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Group Title: Bulletin
Title: Florida crops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002943/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida crops what and when to plant
Series Title: Bulletin
Alternate Title: What and when to plant
Physical Description: 22 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, T. J ( Thomas Joseph ), b. 1870
Publisher: Florida. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1940
 Subjects
Subject: Crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Horticulture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by T.J. Brooks
General Note: "July, 1940."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002943
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA3331
ltuf - AME4810
oclc - 41127056
alephbibnum - 002439620
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
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        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text



44** 4
S Bulletin No. 1 New Series July, 1940





Florida Crops
444.


WHAT AND
WHEN TO

5 PLANT





44 STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
TA LLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
T+ m

-4
NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner

4'
SAAG4

Y, 4i, t*iiI tI iI






BultnN.1 Nw eis Jl,14


Florida Crops




WHAT AND
WHEN TO

PLANT





STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner


Bulletin No. I


New Series


July, 1940










FLORIDA


CROPS


T. J. BROOKS
Assistant Contiissioner
of ,4Ariculture

Florida crops can be classified as fruits, vegetables.
field crops, berries and nuts. They can also be classified
geographically as the crops of North, Central and South
Florida. The temperatures and seasons vary so much that
the seasons for gathering and marketing crops are as impor-
tant as the kind of crops to be grown.

The following are crops that can be grown in all parts


of Florida: Corn,
pasture crops.


sugarcane, peanuts, potatoes, hay and


EDIBLE INDIGENES
OF ASIA


Spices
Coffee
Tea
Cinnamon
Apricot
Rhubarb
Buck Wheat
Raddish
Pistachio
Licorice
Peach
Cucumber
Almond


Olive
Aerixhoke
Garlic
Mango
Pomegranate
Grape
Soy Bean
Yam
Lychee
Citrus
Rice
Cotton


Egg Plant
Black Pepper
Dasheen
Mangosteen
Endive
Barley
Shallot
Fig
Date
English Walnut
Wheat
Rye


EDIBLE INDIGENES
OF AFRICA

Cantaloupe
Carissa
Watermelon


Coffee
Spinach









EDIBLE INDIGENES
OF EUROPE


Apple
Fennel (Parsley Family)
Current
Gooseberry
Mustard
Cabbage
Turnips
Cauliflower
Rutabaga
Kohl-rabi
Broccoli
Brussells Sprouts


EDIBLE INDIGENES
OCEANIC
Nutmeg
Grapefruit


Quince
Pear
Plum
Asparagus
Parsnips
Celery
Lee
Chestnut
Fiblert
Carrot
Lettuce


Cinnamon
Banana


EDIBLE INDIGENES
OF NORTH AMERICA
Sweet Potato
Chayote
Blueberry
Blackberry
Dewberry
Chestnut
Hazelnut
Papaya (West Indies)
Monistera Deliciosa
(West Indies)


EDIBLE INDIGENES
OF SOUTH AMERICA


Corn
Irish Potatoes
Tomatoes
Peanut
Cocoa
Cassava
Pineapple


Lima Beans
Mate
Herbaceous Pepper
Natal Plum
Cashew
Surinam Cherry


Coconut
Breadfruit


Corn
Bean
Pumpkin
Cranberry
Pecan
Hickory
Guava
Avocado
Allspice
Vanilla
Sapodilla







MINERAL IPRODUCTS-STATES THEY COME FROM
(Data from the U. S. Bureau of Mines.)


Mineral

aluminum
ntimony ore
rsenious oxide
asbestoss
osphallt

arytes (crude)
auxite
orates
Iromine
'admium
calcium magnes chloride
cement
'hromite
'lay products
jlay, raw
:oal:
Bituminous
Anthracite
:oke
:opper
)iatomaceous earth
Smery
'eldspar (crude)
'erroalloys
?luospar
'uller's earth
.arnet, abrasive
'old
;raphite
;rindstones and
pulpstones
;ypsum
ron ore
ron. pie
.ead
,ime


Chief States

N. Y., N. C., Tenn,.
Idaho
Nev., Utah. Mont., S. D.
Md.. Cal., Ga.. Ariz.
Cal., Tex.. Ill., Ky., Litah,
Okla.
Ga.. Mo., Tenn.. Va.
Ark.. Ga., Tenn.. Ala.
Cal., Nov.
Mich.. W. Va.. Ohio
Not separable by States
Mich.. W. Va., Ohio
Pa.. Cal., Ind., Mich.
Md., Cal., Ore.
Ohio. Pa., N. J.. Ill.
N. J.. Pa.. Mo.. Ga.

Pa., W. Va.. III.. Ky.
Pa.
Pa.. Ind.. Ohio., Ill., Ala.
Ariz.. Mont., Utah. Mich.
Cal., Okla.. Ill., Mo.
Va. N. Y.
N. C.. Me.. N. H.. N. Y.
Pa.. N. Y.. Md.. Ohio.
Ill. Ky., Col., N. M.
Fla.. Ga., Tex.. Ill.
N. Y., N. H.. N. C.
Cal.. Col.. S. D.. Alaska.
Ala., Tex., R. I., Mich.

Ohio, W. Va.. Mich Wash.
N. Y.. Iowa, Ohio, Mich.
Minn.. Mich.. Ala.. N. Y.
Pa., Ohio, Ill., Ind.. Ala.
Mo.. Idaho, Utah. Okla.
Oh;o. Pa., Mass., Mo.


Mineral

Magnesite (crude)
Magnesium
magnesium chloride
.lagncsium sulphate
Manganese ore
Manganiferous ore
Magnaniferous zinc
Mica
Millstones
Mineral paints
Mineral waters
Natural gas
Natural gas gasoline
Oilstones, etc.
Peat
I'etroleum
Phosphate reck
Platinum and allied metals
Potash (K20)
Pumice
Pyrites
Quicksilver
Salt
Sand and gravel
Sand lime brick
Silicia (quartz)
Silver
Slate
Stone
Sulphur
Talc and soapstone
Tin.
Titanium ore: Rutile
Tungsten
Uranium, vanadium ores
Zinc


Chief States

Cal., Wash.
N. Y.. Mich.
Mich., Cal.
Mich., Wash.. Cal.
Month Ark., Va.. Col.
Minn.. Wis.. Mich.. Colo.
N.J.
N. C.. N. H. N. M., Va.
N. Y.. Va.. N. C., N. II.
Pa.. Ill.. Col.. Ohio.
Wi6.. N. Y.. Cal., Me.
W.Va., Pa., Okl., Cal.. Tex.
Okla., Cal.. Tyx.. W.Va.
Ark.. Ind., Ohio., N. H.
Ill.. N. J.. Cal., Ind.
Okla., Cal.. Tex., Ark.. Kan.
Fla., Tenn.. Idaho. Ky.
Cal., Ore.. Alaska, Utah
Cal.. Md., Pa.. Ind.
Kan., Neb.. Cal.. Utah
Cal.. Va.. N. Y.. Wis.
Cal., Tex.. Nev.. Ore.
Mich. N. Y.. Ohio. Kan.
Ill.. N. Y., Ind., Mich.
Mich., Mass.jWis., N. J.
Wis., Md., Cal.. Nev.
Utah.. Mont.. Nev., Idaho.
Ia., Vt., N. Y.. Me.
Pa., Ind.. Ohio. N. Y.
Tex., La., Nev.. Utah
N. Y., Va., Vt.. Cal.
Alaska
Fla., Va.
Nev.'.alif.. Colo.. S. D.
IUtah Colo.
Okla.. Kan., N. J., Mont.


MIEXICO-Mining industries: Petroleum and its prod-
ucts, silver. gold, antimony, mercury, copper, lead and zinc;
also, coffee, rubber, chicle, chic-peas, guayule henequen, ixtle,
mahognay, ebony, hides and skins, raw cotton, corn and
bananas.


The following articles are produced in Latin America;
many of which are also produced, and all of which are con-
sumed in both North and South America:

(All the countries have various kinds of fruits and vegetables.)


GUATAMALA-Coffee, bananas, chicle, gold lumber,
honey, sugar and hides.

EL SALVADOR-Coffee, bullion, sugar, henequen, bal-
sam, rice and indigo.

HONDURAS-Bananas, gold and silver, coffee, coco-
nuts, livestock, tobacco and hides.






NICARAGUA-Coffee, bananas, gold, cotton, lumber,
hides and skins, sugar, cacao and dyewood.
COSTA RICO-Coffee. bananas, cacao, gold, mineral
earths, lumber, honey, tuna fish, hides and skins.
PANAMA-Bananas, cacao, gold, coconuts, meats, cat-
tle hides, mother-of-pearl shell, coffee and rubber.
CUBA-Sugar and molasses, tobacco and cigars, ba-
nanas. copper, manganese, cattle hides, rum and sponges.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-Sugar, cacao, coffee, mo-
lasses, tobacco, corn and gold.
HAITI-Coffee, cotton, sugar, sisal, bananas, cacao.
molasses, goat-skins, cottonseed cake and logwood.
ARGENTINA-Almost entirely products of the agri-
cultural and meat-producing industries; of the first, wheat
corn, linseed, oats. barley, flour, bran and pollard; of the
second, frozen and chilled meats, hides, skins, wool, resid-
uary animal-products of all kinds, meat extract, butter; in
addition, quebracho wood and extract.
BOLIVIA-Tin, silver bismuth, copper, lead, zinc. gold,
wolfram. antimony, rubber, hides and skins, cocoa leaves and
cassava.
BRAZIL-Coffee, hides, rubber, mate, cacao, tobacco,
skins, citrus, peanuts, sugar, cotton, gold, nuts, carnauba
wax, monazite sand. oilseeds, vanilla, cassava, corn and
kernels, rotenone, and chilled and frozen beef.
CHILE-Minerals, mainly; copper, sodium, sodium
nitrate in the natural form, iodine and borax, bar silver,
and iron and copper ore.. Hides, wool, wax. fruits, grains,
and fresh and frozen meats.

COLOMBIA-Coffee, petroleum, bananas, hides and
skins, tobacco, tagua nuts (vegetable ivory), cacao, rubber,
dividivi, platinum, gold, and emeralds.
ECUADOR-Cacao, ivory nuts, straw hats, rubber.
coffee, petroleum, gold, hides, raw cotton and bananas.
PARAGUAY-Hides, quebracho extract, cotton, cattle,
mate, hardwoods, tobacco, oranges and tangerines, oil of
petit grain, canned meats.






PERU-Products of the mining industries, mainly
copper and petroleum and its products; gold, lead, rubber,
sugar, coffee, cotton, quinine (made from the bark of the
cinchona tree), wool, hides, and skins, guano and cottonseed
oil.
URUGUAY-Wool, hides, skins, meat extract, pre-
served meats, frozen and chilled meats, tallow and beef fat,
residuary animal products, wheat, flour, linseed, sand and
stone.
VENEZUELA-Petroleum, coffee, gold, cacao, rubber,
balata, goat-skins, asphalt, cattle hides, live cattle, heron
plumes, dividivi, fruits and pearls.






The Federal Government has had stations in Dade
County, Florida, trying out all manner of warm-climate
plants of every description for many years. According to
the report of the office directed by Dr. David Fairchild about
20,000 specimens have been introduced. No one can say as
yet how many will prove to be of commercial use. Below we
are giving a list of what one man found would grow near
Homestead, 20 miles Southwest of Miami.

Col H. W. Johnston of Homestead, Florida, gives this
list as growing on his place:

RARE TROPICAL TREES IN THIS GROVE

Ten kinds of oranges, six varieties grapefruit, four
varieties limes, two varieties lemons, six varieties tanger-
ines, two varieties tangelos, two citron and one calamondin.
Five varieties pineapple, 30 avocado, 20 mango, three fig,
10 papaya, five loquat, 15 guava, five pomegranate, four
zizyphus jujube, two tropical mulberry and three cocoa.

Other tropical fruits represented are: Akee, cashew
nut, imbu imbu, ambarella, sugar apple, cocoanut, olive, sour
sop. Bullock's heart, Ilama, pond apple, soncoya, rollinia
mucosa, isis gram, purple and sweet grenadilla, manzanilla.
icaco, pitange, jaboticaba, feijoa, jambolan. rose apple, pin-
tamba, antedesma, litchi, mamoncillo sapodilla (two), white.
golden, green and yellow sapote, star apple, canistel, ti-es,
locumo, mamee, Rheedia madrone, jak fruit, marang, lang-
sat, averrhoa crambola, tamarind, carissa (Natal Plum 2),
karandas. Java plum, unkokolo, tuna, pitaya, date (3). gar-
cinnia, erythoxlon, quitoensis S., quandong, mimusops, bala-
nites, actinidia, mang mao, stricknosis spinosa (2), nux
vomica, lustania, pithecolobium dulce, satin fruit, cecropia,
cudrambia jovoensis, monstera deliciosa, vanilla (2), Ara-
bian coffee (3), beayillia, embloco, tamentossa, julgans,
pemula, cocolobis, pistachio. ramontchi. ratauguresse, lovi-
lovi, elephant apple, phylanthus, zicycum dulaefiam, physic
or Mexican nut, chaya, Malay apple, rambutan, velvet apple,
forbidden fruit, moringa, morinda, kei apple, Queensland
nut, date plum, passion fruit, ocomba spinosa, genipi, cochin
goraka, algoroba, Ceylon olive, wampee, pewa, Jaya almond,
rambia, breadfruit, malphygia, perwiski. bail fruit, domei,
nam-nam, wax jambu, anchova pear, water lemon, santol,
vera aloe, etc.






From the Division of Forage Crops and Diseases of the
State Experiment Station comes the following list:
Alyseclover (Alysicarpus vaginalis)
Narrowleaf lupine (Lupinus angustifolius)
Crotalaria-(C. spectabilis)
(C. striata)
(C. intermedia)
Austrian winter field pea (Pisum arvense)
Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum)
Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum)
Centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides)
Para grass (lPanicum barbinode)
Dallis grass (Paspalum dilatatum)

From the Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases comes
the suggestion that most cereals are not active in Florida
but that Victory and Bond oats, brought in respectively from
South America and Australia, have "some possibility for use
in themselves in Florida and are being used successfully in
breeding better oats for Florida conditions. These two
varieties are highly resistant to crown rust and smut, the
first of which is a serious limiting factor in growing the
crop in the State."






FRUITS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA


Avocado
Ambarella
Akee
Banana
Custard Apple
Canistel
Coco Plum
Citrus
Ceriman
Cereus (Pitayz)
Carob Plum
Cashew
Carissa
Carambol
Cacao
Fig


Granadilla
Grapes
Guava
llama
Jaboticaba
Jackfruit
Jujube
Ketembilla
Lichti
Loquat
Mamey
Mamoncill
Mango
Papaya
Para Guava
Peach
Persimmon (Japanese)


Pineapple
Pitaya
Pomegranate
Prickly Pear
Rhubarb
Rose Apple
Roselle
Sapodilla
Sapote
Seagrape
Sour Sop
Star Apple
Sugar Apple
Surinam Cherry
Tamarind
Umkokolo
Watermelon
White Sapote


VEGETABLES GROWN IN SOUTH FLORII)A


Beans (Limas)
Beans (String)
Beets (Roots)
Beets (Greens)
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cabbage (Chinese)
Carrots
Cassava
Cauliflower
Chayote
Collards
Corn (Sweet)
Cucumber
Dasheen
Eggplants
Endive
Escarole
Greens (Turnips)
Kale
Kohl-Rabi


Lettuce
Mustard (Greens)
Mustard (Chinese)
Parsley
Peas
(English) (Field) (Pigeon)
Pepper (Sweet)
Pepper (red)
Potato(white) (sweet) (yam)
Okra
Onion
Rape
Radish
Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash (Chinese)
Squash
Swiss Chard
Turnips (roots)
Tomatoes
Watercress







TIE FOLLOWING IS FROM THE BULLETIN. "FOR SALE. WANT AND EXCHANGE"
ISSUED BY THE FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA
FLORIDA HOME MARKET VEGETABLE QUOTATIONS

Many Florida growers, particularly those who sell their vegetables in l.c.l, express or truck lots
on the larger Florida home markets, have requested information showing average prices prevailing through-
out the shipping season on vegetables for a number of years. The following tabulation of simple, unweighted
jobbing price averages by months, beginning with January, 1926, and running to July 1, 1910, covering the
principal Florida vegetables, top quotations, in containers as shown, sold on the Jacksonville market, will
it is hoped meet the requirements of those interested in the data presented. This compilation of quotations
should be filed for future study and reference.
NEILL RHODES, Assistant Commissioner.

GREEN BEANS (Bushel Hampers)
1EAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $5.15 0 7.30 3.10 2.97 1.l 2.1.1 3.73 3.54 2.65 2.23 2.36
1927 5.36 6.22 3.60 2.16 1.63 2.41 2.56 2.36 2.5. 2.40 1.63 1.7,
1928 4.40 5.07 3.59 2.61 1.57 1.60 2.17 3.61 4.23 3.50 3.32 2.52
1929 3,51 2.62 2.51 2.20 1.10 1.27 2.33 3.02 2.s0 2.55 2.74 2.25
1930 2.93 3.02 4.10 3.56 1.5 1.21 2. 7 2.37 2.71 1.58 1.55 2.85
1931 4.82 4.05 3.90 2.55 1.52 1.33 2.95 1.!.5 1.93 1.93 1.51 1.50*
1932 1.66 2.29 3.05 3.49 1.50 .70 1.27 2.o04 2.01 1.36 1.8S 2.99
1933 2.05 1.54 1.70 1.29 1.71 2.11 2.S9 1.05 1.41 2.24 1.18 .99
1934 1.51 1.91 2.01 1.85 .9.r .6r r 2.07r 2.44r 1.7 r 1.36r 2.12 2.31
1935 5.33 2.36 1.60 1.68 .78 1.0 1.51 1.59 1.93 2.35 1.65 3.12
1936 2.2 1.1 1.01 1.92 1.25 1.19 1.59 1.2, 1.2.1 1.00 1.27 1.25
1937 1.24 2.32 2.62 2.16 1.46 1.1t 1.31 1.56 1.67 1.76 1.84 1.95
1938 1.80 1.3 1.37 .84 .61 1.10 .s5 1.65 2.01 1.55 .81 .9s
1939 1.31 1.67 2.60 1.43 .67 .96r 1.61r 1.llr 1.19r 1.59r 1.79 1.95
1940 1.98 3.94 5.22 1.98 1.15 1.1s
CELERY (Crates)
1926 $4.58* 5.03 5.04 3.66 5.07* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1927 3.25* 2.55 2.73 2.54 2.86* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 2.63* 2.25 2.61 2.74 4.20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 1.90* 1.85 2.24 2.85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1930 3.04 2.65 2.43 3.14 4.04 3.69* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1931 2.,8 2.98 2.62 2.30 2.76 3.5*" 0 0 0 0 0 0
1932 2.48 2.59 2.92 3.38 2.20 2.17 0 0 0 0 0 0
1933 2.17 1.37 1.44 1.20 2.24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 1.92 1.37 1.42 1.74 2.09 3.6"8 0 0 0 0 0 0
1935 2.82* 2.67 2.2' 2.34 2.90 3.35* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 2.81 2.22 1.91 2.58 2.91 3.03* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 2.12 1.91 2.74 2.00 1.90 2.66 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 2.13 1.51 1.47 1.59 1.89 2.67* 0 0 0 0 0 2.53*
1939 2.11 1.45 1.77 2.68 1.83 2.21* 0 0 0 0 0 2.42*
1940 2.02 2.61 2.14 1.52 2.92 4.05*
OKRA (Bushel Hampers)
1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 3.96 1.-6 1.95 1.,0 2.02 3.05 4.68
1927 0 0 0 7.19' 4.70 2.06 1.33 1.13 1.12 1.35 1.94 2.01
1928 0 0 0 5.10 4.66 2.76 1.29 1.77 1.49 2.28 2.72 4.02
1929 0 0 0 4.34 2.79 1.5 5 1.5 1.08 1.31 2.26 2.80 3.05
1930 0 0 1.05 4.70 5.20 2.95 1.29 1.26 1.17 1.14 2.25 3.34
1931 3.76' 3.42 3.93 4.14 4.38 3.01 1.42 1.18 1.37 1.53 2.42 2.46
1932 2.97 3.28 4.04 3.95 3.31 1.50 .91 .94 .99 1.40 1.73 3.45
1933 3.10 3.58 3.54 3.37 2.68 1.91 .83 .74 .90 1.22 2.11 2.80
1934 2.75 2.95 3.19 3.16 3.10 1.53 1.10 .9 .96 .91 2.11 2.77
1935 0 0 0 0 2.20 1.04 .86 .81 1.16 1.75 1.82 2.35
1936 3.30 3.13 3.54 3.01 3.21 1.74 1.00 1.02 1.03 1.18 1.69 2.94
1937 2.53 2.90 0 3.52 3.47 1.94 1.03 1.01 1.39 1.84 2.74 0
1938 0 0 0 3.33* 2.40 1.45 .84 .97 1.19 1.49 1.42 1.76
1939 0 0 3.33 3.47 1.82 1.0- .7 .93r .90r 1.14 2.18 2.50
1940 2.68 3.39 4.63 3.04 3.57 2.40
RED BLISS POTATOES (Bushel Hampers or Crates)
1926 $ 0 0 0 3.34 2.50 0 0 0 0 0 0
1927 0 0 4.07* 2.62 1.60 2.35 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 0 2.50 3.10 3.04 2.20 1.3S 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 0 2.92* 1.89 1.23 1.51 1.75* 0 0 0 2.49* 2.33
1930 2.33 2.94 2.7' 2.63 2.15 1.8S 1.59 1.47 1.46 0 0 0
1931 2.02 2.04 2.28 2.48 1.27 .97 .87 0 0 0 0 0
1932 1.71 1.92 1.87 1.98 1.98 1.18 1.22 1.36 1.38 1.47r 1.29 1.35
1933 1.67 1.66 1.49 1.52 1.05 .99 1,69r 2.33r 2.lSr 1.92r 1.85 1.78
1934 1.70 1.74 1.47 1.50 1.21 .87r .Sr .86r .90r .90r 1.63 1.IS
1935 1.51 1.61 1.43 2.02 1.14 .98 .99 1.04 1.34 1.39 1.75 2.11
1936 2.17 1.81 1.53 1.66 1.27 1.83 1.76 0 0 0 2.14 1.71
1937 1.77 1.65 1.72 1.77 1.47 .94 1.06 1.13 1.15 1.35 2.12 1.81
1938 1.75 1.1 1.12 1.17 .84 .92 .98 1.17 1.10 1.00' 1.59 1.62
1939 1.38 1.31 1.61 1.82 1.01 .91 1.42r 1.87r 2.09r 2.17r 1.83 2.04
1940 1.68 1.63 1.98 1.85 .97 .94






