr TInIk at a Ringdove deadly ain,
)But ere le fir.d tin. fatal shot,
] lis arim, arretid l on the spiit,
iDown in a trice the weapon ftlling,
Ilis leg was b a an adder stun-g
Swift thriugili his blood the lp',is,'.n "n,
\\lieli soonil to norttify be.an ;
And whlien lie saw approachinii death,
lie iinirinured w\itl his parting breath,-
" l had I let, the bird alone,
Seeking its life f've lust Iiy oi n n"'























THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.

PnT HUNGRY Wolf, once on a day,
Devouring greedily his prey,
Stuck in his throat an ugly bone,
Which made him wildly howl and groan,
And vow that he who eased his pain
A due reward, with thanks, should gain.
At length a Crane, tie Wolf to free,
Pulled out the bone, and claimed his fee.
" lie glad 1 did not bite your head off'"
Exclaimed the rogue, and quickly made off.
So, he who helps the thankless, pgaij
Ilu labour only for ihis pains.


--- _..I,-_....~~ ...... _..~l..cL,,,_._ ____






















THE WIND THE SUN AND THE TRAVELLER.

"(iT' HE Sun and Wind one day disputed
[,. Which should the strongest lie reputed,
And both agreed their strength to try
Upon a Traveller passing by.
With driving showers the North Wind ble),
Iis cloak the Traveller closer drew;
'lhen through the clouds and vapours lun
Down on him fiercely burst the Sin;
Till flying to a grove's retreat
lie shelter found from wind and heat.
A void extremes if you be wise
In timely flight your safety lies.






-c I


:e~4-~.j

P
_~__
i
:I-I
t:
-

,1ed~)l
~i

I: ,
-~i ;~.~--
~ -;--;-


THE HORSE AND THE LOADED ASS.

S. 'N ille Horse aid laie.ld Ass

Tli-7 ethicr on the road ditl r.

Thle I 'urdened, Ass, I h.'l to ,be l]itiei,

TI sl4are its lioal, thie lIrst. enitrat,-il.

But. wvitlh a s ort ,.)f lazy pridh,

All his reiptests the H11irsc letniic.l,

Till, \\_aried far lbeyniil !iis strenlti',

'Ih liielpless Ass ftill lead at len-gthi.

hits master, as a last resiitr.,

Lail the wtltle hlarilin itt the l.rs.

A i. fAsr is cskinirt, so,tling nure,-

The A.ss'. skin ihe also ioru!


j
I j
I i


I

~'IF~B~


i i
I
I







I
~a;


IC I I -- ~.._,^--- -Fl ---- --~-~^--------i~--
~~ '~`
~_j&~7 F;r;T~;gp--
,,i 8~: o
ie ~_d'~~=~ II IIY


~6:

..-~I~_~___ __~ __


'S~-T

























THE ANGLER AND THE LITTLE FISH.

i" IAN, while alnling it a brook,

1, Caught a small Perch upon ii.N hook,

which h legged him in a thulimle trail

1', throw it in the stream again.

Smnne otimer seasll1," saiid thle Fish,

When grown, I'd prove a dainty dish,

hIt lOw, so silly, young and slight.

I scarce would make a sillngle bite."
I ,0 yuir pardon," said thle lajn.

lint I inlmist keep you while 1 can

Should I your liberty restore,

I lever may behold you more '"


s- ;--~-~~iP
--;--
-~----- --- T;













i :







STE.E OLD MAN AND HIS SONS.
1.. 'lN led a. wretei life.

c-aist-l l y his S sl, Ilo i I.d in striel
\\.lv ct, uIVit t 1, 111 thns tv teachI

T ,. sti't'ithlli if ulit t t uacl :--
A liiil I', l irUl1t ijf sticks It I n t.i C
S' V. try yillur strcllgtli, li, Il S il, e s' i.
S "' T hl!'reak it tlhui hl." Tlic'y tried in \;lil,
I It.s stire thtil re.si.teil evtr strain.
N,_w tlake thi.ii sin I gly." TJ y I ii .gc a
Like free's tiu s 1lluu I tllt in l lc y oll"e.
S ct ,'e lear1n,1 l Si-ns" t1le father cries,
1 at> \\ it t_ strn.1 tl in u ion Ijs."

