• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Introduction
 The citrus industry
 Non-citrus fruits and melons
 Vegetables
 Livestock
 Poultry
 Honey
 Value of livestock on Florida farms...
 Livestock and agricultural statistics...














Group Title: Bulletin New Series no.
Title: Bird's-eye view of Florida agriculture
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002929/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bird's-eye view of Florida agriculture
Series Title: <Bulletin> New Series no.
Physical Description: 15 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hiatt, S. W
Risher, F. W ( Francis Washington )
Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: <1941>
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Statistics -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: S.W Hiatt and F.W. Fisher.
General Note: "October 1941."
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Chiefly statistics from 1940-41 growing season.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002929
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002458455
oclc - 41560548
notis - AMG3804
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    The citrus industry
        Page 4
    Non-citrus fruits and melons
        Page 5
    Vegetables
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Livestock
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Poultry
        Page 10
    Honey
        Page 11
    Value of livestock on Florida farms and 1940 production, farm crops produced and value 1940
        Page 12
    Livestock and agricultural statistics by counties
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
Full Text
etin No. 86
New Series
October. 1941
Bl RD'SEYE VIEW
OF
FLORIDA AGRICULTURE
S. W. Hiatt and F. W. Fisher




IXTRODICTIO.X
This Bulletin is prepared to give to the reader a bird's-eye view of Florida agriculture. No attempt is made to cover the scientific side of production or marketing, however facts in the nature of statistics are given to show where the various crops are grown and livestock produced. The total area of the State is 58.666 square miles, or 35.111.0-10 acres. Of this area, 1.751.275 acres are in actual cultivation. The population is approximately 1.900,000 people exclusive of the tourists, many of whom maintain homes here as well as elsewhere.
AGRICULTURE
The agriculture of the State is quite diversified, varying from general crops, such as corn, cotton and tobacco grown in the northern section, to subtropical crops, such as oranges, grapefruit, limes, avocados, cocoanuts. etc., in the central and southern section. Many of the common vegetables are grown in specialized areas all over the State, though the commercial growing of the more tender varieties for winter market are confined to the central and southern part of the State. The commercial production of gladioli blooms and bulbs is of growing importance. Asparagus plumosus fern and many varieties of ornamental plants and shrubbery are grown and shipped to markets throughout the country.
GENERAL FARMING
Florida produces a wide range of staple crops including cotton, tobacco, corn, peanuts, oats, rye, rice, velvet beans, cowpeas, soy beans, chufas, cassava, etc., forage and soiling crops including sorghums, millets, beggarweed, crotalaria and numerous grasses adaptable to the different soils and climatic conditions of the State. While corn is grown to some extent in every section of the State, the heaviest production is in the north, central and northwest portions. Short staple cotton is produced principally in the north and northwest portions. Sea Island cotton acreage is increasing in the central sections of the State. Two principal types of tobacco are producedshade or wrapper tobacco is grown in Gadsden, Jefferson and Madison counties. Cigarette tobacco is grown largely in Madison, Suwannee, Hamilton, Columbia, Alachua and adjacent counties. Sugar cane for syrup is grown extensively in the north and northwest and central portions of this State. Approximately 32.000 acres are devoted to the manufacture of sugar in the southern district,


principally around the southern end of Lake Okeechobee with a smaller acreage in Indian River County near Fellsmere. Sugar mills are located at Clewiston and Fellsmere.
Irish potatoes are an important crop in many sections of the State. The heavy commercial shipping areas are confined to St. Johns, Putnam, Flagler, and Alachua counties in the northern section, Escambia in the northwestern, and Dade, Palm Beach, Lee, DeSoto, and Manatee counties in south Florida.
Sweet potatoes and yams are produced in practically every county in the State but more extensively in the central and northern districts.
Tung oil production is increasing in volume and value.
THE CITRUS INDUSTRY
Reports from the Florida State Marketing Bureau show that the production of citrus fruits is the leading agricultural industry of Florida, and represents an investment of over $500,000,000. During the 1040-41 season, which closed in July, there were produced 55,890,754 boxes of citrus divided as follows: 28,752,089 boxes of oranges; 24,387,011 boxes of grapefruit, and 2,751.624 boxes of tangerines. This is the equivalent of 140,903 carloads and had a gross value of $64,192,695.
Florida citrus fruits are marketed under laws passed by the State Legislature and agreements with the Federal Government.
During recent years the canning of citrus fruits, both for juice and sections, has increased rapidly and a large quantity of stock feed is being produced annually from the pulp and hulls as a by-product of this industry.
According to figures supplied by the State Plant Board, Florida has a total of all citrus as follows:
Oranges ..............................18.837.897 trees
Grapefruit .......................... 6.698.019 trees
Tangerines .......................... 1,592,490 trees
Limes .................................. 755,25-1 trees
Satsumas ............................ 88.680 trees
'Miscellaneous .................... 742.029 trees
Total ....................................28.714.369 trees
(The above figures represent all trees inspected by agents of the Plant Board whether in grove formation, in small plantings, or back yards, and will naturally show an increase in number over estimates of commercial grove plantings in the State.)
Lemons, rough lemons, kumquats. etc.


NON-CITRUS FRUITS AND MELONS
Avocados, guavas, mangoes, pineapples and papayas are important in some sections of the south portion of the State. Strawberries are marketed from late November until June. The heavy producing areas are around Plant City, Wauchula, Webster and Starke. The Missionary variety is grown almost exclusively.
Watermelons are produced in a limited way in nearly all counties of the State, however the heavy commercial areas are in Lake, Marion, Alachua, Gilchrist, Suwannee, Jefferson, Jackson, Washington and Holmes counties. The shipping season usually extends from the middle of May to the middle of July.
Grapes, peaches, pears, plums, blueberries, blackberries and Japanese persimmons are of minor importance but are produced over a considerable portion of the State.
Pecans are grown extensively in the northern, central, and northwestern sections of Florida.
NON-CITRUS FRUITS (Total Production) 1910-11 SEASON
Strawberries..................... 1.399 carlot equiv...........................S 3.220.016
Watermelons..................... 7.001 carlot equiv........................... 1,503.120
Other Non-Citrus............ 1,523 carlot equiv........................... 761.500
9,926 cars $ 5,181.660
VEGETABLES (Total Production) 1910-41 SEASON
Beans (including Limas) ........................ 9,809 cars $ 8,439,115
Cabbage ...................................................... 5.768 cars 2,581,460
Celery .......................................................... 1 1,318 cars 7.263,268
Cucumbers .................................................. 2.542 cars 1.986,138
Eggplant ...................................................... 957 cars 682.680
Escarole ...................................................... 786 cars 379,485
Lettuce ........................................................ 817 cars 561.670
Peas, English .............................................. 502 cars 510,910
Peppers ........................................................ 2,655 cars 2,540,970
Potatoes ...................................................... 6,522 cars 3,313,260
Tomatoes .................................................... 9.655 cars 9,814.100
Mixed and Miscellaneous Vegetables .... 7.229 cars 5,001,760
Total Vegetables ........................................ 58,560 cars $ 43,077,816
Total Vegetables & Non-Citrus Fruits 68,486 cars 48,562,482
Total Fruits and Vegetables .................. 209,389 cars $112,755,177


VEGETABLES
No state in the Union surpasses Florida in the production of winter vegetables and no article of diet is more essential to health and well-being than fresh vegetables. No dinner is complete without them and the wide variety adaptable to production in Florida during the greater portion of the year makes it possible to provide a menu including a variety to suit the taste of everyone.
According to the Annual Fruit and Vegetable Report of the Florida State Marketing Bureau, for the season 1940-41, Florida produced a total of 58,560 carloads of vegetables; it was estimated that 26,584 cars were shipped by rail and boat, and 10.735 carloads were consumed in the State, that 1,200 carloads were canned, and 20,041 cars were hauled out of the State by trucks. Total vegetables produced had a gross f.o.b. Florida value of $43,077,816.
-V
CITRUS PLANTINGS
4','. ' ''')
Over 1,000,000 citrus trees 1300,000 to 1,000,000 citrus trees 100,000 to 500.000 citrus trees Less than 100,000 citrus trees
The 10 Ranking counties Abe:
Polk ......................................6,30-1,183 trees
Orange ................................2,033,010 trees
Lake ....................................2,638,888 trees
Hillsborough ......................1,626.111 trees
Brevard ..............................1.203.154 trees
Volusia ................................1,157,398 trees
Pinellas ..............................1,156,827 trees
St. Lucie ............................1,132,405 trees
Highlands ..........................1,049,270 trees
Indian River ......................1,003,607 trees