LIMA BEANS (Bushel Hampers)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 2.73 2.10 2.24 2.37* 0 0 0
1927 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.15' 1.92 2.09 0 0 0
1928 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.09* 1.87* 0 0 0 0
1929 0 0 0 0 2.25* 1.69 1.75 2.78* 0 0 0 0
1930 6.19* 5.17' 3.59* 5.11* 4.33* 2.92 1.83 2.61 2.18 1.87 2.25 4.87
1931 5.55* 6.58 6.12 4.96 4.16 2.22 2.18 1.80 1.84 2.01 3.12 3.19
1932 3.70 3.69 4.19 4.94 3.32 1.33 1.19 2.10 2.02 0 3.10' 4.57*
1933 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.06 .99 1.51 1.93 2.12' 0
1934 2.90 2.98 2.45 2.44 2.73 1.37 1.77 1.85 1.61 1.34 2.22* 4.98*
1935 4.16* 0 0 3.53 2.78 1.16 1.04 1.15 1.65 1.68 2.44 4.83
1936 4.21 3.92 3.02 2.97 2.61 1.43 1.54 1.60 2.03 0 3.39 3.48
1937 3.16 3.37 3.92 3.31 3.21 2.06 1.29 0 0 0 0 3.36
1938 3.53 3.54 2.30 2.16 1.60 1.45 1.07 2.42* 3.01 3.72* 3.29* 3.50
1939 2.56 2.06 2.52 2.32 1.39 1.08 2.03r 2.31r 2.99r 0 4.90* 3.86
1940 3.23 4.53 5.19 3.92 2.75 1.44
BEETS (Per Dozen Bunches)
1932 $ 0 0 .66* .66 .47 .44 0 0 .62 .67 .73* .66*
1933 .51 .46 .41 .35 .36* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 .73 .64 .60 .56 .45 .38 .59 .83 .77* .68' .80 .75
1935 .75 .66 .65 .49 .42 .44' 0 0 0 0 0 .64*
1936 .63 .5S .53 .41 .42 .42* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 .62 .45 .15 .48 .46 .53 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 0 .53 .53 .45 .40 .40* 0 0 0 0 .76*
1939 0 .66 .50 .4.45 .46 0 0 0 0 0 .62'
1940 .65 .76 .61 .51 .45 .40'
PEPPERS (% Bushel Crates)
1926 $4.48 5.28 6.33 4.83 4.64 3.87 1.83 1.65 1.76 2.58 2.42 3.19
1927 1.36 4.97 3.59 2.28 2.65 1.96 2.18 2.04 1.63 1.65 1.66 1.49
1928 2.29 3.53 3.20 2.71 2.52 2.21 1.90* 2.51 2.75 2.55 4.22 7.21
1929 6.17 2.89 2.06 2.10 2.27 1.58 1.61 1.96 2.17 2.78 3.24 4.61
1930 4.75 4.63 4.10 3.34 2.73 2.27 1.75 1.82 1.95 1.84 1.70 2.07
1931 2.16 2.40 3.01 2.97 2.75 2.60 1.17 .79z .89z 1.35 2.10 2.21
1932 1.88 2.08 2.37 3.36 0 0 0 0 0 1.04 1.08 1.64
1933 1.28 1.07 .83 .R1 .76 .67 .35 .52 1.07 1.60 1.47 1.82**
1934 1.12 2.00 2.14 1.75 1.51 .83 1.11 1.09r 1.10r 1.05r 1.24 1.55*"
1935 2.28 3.37 1.72 2.37 1.61 .91 .61 .79 1.32 1.64 1.72 2.26"
1936 2.38 1.78 2.16 1.20 1.01 .81 .,7 .83 1.04 1.01 1.11 1.52
1937 1.31 1.11 1.64 1.62 2.19 1.70 .74 .83 1.09 1.10 1.55 2.03
1938 193 1.98 1.56 1.14 1.02 .80 .45 .88 .97 .91 1.02 1.19
1939 1.47 1.26 2.06 1.82 .87 1.38 1.35 .99r 1.10r 1.22r 1.94 1.85
1940 1.61 1.11 8.44 6.44 5.34 1.67
SQUASH (Yellow, Crates)
1926 $5.31 0 7.36 5.55 4.05 1.17z 1.77z 1.89z 1.98z 2.06z 2.00z 1.71z
1927 2.13z 6.87 5.77 3.45 1.22* 0 0 2.25' 2.02 1.29 1.73 1.41
1928 5.05 5.50 4.46 1.39z 1.30z 1.43z 1.63z 0 0 3.15z 2.21z 2.30z
1929 2.88 2.93 2.99 1.36 1.21 1.35 2.42 2.61 1.54 1.99 2.62 2.59*"
1930 2.64 3.71 3.62 3.48 1.72 .84 2.45 1.76 1.23 1.30 1.42 2.71**
1911 4.14 4.32 4.14 2.75 1.40 1.36 2.46 1.61 1.48 2.24 2.60 2.64
1932 3.07 3.11 3.28 1.85 .95 .73 1.90 1.78 2.04 .99 1.49 2.37
1933 2.40 1.73 1.86 1.30 1.69 1.28 .89 1.20 1.88 1.98 1.25 1.30
1934 1.88 2.30 2.70 1.96 .78 .94 2.36 2.16 1.19 1.11 2.54 2.63
1935 6.48 4.33 1.45 1.21 .68 .76 1.13 2.08 2.53 2.92 2.33 3.35
1936 3.27 2.78 3.26 3.31 1.65 1.35 1.61 1.35 1.20 1.52 2.10 2.70
1937 1.99 3.27 3.42 2.20 1.36 .82 1.36 2.28 2.30 1.59 1.60 2.66
1938 2.80 2.35 1.15 .79 .57 .71 .99 1.56 1.88 1.06 1.43 2.98
1939 2.08 2.96 3.17 1.45 .72 1.12 1.40r 1.79r 1.04r .81 1.95 1.47
1940 2.36 5.40 5.13 1.48 .74 .70
CARROTS (Per Dozen Bunches)
1932 $ 0 0 .75* .71 .56 .50 .75* .69 .64 .67 .62' .59
1933 .43 .38 .37 .33 .32 .38' .56 .66 .68 .63 .62 .68
1934 .70 .60 .50 .49 .42 .37 .46 .56 .57 .54 .59 .69
1935 .61 60 .53 .45 .36 .42 .49 .55 .58 .56 .57 .66
1936 .61 .51 .47 .39 .38 .44* .46 .61 .60 .58 .51 .47
1937 .47 .45 .44 .43 .44 .57 .75 .55 .50 .51 .53 .55
1938 .63 .43 .42 .39 .39 .39 .47 .51 .52 .58 .61 .58
1939 .52 .44 .43 .40 .40 .40 0 0 0 0 0 0
1940 0 .50* .37 .41 .40 .38'
SPINACH (Bushel Hampers or Crates)
1933 $ .73 .56 .63 .65 .66 .60* .57 0 1.04' 1.45 1.32 1.09
1934 .75 .78 .85 .78 .61 .56 0 0 0 .99 .91 1.14
1935 1.19 1.07 .89 .82 .55 .50 .79 1.28 1.53* 1.48 1.22 1.27
1936 1.16 .82 .63 .78 .96 .91 1.06 1.41* 1.37' 1.19' 1.03 1.22
1937 .82 .68 1.13 1.03 .73 .64 .65 1.01 1.10 1.27 1.17 1.26
1938 .95 1.04 .83 .60 .74 .70 .95 1.18 1.11 1.08 1.12 1.08
1939 .94 .80 .85 .78 .72 .82r 1.OOr .90r 1.02 1.12r 1.16r 1.04
1940 1.03 1.46 1.04 .78 .77 .75







EGGI;PLANT (1a Hsthel Cratl)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR APR. MAY J'N. JUL AUG(. SEP. (KT. NOV. DEC
1926 $3.-3 0 :..0 :.... 0 43 1.91 1.991 2.2' 2.11 2.90 3.31
1927 :3., 4.77 4.,1 3,116 2.65 2,2 0 1.72 1.71 1.6i 2.04 1.711
11128 2.69 2,167 2,7s 2,11 2.06 2.,2. 1.52 2,0s 1.s1 ;1.1i 1.21 3.03
11211 1.3: 4.:I 2.61 2,2r, 2.15 I.a 1.741 I.7 2.15, 1.73 2.03 2.72
19:10 2. 22.01 2.60 2.W'. 2...6 2.12 1.94 1.0'i. 1.63 1.41 1.77 2.17
1931 2.22 207 2.71 272 1.94 1.l.' 1.03 .-I 1.03 1to 1.29 11;
1932 0 1:7 1.1 10 1.13 ." 0 0 .-3 1 .93 12
I'33 1.33 1 I 1.43 :.. .6 .63 .: 2 1.31 1 .1
1931 1.21 1 ;22 1.2;. 1.0. .T7 7. .77 *.Or 1.17r ..r 1.03 1 12
193. 2.2, 2;I 1.., 1.10 1.03 1 11 .63 1.23 1.i1 1.-4 1.,
1931 1.36 1.3:1 1.71 .;11 1.06 .92 .0 .7 .77 ,*0 5 1.111
11:17 .92 101 1.10 1.211 1.20 .11 .6:1 .71 1.561 1,70 1.6 1,7i1
1113I 1,115 1,71 1.:5 1.33 1.06 I .19 .r2 .91 I.11 .97 .117
19:19 .99 .99 1.11 .97 .7. .72 .90 .90r 1.01 1.37 1,11;
1940 1.3: 2 12 1 29 I "'.' 2.3 2 10
('I'C'MBERS Iuhekl Basketri
1926 ; 2' 0 0 ".* 1.-6 1 .1 1.69 0 0 .1 3.41 3 7
1927 1.20 0 ..67' i.uo 1.43 1.,7 1.36 1.91 2.56 ..u, 2. 0 2 .4
192 0 0 2.2 1. 0 3 0 0 I:.11 2.7:1 3.12.
1129 0 0 3.50 2.1 1.42 1.73 2.73 1.10 2.70 2.'1 2. 9 2.71
11111 31.71 2.,1101 1, l 2.69 1,01 21 271 2 1 .3 2,.:11 2.2.1 2,.,1
19:11 3.112 ..11 1.51 1.7:12.0 1,0:1 2.00 1,S7 2.27 0 0 II
193:2 4 I'0 .'2 3.: 9 I.'. 1.93'* .7 0 0 0 1 60 2.29r 3.1t,
1933 0 0 .1.7- 11 1.69 0 I.3 r .62r 1.92r I .r 1.39 1.7;
1931 1.99' 3 1'." 1 I 7. 1.'7 *;r r 2 Ir 2.3-r ; 0.,r 2.26 '***
I39, 0 0 3.*3 2:. .. .71 1.32 1 : 2.41 2. 2.U7 2 1
1936 2.10 1:' 4 ;.2 31 1 1...7 1 0' 1.11 1 ,0 1.56 1 20 1.4' '
1;:17 ;3. 1 4.. 3.l.7 2.1:. 2.3' .'i7 1.06 1..":. 2.0' 2 1", 2.27 2 ,
19113 :1.33 1,16; 1,:0 1.,2 1.24 1.1100 1.413 1,'.l 2.h0 1.7- 1.49 2.0l
111311 3.11 :1.77 31.73 2,211 1.06 1.lllr 1.57r 1,7Tir 2.24r 1.67r 1, 0 2i.1l
1910 3.31 3:l.97 3.S.5 3.112 2 13 1.22
G(;IEEN PEAS dliu.hel Ilampers)
196 11.36 17 3'.1 310 0 0 0 00 0 0 2 1
19:7 3.'.6 0 .'.-2 1 1 '.' ..v .0 .90 1 u 0 1
112 3.1 3..1 -1 .0 0 ; 17 0 0 0 0 3.43* 2
1929 3 03 1 .', -.2.13 2. 2.23 U 1.03* .!.7 0 0 0 2.
1930 2.7,. 2.:.' 3.23 2.97. 2.21' 0 0 0 0 0 2.7' 2.7-
111:1 1.111 2,06 2.77 1.71 1.51 II 0 II 0 1 3.09 2,1.
111:2 2.f1 2 2.:11 2,.0 2,07 1.61 0 0 0 0 0 2.54r 2,421
193:1 1.6 2.10 2.14 1.il 0 4I 0 II 0 II 2.34 1:9
1931 1.31 1.4.0 1.11 1.'.1 1.33 0 0 0 0 0 0 ;l.2.
197 2.'~9 1'.0 1 1.70 2 3 0 0 0 0 o 2.67 2 -
193t I 1.10 1.-1 1' 1.39 0 0 0 1.77 1 1
1937 1.26 ;.13 3.30 I.-.' 1.41 1.61' 0 0 0 0 3.1-" 2 1
193 1.-u 1.&.0 1.7 .7 0 0 0 0 0 00 1. 6r 3.11.
19319 2.00 1.-. 2.19 1.9i .*1' 0 0 0 0 0 2.53 I.2
11111 1.14 ;1.2t, 2.19 1.1h6 1,19 0
STIlAW IIIOItES (Crates, Quarts or P'lIs)
1926 $ .73 ..* .11 .: .2I2 0 0 0 0 I 0 4
1927 .63 .'1 .23 .13 0 It. 0 0 0 0 0 "
19 0 .12 0 0 rl0 0 u 0 u
192' .1" "1 .1 1' .7 0 qt. 0 0 0 u 0 0
1930 .31 .12 .21 .1 .0; .I'. qts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1931 .33' .;3 .31 .:i .09 07' 193.12 .1 .2 .21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 II
191 11 ,1 .11 15 ,11 0 II qil4 0 0 0 0 0 (I
1934 .23 .2. 1', .21 12' .0S* 0 .II 0 0 0 II 0 II
1935 .1 .11 .13 .0. .03 I plt* 0 0 0 0 0
1936 0 11 .12 .". .03 0 pti 0 I u 0 0 )
1937 r.'* 0.,I .12: 0.,'; ..', 0 1., 0 0 0 0 0 0
193% 0 .10 .10 .0.00; 0 pts 0 0 0 0
1939 .12 .M:' .1 .07 .0." I lL.t 0 0 0 0 0 0
1940 .1' I .14* .0' .06 0 I.iL
CAIIIIAGE (Contnlineri oe foolnlte)
19211 $:1.02: 2.0.;,z 2.1222 L.HI 2.5. :12'.'2. l.09c 0 0 II 0 II
1.27 1. I:z 1.1 I 1.21z 2.22c 2.1 :c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
192. 1.26: 1 i 1.19: 1 **. 1..3: It 1. 0 0 0 0 I
191. 1.14: I It .I'z 7.1 2.15c 2 00 0 0 0 (0 0 0
1930 1.10: I l. 1.39: 1 l. 1.12: 127 0 0 00 0 1.01: 0.
1931 1.0l .'i .-'z O .71T I..1 0 0 0 o 1.572 ..'
1932 .70d ,; .73d .'2 .66d .013 .52d .43d .33d 1.,.3a .62d .l4.4
:1:1 .27d f2II .66d .72id 0 0 3.22a 2.l a 1.91a II .90d ,N, I
111i4 .48I 1 .,11 .139 .17.1 .911d ,174 1.201a 1.Nl)n 1.45. 1.10.,1 1.75in 1.6111
19:15 1.13u 2,7.a :.39a 31.2011 I.61a 1.2 1n 1.35na 112o 1.22a 1.211t 1i.5n 1,7.i/.
1936 1.702a 1.I .9-a2 1.00aa OOa 2.11i* ..55a :.N14 2.56a 1.7in 1.53a t.,',.
1937 .77a .70a .97a .7a 1.63a 1.61 1.24a I 42a 1.26a 1..3a 2.15a 22 .'
13. 1. 76 1.9'2a .97a .7- .7a I OT7 1.01a 1.17a 1.6. 1.34. 1.21a 1 '.'
1932 .9a ..,a 1 622 2 30a .99a 1.32r 1.72r .r3r 1.43r 1.'.7 1.9.a I V.,.
1910 1.33. 1..4 ..*6 1.07* 1.15a 1.33'*






TURNIPS (Per Dozen Bunches)
TEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC.
132 $ 0 0 .66' .57 .43 .11 0 0 .61 .52 .39 .39
1.33 .32 .36 .40 .34 .33" 0 0 0 0 .67* .56 .42
1934 .34 .57 .59 .46 .29 .34* 0 0 .55* .46 .42 .58
1335 .59 .55 .44 .40 .41 .46 .55 .55 .56 .75 .51 .53
1936 .55 .56 .47 .41 .44 .42 .53 .60 .50 .60 .52 .51
1337 .26 .40 .48 .56 .58 .59 0 .70" .85 .83 .69 .64
133. .59 .60 .48 .37 .34 .56* .53' .65 .82 .76 .55 .61
1939 .69 .63 .75 .71 .61 .45 0 .Mr* .64r .60r .51 .42
1940 .53 .7s .72 .47 .40 .43
CAULIFLOWER (Crates)
1933 $1.49' 1.60' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 2.00 2.19 2.43* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.01'
1935 1.92 2.01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 1.25' 2.05* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 1.81 2.15* 1.69' 1.5,; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.35'
1938 1.10 1.22 1.10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.29'
1939 1.52 1.48 1.61' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.50"
1940 1.55 1.81' 1.66* 1.33' 0 0
TOMATOES (Crates)
1926 $5.31 5.51 5.25 4.31 4.69 2.83 2.24 0 0 2.81 2.75' 6.50'
1927 5.65 3.70 3.13 2.24 2.06 1.68 2.09 2.26 1.92 1.90 0 3.85'
:928 3.03 2.83 4.45 3.2; 2.2, 1.82 1.88 2.S1 2.68 0 3.25* 2.92
1929 2.07 1.73 2.32 2. 2 2.45 1.4 3 2.36 2.46 2.47 2.16 3.43* 3.74*
1930 4.26 3.65 2.89 2.62 3.13 2.35 1.91 2.00 2.59 2.20 2.19 2.9"
1931 2.36 2.31 2.87 3.16 2.81 1.30 1.50 0 0 0 3.09 3.48
1932 2.59 1.96 1.87 1.59 2.12 2.03 .01/ .047/ .04'!/ .04!,/ .04.l/ .05/
1933 .05/ .04 // .04/ 1.96 1.71 1.79r 1.51r 1,64r 2.01r 2.40Or 2.19r 2.37
1931 2.35 2.02 1.82 2.58 2.24 1.45r 1.72r 2.00r 1.89r 2.12r 2.75 2.69
1935 3.3:1 1.25 3.83 2.63 1.S7 1.32 1.41 1.41 1.83 2.53 2.38 3.13
1936 2.21 2.75 3.38 3.69 2.54 1.34 1.62 1.87 1.87 1.83 1.91 1.96
1937 1.92 1.9s 2.40 2.88 2.45 2.06 1.23 1.40 2.04 2.31 3.69 3.40
1938 2.44 2.25 1.49 1.69 1.31 1.01 .96 1.21 1.73 1.66 2.69 3.25
1939 3.68 2.88 3.26 3.51 2.95 1.78 1.60r 1.42r 1.60r 2.13r 3.36 3.13
1940 3.01 4.06 4.00* 5.38 3.74 .90
GREEN CORN (Crates or Dozen Ears)
1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 2.37' 1.62* 0 0 crates
1927 0 0 0 0 2.55 2.23 1.38 1.25 0 crates
1928 0 0 0 0 2.94' 1.39 .18 .25 0 crates- dozen ears
1929 0 0 0 .33 .23 .21 .19 .18 0 dozen ears
1930 0 0 0 5.24 2.58 .29 .19 .23 0 crates dozen ears
1931 0 0 0 .39 .23 .17 .21 .24 0 dozen ears
1932 0 0 0 0 .36 .16 .10 .13 0
1933 0 0 0 .32 .25 .18 .1. 0 0
1934 0 0 0 .33 .27 .18 0 0 0
1935 0 0 0 .32' .20 '/ .10 .12 .17 0
1936 0 0 0 .27* .25 .15 .16 .20 0
1937 0 0 0 0 .28 .21 .14 .18 0
1938 0 0 0 .28 .21 .11 .13 .16 .18
1939 .28 .25 .29 .34 .22 .11 .16r .19r .20r'* .270
1940 .25 0 0 0 .27" .14
SWEET POTATOES (100 lb. Sacks)
1926 $3.00 3.60 3.63 4.68 4.91 0 0 4.17* 3.4.1 2.94 2.20 1.93
1927 2.68 2.41 2.20 1.90 1.00 0 2.98* 2.49 1.93 2.02 1.56 1.05
1928 1.84 1.88 2.36 2.32 2.63 3.00 3.32 4.14 3.07 2.45 2.00 2.01
1929 2.59 2.75 2.73 2.75 2.75 0 3.48 2.35 2.00 2.13 1.92 1.75
1930 1.77 2.00 2.00 2.26 2.35 2.47 3.31 3.S4 2.74 1.90 1.90 1.89
1931 2.15 2.37 2.58 3.27 3.69 4.15 3.83 2.75 1.87 1.62 1.56 1.59
1932 1.73 1.75 1.88 2.03 2.07 1.95 2.07 1.22 .97 .87 .77 .70
1933 .73 .74 .80 .76 .87 .96 1.94 2.20 1.31 1.07 .91 .94
1934 1.13 1.36 1.41 1.62 2.24 3.29 3.32 2.11 1.35 1.09 .98 1.03
1335 1.10 1.25 1.55 1.53 1.62 1.89 1.83 1.40 1.04 .98 .86 1.09
1936 1.17 1.50 1,50 2.00 1.61 2.33 3.92 3.25 2.05 1.41 1.31 1.28
1937 1.37 1.49 2.05 2.48 3.04 3.00 1.93 2.08 1.49 1.20 1.13 1.40
1938 1.57 1.65 1.72 1.94 1.86 1.94 2.31 1.38 .97 .99 .99 .96
1939 1.11 1.08 1.06 1.55 1.68 1.72 1.81 1.60 1.22 1.09 1.04 1.17
1940 1.26 1.50 1.55 1.61 1.80' 1.73

*Part month.
** Hampers for years 1933-193,1-1935 for Peppers: 1929-1930 for Squash.
r Southern offerings.
z Hampers.
c Crates.
d Per dozen heads.
a Per hundred pounds.
/ In lugs per pound basis.