^_ _________J


j


`' 1~- I,~-r~~--.-~-I------- --.--i---~~----.,~ .. ..~.~,..,. _


j






















THE JACKDAW AND THE SHEEP.
71' PERT Jackdaw, with itnoisy cla.;,
j Ai1 A sheeplr once foundtt 01011 nher lack,
AnII wo nlerred whliat could lie tlie niatter,
IIHe so annoyed her with his chatter.
" Peace, noisy thing," then cried the sheep,
" Leave me alone, or silence keep;
Were I a doga full well yon know
Yon would.lnot dare to use me so,."
"True," said the Daw, "the reason's plain,
You cannot do me harm a-ga.ii
I tease the helpless in my' fun, 4
Bllt all the strong and surly shliun."
cI~t~
























THE TWO POTS.

1NN\\ WO Pots sat on a river's 1antk,
f f brass anl heart henware their rank.
litt, ere they twist, t their disimnay,
The rising tile s\it- t hth away
The earthen Pt w\vas much afraidl
His 1trazen frienlt w\ouldi lend himu ail
Ainl be-g-ied he w\_illd his distance ke:t,
Nor help hint on tthe waters deep
"* Fir if we should but touch,".said lie,
" .1|v brittle frame will shattered le."

1ti" o t/e 'I o s,!fibel w/'oi'f,
II hAojustle w'ith the e'at <(.ad *.trnji.


_ __~~_T _;11_______~__11~ _~I~~~__ __i_____r~___~_~_____I_~__~ _1_1~ ~___~___~1_




.1 L '~~. ~ O


vL


















k


'JI


p


?B^


SGUST of wind one stormy day
Tore up and swept an Oak away,
Who saw, while down the stream descending,
A Reed before the tempest bending,
But, while it bent it kept its station,
Which filled the Oak with admiration.
" How can you stand the tempest's shock,
Frail Reed, that breaks the sturdy Oak ?"
The tree inquired. The Reed rejoined,
" I bend before the roaring wind,
While you, so stubborn, proud, and high,
Resist the storm, and there you lie!"


1 '1' ~~y~A~L~ir~~


THE OAK AND THE REED.


202 '


ri
*18














i4
























THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

.0' LION once in kingly pride,

-7 Ranging at will the forest wide,
By accident his paw so dread
ULpon a trembling Mouse was laid,
Which, pleading hard for liberty,
The generous beast at once set free.
It chanced the Lion, after that,
In hunters toils one day was caught:
Thle Mouse, who heard his roaring noise,
And knew his benefactor's voice,
With teeth so sharp the meshes severed,
And gratefully his friend delivered!


_~ I___ __I~_~~ _Ir_/_~__~ ~ _~_~_~_P~_s______ _~~~__


. --Y--.-.y*e ~_ ~-- -.-ru












IL 7S
r,', AA~~~9~1 p


THE ASS EATING THISTLES.

ell^ Ass beneath a heavy loadl
Of dainty viands took the road,
Anl cropt a Thistle by the way
His craving hunger to allay,
And while he mullbled at his prize,
lle reasoned thus, so sage and wise:
" The load 1 carry may delight
A nice or panimpred appetite;
To me the Tlistle proves a feast,
More sweet than epicure can taste:
Let health and tempnerance buuiid my wishes,
And give the great thleil dain;t dishes."
























THE GARDENER AND HIS DOG.
i ?'RISKING beside a draw-well's brink, -
And stretching out his neck to idrink,
A Garleners Dog fell headlong down,
A depth where lie was sure to druwln.
1 is master to his rescue ran,
When, thankless brute, lie bit the man:
Who. tlirown into a rage with pain.,
Just dashed him in the well again.
" Ungrateful wretch '" the (Gardenei said,


And1 would have saved vou,-- wh c uld bear it
I leave you to the fate yoll neri."

o- ___W Mh.


m~--~- l--~rr-- ~ --- ------------- r --- i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs