• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Index
 Introduction
 Home beautifying
 Trees
 Shrubbery
 Lawns
 Foundation plantings
 Acknowledgement














Group Title: Bulletin New Series
Title: Beautifying the home with trees, shrubbery and lawns
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002889/00001
 Material Information
Title: Beautifying the home with trees, shrubbery and lawns
Series Title: <Bulletin> New Series
Physical Description: 97 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee <Fla.>
Publication Date: <1941>
 Subjects
Subject: Landscape gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Ornamental horticulture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "August 1941."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002889
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001962964
oclc - 28589423
notis - AKD9641

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Index
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    Home beautifying
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Trees
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Shrubbery
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Lawns
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Foundation plantings
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Acknowledgement
        Page 97
Full Text
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INDEX
pace
Introduction ..............................................................................
Vckuowledgmeiils ....................................
Foundation Plantings ....................................
Illustrations ...................................................... 77-*><
Home Beautifying .....................................
Borders ...................................................
Hedges ami Wind Breaks 7
Humus.........................................................................................
Lawns ....................................................................................... *
Low Ground Planting .................................
Natural Gardening Style
Ponds ..................................................................................... u
Roads .............................................................................. 5
Rock Clumps............................................ **
Shade ...........................................................
Show} Plants ............................................. }!
Use of "Crow's Nest"...................................................... 1
Wild Gardens ............................................. 6
Lawns ........................................................................ 68
Chinch Him Control ............................
Dusts .................................................................................. 76
Liquid Sprays ............................................. 7o
Fertilizing Before Planting "2
Fertilizing Ksiablished I.awns 74
Grading ............................................................................. -
Green Lawns During Winter 1 '
Mowing ........................................................... '
Preparing the Soil 7'
Sowing Seed ........................................ '*
Treatment for Old Lawns 73
Varieties .................................................................................... 68
Bermuda .................................................
Carpet ....................................................................................... 69
< lentipede................................................. "
St. Augustine ........................................................................ 7 '
St. Lucie ........................................................................... (>if
\\ atering ...................... '


I N I) K \Continued
PACE
Shrubbery .......................................................... 57
Australian Tree Fern ..................................................... 37
Bread Fruit Plant ......................................................... 58
( i i.iciii- ..................................................................................................... *9
Cherry Laurel ............................................. 59
Florist or Winter ({looming Cardenia 60
Golden Feather Palm ................................................................... 61
llihiseus ...................................................... 62
Hydrangea ..................................................... 62
(Meander .................................................................................................. 63
Pittosporum Tobira ........................................................................... 64
Severinia lluvifolia ..................................................... 65
Star Jasmine ................................................................ 6.")
Yellow Bell ........................................................................................... 66
Yellow Plumbago .............................................................................. 66
Plants or Vines as Sereens ......................................................... 6/
Trees ........................................................................................................-........
Common Name Description 27-56
Conifers ..............................................................................................52-36
Index of Common Names ............................................................ 12-13
Native Trees of Florida .................................................................. 14-26
Pruning .......................................................................................... H
Utility ...................................................................................................... 9
Varieties...............................................................................................


Introduction
According to history, the discovery of Florida by Ponce tie Leon was on Faster Sunday. The mass of bloom that greeted this early explorer compelled his admiration and he forthwith called the new land "Pascua Florida," which means the "Feast of Flowers."
Further exploration disclosed blooming and ornamental plants in great profusion and the early settlers were so well pleased with the floral effect that the territory soon became known as the "Land of Flowers."
Since that time both naturalists and botanists of worldwide reputation have visited the State to study the unusual variety of plant life and numerous hooks have been written describing the exceptionally wide range of trees, shrubs, flowering plants and evergreens native to Florida.
The settling of the State together with the growth of industry, however, has had its usual effect and a great deal of the natural beauty has been destroyed. As a result new arrivals to the State question the feasibility of growing the plant life so necessary for "Home Beautificatioii." Many hundreds of varieties of flowers and plants can be raised very successfully in Florida, if the same attention given in other states to soil, rootstocks, varieties, cultivating, fertilizing, spraying and pruning is observed. Climatic conditions in Florida give the State a very distinct advantage over most every other State.


4
DKI'AKTMK.NT OK AGRICl l.'I'L'KK
4
HOME BEAUTIFYING WITH PLANT LIFE
When constructing a new home a very careful study of the existing trees, plants and shrubbery should be made before removing any of them. Denuding a tract is often a serious mistake. In many instances it is futile to attempt improvement on the natural conditions as they exist. The greatest landscape artist, .Mother Nature, will never be equalled by human plans and only through a study of Nature's plans can new ideas relating to planting he improved.
There is a vast meaning back of everything created and placet! by this Supreme Intelligence, so much in fact, that human intellect is slow in grasping its full import. The rhythm and harmony in growing things needs to be learned to be appreciated. Natural conditions used as a foundation or central idea, when embellished, will bring out the maximum beauty in the home surroundings.
It is best to carefully analyze the entire landscaping plan before any clearing is done, any roads or pathways eleared, or foundations dug. Nature's green bosom is ready to receive any structure to be built and if "correctly dressed" with green "garments" it will merge into its surroundings with such pleasing effect as to appear a homogenous part of the growing things around it.
"Repose thyself at the feet of Nature and learn."
Use of a "Crows-nest"
A portable "crows-nest," built about 13 feet high, consisting of a light weight frame or scaffold made preferably of 1x3 materials and that can be moved easily, is equipment that every home builder can use to distinct advantage.
On one side the strips serve as steps and a platform at the top with a guard rail will enable the builder to obtain a birdseye view of the grounds. When placed on the spot of the contemplated building site a map or plan can be sketched of all the natural surroundings, elevations, streams, etc. This assures scientific and natural procedure.
Natural Gardening Style
Nature is the only natural planter we know. Single trees have been set like lone sentinels by this great architect-gardener. The effects of lavishness, profusion, massiveness and solidarity are all parts of the Natural Plan, which reflects harmony in all its perspective and nearby effects. The planting that gives lasting satisfaction in home-landscaping is that which uses the natural laws of where, how and what to plant.


beu tifyino the home 5
->--
The more intensively this master plan is studied, the more eertain the success will be. The dwelling rightly should be considered an integral part of the landscape, the same as the roads, bridges and planted vegetation.
Lawris
The open spaces and meadows found amidst forest, on mountain tops and in the valleys gave the first concept of lawns.
The shape of the lawn may be left to individual taste. Severe, straight lines of the formal type or graceful curves that blend into the general layout may be achieved. If the greater part of it is visible from the dwelling it will produce a more pleasing residt when compact.
An open space in front or at the side of the dwelling should be the location of the lawn. Florida's climatic and geographical conditions are such as to demand that they be fully taken into consideration in any landscaping if mis-lakes are to be avoided in the final residt.
Shade
Shade is needed as a protection against the continued direct rays of the sun and plenty of sunlight is likewise necessary to prevent dampness within the home. The growth of mildew must be guarded against. Every side of the dwelling should receive its share of sunlight. All surface water should drain away from the house. Fuddles and very moist places are breeding places for mosquitoes and other insects.
Borders
The border planted around the lawn and the plants used for this purpose are important steps in producing natural effects. Such plantings are more satisfactorily done after the house is built: then tin- \i<-u from different positions inside the house may be obtained as well as those from the outside, and from the top of the temporarily built "crows-
Koads
The first winding road was the outgrowth of the path made by wild animals in their avoidance of natural barriers in their path. In laying out a winding road or path the existing trees, plants, and other natural conditions should determine the direction the road or path will follow.


6
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
4-
Natural Cuttles in Landscaping
Rock gardens, cool-retreats, ponds, vistas of lake or stream in their natural state furnish a safe guide for these phases of landscaping.
Ponds
A small pool containing top-minnows and native fish will prevent the breeding of mosquitoes. Hank the pond with trees or well selected shrubs and an individual beauty will be added.
A Pool Like This Makes a Delightful Spot in the Landscape
Rock Clumps
Any mass of rocks that are to be covered with plants should always appear as natural ledges or formations, their location properly being on the side or edge of a slope. Unless certain of where and bow to place them it is better to eliminate them, as much skill is necessary to set up a rock-ledge. Loose material carelessly piled together serves as a foundation for this kind of planting.
Wild Gardens
Native pine forest land can be converted into a wildwood garden. The wild shrubs and flowers growing thereon may be added to by others to be had in the neighborhood and the planting thus completed.


\ kot'KKKY IN A tkid'ii Al. sl.lllM.
Hedges and Wind Breaks
To get a garden started in some locations it is necessary to plant wind breaks of trees or hedges of shrubs to protect the garden against wind and frost, this being particularly true of locations fronting on large bodies of water.


V, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
->--
Hunius
.Murh of Florida's pineland, which is generally so loose that it fails to retain the fertilizer applied to it, needs humus. Anything which, when decayed will make mold, should he used to rebuild these soils. Make a compost heap of leaves, grass from the lawn, rotted limbs, old wood and weeds, and when fully decayed it can be used as a dressing for the land, the trees and the plants.
Planting
\ very little knowledge of plant life teaches us that plantings made in dry, hot or windy weather are most difficult to grow. A cloudy day with little wind and a liberal supply of water will protect the planting.
Showy Plants
Some landscapers advise against the use of plants with showy, variegated foliage such as Crotons, Acalyphas, Pan-danus, etc., but a study of tropical vegetation shows that these plants with such gorgeous colors were developed under the influence of light and heat. Many sections of Florida are adapted to their cultivation, and these unusual specimens of Nature's handiwork are as much a part of the landscape garden as the bright feathers of birds. The colors of the spectrum are alike found in the gems from the mines, the flowers in the woods, the minerals of the mountain fastness, the animal life of the plains and forests, the fowl of the air. the fish of the sea, and the soils of the earth, clearly indicating that they belong to plant life in the landscape of Home Beautification.
Low Ground Planting
In designing walks in lowlands better results are obtained by laying them out, as far as possible, on the higher part of the land being landscaped. In marshy spots a liberal use of broken rock, bricks, tile and concrete blocks will furnish a good foundation for the path.