PLANTING TABLE FOR FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS

FLOIIA II 0OWER FiOR MAY

General Instructions for the commercial l Irnduction of cgetablle Crops

All truck crops listed in this table are produced in commercial quantities by Florida farmers. Such crops as beets, turnips, radishes,
spinach and cantaloupes, which are grown mainly for local markets in this state, are not listed,
Because of the wide range in Florida climatic atin soil coalnitions, the rules fort grIting one croi in the Southern part of the state do not
always apply to growing thle same crop in the Ccnntral or Northerl sections of the state, HIece, the information and suiggstions given in this
table are of only a general nature, anil must lIb properly interpreted when applied to various local conditions,
REFERENCES: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, (aincsvillc; Florida State Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee; P, H, Rolls'
"Sub-Tropical Vegetable Gardening;" antd William Gomme, County Agricultural Agent,


CIO1' I'ri tipll Viaietiis iliv io Soil
Ilr(.l ii ililpil


Il Fe r ,,
Block Oalentine
Wanrdwll's iil ne w m
IIBANS New Davis Wlile wa
Grnci n11t IYello
lBountiful
Forlliouk
Lima

IA le recy Wakefidl
ChI:irlistonW t llkt i
CAlIllAGB I'remiin ilal Dulch
SCititbiligoi
|I~t]IB|I|II;(II


Il wownll

quality
I lloi li

luck

rilcH, Illit d
quality


Amountii
Sil I'tt
ATre




i ik II
I lI.


Ilib
fr Ictienrl
ior 2 aers


tll' i to A ntoill lli D ys to I ST
P'lnt F rtilizer ature I Yiel
Arre




Sept, t Alipil 0( ti1,000 11 IImm
uc l t ler i, ier ; 70 Iys
vor'itit I Ce lle


Octof cr to
OFiltitry


1,"10 to
2,000 Ih,
pet icra


Il10 to 1 i0 1 5 to
iltoy I Crates siil


t1ATED l) t
Cot Per i Api rtllios
allrin e ow
Acre


Rloadl' market for
late fallt ail
i10 o to ,l ft, priln crop, In
Isi to i Sooth Ili ridl fall
Imose il well,


spring crop
3ty 1i| ft, ltirigsll goil
rettir is


lrtS1 Tli n hin llumck July to Sept. This crop mlt
CELERY lat W l oz, S' t I ier acre if io 00 00 to y I inc, c refullyp hnrled
C 1 i Tp 1 Se it to Jan, l orif crates l0 e. for elte l
Ey lching 'ell drained nece """ ul,

Impron l d il1 iiite Spine lloi ck 000 .to 1 to 0 to crop to
CUCUMDEBS t DVis Perf et Flat Wiood, 2 to 3 hi Setl. to March l|i, per (lyas cake 100 I by Itl gross, giod
Stay Green el'd-draind acre market,
Hammock; Flat
G lack Bleauty wel. Jan, nd Fe.il 20 l00 Good profiable
EG T Florida Higiush drint; line 6l spring rop cr teo s I y 3 yt shipping crop.
good quality, y, al crop tetdy markait,


1
.- ------~-------- ---------- -


I


S I






Ilig Boston
IEYrUCE Cream Buler
lomaine
I((WB


I I
iii li i p t, J a, 0 lbs. 0 6 00 l to li
Flt IiWoods Per e cter
aill'ilndrain


Crystal Wax ILo fammock 1 c Ii
ONIONS IWite ermnd It l aiI Wols, il cI
Mustralian B rown ll r i., i, sI
101 Bermudilln


Iluck
Alaor Exrin i ,lrly iiai rk, Flat
I:NUSH Thn m as Liita o hih l
PEA. Florida MNeil .y
Telephone I uli


Si el. 1t T c s,t Lrn 0 120 I las,
t per acire


tl00 )Ill 00
Sept, to Mlarch Ill. per 1 ly
iere lhiniiers


lsim will rooted
0t nti e manure
t00 Ii O ircli, Nitrate
cra ts il3 Il y ; in, coli aln be used
within mturing
100 Ii, to acre,


iSoil mut not ie
I t, y I rin, I8+T, lnoculalion
of odnl advisabUe,


RIuby KinL 1lat Wlodls July to Oct,
IEIPERS Worl Bci llleaiiii ck; Pi ne, I: Il full crop: t he. 1 t. 10 200
R bll Ciant gooiiil quality, Ini, nii Fe. iIn'r re lly
__p____ _rl crop


Flat Woods
POTATOES StI"ulding I11e 'I well'lrained
Irish) liss Triumph Halindiek
Irgah Cobblr Ill ck

Inorto Rico
Ilig Stem Jergey Iile lam
0TATOES Triumph Sildy Flat
ITOweti Norton Yam Woodi
Sancy Hall

STRAW. Missionary Flt WIll+
IIERRIES lonldyke Ilnimaok


Adams' Early
SWBET COlRN Ciroby's Early
Stowell's Ev'erreen
Country Gentlleman


Livinilon Glie
Marlilo
Stone
TOMATOES Enrlinea
Illauty
linny Ite
Norton

WVAT'fR 'I'lTm WatIoin
iiLONS i:hlridla hiviorit
Iril Gray
StLne luntlin


i
-u1kA: Flont
ollslllk



PrIirier Ilam.


lii


Iept, fall crop ],100 lhi, to
Nto, iBl March 2,000 lbs, 9 llas 0 bbl,
spriig crop per acre


Slii, inr l re
Ilrll n

Sinirc lon,
oll! in, log, 1
11,i100 clon


tl July


Q00 to 1,000
II,. per 12a iln 100 ti
acre 200 Bi,


'1:1 crati :i f. ly Di in GoCil fall shipping


-reat eed before
hpluting, Be pre.
I, fi in, by parle to dunt or
12 12 in, spray with bor.
S idnuX prepara.


J i t, I cy in, Allow 10,000 slipi
tic er,


,1100 lics, Inr table manure
o Nov, lur 100 15110ol0 $ t ito if possible in ad.
SNon i, Nitrate (0 lois 2 000 ti, $250 11, I by 1 in, dlitin to commer.
ier acre cial fertilizer,


3iO lI, plus
50 li, Ni.
Irate soda ;0 tio
At tassel, coys
aui pter
acrie


Run eed through
creolln solution to
i0 to i) kln on birds,
cra te i U in Ic b, I ne b
n te lead powder
to 6 Ik, hyrdratI
lime for lud worm,


nimock Mluck Septl, It Feb 1,100 1K to
Flat Woh s I I. ud July 1, 00 ls. $100
willdirainid per acre cratle



Fillt W I |i, Jainiry to |1,00 lb,I ;t tio i0 i carload
I'll March per acre iliui 2 ra


Good commercial
market for rint.
*I It l (t, ct las material,
Ietal market


Tret eed andl Ic
pretimra l to dust
10 Ily 10 ft, or ipray with
nicotine and bar.
iletux solution,


CilM drainage
S II mlemial and land
II ni i llo l not be
oar,






SPRAY CALNDI)AR OR SOME FLORIDA1 1'RLCK CIROPS


'rep ed b)' I, Ensig Ilorida E rinent Stalio

lFor filcrital Iroducl (Irol er


VEGETILE 10W AFFECTED


I'ESTS, CONTrlmI, M\EASIlf'l


Iutl t lit ub lian) iiir oif nlilw; repialt us
ilexelyqi .