Due to adverse weather conditions, the vegetable production for the season 1940-41' was not up to the average per acre basis.
Cash markets prevail largely throughout the season.
Growers are provided with facilities for marketing their crops through State-owned Farmers' Markets located in practically all the heavy producing vegetable sections of the State. Farmers' cooperative associations and independent buyers and brokers also play an important part in the handling and marketing of Florida's perishable crops.
During the 1940-41 season approximately 57% of all Florida's fresh fruit and vegetable interstate shipments moved by rail, 14r; by boat, and 29f? by truck.
Federal-State shipping point inspection was given on 302,102 cars of fruits and vegetables during the 1910-41 shipping season (fruits 89,685, vegetables 12,417).
m
feu,
COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE
season 1940-41 (Including Watermelons and Strawberries)
B Over 20,000 acres KXv.--.v.vi 10,000 to 20,000 acres I I 5.000 to 10.000 acres r- 1 I 1,000 to 5.000 acres i ; n Less than 1.000 acres
The io Ranking Counties ake: Countu Vegetables Straw-
acres berries Melons Tola!
Palm Beach .. 16,970 ................ 46.970
Broward ........ 21.550 ................ 24,550
Dade .............. 15,175 150 ........ 15.325
Alachua ........ 5,600 1,000 3,500 10,100
St. Johns ...... 8,650 ................ 8.650
Manatee ........ 7,275 200 ........ 7,475
Seminole ...... 6,400 ................ 6,400
Marion .......... 5,305 ........ 900 6,205
Hillsboro ...... 4.025 1.500 200 5,725
Sumter .......... 3,775 350 900 5.025


LIVESTOCK
Livestock production is making rapid advances and cattle raising is practiced in every county. Evidence of this is shown by the fact that records kept when cattle were dipped for ticks showed there were approximately 1,200,000 cattle in the State. Hog production is confined largely to the general crop area of Florida, beginning below Ocala and extending to Pensacola in the west and Jacksonville in the east.
The producers have been marching in step with progress and thousands of pure bred bulls have been imported during the last few years for use on native cattle, to improve the quality. Good foundation stock has been brought in by the hog raisers, and the quality of the Florida porker is as good as the best.
Dairying in Florida has reached a S15,000,000 annual business. All the fluid milk consumed is produced in the
NUMBER OF CATTLE BY COUNTIES
Over 20.000 head
10.000 to 20.000 head
5.000 to 10,000 head Under 5.000 head
THE 10 Ranking COUNTIES Are:
Polk ......................................................44,463
Osceola ................................................36,967
Glades ..................................................36.943
Highlands ..........................................29.020
Hillsboro ............................................28,520
DeSoto ................................................25,692
Alachua ..............................................23,537
Hardee ................................................20,339
Levy ....................................................19,904
Marion ................................................19,111
v-iii


State. The eradication of the cattle tick and the improving of pastures have all combined to help put dairying on a solid foundation and make it profitable. Very few States have as good or as sanitary barns as found here.
To improve market conditions, big producers have organized many cooperative shipping associations. One of these, located at Trenton, Florida, shipped as many as thirteen cars on one day, and when it is realized that they ship once every week during fall, winter and spring, this is really remarkable.
To aid the livestock men, the Florida Department of Agriculture is sponsoring and building market sheds, livestock auction markets and shipping pens in many sections of the State, in cooperation with other stockmen themselves.
The production and marketing of good quality hogs and cattle by Florida farmers have received attention on a National scale. This is evidenced by the fact that one of the Nation's largest packers has been operating a plant for
NUMBER OF HOGS
MB Over 20,000 head
Ivyv^^l 9,000 to 20,000 head
j"" ~! 5,000 to 9.000 head
L_ i 1.000 to 5,000 head
r I Under 1,000 head
The 10 Ranking Counties are:
Jackson ..............................................36,439
Suwannee ..........................................32,165
Alachua ..............................................26,694
Madison ..............................................22,611
Levy ....................................................22,553
Marion ................................................20,937
Columbia ............................................19,044
Holmes ................................................17,647
Gadsden ..............................................15,859
Jefferson ............................................14,729


several years in Florida. Practically all of the large packers have buyers located in the State and make purchases and ship to their plants which are located across the border in Georgia. Some hogs are shipped to packers as far away as Virginia and cattle, especially calves, are shipped to the eastern markets. Recently northern feeders have been buying feeder cattle in Florida and have found they do well.
POULTRY
Poultry production is carried on in all counties, however the commercial sections are near the large cities like Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Ocala and Pensacola. Turkey production has been making rapid strides, especially in the sand hill sections of the Suwannee River valley, and west Florida where peanut production is heavy. Broiler production has been growing very rapidly all over the State.
.'.Vv'-v.
NUMBER OF CHICKENS EY COUNTIES
Over 60.000 head 30,000 to 60,000 head i i 10,000 to 30,000 head I.J 5,000 to 10,000 head I I Under 5,000 head
The 10 Ranking Counties Are:
Hillsborough ....................................149,495
Nassau ..............................................116,237
Jackson ............................................ 91,696
Duval ................................................ 90,904
Polk .................................................. 83,336
Alachua ............................................ 78,134
Marion .............................................. 69,717
Columbia .......................................... 68,978
Pasco ................................................ 31,383
Suwannee ........................................ 61,208


To foster better production and market practices, the poultrymen have organized many county associations, and these have been federated into the Florida State Poultry Producers Association. This organization has brought about the passage of the Egg and Poultry laws, to assure the consuming public a quality product and give the producers protection from unfair trade practices. Many of these Associations market eggs for their members to very good advantage. They hold regular monthly meetings with educational programs where topics of interest are discussed by the members themselves, and also have speakers present from State and Federal agencies, to bring them information on production and marketing subjects. The Agricultural Marketing Board has begun the operation of several markets where the poultrymen can sell eggs and chickens. The enforcing of the Egg Law is done by the Florida Department of Agriculture.
HONEY
Honey production is a very important industry because of the profusion of wild flowers. From the citrus blossoms is produced the famous Orange Blossom Honey. From the tupelo trees, growing along streams in west Florida, especially in the Apalachicola River valley, comes the nectar that produces Tupelo Honey.
The flow of nectar from the citrus trees, especially oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, is so heavy in the early spring that Northern beekeepers find it profitable to bring their bees down during this flow to produce the delicious orange blossom honey.
There is some flower in bloom practically every month in the year that produces honey; even the old palmetto bloom, the gallberry and the mangrove tree of the tidewater marsh make very delicious honey.


VALUE OF LIVESTOCK OX FLORIDA FARMS AND 1910 PRODUCTION
All Cattle on Farms ........................ 1,200.000 head 26,800,000
Horses on Farms .............................. 20,000 head 1,850,000
Mules on Farms .............................. 40,000 head 4,880,000
Sheep on Farms ................................ 39,942 head 140,000
Hogs on Farms ................................ 555.000 head 2,583,000
Pork produced .................................. 56,000,000 lbs. 7,000,000
Lard produced .................................. 8,000,000 lbs. 723,000
Chickens and Turkeys on Farms 2,595,000 head 1,944,000
Chickens and Turkeys raised ...... 4,750,000 head 3,000,000
Eggs produced .................................. 22,830,000 dozen 5,796,000
Dairy Cows on Farms .................... 130,000 head 5,632,000
Milk produced .................................... 57,000,000 gallons 15,015,000
Butter produced ................................ 1,266,000 lbs. 392,000
Honey produced ................................ 1,800,000 lbs. 250,000
FARM CROPS PRODUCED AND VALUE 1940
Corn .................................................... 9,031,000 bu. $5,550,000
Cotton .................................................. 20,000 bales 1,200,000
Cotton Seed ...................................... 18,000.000 lbs. 1,800,000
Cow Peas ............................................ 68.000 bu. 124,000
Hay (all) .......................................... 60,100 tons 605,000
Oats .................................................... 128,000 bu. 97,000
Peanuts .............................................. 75,000,000 lbs. 2,250,000
Potatoes (White) ............................ 4,312,000 bu. 4,200,000
Potatoes (Sweet) ............................ 1,080,000 bu. 800,000
Cane Syrup ........................................ 1,800,000 gallons 520,000
Sugar Cane sold ................................ 956,000 tons 2,750,000
Tobacco .............................................. 23,490,000 lbs. 4,111,000
Velvet Beans .................................... 500,000 tons 295,000