BEAUTIFYING THE HOME
9 -4-
TREES
The growth of trees is a marvel of the ages, in the contemplation of which our thought is carried hack to the period of greatest antiquity. Some trees, namely, the Mac-rozamia of Australia, are reputed to he over 12,000 vears old.
From the small well cared for tree in the grove or orchard to the mighty trees in the Western Forests, there is a symmetry and grandeur found in no other growing things.
The towering, massive Redwoods in Sequoia National Park are some of the oldest growing things on earth. Some of these awe-inspiring giants were stalwart sentinels growing mill Nature's green-clothed park- when the Pharoahs of Egypt were establishing their kingdoms and probably before pyramid building became the obsession of those early riders. Within the long span of life of these grand old patriarchs of the forest they guard secrets that would be riddles to a Sphinx.
A comparison of this marvelous plant life witli the short period of human existence is all sufficient lo l'im' man pause in his concept of the order, the expansion of growth, the deep mystery of these mighty monarchs, truly the rightful kings of this globe.
Utility
The utility of trees is almost unsurpassed. From them we obtain shade from the sun and shelter from the storm; fruits of almost innumerable variety: material for building ships, business houses, homes, for making articles of clothing, tanning material, dyes, saps, gums, sugar, medicinal properties, chemicals, insulating material, charcoal and when the tree decays it forms food for other plant life, and if burned the gases arising are put to use by Nature's laboratory, and the ashes enrich the soil.
A beautiful story is found in the act of Judge W. H. Jackson, former Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court.
On his plantation there grew a white oak tree on the crest of a hill. A view of his plantation could be had from this point and it was the habit of Judge Jackson to climb this lull, rest beneath this grand old tree with its symmetrical branches, and there, no doubt, ponder some of the mysteries of growing things.
In the will made by the Judge he gave "to the tree, the land on which the tree grew, because of the great love he bore for it." He wanted to protect this tree against the on-


ill
department ok w.kkt i.tire
slaughts of "civilization" and this deed recorded in the civil court at Athens over 1 IT years ago is still a matter of record.
V tablet has l>een placed on this 350-year-old monarch by the people of the district, stating that the tree has title to the land which it occupies, because the former owner of the land loved the tree.
Thousands of visitors visit this unusual tree and pay homage to the tree and to the memory of the man who had grasped some of the meaning of Nature's love for man.
Oliver Wendell Holmes is quoted as saying: "What a strange underground life is that which is led by the organisms we call trees! These great fluttering masses of leaves, stems, boughs, trunks, are not the real trees. They live underground and what we see are nothing more than their tails."
In the determination of the life of trees or plants, water is perhaps the most important single factor. Plants are principally water, the chemical analyses showing the water content to he from 55 to 95 percent. Plants take up enormous t/uantities of water and for every pound of water remaining in the plant structure 95 to 99 pounds of water are Iran-spired or evaporated through the leaves. To make a pound of dry matter or solids in plants there will he taken away from the soil between .100 and 1.000 pounds of water, or from one-t/uarter to one-half ton.
Native Trees
The species of native trees in Florida are exceptionally large, and the number of those introduced from other sections of the globe is perhaps larger. This gives a very wide range of selection and makes possible good plantings for every type of landscape.
Tre-s native to the temperate zone and the tropics are alike found growing in the different localities of the State.
Transplanting of trees from the wild usually is not successful and for this reason nursery propagated trees are best to plant. The trees raised by a good nurseryman will have belter root systems and development than most trees taken from the woods.
\\ hen the trees are planted they should be placed at the same depth as when growing in the nursery, (.nod manure, well decayed leaf mold, with small quantities of muck, if available, mixed with the soil placed around the roots will assist in the growth of the trees. Steamed hone meal and tankage is also used, the application of commercial fertilizer


heing used after the tree has begun growth in its new location.
Use only the top soil that is removed from the place the trees are planted. The subsoil should be discarded.
Covering the trunk and larger limbs of large trees with Sphagnum moss, which is lied in place, will protect the trees that are transplanted. This moss should be kept damp for several weeks to assist the root system to resume its natural functions. Spanish moss may be substituted but it dot's not retain moisture so well.
Deciduous trees are generally transplanted during the cooler winter months or when they are bare of foliage.
Plants moved to new locations during the summer months should he kept shaded.
Conifers are usually transplanted with their original hall nt earth adhering lo the roots.
Pruning
The art of pruning musl be acquired through practice. Trees -Inmid be pruned to assist their growth as well as to attain the desired shape and symmetry that brings out the harmony of the planting. If in doubt it will be besl to employ some one skilled in the art. All cuts should be clean and without ragged edges. Covering the cut portion with a tar preparation to exclude micro-organisms will protect the tree and gi\e greater assurance of a healthy tree or plant.
I arietiet
The list of trees available for Florida plantings is very large. (Inly a portion of these trees is illustrated, but a list of most of these trees will be found at the end of this chapter.
4-


12 -
department ok \(.kk i lure
INDEX COMMON NAMFS OF TKFFS
Acacia__
\cyncja
mrxandrian laurel american elm
\natto .......
australian pine
pact
27
-:
27 27 27 27
klt. silk tree Fountain tree Fringe Tree
geigrr tree Bamboo_____.....-- 28
bauuralag 28
Baobab 28
bea.l tree --- 28
Deaf wood____ - 28
Biachofia__- 28
black olive 29
brazilian pepjwr tree -----...... 29
ruttonwooil ..... 29
Caieput--- 29
calabash tree---- 29
< amphor tree ..--- 29
(landlenut 29
dandle tree 30
cannonball tree ......... 30
Capo chestnut---- 30
I !a|ie pittospnrum ---- 30
Carob _- 30
Caaiia-bark tree------ 30
catalpa 30
Catesbaea 31
chaste tree 31
('.hem- laurel 31
China Berry-- 32
chinese pistache--- 32
circassian Bean---- 32
citrus ................................_............. 32
(oral tree 32
crab apple 32
Dalbereja___ 33
desert willow 33
l)i>)!wood (flowering i 33
dnmbeya ..........._________............... 33
dwarf elm 33
Ear Tree______--- 33
empress tree ------- 3.3
eucalyptus or cum 33
kat pork tree 33
kip tree 33
klame tree ______ 33
klorida maple___ 33
no
- 33 34 34
11
35
gum______ 35
Hackberry ............ 35
Hayata _______.........__--- 35
heliotrope tree___ 35
Hemp Tree____ 35
Hickory____ 35
hill.m tree 35
Holly_______ 35
Horseradish tree ................... 35
indian Bean 35
Jacaranda________ 35
japanese varnish ----------- 35
japan wood-oil tree 35
jerusalem thorn --------- 35
ludas Tree___. 85
Kaffir Bean-- 35
Kapok _-i- 35
kentucky coffee tree ..................... 36
linden basswood 36
Loblolly Bay 36
Locust_____ 36
madeira redwood .................. 86
madras thorn .................. 36
magnolia__ 37
Mahoe____ 37
Mahogany______ 38
maidenhair tree
Mango_______...... 38
Manilla tamarind 38
Mock orange 38
monkey apple 38 moreton bay chestnut
mountain ebonv------ 38
Mulberry___ 39
mil oil tree 39
Oak ........____.......-.....................___........... 39
Olive ______ 39
Old Man's beard 39
orchid tree 39


1 N I) E X
COMMON NAMES OK TKEESContinued
pace
Paper Mulberry__________ 39
Parasol Tree .................... 40
Pecan .......................................................... 40
Physic Nut..................................................... 40
Pink Cassia .................... 40
Plane Tree____ 40
Poonga Oil Tree_____ 40
Poplar ........____ 40
Pudding Pipe ......______ 40
Phoenix Tree ............................. 40
Pri.le of India Ml
Punk Tree 40
Purging Nut________..... 40
pace
Tallow Tree_____ 47
Tamarind .......------ 48
Temple Tree 48
Texas Umbrella Tree 48
Traveler's Palm 48
Traveler's Tree______ 48
Tree of Heaven_____ 48
Tropical Almond 49
Tulip Tree ........... .........__ 49
Tung-Oil Tree .................. 49
Victorian Box ........ 50
Vitex________ 50
Omen'- Crape Myrtle 40
Quern's Flower ......... 40
Queensland Nut 40
Rain Tree_________ 40
Rcdlmd ......_....._........_____ 42
Red Cedar______ 42
Red Cotton Tree__________................... 42
Red Maple ......................... 42
Red Sandalwood 42
Royal Palm ............... 42
Royal Poinciana ------- 43
Rubber Tree 43
Sacred Bo Tree 13
Sandbox........_...................._________............ 43
Satinleaf ..............................................-......... 43
Sausage Tree ........................... 43
Scarlet Maple...........__ 45
Seagrape .. _______ 45
Seaside Mahoe......______ 45
She-Oak ........_ 45
Silk Cotton Tree .................... 45
Silk Oak ..... ......................... 45
Silk Tree If)
Silver or Soft Maple__ 46
Soapberry 46
Southern Magnolia ..... 46
Southern Sugar Maple 46
St. John's Bread ........... 46
Stopper .......................................................... 46
Sugarherry ................... 47
Swamp Maple
Sweet Gum ._ 47
Sycamore__ 47
Water Elm_____ 50
Weeping Willow 50
White Elm ......-...................... 50
Wild Black Cherrv 50
Wild Olive......................................... 50
Woman's Tongue Tree--- 51
Yellow Elder___ 51
Yellow Poplar ................ 51
YlangYlang ........................... 51
CONIFERS
Arbor Vilae ...............................__ 52
Bunya Bunya ....... 52
Chinese Fir ....... ........_ 52
Cypress----------- 52
Cypress-Pine ~_--------- 52
Florida Yew............. 54
Indian ( edar ....... ................ 54
Juniper and Cedar 54
Monkey-Puzzle ....................___ 54
Moreton Bay Pine ......_____ 54
Norfolk Island Pine.............................. 54
Pine........................................................ 55
Stinking Cedar___ 55
Yew_______ 55


native trees of flukiih
section wiih
florida or southmi sugar maple wrstrrn
smitten supar maple......................................western.....................
soil, silver, while maple western
red, swamp maple..................all escoept extreme soatti,
kox elder, sugar a$fa Mm
poisoiwood. hog gum................................extreme smith
sumac, dwarf sumac.......................................all except sot
mingo............. southern
pond, custard apple...............southern.
..............................................northern
illy...................................._________
mi holly .northern kings hotly...........................................extreme south..
lap, cassena...............................................men.
deciduous holly, possum haw northern 1 interim............. western
lli'milcs cluli, dfiil'sdliiiigslii'li northern
hornbeam, blue lurch, iroiwoi! northern hall
hop hornbeam men hall.....
river, ml, black liircli. .northern swift, lilad liireh ............western........
smooth alder................................................................northern.
! sudworth'S chi
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leer jwiiiimi liffs hi mkkm hthn
wo f,m> fol
hfijds via
,hkk mi h (hint
Ik fapm
lit mmm
M ma


NATIVE TREES OF flOIIIDUoniW
Cumin fa SmiirttaFui'Mi Hotamcal Family Hmtamcai. Name
I Jial|ia........................................................,...............feslorii.................................................................... Mil IpniA
Black calaMi lire_.....................bm mlL.........................._ Wip Batik
lifitrrtrrr Eitrrmr ttlk_ MWWM Mia MfllflJ U.Wte
Stroiipbark .......Extreme toulheasteni htm urola Hlffl
lliiiiiliiilniliii, Cum elemi .Southern Mill........ IIIKMM ktlttb hdti (%lfii
Ijiinamonlutl, Wild ciniuiiiiiii .Exlrrmr *uth________ QMffili Winfkm
Caper tree.........Southern iwlal.............. (MilMlM, Cfafii jttMl
leaved ran tree........................................Mini............................................................. Gujrb prkIo|il(ira
Flnriilaelik ._ Allseeliorw_..... 1,'WOMM klacai kmdlt
Florida elder, Florida dderkflj Northern ball_____ Sttku Skr!i
Niulb. nity lilirkb Men _...... I'iUtui 'uWam
Small Vilnirniini .Northern kill__________ I"ktm obtain
I'npayi favpiff.................................................Southorn................................................................. C1CJ(M Cartel pp
Fal* bid leys .__ (MMM CwWa Imfolia
Woo, Strawberry basil .Northern _-_ EmJIII rtpurpuw
llbaronia.__..Eitrtine HWlh___ JtAontmii (.'waeialam
brood, rlotida boxwood Exlrrmr ntlh_..... Sck||ffia|ralweat
Majtrnu>...........Extmne winlh.._............_ %lr jjjfcWn
Illicit dm...........loll Krj...........-.................................... 1,'fMMf Mi Jictris
Tnpiral aliiiiuid__.......Southern.....___........._ Mil Gftp
lliiitoawooi_Soaihi coutiL__ Coaacvfeu cedi
llultooKOod. White bullonwiod Southern iwtal________ [tp(MW IKOWN


NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDAConlinuprf
Common Nam Sbctiom I m Finn Botanicai Family
lintnisei irit .........All sections........... (MM
Clustered groundsel tree.......................All sections,.............
Flowering dogwood__________________.......-Central and northern
h'oughlraf dogwood..........................................Western....................................
Illuc dogwood, Dogwood...........................Gadsden county...............
Cornel________..............__________.............. Jiorlbi-----
Ironwood, Redlili, Leatherwood -Northern..........-----------
lili, Black titi...........__________............Jortta..,.__
Persimmon. Possumwood............................All sections..................
Persimmon.........................................................
Mountain laurel...............
Sourwood...................----------------
Xolisma, liti.............------------
White wood, Guiana plum..........................Extreme southern.
While wood, hig tona plum.................Keys...................................................................
Crahwood, Poisonwood..............................Extreme south..................
\lanchineel..............._______.....-......Extreme south-..................
Olalheile gooseberry.....____....................Extreme south mainland.............
Savia....._............................................leys.............._.............
Tallow tree.....................................................-Northern.................................
Milk'tree........................................._....................Extreme northwestern......................
Heech........-..........................Northern............. UUOl
ipin.................................................Northern---------------------------------
"9
I gweraipi 'mmjlorido (Won
lm aiperijolia (,'oraui aliemijcla Cam tirido (Sw'do
Cytk mmljkn llijlonio monoplylla
Diojpyroi tvpna
Qxiklm tkm
Prweto loierijU Drypitt kinljik (mmik Wo llippmnaaf MiwiiA Cm kick km Mim
Saautffi setV/ermn (friadica
k$k (Wlkai
foju imiljnk taw puiA (in fm


\ATIVK TREES OF FLORIDUWiWrl
living Yuii, Sei m\ Wiieii: Fin mi Bohmi.il Family Botanical Name
Black oak Western UMfMl [kmnkki
Turkey, scrub, blackjack oak Northern half ............ pcwCateki
Hybrid oak .Duval county (Iwro If 'ittnm
Red, Spanish oak -Western and Central pcwrik
Swamp, red, swamp Spanish oak Western ('ww ink fpkjAi
Swamp red oak Western (taiiuiiWeaivipMii
lllarkjack, barrens oak .........Northern (tall iwriW'fli
Hybrid oak .......Levy county (taw Mii
Water oak................................................................Northern.................................... Owuip
Hybrid oak Okaloosa county... pel) iWi/m
Willow oak Northern (tall fjth
Laurel, willow nak 111 eicepl extreme south (tali W|ofia
Blue jack, turkey, cinnamon oak ..Northern to Lee county (tall ctaa
Oak.......... ..... .Oraner and Volusia enmities Ami tam inliUhi
Hybrid Oak Alachua ami Duval counties p oataca
Hybrid Oak ....................Columbia county.................... (tali dklqri
Hybrid Oak Seminole county (tan minis
Hybrid Oak Northeast (tali him
\lyrtle. scrub oak -All secti..... (tacii wiiii
live oak.................................... All sections (taw wqnm
live oak, twin live oak Peninsular ami northern (taw pin*, It), rirpnioM
aniMli)
live oak......... Central ami southeast (tarjj w'rpw ifcww
Chapman, Chapman while oak Near Cull and in Central (tarw CAupmaii
Whilf oak Central and western (tain alia
Post oak Northern (tali ifeUatt
I'osi, small post oak .Central and western (taw ilelk .Ifupifu
Pin, bastard white oak...............Central and western (tall mlh
Overcup oak Northern l)wm\ lyrata
Ik, basket, swamp cheslnnl oak Northern peninsular I western (taw Prinw (Kickliij
ChestnnL, chinquapin oak Western (taw IfaMeaVpi


NATIVE TREES I IF FLORIRMionltWil
'mm Mi
Sweet film. Red |iiu Red butken
Northern
All etfrpl illirill"
Northeni Esi
.......................Western
mint, swamp liirkon Western
River swamp*
trr, itarrowie
Willi shrlllinrk hickory.............Western
\lnelierniil, Imllmil, red hickory Northern hall .
\lockemut hickory........ Northern
l*icnut. paleleaf hickory..... Western.....----
I'ilinul hickory All except extreme south
..East coast
Florida hickory........._
lied, sweet hay, Fit, mahogany. .. All sections
swamp, swamp ml Lanrewood
All sections
Southern coastal .Northern,
Misanteca
Camphor...............
..Peninsular..
Cift
...Extreme south..............................................
Central anil northern
s tongue tree
Extreme south lluisarhe, Opopanax......... All sections
.IflCJ'U! f
kktk gi'iirgionn
him nigra faia rd\m\ limn
link iipk f(*n aoaatttraj llkm nph ami Ink mil Km mini Ink oik (Cryi Ail link ik iinWMCNI faia polio. Km filth) Wiro/io paVi KfKfN hk jkUm
imu1m Penea Mow (Wii kkkl
km j/lkm it, jkhnl OflKea (ieiorana kmlmoJlMtli'kmjtiil
Iwiffa tnaatVi
Ciaaamiiiiiaai rampkra
PilWoliiam ungaiwiili /fciii jSiim
- T
7.
/
T
/
-
<
1
/kin f'oraw'iina, (Fw fwiinnol


Y\TIU; TREES (IF FLIIRII)Uoriiird
C minoii Name Stc im\ Where Fiiiaii IIhumcal Fmiii v Butamcal Nre
1/ncaei Keys...... Ml WHlMf' Lruiwi jlrnioi
Tatuarind. km......illi hrnmk idin
Red-bud. Judas tree Northern lull (kit fanoibii
Honey hi Northern Glett IfWoi
Water loeu>l Northern CWiUl'o m/oalM
Jerusalem thorn, Horsebean Peninsular fdnaw toaVaia
Royal Poinciina Southern Pong regie
Australian corkwood......Extreme south SesWo pdifon, Mali
jrandproi
Jamaira ht*m\ Extreme Miuth fcknWioio pisawla
Frythrina Southern coastal ErylJriw orioreo
Dallierpia Southwestern Oatofrato Sijioo
Corkwood .Apalachicola Ian............... llllMMUl lAerio (Mono
Spanish bayonet Northern UMUl laaaVltiii
Spanish dapiei Northern Facro jkioia
Crape myrtle Every section I.ITIIMM Itanlrofflio uidica
IHpliL 111 sections ......... MMWMl Magnolia m&h
Sweet bay.............................All sections..................... Vpliii nqs'iini mink
(jirumber tree, brpe-leaveil
cucumber tree Northern Magnolia moffoplylla
Southern eueiimlier tree Western Vanolio pyramidolo
Tulip tree. Poplar, Yellow poplar Northern /irmWron I#n I
IjH'Ust'lierry Extreme south MMIMM hmk \mk
Seaside mahoe Extreme south UlliM Iktpru'a popalneo
Malioe Extreme south fBlSCW likens, (Porililffl
fallal


(mm \m,
.....Extreme south.
All sections
.ExttlJM south.
...............................................All sections.-
alerry.................................................Men
......Peninsular
Paper mulberry
Northern
lie, wax oivrlle, canilleliem
less wax myrtle.......................................Northwestern
Southern coastal. Southern
lied stopper..........
Naked stopper
Stopper..............
...Keys......
Stopper
\larlberry...........................................
Ilyrsine.....................................
Spanish, purpron stopper Southern roastal Slopperi White stopper; .Southern coastal
Southern coastal..................
Felwijo Wir
lleli/i himA Siiielcniii mkpni
Horiu in Dow nip
iMllg fiph (rJ|P pnpyrijera)
pttpJkWJ JVrrin cerijera, ((.'erolkiiw
terfemij
Egpo y/olia
fiipiiu llCftM U jimpwnii, (inii/iiomi) Simpjonii)
lonppes, \iatm
blip)


nativi: ties of mlwk'/d
Common Najie Section Where Foumj Botanical Family Botanical Name
starr. extreme smith ......... MlM hgtm kkmmk I \mm
kkwwl
cijqiul...... southern walciraleiciiilfliilniii
lliilr >|iiinml extreme snulli colyplrim/ta palk
spjceiooi key; CAylmlk ibpi
molly, forbiiinil, pigeonwood extreme south .itiim.m'm' hmlkkpjtk
1ii|irk lilail, vniir jiiini northern ............. flmM huishk
water, swamp black gnm. northern fy.iilii/u
smr lupelo, ogirrhrr limr northern ____ ifysM ojede
tupelo, cotton gum _. northern
fhilrwood southern IHIIUI sckn|iii rjwjimoiilfj
ling plum, lalhittiioil. southern ami central..................... ui ierfcm
later, pop ash northern 01mm him nuilmi
later, swamp uh northern ami southwestern frminai prim
while ash- western ami central halmmalma
i, m in 4 ____...............western area__________ halm ftmimm wola
pumpkin ash ............ western area ........ halm plunk
swamp privet ............. northern area........................ wera mhhi
fringe tree old man's heard northern area............... fimnfiis mpm
wild olive, deiilwooil. northern and central osnionlki amen
i........ii extreme south IWLMfM Cm wljw
buccaneer, hog cabbage palm few keys ....... pieiuloploenil rai|ero
royal palm extreme south............... fctaeu rrgia
sow cabbage palm.......... extreme ................. wowplcrojllii
silver, ihalrh palm extreme south toltok uplk (c
jtomfj


Section Where Foi
Cabbage palmetto....................All except extreme western..,
James palmetto .Extreme south Thatch |ialm Extreme south
Brittle thatch, silverlop palmetto Extreme south. Thatch palm Extreme south
Key thatch palm leys
Lolilollv, olillield, ineailnu pine
Soial pato
Mai bemii
iu in
in. loiiiiuiy, pine
:e, oldfield, ami scrub
Northern
Shorlleaf, yellow pine. Northern Spruce, while, lowland-spruce
apical, souinern, yeiiow pine ill except extreme snulli.. Slash, swamp, saltwater pine Near coasts, including keys
res...........All sections.................................................
roml cypress... lied cedar......
.Northern
.Southern red, Barhadoes cedar I'eninsul
ffui wlk If, rigida
us ten
' cedar, |
Niirlhern
Sycamore, Bulliinha
Sea prapr.....
Southern coastal Southern coastal
Lower peninsular
iin/nim mm (jiiroliiliiwililiT^
Wllea rotaa


MWWi TIES OF WA-Conteii
Common Nahe Section Where Round Botanical Family
Darling plum, red imnwind Extreme southern MMMCMl
Black ironwond... Extreme southern
Vcllowwodd. Inilian chcrr?...........Central and northern........
Soldieiwd, Nakfdwfflnl Keys
Nakcdwood................................................................Keys............................................................................
Wild coffee. Nakedwood............Extreme southern.......................................
Mangrove...................Southern coastal /illl/'"1'
Crahapple Western
Pear..........................................................................
Service, shad, Junelierry....................ixorn
Haw, Hawthorn Most ii.....rthern
Wild plum, Sloe I'ei
Wild plum
Chickasaw, yellow plum....................
log, wild plum. Sloe All hut southern......................................
Wild cherry, wild Hack cherry Central and northern
111 except extreme south
West Indian cherry........................Dade county...................................................
(ko'plum.........................................Southern coastal counties
Coco-plum ......................Dade county.............
Few tree, Georgia hark Western............
Princewood .........................Extreme southern
Biillunliiish All sections.....................
Seven-war apple .. Southern.........................
wsm sepirraimiis Wodendron I
Mtiimti rewia
uiMwin (Bwesce Iteotloro U
mm snpip \hk Jracieaia Pynu cjnii kUki mkm
(kie^ I Nearly 5(1 species)
hm ntn'caa jMaiw
Pw ouiutt
PmiWi laronk PadiH
Ph ciirofciwii, (hmmm
i airmail
mm
hi


NATIVE TREES OF MMiiiiini
Common Name SBcnoit Wheme Founp Botanical Fabiii.) Botanical Nami
llnrlii Soatberti MiUl KmA m(ci
\r\\t\W tCeys
llikiiiin S.utrVrri Ps]M WW
I ill roller Nnilliern ciud P^MMMtl
Bimimd 41 codec Key> P^fi Maiei Prickly ui \||>n1iNii. WfflHl
Villi lime Stttbl CNRll MiiulMfwo.'I''i
Silinii.....|, Yellim Keys hiUBikm
Hoptree Norta PtetolrfcMii
Bib Torchwood Eitreim......ill ip Wvw'rVw
.....I Extreme Sun, Seville MIR____________Penbahr__ Wll iVMfHM
Siirionut Peninsular (kftawj
I'kiriila rouj-h It....... Peninsular (SlwWl
Soutbern cotton.....I, Rim ami
m-Uan? Mpltl fetal MWaXlal Miaai ajHl
IILirl iin Northern Sp lipi
Mfk Western at Ml
Black lean S&lnproww
Soapberry tan......th MfflMM SoaMoavi Mponoria
Soapberrj fA Ssataaaj aiarfiRBtai
IllUmiil, iii'iiiiil Extreme an _________ tMMI puki
Wlute itNid___Keys--...... Ip* IP*
lii|uiiia__ Keys_____, Cpi
lliiilonea .Keyi, .. WMtlfaWM


NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDUo/iiwil
i iviwN'vi
Ml Wi
,!ini
Hii\\\\
Soi
Extreme south
IliTll roih
Northern lull
Northern
Northern
Southern coastal.. Keys
Extreme south
jiijilipiiMiliriWir
MRU toiiap Wia lew Win /iiiiiiji'ikisii
Willi Wfs Will (IllfWPlfl
llfmutiiii /in
icjflU 101
ItiTOiiwI
Tree ol heaven.....
Hot.....................
Loner fatal...
Extreme south
Northern......................
Extreme south........
Skllrlio flaaca
hnkiimifkiin
Southeastern coastal
Parasol tree, Japanese varnish tier- Northern
Vi s...........
v tern.....v
ffr.
lie jiMi
Northern.
Snowdrop tree, Twowinp silver-
Si yrav
.....______ > '>
Cadsden ami Leon counties............
Astern......a......a1..............
tiav mia
Vital, lloi-r sugar
Southern ttotstal ...
Northern
ft
fkim simpler
nitei/i ca UiiImu iWinwi m*i///\
Slrra* pli|A Sim mink Sfflplww liaflorio


NATIVE TKKKS OF raHoiM
(mmhi n.....\IhekFihmi Uwni h\\\ Bouinui Nun
Sliiiliii" (Tilar, Jorreya Em lull l|iiiliii'liinil.l lijjl fll'IM' Immt ImjA, Ihmrn
Florida y__lilertf ttMlj toJMtai
Lolilolly bay Xorlheni FEKM Mum imik
JoriJoi Sn myrtle Soiiibi and fo IWIIMIfl'II! jm ineiw
Bamwood Central -/......../ WVM Tkmmn
Florida linden, Haywood fettfl Mil|Wfcll
Bufwoodl_____Ndta FUm AfUbi AInfi//w
Limn I bile luood Leon and (*Wfn miuiI^ Tit Mlftk
H'bile braid (iadsdin rounty 7V/f Ar/rfwpAW/a mien
dbiii' ImmI CkWm minty Tik mm MpUbk
lU'd Ciml and wcsiern Tik fltjm 11 fktUll
Inrricin, *bile flm Vlbern MM(M Hum Mwiraw
VlU, 1 'inffil, fori, red elm NorllVm__ '' t'tlt
%ry, red rim leslern milk
lalrr elm, Planer Iree \nrthrm Ptpffl tflKKI
Sipborry, Inirlilierry :lll *rti* CM WpM
ft iWJt^KlllilJ
Siiall' baelilrrry Istern Qkbwkii
(ieorpa hacklirrn Wcslrrn Wtfmf*JM
Florida Extrcmr MHilh kmnikH^Umi
WmI Indian Irrrai Extremr wulb Imilmindm
FjilMnry, Tn-r biiflileliei'iy Xiirtlicrn IJdIUftM knklim urUm
(IWiniii/ii viwilj
HIIUiioJ .VolbfMrni coastal IIM'MM Olkfjyk \dmm
MarM, Klai k niansroif Southern coutal- Mmm nWj
[jpiantae fen ZIGOTIUKM (>m'


beautifying the home
27
COMMON NAMK DESCRIPTION
The I < A11>*> i 11 n list of evergreen and deciduous trees growing in Florida lias been arranged alphabetically according to their common names. The botanical name follows.
We believe this arrangement will prove more satisfactory to the home owner.
Only an abbreviated description has been given.
Before planting, unless a complete knowledge of the trees to be planted is possessed, it would be well to consult a reliable horticulturist.
The Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee, Florida, will gladlv co-operate in either supplying further information or directing the writer to the proper sources for obtaining it.
Acacia (Acacia auriculi)oralis). Southern area. This species of acacia is of medium size, thick-foliaged and symmetrical. The tree has few pests.
The species (Acacia longifolia) is an erect shrub adapted to dry and exposed locations in the Southern and Central areas.
(Acacia niacrantha) is a low spreading, small tree with foliage of a bluish or steely color and is adapted to the Peninsular section.
Agyneja (Agyneja inipuhcs). This upright, small, deciduous tree is found in the Northern, Central and Southern areas; reaches a height of 25 feet and is adapted to sandy soils. It bears very small flowers.
Alexandrian Laurel (Calophylluni inophylluni). Southern area. Native to the Southern Coastal region. Of medium height, bearing small, white, fragrant flowers.
American Kim. (See Water Kim).
Anatto (liixa Orellana). Central and Southern areas. A tree that grows about 20 feet high and is a source of dye. Bears attractive rose-colored blossoms. The pulp from the fruits is used to obtain orange-colored dye for coloring rice, soups, butter, cheese and other articles of commerce.
Australian Pine (Casuarina). Also called Beefwood and She Oak. Central and Southern areas. Adapted to a wider


28 department of agriculture
-<-
range of ornamental uses than any tree in Florida, including windbreaks and hedges. Grow well on aeid and alkaline soils, sands, calcareous rocky soils, muck. etc. The species are numerous, the flowers showing some variations.
australian pink (Casutirinu Cunningham
Bamboo. Very good for mass planting or wind-break. \\ ill grow throughout the state.
Bamicalag (Aleurites trisperma). A member of the same family as the Tung-oil, having similar characteristics and bearing large flowers.
Baobab (Adansonia digitata). Southern area. The Baobab tree is of interest because of the immense diameter of the trunk when advanced in growth. The white (lowers are borne in mid-summer.
Bead Tree. (See Red Sandalwood).
Beef wood. (See Australian Pine).
Bischofla (Bischofia jaraniva). Central and Southern areas. Is a fast growing, tall tree with foliage of a bronze hue.


4
bf.alTIKY1NG thk iiomk
Itlack OllVC (Iturida Itinera*). Southern area. V ualixe
tree thai It resistant to wind damage* growing about 10 feet high.
Brazilian Pepper Tree (Srhinus lerehinthefalius). Southern. Central anil part* of Northern areas. Small c\ergreen which hears clusters of small bright red fruits.
Ituttonwood. (See I'lanc Tree).
< ajeput Tree (Melaleuca leueademlrtta). Known also h\ the name of Punk Tree. Southern to Central arras. Gr<>\ lo medium height, producing white and pale mIIow flowers that attract honey bees. Kesistant to effects of sail water.
Calabash Tree (Creseenlia C.ujele). Southern area. mi hum size. I .11 inn dark brownish-purple colored flowers.
< .imphor Tree ((innuintiniuni rantphnra). Northern. Central and Southern areas. V large tree with round. spread-
it imboo
ing head that grows to a height of 50 feet: an evergreen with inconspicuous flowers.
Candlenut ( Aleu rites moluccana). Is a member of the
same family as the Tung-oil: has similar characteristics and bears a profusion of I a rye flowers.


:)
DEPARTMENT OK \OKI( I ITIKE
Candle Tree (Ptirmentiera rervifern). Southern area, (.rows to a medium height, producing white dowers. The fruits resemMe long yellow candles.
Cannonhall Tree (Cimrintpilti xiiitinensis). Southern area. V large, ereel tree hearing iiiiusuall) large flowers that are reddish-yellow on the outside and crimson within.
Cape Chestnut (C.alodfiulrum rnpcnsis). Southern to Cen-iral areas. \ larg;- evergreen tree hearing large lavender-colored flowers in the spring.
Cape Piltosporum (Pittosporum viridiflorum). Northern and Central areas. Kather rapidly growing tree that attains a height of ahout 2.> feet.
Caroh. (See St. John's Bread).
Cassia-Hark Tree (Cinnamomum rassia). Central and Southern areas. The hark of this tree is used as a cinnamon hark substitute.
Black Olive(Bucidu Bur.eraxJurara)
Catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides). Also known as the Indian lican. Central ami Northern areas. This native tree is round


bf.u ilhilni; thk iiomk
hcailol anil attains a height of nearlx .">() feet. The flown* are white ami purplish-hrown splotches ami stripes of yellow .
.it" -li.u.i (Catesbana tpinosaj. Southern area. V spinj
Camphor tan (Cinnamon (.umphoraj
suitable for any section of florida
evergreen that grows ahout I ") feet 11 il: 11- hearing crcaim while flowers.
(haste Tree. (See Hemp Tree).
cherry Laurel (Primus ciirttliniiinn). known also as the Mock orange. Northern ami central areas. \ native ever-


coc:os i'ai.ms(Cocos Australia) nut affected by ('nlil weather: has hlue-preen (iurved leave*
Coral Tree (Krythrinn Poeppiginnn). Central and Southern areas. Grows to a height of about 35 feet and bears bright red dowers during late winter.
Crab apple (Mailt* angustifulia). Northern area. This
->-<-
green thriving on well drained soils and attaining a height of 35 feet. Deep green foliage and hearing small while (lowers in early spring.
China Kerry (Melin nsetlarach). known also as the Pride of India. Northern. Central and Southern areas. Attains a height of nearly 10 feet, producing a dense shade. The v a-riely known as the Texas Umbrella Tree (M. iinibmciilijern) is more symmetrical, producing lilac-colored dowers in late spring.
Chinese Pistache (I'ixlnein rhinenxix). Northern and Central areas. A broad, round-topped tree with short trunk and heavy branches.
Circassian Bean. (See Bed Sandalwood).
Citrus (Citrus). The many species of citrus are described in a separate bulletin published by the State Department of \griculture at Tallahassee. Florida. Such well known species as the orange, grapefruit, lime, lemon, tangerine, citron, kumqiiat. and others are fully described.


bk u tlr'yiv; the home
native deciduous tree hears fragrant pink blossoms in early spring.
Dalhergia ( Dalbergia Sissoo). Central and Southern areas. Resembles the Poplar, somewhat: grows to a height of 75 feet; hears white flowers.
Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis). Northern area. A small, deciduous tree with willow-like foliage. Dears trumpet-shaped flowers that vary in color from white to pale purple, with yellow splotches.
Dogwood, Flowering (Comus floritla). Northern and Central areas. This native tree, when in hi....... in early spring.
is truly a thing of beauty.
Dombeya (Dombeya Wallichi). Central and Southern areas. The Dombeya attains a height of 25 feet. Its flowers are pink. It grows rapidly.
Dwarf Flm (Llmus pumila). Northern and Central areas. Fast growing to a height of 15 feet. Kound top.
Ear Tree (Enterolobium cyclocarpum). Southern area. V huge, wide spreading tree with fern-like foliage. Bears small white flowers that have a green tint. The pods produced resemble the human ear. accounting for its name.
Empress Tree (Paulowina tomenlosa). Northern area. Ivapid growing, reaching a height of about 15 feet. The flowers are pale violet, marked by two yellow bands.
Eucalyptus or Cum (Eucalyptus). Central and Southern areas. There are several species of this genus in Florida. Some of them are known by the common names of gray gum, red gum, blue gum, desert gum, and red mahogany, swamp mahogany.
Fat Pork Tree. (See Monkey Apple).
Fig Tree (Ficus). Also known as the Rubber Tree. Central and Southern areas. Among the hundreds of species of this genus there is a wide variation in their foliage and fruits. The Department of Agriculture at Tallahassee, Florida, has published a bulletin on Fig Culture for those who are interested.
Flame Tree (Poinciana regia). Southern to Central areas. Is considered Florida's most popular flowering tree with its finely cut foliage and scarlet flowers which have an upper petal that is tinged with yellow.
Florida Maple. (See Southern Sugar Maple).
Floss Silk Tree (Chorisia speciosa). Southern area. The trunk and branches are covered with heavy, sharp spines. The pink flowers appear in early winter.


DK.r \KTMKNT OK AGRICULTURE
Fountain Tree ( Spathodea mmpannlnln). Southern to Central areas. An evergreen attaining a height of 70 feet: the large, scarlet flowers being very attractive and account for its growing popularity.
Fringe Tree (C.hionanthus virginim). Called also by the name of Old Man's Heard. Northern and Central areas. This
Eucalyptus
native tree bears greenish-white flowers and attains a height of 30 feet.
Geiger Tree (l.ordia Schestena). Southern area. This small, slender, round-topped tree is a native of the Keys; bears large orange-colored flowers.


BEAFTIKYINO THE HOME
35
Glossy Privet (Ligustrum lueidum ). Northern and Central areas. Used both as a shrubs and a small tree. Bears white flowers in the spring.
Gum. (See Eucalyptus).
Hackberry (Celtis laevigata). Known also as the Sugar-berry. Northern, Central and Southern areas. Its broad, spreading bead reaches a height of 75 feet.
Hayata (Koelreuleria formosana). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Bears small yellow flowers in early October.
Heliotrope Tree (Ehretia acuminata). Northern and Central areas. Derives its name from the odor of the small, white flowers which appear in the spring. Attains a height of 15 feet.
Hemp Tree (J'itex Agnus-castus). Known as the Chaste Tree also. Grows to a height of about 20 feet, producing small lilac-colored fragrant flowers during the summer.
Hickory (Hicoria). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Two species, the Mocker Nut (H. alba) and the Fig Nut (//. glabra) grow extensively in the Northern area.
Ilinaii Tree ( Elneocarpus dentntn). Southern to Central areas. The tree produces a mass of creamy white, saucer-shaped (lowers that resemble a spray of lilies of the valley.
Holly (Ilex). Northern and Central areas. There are 13 known native trees of this species in Florida, seven of which should be classed as shrubs.
Horseradish Tree (Morigna Moringa). Southern area. A small tree bearing sweet scented yellowish white flowers. The roots of the tree have the odor and taste of horseradish and have been used as a substitute.
Indian Bean. (See Catalpa).
Jaearanda (Jacaranda acutifolia). Southern to Central areas. The lavender blue flowers and the delicate fern-like foliage borne by this tree make it a favorite. Attains a height of 40 feet.
Japanese Varnish Tree. (See Parasol Tree).
Japan Wood-oil Tree (Aleurites eordata). Is of the same species as the Tung-oil and bears numerous large flowers.
Jerusalem Thorn (Parkinsonia aculeatn). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Grows to about 30 feet high and produces small, bright, yellow flowers in early spring.
Judas Tree. (See Redbud).
Kaffir Bean Tree (Srhotin Intifolia). Southern to Central areas. A small tree growing about 30 feet high and producing rose-colored blossoms in early spring.
Kapok (Ceibn pentandra). Also called the Silk-Cotton Tree. Southern to Central areas. This huge, massively but-


36 DEPARTMENT OK M.KKll Tl RE --
tressed tree is one of the most distinctive found in the areas where grown. Hears great numhers of pink or greenish-white flowers.
kentuckv Coffee Tree (Gymnodadu dioica). Northern and Central areas. This is a large attractive tree, the seeds of which were once used as a substitute for coffee.
Linden Basswood (Tilia floriduna). Northern area. Native
jerusalem thorn(Parkinsonia Acuhota)
upright growing with hroad head. Honey produced from its flowers is stated to he of exceptional quality.
Loblolly Hay (l.ordonia Lasianlhus). Northern ami Central areas. This native tree grows best in moist soils. Hears large, white, fragrant blossoms for nearly three mouths during the summer.
Locust (Gleditsia drlavayi). Northern and Central areas. The Honey Locust and the Water Locust are the best known.
Madeira Kedwood. (See Mahogany).
Madras Thorn (Pilvvolohium dulve). Also known as the Manila Tamarind. Central and Southern areas. A spreading, thorny, quick growing tree, free from pests.


isr \l i'lhim. i uk ih
37
Magnolia (Magnolia grundiflora). Also known as the Southern Magnolia, the (M. virgiana) known as the Sweet Kay, and the (M. macrophylla) known as the Cucumber Tree, are all native to Florida. The large, creamy white, strongly scented flowers are borne from April to June. There are other varieties introduced from other countries.
magnolia (younj: tree )IMagnoliuceue)
Mahoe (Hibiscus liliaccus). Southern area. Attains a height of 30 feet and grows well near the seacoast. Bears hibiscus-like flowers of pale yellow. The Mountain Mahoe (Hibiscus dolus) produces some flowers in summer and masses of red blooms during the winter.


38
dki'aktmem ok uikkt i.i i kk
Mahogany (Sweilenia .Mahagoni). Also called Madeira Redwood. Southern area. This native mahogany does not exceed a height of 50 feet, neither does it make a dense .shade.
Maidenhair Tree (Ginkgo). Northern area. A slender tree that produces fan-shaped leaves which drop off in the late fall.
Mango (Mangijera indica). Southern to Central areas.
mountain ebony(Bauhinia)
This evergreen is generally planted for its fruit; makes a very satisfactory ornamental tree.
Manila Tamarind. (See Madras Thorn).
Mock Orange. (See Cherry Laurel).
Monkey Apple (Clusta rosea). Known also as the Fat Pork Tree. Southern area. The flowers have fleshy petals.
Moreton Bay Chestnut (Caslanospermum auslrale). Southern to Central areas. A tall evergreen that produces large yellow flowers.
Mountain Ebony (Bauhinia). Also known as the Orchid Tree. Central and Southern areas. The flowers of these trees are large and resemble orchids. They appear in the winter and spring months. There are several varieties, each bearing different colored flowers.


hkaltifying t1ik homk
39 4-
Mulberry (Morns). Northern, Central and Southern areas. The native Red Mulberry (M. rubra) and the two introduced species, the White Mulberry (M. alba) and the Itlack Mulberry (M. nigra) make rapid growth and are adapteti to all sections of the State.
Mu-oil Tree ( Aleurites monlana). Belongs to the same family as the Tung-oil. Produces large flowers.
Oak (Querents). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Florida is credited with 30 native species of oaks, many of which are planted for both shade and ornament.
Olive (Olea europaea). Southern and Central areas. These
live oak(Quercus)
trees make satisfactory growth in well drained soils but rarely produce any fruit.
Old Man's Beard. (See Fringe Tree).
Orchid Tree. (See Mountain Ebony).
Paper Mulberry (Broussonelia papyrijera). Northern and Central areas. Grows to a height of about -10 feet; produces orange-red fruits which are liked by birds.


DKIWKTMKNT OK AliKICl I.TL RK
Parasol Tree (Firmiann simplex). Also known as the Phoenix Tree and the Japanese \ arnish Tree. Northern and Central areas. Reaches a height of 10 feet. The trunk and branches are smooth. The flowers are small.
Pecan (Ilicoria pecan). Northern area. While this tree is planted for shade it likewise produces a supply of nuts for winter use. A bulletin on Pecan culture is obtainable from the Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee, Florida.
Physic Nut ( Jatropha curcas). Also called Purging Nut. Central and Southern areas. A small tree bearing green-colored flowers. The fruits contain seeds that are purgative, but poisonous.
Pink Cassia ((Cassia nodosa). Southern to Central areas. Small tree that bears rose-scented, pink flowers in profusion. There are several other species, all of which bear attractive blossoms.
Plane Tree (Platanus occidentalis). Also known by the names of ltuttonwood and Sycamore. Grows to over 100 feet high in the Northwestern area with heavy branches.
Poonga Oil Tree (Pongamia pinnala). Quick growing, medium size tree having thick foliage that is resistant to heavy winds.
Poplar (Popnlus). Northern and Central areas. The native Cottonwood or Necklace Poplar (P. delloides). the Lorn-hardy (P. nigra) ami the Carolina are planted in the Northern areas.
Pudding Pipe (Cassia fistula). Southern to Central areas. Small tree producing an abundance of yellow7 flowers. Phoenix Tree. (See Parasol Tree). Pride of India. (See China Berry). Punk Tree. (See Cajepul Tree). Purging Nut. (See Physic Nut).
Queen's Crepe Myrtle ( Lagerslroemia speciosa). Southern to Central areas. Also known as Queen's Flower. The pink flowers appearing in early summer are produced while the tree is quite young. The common deciduous Crape Myrtle ( Lagerstroemia indica) may be had in pink, purple, red and white flowering varieties.
Queen's Flower. (See Queen's Crape Myrtle).
Queensland Nut (Macadamia ternifolia). Southern to Central areas. A tall tree with dense foliage bearing flowers about the size of the leaves. The seeds or nuts are edible, but have a very hard shell.
Bain Tree (Samanea Soman). Southern area. Gets its common name from the fact that the leaves fold together in darkness or cloudy weather. Attains an immense size.


l'i \k nil gajepi't thkki'melaleuca t.curatlentlnm)
->--f-


12 -:
department oe at.rk'l l.tl're
kill Inn! (C.ercis canadensis). Vlso called the Judas Tree. Northern and Central areas, (hie of the first native trees in hloom. The rosv. pink flowers arc home in profusion. i in specie- alba hear- a while flower.
Red Cedar. (See Juniper and Cedar).
Ked Cotton Tree (llinnhax malaharicum). Southern to
rival palm Central areas. Large, heavy buttressed tree bearing red blossoms.
Ked Maple (Acer ruhram). Also known as Scarlet and Swamp Maple. Native to all parts of Florida. These trees prow upright and form a narrow head; will grow well in the shade of other trees. The deciduous foliage turns to yellow and bright scarlet in the late fall.
Ked Sandalwood (Ailenanlhera ftavonina). Vlso known h\ the names of Kcad Tree and Circassian Kean. Southern area. V moderate-size evergreen with small, feathery foliage. The flowers it bears arc yellowish in color.
The Koyal Palm is one of the most striking of the Palm family: adapted only in the southern part of the state: are


HK\l Tin IN<; THK MOMK 13
->-i-
grown in the Central portions to some extent along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.
Koyal Polnclana (Poittciana Kegia). Southern and warm sections of Central areas. A small tree that is prized for its Mowers which are produced in large masses. Should be planted in proteced locations.
Kul.I mi Tree. (See Fig Tree).
Sacred lio Tree (Ficus Kiligioso). Southern area. A member of the Fig Tree family; grows well on poor soils that are well drained.
Sandbox ( IIurn crepitants). Southern area. An upright deciduous tree bearing small red flowers. The dried pods produced by this tree were used at one time for containing sand to blot ink. prior to the introduction of blotting paper.
Koyal IVmnc.iana(Poinrianu RegiaJ
Satinleaf (C.hrysophyllum oliviforme). Southern to Central area. This native tree with its coppery-colored leaves is very attractive.
Sausage Tree (Kigelia pinnata). Also known as the Fetish Tree. Southern to Central areas. A small tree bearing


sackeh bo tree (Ficus Religioso)
sea grape(Coccobulis ivifera)


rkal tlryini; thk home 45 -+-
fruits which strongly resemble sausage suspended by eords.
Bears brownish-red flowers.
Searlet Maple. (See lied Maple).
Seagrape (Coccolobit uvifera). Southern to Central areas. This native tree is best adapted to the eoastal regions.
silk oak(Greiillea Rnhusla) kernmniended fur southern and central sections
Seaside Mahoe (Thesnesin populnea). Southern area. Native tree of medium height with yellow flowers that turn purple with age.
She-Oak. (See Australian Pine).
Silk Cotton Tree. (See kapok).
Silk Oak ((Irevillea rt>hu$t

DEPARTMENT OK W.RU I III UK
a white, silky appearance on the lower surface. The large golden yellow (lowers appear in April. The species. (,reville Silk Tree (Albizzin Julibrissin). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Has fern-like foliage with (lowers of pink.
Silver or Soft Maple (Acre suerharinuni). Native. Northern area. Is a large deciduous tree with heavy branched head. The branches are brittle and break in windstorms.
Soapberry (SapinduM marginatus ). Northern. Central and Southern areas. A novelty that attains a height of about 30
stopper(Jumliolan Plum I (Eugenia Jarnlxilana)
feet. The pulp of the fruit contains saponin which will form a lather in water. Has been used as a soap substitute.
Southern .Magnolia. (See Magnolia).
Southern Sugar Maple (Acre flaridanum ). Also called the Florida .Maple. Native and found in the richer soils of Central and Western Florida.
St. John's Bread (Ceratonia siliqua). Also called the Carol), which is referred to in Bible history. Southern to Central areas. An evergreen of slow growth.
Stopper (Eugenia). Lower Peninsular and the keys. The


rem TiniNl. the home
conunon names of some of the different species are: Red Stopper, Naked Stopper, Spanish Stopper, etc.
Sugarberry. (See Hackberry).
Swamp Maple. (See Red Maple).
swkkt gi'm (Liquidambar Styradflua)
Sweet Gum (Liquidambar ttyraciflua). Northern. Central and Southern areas. Tin- native Sweet Gum grows vigorously and the deciduous foliage turns to beautiful yellows ami reds during the fall.
Sycamore. (See Plane Tree).
Tallow Tree (Sapium sehiferum). Northern, Central anil Southern areas. Free from insect pests: grows about 30 feet


m
uki'mm'mknt ok ac.kh i i.tl ke
high. 'I'll*' wax coating on the seeds is used holli for making candles anil soap in China.
I .1111.11 i ii 11 ( I ninnt it ii'Iii inilicu). Southern area. This de-tii i in hi- tree is large, rouml topped, with low hanging branches. Desirable win-re a large tree is wanted.
Temple Tree (I'liimrrin). Southern area. \ stocky tree of low height bearing verj fragrant purple (lowers. There are *e\eral other varieties that have different colored blossoms.
texas imkrri.i.a trekflUelia Azedtirach I mlirnrulifera)
Texas I nibrella Tree (Melia I mhraculifvru). .Northern. Central and Southern areas, except in sections where Citrus Trees are grown. The citrus white fly attacks it. Hears lilac flowers in late spring.
Traveler's Palm. (See Traveler's Tree).
Traveler's Tree (Rtirenala miiiltitniscuriensix). Southern area. This tree is closely related to the Banana and is also called Traveler's Palm. Derives its name from the watery fluid stored in the base of the leaf stalks, and which is supposed to be a substitute for water. It has the appearance of an open fan.
Tree of Heaven < Iilnntliu- tiltimliilitsus). Northern area. V large, deciduous tree of rapid growth, with large, spread-


Traveler's Palm(Ravanela)
Tulip Tree (Liriodendron Tulipifera). Known also as the bellow Poplar. .Northern and Central areas. This native tree is one of the largest that grows in America; has a straight trunk and bears tulip-shaped flowers with greenish white petals that are orange colored at their base.
Tung-Oil Tree (Aleurites fordi). This tree is grown coin*
--<~
ing branches. The odor of the flowers and foliage is objectionable hi most persons.
Tropical Almond (Tertiiituilia Catappa). Southern area. This large tree grows tall and is adapted for planting along the coast or inland. Bears almond-like fruits.


'.ii
DEI' VKTMENT OE M.KKILTIKE
mcrcially and also used for ornamental plantings. Produces an abundance of large (lowers.
Victorian l!o\ ( Pillosftorum unilulatiim). Central and Southern areas. Ha* attractive, dark green foliage; grows to height of about 30 feet.
Vitex (f ilex quinanla). Northern anil Central areas. Ueaches a height of 30 feel: hears purple or lavender (lower-.
Woman's Tonci k Tkkk(Alhizzia Lebbek)
Water Kim (IIntus amerivann). Known also as American IJ m and \\ hite Kim. Northern anil Central areas. A long-lived tree that attains huge size on fertile soils in bottom lands.
Weeping Willow (Snlix bahylimira). Northern area. The trunk is short, the head spreading with long branches. Grows to a height of about 3."> feet.
White Kim. (See Water Kim).
W ild I'.lack Cherry (Primus serotinn). Northern and Cen-Iral areas. \ native tree that grows well in sandy soils to a huge size.
Wild Olive (Sitleroxyliim foetiilissimunt). Southern area.


This native tree has a heavy trunk and reaches a height of nearly 70 feet. The yellow, olive-shaped fruit, when ripe, may he eaten.
Woman's Tongue Tree (Albizzia Lebbvk). Southern and Central areas. The tree is adapted to a wide range of soils: has a broad top and spreading limbs. The flowers are greenish-yellow.
Yellow Klder (Slrnolobiuni starts). Central and Southern
Arborvitae Aurea Nana(Thuja) (Ion iff ions evergreens have a wide number of uses, especially in Central and Northern Florida
areas. This native grows over 20 feet high and produces bright yellow blossoms in the late fall. Yellow Poplar. (See Tulip Tree).
Ylang-Ylang (Canangium odoratam). Southern area. A fast growing tree bearing long, greenish-yellow flowers from which perfume is made.


DEPARTMENT oh M.RKT III RE
CONIFFKS
\moii*: tlx- Conifers grown in Florida arc:
Vrbor Vitae (Thuja). Vromatie evergreen* of which ihere
are several varieties, some of which are native.
Ituiiya-ltuiiya (Arauraria hiduillii). Northern. Central
ami Southern areas. Not affected hy heavy frosts.
Bt'ny.vBi'nya Pine(Arauraria Biilwillii)
Chinese Fir (Cunniniihamia lanceotala). Northern and Central areas. An evergreen with whorled branches. Slow growing.
Cypress (( upressus). Three species of Cypress are adapted to the Northern area: the Italian Cypress (('.. semper-virens). the Arizona Cypress (('.. Arizonica) and the Portuguese Cypress, sometimes called the Cedar of Goa. (('.. lusi-lanica ).




5 i
DEPARTMENT OK AGHIC.l'LTL'RE
Cypress-Pine (Callitris robusta). Lower parts of Nortliern and Central and Southern areas. Rapidly growing and adapted to a wide range of soils. Has an appearance somewhat like the Cellar. Other species are also planted.
Florida ^ ew (Taxus jhiridanu). Northern area. Native to the eastern hank of the Apalachicola River.
Indian Cedab(Cednu Ueudara)
Indian Cedar (i'.edrus deodara). Northern anil Central areas. Grows with a regular pyramidal outline and has a blue-green color. Makes an ideal living Christmas tree.
Juniper and Cellar (Juniperus). There are two native species (J. lurayana) and (J. rirginiana). both of which arc commonly called Red Cedar.
Monkey-Puzzle (Armtcaria araucana). Symmetrical and pyramidal in shape. Planted in all sections.
Moreton Ray Pine (Armtcaria l.unninghainii). Has a tendency to turn rusty in some sections.
Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria excelsa). Used extensivelv as a potted plant.


:,r, 4-
Pine (Pinus). There are seven native species of Pine in Florida and although they are seldom planted, those that are growing on a building site are generally left to grow.
Stinking Ceiiar(Torreya Tuxijuliu) Photo of Tree Growing in the Grounds of the State (lapitol
Stinking Cedar (Torreya taxifolia). Northern area. Found in a very limited area on the eastern bank of the Apalachi-cola River and in one county in Georgia. The leaves, twigs and wood, when crushed, give off a fetid odor.
Yew (Podocarpus). These evergreens are found in the Northern area and will grow in shady places. There are several species.


japanese Yeh(fmlorarpus MncrophyUa Sinensis/ i Sheared Specimen) Verj desirable for formal planting- at entrances or corners. May be sheared to grow in many shapes. Also used as a tub plant.


57 4-
SIIKl KKKIO
Only thrifty, robust looking shrubs anil hushes having an abundance of foliage will produce harmonious and satisfactory plantings. Most of these plantings are made with the expectation of their permanent location in the place they are planted, and it is poor economy of hoth expense and satisfaction, to plant second-class plants because they may cost less. (JiiimI plants need not be expensive unless the variety is a ran- one and difficult of propagation.
Florida offers such a wide range of color, shades, si/e-. shapes and styles in the plants available for landscaping that any effect desired may be attained, lieautiful plants are found in every section of the State.
The proper time to transplant shrubs anil bushes is between December and March first while the plants are in a dormant state of growth.
Australian Tree Fkrn(Alsophila Australis)
The Tree Fern should have a shady protected location as it is very sensitive tn wind and sun. Requires a moist soil. This lieautiful fern will more than repay tin* home owner for the time and care given it.