Sipr or lit at iry iIt appi rante f the
Aitie of ( i l l wpray in wrm |Ie oat i, i a eek to te (la if new*.
f; B lk. ltoG il lnofa ,l


Cablbage c1n1l a:i rinoduitii', Aplhiul or plot n le' iintl,l


l i il ii ht,


Jl' lyI li kite lili g ll IilllR ,


Spotting l ad ligltiii f l lei' "'y anhrih n '
Spollin o fruit ad y I ,nnulr leaf ll
Iulrltrial,

Cuaumbee Delvourdl Ieales anid worm l in
fruit, 111 i ne t

Slunell anl uilirodutlive lilunl, Aplid or p|lut lie linseetl.


: r ent l nirt'ne (fi st

J.W.Sll hllt, dcu


":ipot ldust"' under coer oir hall first leo plant
11tt lbrome infelte, D)st waen arm and
bright,
iA lon i pfliiait 1 cot Ii in serlll n: eunliut
lit 1 11 y inl ii tl until tolery is biorddl,


Fir two bIorilnux aititolicitins of 14.5
:1.~; lldei al ruo.nd 0 I ri itregilth, Ileiin with aipparani of third led,
tkeux or i4 epnper-liirme lt, continuinli at f; lly intervals till bliarst i
over,
11;, lli:i I'.' msl aire fR ouI nd on uer
ll I, naro te i f lill to 0 sidle of le (, I'bhi inot the ticklie-worm for
lfbfin o(f|pray, whicl ia train erlT11A ilat ir eltI,
1 lper rill ilitille (i or "Sit ilu t" tle firlt olalinci s ulo l ad rie r haol,
liuiilie suipiutle in llln lit Dint or rsprny fr Ieneal infestation as iltcn
rite of I Iprt to t, a nietanry for control.


itllo


,eaf ad atem light ilate Bliglt Ifungesl,

Curlie, sitleii l eri I A pill or pillit IIIOU (iieetl),


I,(leaf ptting,


SIe Il forde
'iinlnllw


ditto


ditlo ditto
biiin whei plnn b are 1. ines hiigh continue
11, for 1 to :i ilns t inter(llu iol iays,


uiKiilm e,


Cercoipurn leaf qil or I'td lIrop .I 10 Boreaux,
IM A lu,),


Sae as for euntii lb,

Begin ilh finrt lae in sheI,
Repeat at weekly internal.


I'lilar y i llilew I llnsigus


1EN ''0 TREAT


lil mniirgi a ul :tiiil r led,


eI, .ri kr linct ll


IlF werr l o uilliihr,







SI ptting If lium l'i nnl iiull Nall1 ril '111 r t un1 u l,


l.4ii11 Ikiln'ux,


Illl lr 0 li ilwhn in t r well Ni l nl In sellil,
Itlrip l t i l y inerl all unlil hirte ,


Ia' dins ur, rtom-.ile in C: neir w,,rm C: tmlat m It l iad II,,nlt1. 10 b ., n wi t n 'ht f ol inf I tl, EI ml'm
IrL in Ie ii. ;jra) ion li ii IN 1 IBn.


Curled ail ilullo'if l amt,


SAhiil iir pla lt ijoi t lllill, ShilI' ii ftr cuIcutIri,


ho'1 am cucm lH'ti


Slittliri I an Illyhlting II Iarn,,
littlin of fruil Anthr lri funrgu,.


4.1.,o lloriltai


I lii r il lth i Ilrot alltparni II li eal e Iti
lrli, Reptll 'I ay Inrili u mian
lims as reiitr for mnttrol,


'"Spot diat ln" mea Inhr ilutDing of IhIre Ilan h er e anil thet iwh nftate n fe i ut gun. 1f) Ith uwe 1 a he l ri ier of mirl l or cloth the' nit(tine furmn
are reind In fnoerntratd firm wit h hiilr it i I lilntale ll kill i iin tit line iiloin lil Ih llor hI high t pli lpratiri ptro ailing si m II inro III viliatilit) of
Ili In I i, Il lII iiy slloille s 11 IIi uil'iil 1tliit lii 1111 I iil ll l n y l i ti' ti l liy J)llih l peitl iliiiln .,"

aNtpt for noitine dut Iu (Iiu int, the Ur of the lat fir nthe cntrll nl inset petl arid plant iliirn f Nltrk rilia ha not lhsn proIea Ii rllttlive Iquil
nrt it I ln inmllUma Ih uw dslt Ih lItn rto ppkp lnt It he liuid ita la the di d t be h lll phI more quickly ,
Ariat if l d ma I o uil fitr Alane t he strengths indicatd oar t ay e e wth oa r alb ua h i rmi it it ii ut wtit ItMiu the itllr ati ui ai
fliettive shirt.





SEASONS OF BEARING
The harvesting sti ons for the various craps vr ay si greatly owing to varying sla ns as to temle lnture and rainfall hat ni, dIrinit length t harvesting datls can be
given, The same crop will last m h longer when ilnlitil to dillerent daties, Dilferent vmari tif, of llie sami crop diltlir t length cf gathering lays, lBunch beans ln nat
bear as long as polel Ibraro, and] pole hIlllki' beans hear l I ing of all.
It will be noill that the nUnium r t days from planting to maturity varies mluh more in some trolps than in othetl Weather ail soil condition' are the rause in the
main if thee variations,

CROPS GROWN IN NORTH FLORIDA, I\HEN PLANTED AND HARVESTED:
NORTH FIOll(IA conmprises Allc'h iaker, llradllord, CalhoI n, Clay, Colauni Iliii Dual, EsItiaml I,, ll, Il ,I i. ( l in, Gilrhrist, (;llf, Hamilton, Hilnr is,
Jaksin, Jefferson, LatIf i tte, I ihertl Mlilinion, Nassai, Okaloaosa, I'utilnm, Santa RosaS, S1i hs, Sllh inn, ie, Taylor, i'nio, Walton, WisiliiOgton, Wllklklla Counties, Area,
11,1t,10i(h acres,
The numli alir erop indicates the number o(f dlys raeluired I to ii i',, ., or althering maturity if non-alile,

Vegetables When Plantld bhen Harvsted

Irish Potatoes .... ... January, February, March, Apri,, August, Stptember, Octdlbr .. 100 to 120
Sweet Potatoes ..... ..... April, May, June . 100
Cassava .... r..... ilh, April-a rooiit crop, NIo linlinite harvest late .. 18
Cucumbers .... February, March, April 64
Squash arch, April, May, August 60 to 80
''aiph October to February 65 to 8(1
Collards ....... ...... ...... January, February, March, Novemb(r 85
Lettuce ...... .. January, February, Septemn r,i October, November, Demler 75 to 83
'plj, i. tFebruary, March, \liil, l: i,.l 84
Beans ..... 1. 1hpI1, nl.. w .1 1, S 1 ni i 65
Peas IEnglishl Setptrmlbr, Otobler, February 45
Carrots F. February, arch 100
Parsnips February, Marih, April, October, November 125 to 160
Beets February, March, August, September, October, November 60
Brussels Sprouts ...... January, February, Septembtr, October, Novtember 90 to 120
',iu!ht!hv,'r .. January, Septemlbr, October 55
Onions .Jantuary, Fel)ruary, August, Sreptem r, 1, I;i 1, 'i:, lIa., DIecember 100
Okra )larch, April, May, August 60
Ralishes January, February, March, April, September, October, November, Deem er 27
Turnips January, February, arch, April, August, September, Octtli)r 45
Rutabaga February, March, April, August, September, October 50 to 80
Spinach ...... February August, September, October. 50 to (il6
Mustard September, October, February, larch 30
Tomatoes .. March, April, May, June, July, August 73 to 82
Parsley February, March, April 40 to 80
Kershaw...... March, April 15 to 180
Kale ....... March, September, October, November .... 90 to 12
Kohl-Rabi ....... AI. ..i Ai... 60 to 80
Leek ... .. January, February, September, October ...... 100 to 115






W ln I'lned


Jariijaryar, hrlrwry~r y i ra
fl I I Frs.
PeatI yrs.
Plum Vrs"I
P(,rsimmoun 1 rs
Fig to I Mrs.
Soltuma I tI II rs,
Waterrmelon 'Morirr, April S 111,v
Grapo I to yr,
(antaloupts
Fid (i h Crp
Corn I'llbruuty, Morcli, April to !IoII
C(otloii 1.1or, Apr~il 1
Penuls Iunh, April, June, July
Sug8arme FebruarF, ylirh
HOF
Tobancco M;Mrr, Ald 111 1 11
Jupan lover 1h1y, Jun, July
Carpet (riui YIiliih to uly
Surv u Beans Illrclh, April, IiqJu


L. ph tktler, FvI'nmler, Itteml e D
cowlu'us 111in'hl to July
HIlggrwend Mluy ti July
Kuflzu Iher, buorv, PlINVIV
(nMalaria Milt, Juli
Bkmuua Clasu (cIuih, April, %l,, Jun, JulF
SoF Beari
lorrio
Bluvlerliv I)enmber II Ihlirch ito21 I
Blakcberries Jaiiwry, Fllrwiry, MIoll to n'n.
Dralernies k;nnuaqr, Flrunry Mahrch t 2
Strawberries Mlay and June Svplemlr awl Rkr 1r June
Young Berries .\uemller 11)la% I r s.