LIVESTOCK AND AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS BY COUNTIES
Mm Coins
Corn Pewfs Cotton foto A Acres Acres Acres
Alachua.................................... 23,537
Baker.......................................
Bradford ..................................
Brevard ...................................
Broward....................................8,061
Calhoun....................................5,299
Charlotte..................................3,731
Citrus........................................5,134
Clay..........................................14,711)
Collier........................................3,25"
u Columbia..................................10.875
w Dade..........................................11,976
DeSoto......................................25,6112
Dixie........................................13,7!
Duval...................................... 9,872
Escambia................................7,731
Flagler......................................11,754
Franklin....................................1,216
Gadsden.................................... 7,089
Glades' ,1111....................3SJH3
Gulf............................................ 831
Hamilton..................................7,751
Hardee...................................... 29,339
Hendry....................................14,754
Hernando................................5,388
HUlsboro..................................28/)2()
Holmes......................................7,231
25,594 t llll 3,116 MC 78,131 19,718 iikm 70,11 22,000 d 71 78 ",\
5,'loU r* r* 'Hi mo Ii27 lu,i)it) l|u'll 1,826 1,482 117101 ntjn li.iliu i iV'l'lil ,ji 62 "id
6,532 776 421 506 i-M y,oou 14,576 81
170 1 19,770 296
S,K 523 12,353 10,133 10,500 191
513 68 3,063 28 ..........
5 OOll i M ')W i iiilfi
1)1 uu ..........
1,562 1 r , 586 1'tO 13,227 2,187 1 ACfl 101! 200 ..........
166 19,(111 138 2,171 68,978 36,767 27,000 1,171
3,922 9,511 51,917 492
2,611 750 18,751 322
7,112 299 7,49!) 3,472 2,090 ..........
5,789 5,807 P 2,28(1
7,939 825 3,285 188 34,531 12,263 6,091 3,079 2,100 3,264
261) 15,858 13 2X1 1,299 29 40,122 36,113 11,100 62
19,851 968 19,751 22,019 12,700 52
2,872 1,045 176 97 9,203 269 2,691 683 ..........
13,123 819 21,939 22,691 15,900 2,067
7,365 872 101 31,071 2,217 11IW 'HI 200
2,357 }\. COI /.llll & OC 700 179c
5,116 1 J J 1L t 058 .d,uo on iwi tfi ..........
1,092 6,5111 167 9,318 119,495 5,563 200
17,617 2,639 45,135 34,391 31,600 8,746
78 3,212


LIVESTOCK AND AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS BY COUNTIES i Continued I
ill Mlli Sum Mi/ Cotes Com Cliirfas km Ih'iinlx Acres Mod km 'fiiliumi km
Indian River............. ..............3,237 242 284 4,944 HHHM
Jackson .................... ..............15,18? 36,139 5,116 91,696 18,160 18,060 11,881 195
Jefferson ................... .......1,98? 11,125 1,443 30,324 34,586 1,060 2,628 372
Lafayette................. ..............5,968 12,810 563 18,488 13,029 \::mi 446 1,936
Lake........................... ..............3,195 1,330 723 43,619 1,162 160 364 58
Lee............................. ..............4,138 1,193 644 10,274 21
Leon........................... ..............6,-119 19,904 1,745 3,659 21,039 26,833 2,460 3,669 96
Levy........................... 22,553 834 33,839 23,995 22,306 48 283
Liberty ....................... ..............2,35? 3,606 262 10,503 2,628 1,160
Madison ......9,961 22,611 2,865 59,686 38,118 15,9011 5,501 3,114
Manatee 16,189 3,738 1,119 16,633 1,041
Marion....................... .............. 19,111 20,93? 2,655 69,111 32,307 19,2011 136 "253
y Martin....................... ..............1,617 .............. 176 357 188 2,681 16 .......... .......... ........
* Monroe....................... 121 926 ..........
Nassau.................... ,. 7,362 4,960 1,245 116,231 2,669 850 84
Oklaloosa.. 5,410 9,511 1,495 23,295 11,163 3,.....' ;w ........
Okeechobee ............... .............. 11,198 1,845 418 4,936 153 ......., ........
Orange ....................... 7,531 1,777 2,398 46,095 612 .......... ......... ........
Osceola ..................... ............ 36,967 1,859 M5 11,543 93 .......... ........
Palm Beach ............. 6,614 1,116 :;iim 21,666 378 .......
Pasco ......................... ,. 12,292 5.N 1,652 61,382 3,661 800 81
Pinellas..................... ..............5,228 1,508 2,834 29,696 120 .......... ........
Polk 11163 4,9111 3,434 83,336 4,531 5
Putnam..................... Si, Johns .......... II|1UU ..............8,955 16,336 1,121 3,986 705 746 29,621 1,118 22,310 3,621 560 "'227 8
St, Lucie................. .............9,329 ..............6,736 179 12,661 276 2,608 6,292 73 32,972 18,144 7,600 7,583 78
Sarasota ................... .......16/186 3,747 1,891 1,831 392 r;ii U16 91 26,513 1,156 ......t,
Sumter....................... 14,955 9,199 948 21,681 11,791 4,960 63 263
Suwannee................. ..............12,351 32,165 3,240 61,208 55,095 19,000 1,611 6,091


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