I'aeclu lis Io Fvlcla lllml,
Tung Nut IDevmvber Io leiruarv I lo f ivs.


It'hrn lla'vstd





CROPS GROWN IN CENTRAL FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED AND HARESTID):

CENTRAL FLORIDA comprises Brevard, Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Levy, Marion, Orange, Osceola,
Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole, Sumter, Volusia Counties, Area, ,164,800 acres,
The number after each crop indicates the number of days required to reach edible maturity, or gathering maturity if
non-edible,

eelahles When planted When Harested

Brussels Sprouts ........... January, February, March, September, October, November 90 to 120
Beans .......... February, arch, September ........
Beets ......nuary, February, March, Septcmber, October, November 60
Cabbage ...anuary, Februar'y, October, November, Drcmbe .r .65 to 80
Cantaloupes ..... February, Mar ch . ... .......... 85
Casava ......... March, April 10 to 20011
Caulilower .........January (seedl; larch, June (seed); July, August, Septmbelr, October 55
Cucumber ...... .....pt emir to llarrth 6
Collards ............. .. ...... January, February, March, April, May, August, September, November, )Dcccmber 85
Celery ........... .. u (seed;July (seed); September to February 120 to 150
Dashens ........... llarc April.
S P4rl .Juuiarl, February (spring trop); July, (fall crop) 81
Escarole .... ...... c r to February 50 to 60
English Peas.... ........ September to Mlarch 62
Irish Potatoes ... ....... September (fall crop); Novemblr to March spring crop) 100 to 120
Kohl.abi ....... ..... Mr, April, August 60 to 8(
Kale ....... ........... Ferury, March, August, September, Octolor, November, D)cin' mbr 90 to 120
Leek ....... ..J....... January, February, March, Sept(cmber, October, December 100 to 115
Lettuce .....Jan.uary, February, September, ctobr, Novmber, Deccmbir 75 to 83
Mustard .... ..... ...J.anuary, February, Ilarch, April, August, September, Octolbr, Novlmbier
Onions January, February, Jarch, April, August, September, October, November 100
Okra ... ..... ... ,bruary, larch
Parsley ..... ..Februar, March, April, June, July ..0 t 80
Parsnips Fbruaryi March, April, Septembcr, October, Noember 125 to ill
Pumpkins .. May, June, July .. 150 to 18
Peppers ..... January, February, March (spring crop); July to October fall crop) 100 to 114(
Radishes ....... nuary, Febluary, March, April, September, October 28
Rutabagas ..... february, larch, September to December .. ....50 to 80
Tomatoes ......eptmber to larch, July 73 to 82
Turnips ........ ... lanuary, February, March, April, August, September, November, December 5







Oranges ......
Tangerines
] rijfrui
Lemons
Limes
Mangoes
Avocados
,Watermelons
Papaya
Guavas
Cantaloupes
Grapes


When Planted

December, January, February



........... .. September and October
l. lhrmb" and Oclober
January to March
February to Juna
.Octoblr, Novembi', February
February to Ilarch
January and February


Years to Production

Sto 6
Sto 6
Ito 6
3 to 5
3 to 5
Sto 6
Sto 6


12 to 15 mos,
2 to 4 yrs.
85
1 to 2 yrs. June anl July


Berries
Strawberries 11ay,, I jr. p' ihll1 I G.:11ld October


Decemlir to April


February, larch, April
.1,111u.1i (early); Flbruary, March, April
J.ll,,m ,, Novemblr, IDeember
J.iu.,; aind FIeruary


larch, April, May .
April to July
............. April, May, June
.......... .April, May, June
March, April, May
SMarch, April
April, May, June
...... .... January, February, October to IDcember
January, February, October to December
Octoberto January
........ April, May, June
November, December, January
January to March
January to March
March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October


Field Crops
Cotton ....
Corn
Oats
Sugarcane .
Hay (Native).
Shufas
Cowpeas
Sor m .....
Peanuts
Velvet Beans.....
Tobacco .....
Soy Beans .......
Rye
Rape ........
Vet h .......... ....
Beggar ',, .i
Kudazu
Napier Grass ...
Meeker Grass... .
Bermuda Grass
Nult
Tung Nut ...............
Pecans .........


1 to 6 vrs
1 to 6 yrs,


1511 to 180
i5 to 10


October and November
July and August
Oct,, Nov, Dec,

July, Aug., Sept,
July, Aug., Sept,
Sept., Oct., Nov.
June, July










October and November
October and Novemib


When Harvested

October to June
October to March
October to May
Depends on Variety
Depends on Variety
Juie, July
July to January
83 to 93


December, January, February
December and January ....














Beuus..... .
B mts............ .




Ca~g ......... .
(urruts ...

J1,0 11S~
Coullrds.....
Cuutaluupes

Egg Plrts...
English Phis
Irish Purtues




011iors...
hhgle



Pluruip
Puiukius
Rudishes


Slwee ?'u11li

Turuiys
Brucruli


Ygetables


.u... ........u.r., j b ruk ry Ph r Aprtilir, I d a'emb i
II ~ Ja8qtdor to kr6 I I . ....... . cmber .... .........
-........ tu1)or to l'.b. ..ury
...J..uury to Mild ......... .

hanvu ry, ( l);runqy Mhir6, August s qtmkr
.............. .... .... Jaueuar ic6m q, Augusr, &plomkii 0. 1 ,.!); Srtob
F .... ............ ..... .... ...... ......, il l~l:, 1;1:.1:1!, [ill~ nd~ l
Fdliuurey, 51 ~lh.
hnuury to April .. ....
Jruuury, Hbrugi (spiriqg mrp); July, August (fdIl a ...

Sov(6mbe to Mnrc6, (spriiig arqu Stoplr, f pll rup)
...uri. Fe.ru.ry, Sicf, August, &,ptombor, kltubr, NovmlJol
bmin,. Apdlril, August ... ....
.~................ ..... & ~Scl)e r to Jmuiti ......
hanq, Mai,6arc, August, Srppcomle, Oaokir, Nonlel, Nmkibllrh,4itml



Iair6, April, lqy, Juue, July
Fauai r nqrar, Mgr6b, &ptelvc, Moleb, Novoroler, N(6emb
August, NIvtmury, 5lu b,
. ......... ... .... .... ................. R rj,rvi, b 6rc kpril, Mqg, Juii, Jul, August, &eptcmker ...... ... ..
Jamuury, Flruury, Augusu, yuqmImr, kotlIea Nouumbr ... ..........
..p.. i April, MRy, JuHC, July..... ............ ............. .. .......................................
SSuqmkr to Fbruury; July for full mp ..... ....
hlm q to od r ... .........J..uuuury .u .ctub .i..


hen Harvested


65

90 to 120

65 to 80
75 to 90

55
85


6
100
10 to 140
150to 80
28
50 to 80
i to 80
50 to 60
100
78 to 82
45


wk P Ilaid~


_::: _


CROHS GROWN IN KOTH KIORIIA, WIHEN ?LANTD AND HARVEMSTD:

OUTH FLORIDA mompdo B Ironrrd Charlotto, 511kis, Ddoe, kk~oo, Gltdci, lrhoe, Hvndq, Highlabd, Infinn
Rivur, Uee, M~atu, Muiin, Mumro, OkebMbe, halm k6a, t. U& S, uc, Anre, 11,5,0 waaed






Wbhen Plntcd


ouogerioes .
I1o~lri
Grupef ril
kipfrfl .
Limos .


Nub iki
Avoordo Pers
Sopod lbs
]I1L'iq
5liomote
5oroooobsR
Cootoaoo}~*ol~El'to


I1~ 1ib dooool, ryri' Fobrosy
II II I
II I


":' TAm..
giiroory to Jooo



Gdoboo, Nooomboer, PI.'uer:ro'
...... .... or .......... .......
oooloos............ ..... ..o r
.... .. im .
melns... hai~r q alli P ,Iarw ......_ ........ ... .. ..... ..


oohPomp .o........... r.. Tri..


Ngikr .ss ........i. Tim..
8ormodo Gross iSccl) O~tlob
Corpet Gross (8cel) GObol~r
St. .Aogostil~c Gooss...... 8~ed)l a~ Tio
Coro Poos Sboooh ....... ato Joly
h1illot Fob o roory 00 do
Sog mr.o..........or......... B 'm ibr to A
Piolp . oost hg od Sa&


.... r~r....... .......


ne .. .. ..... ................... ..
00PliLe t

yiril
itomber


2 to Imo,


Nov, to April
..... 8 mos,


hnHarested


I to 6 irs,
3 to 6 yts
12to 68 ms,
31 to 15 5rs,
I to yrs,
12 to 18 yoo,
12 to 15 yos,
I to 6 yrs,

4 to 5 mos,
I to 8 yrs,
8 mos,




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