.58 DEPARTMENT OK AGRK I'LTl'RE
-j--
Rkead FRuh Plant(Mtmslcra Delicins-i)
Tropical vine with large lacy cut leaves. Requires shade and should be crown near a tree or some kind of support.


bf.aitifyinc, imf. homk
59 4-
i
Chkrry LkvnzL(Pfunus Carolinians) (sheared)
an exceptionally pood plant for hedge or specimen planting as it can he kept almost any desired shape by shearing regularly.
Crotons (or Coilieums, as they are popularly known in America) are lieautiful plants with many forms of handsome anil oild foliage of the most hrilliant coloring. The different varieties of distinct coloring make beautiful specimen plants for jardinieres for interior decoration, as they are used in Florida both for interior decoration and landscape plantings. As exhibition plants they are very effective, anil may be grown to specimens r> or 6 feet high or even larger. In smaller sizes Coilieums are much used as table plants. The narrow-leafed varieties are most used for this purpose. They are also attractive in window boxes and for mantel and table decorations.


Florist or WINTER Blooming Gardenia(Gardenia Veitchii) (Grafted)
It has been found by grafting the Gardenia Veitchii on a root-knot proof root stock that it produces a plant lor landscape uses which otherwise could not be used: has a blooming period of ahout four month-.


BKMITl'VIM, THE HOME
61
Requires a semi-shaded location: makes a bushy, compact plant. Very desirable as a pot grown palm for interior decoration.


62 DEPARTMENT OF ACiKICLLTLKE
Hibiscus
Is a fast growing shruli anil has many uses in the landscape scheme. Among the newer introductions there are many shades anil colors. The plant is tender and easilv frozen hut generally sprouts from the n>ot and hlooms again in a few months.
Hydram.k v
A very showy plant during the spring and summer with its large bloom and rather heavy foliage. Is adapted to shady and pari shady locations, and when severely pruned about, mid-winter will produce an abundance of bloom and new foliage in early spring.


UK.UTlFYINi; THE HOME
63 -r-
Oi.eamikk (i>r Serium)
A most effective shruh adapted to Florida. May be used as a hedge plant or for mass plantings. They bloom in profusion in a wide range of colors during the spring months.


DKI'AKTMKM OK \CKI< I I.TL KK
Verj- good for hedge, foundation planting, or specimen. Will grow well in most sections of Klorida and stand considerable salt spray, making it desirable for coastal planting.
Prostrated Juniper(Juniperu* Chinensis Pfitzerlana)
I hi- Ion spreading Juniper is excellent for corner- or l>orders. Crows well in central or north Klorida.


\ dense, slow-growing, hardy shrub of the citrus family, is very good for foundation planting, hedges or specimens.
Star Jasmine(Jasminum I'ulirsiens) almost indispensable as a foundation or landscape plant. it ha> periodic crop, of star-shaped while flowers and can be grown as a shrub or vine.


Yellow Bell(Bush Allamanda) May In- trimmed to prow as a Iwsli or trained as a vine. It l>ears its waxlike yellow (lowers practically all year. Freezes easily. Imt generally sprouts
up from the roots.


BEAITIKYING THE HOME
67 4-
Plants or Vines us Screens
Kither plants or vines will serve to hide unsightly huild-ings or views hut they should be planted to serve as the background for lawns or plants that do not grow high and varieties adaptable to the region should always be employed. Yellow jasmine, honeysuckle, and Virginia creeper are suitable for North Florida, and for South and Central Florida, trumpet vine, wisteria, honeysuckle, jasmine, allamanda. bignonia, and thundergia are among the plants recommended.


DEI'AKTMKNT OK ACRICl ITl KK
4-
LAWNS
A properly designed and correctly planted lawn in its emerald beauty adds ornamentation to it* surroundings and it conveys the impressions of peace, repose ami tranquility.
lieautiful lawns may be bad by any home lo\er in any section of Florida. The building of a good lawn involves proper soil preparation, good grass seed, plenty of water and sufficient attention and care, Grass needs plenty of water ami if the soil is poor, plant food must be adde I through fertilization.
\ MtlKTIKS OF <>K VSS
The varieties of grass generally used in Florida are: Bermuda, St. Lucie, Carpet. Centipede and St. Vugustine.
Illustrations of lawns planted with these varieties are given herein and descriptions of them follow.
Bermuda Grass
This makes a very attractive lawn when planted on proper soil and under good care it compares with the lilue grass of Kentucky. Loam or clay-loam soils are best for its growth. It also grows well on some sand soils or muck. Soils having a heavy subsoil that retain moisture are necessary when Bermuda grass is planted in light soil. Ample moisture supply must be provided.
When Bermuda is allowed to form seed heads it will grow to a height of 6 to 12 inches.
i.an of bermuda crass


beautifying the home 69
->-<~
Lawns planted with Bermuda grass should he cultivated at regular periods to assure a vigorous growth. Should the lawn hegin to thin, spading it up will prove beneficial.
The grass will not grow well in the shade.
Bermuda grass may he grown either from seed or the setting of the plants. The growth is through rootstocks and surface runners. Seed retpiires about three weeks to germinate. If soil and other conditions are good germination may take place within two weeks.
St. Lucie Grass
This grass is a strain of Bermuda. It does not have the underground rootstocks typical of Bermuda and is easv to eradicate should any change in the lawn be desired.
The leaves of St. Lucie grass are coarser and when grown in shady places it becomes lighter in odor.
The same class of soils suitable for the growth of Bermuda grass will produce good lawns of St. Lucie.
The sod will remain dense for a longer period of time than Bermuda.
The only disease which seems to affect St. Lucie grass is leaf spotting which has been prevalent along the Last Coast of Florida.
Carpet Grass
The spreading of Carpet Grass is by means of surface runners only and under good conditions will produce a
itS*^'
Lawn ok Carpet Grass


70
department ok \<;ki( i i.tl kk
-
(It-list' sod. Inil il should be planted in a good moist soil. It will grow to a height of six inches and if allowed to form seed the stalks will grow over nine inches high. The tendency of the stalks is lo bend and if allowed to grow without frequent mowing considerable difficult) will be experienced in cutting. This grass is one of the best pasture grasse-raised in the State.
w ith good supply of plant food ami ample moisture Carpet grass will grow on any type of soil. Drought and insufficient moisture will cause the grass to die out.
Carpet grass seed will germinate within fifteen to twenty days.
Centipede (rnss The short leaves of medium fineness of this grass grow to a height of three to four inches, spreading by means of surface runners and under proper care will form a very dense soil.
This grass was introduced in 1U{ from China and is belter adapteil to dry, sandy soils than any other lawn grass grown in Florida. Drought will cause the grass to wilt and become dry hut it regains its normal strength and vigor quickly. Its vigorous growth has crowded out all other grasses in some localities.
i.awn of Centii'edf. grass
Centipede grass does not require the attention that other grasses do. thriving with less water ami mowing. After becoming established it will remain a beautiful lawn for an indefinite period, if given ordinary care.
High, dry sands and heavier soils have produced many attractive lawns of Centipede grass in every section of Florida.


71 4-
St. Augustine Grass
Lawns of St. Augustine grass are more common than any Other in Florida.
The plants with their coarse, tender leaves, when kept well watered and fertilized, will put forth vigorous growth and make a very satisfactory lawn. If the grass is permitted to grow without cutting it will attain a height of nearly twelve inches. Proper care given to the lawn assures a dense sod, the grass growing equally as well in the shade as in locations receiving ahundant sunshine.
Lawn of St. Augustine Grass
This grass will grow well on practically every type of soil found in the State and can he maintained in good condition if moisture and the necessary plant food are supplied.
The grass spreads through surface runners.
The desirable dark green color is obtained only through proper fertilization, and, being resistant to cold, these lawns frequently remain green throughout the winter months.
Chinch bugs attack St. Augustine grass. The methods for their eradication as given in the last pages of this bulletin should be carefully followed. Chinch bugs multiply very rapidly ami strenuous effort should be made to control them.
preparing THE SOIL FOR MAKING A LAWN
An underground watering system should be installed, if possible, as no other method of watering a lawn assures such an equal distribution of moisture. Plant life contains


72 DKI'AKTMKNT OK ViKIU I.'ITKK
->-<-
from 55* f to 95% of water anil ample moisture supplied at regular intervals is necessary for continuous, vigorous growth. When installing such a system it should he done hefcre the soil is prepared for the grass seed. Trenches about twelve inches deep, properly spaced, are dug and the water pipes laid in the bottom of them. These pipes if laid level will give a more equal distribution of water. Uprights or outlets arc placed at regular intervals.
Grading
The entire plot to be seeded should be thoroughly spaded, the soil pulverized and raked smooth. Then the soil must be well watered so that it will settle and become firm for planting. Grade so that there will be a slight slope away from the house.
Lawn of St. Augustinf. Grass
Dwellings of this type should have formal foundation plantings for the most satisfactory results.
Fertilizing Before Planting
If the soil is deficient in fertility or is very sandy, manure or rich soil must be used. A clay subsoil about a foot below the surface is ideal for retaining moisture and for permanent lawns it is economy to lake out the poor soil, put in a foot of clay and a layer of rich soil about six inches deep on top. There will be little, if any, difficulty in maintaining a lawn so prepared, in perfect condition.
Before seeding, about ten pounds of super-phosphate, two pounds of muriate or sulphate of potash and two pounds of


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74
kepakimkm of \l.ki i i.tl'kk
perhaps the niiw- of most unsightly lawns. IMaul lift- need* fooil ano! moisture just as human* ilo.
Wowing
V fast growing lawn ueeils to lie iimunl tori cven to ten days. Mowing loo clone weakens the plants. The mower lllollld he ml to mow alioul one inch above the surface runner*. Mowing will keep ilown weed* anil assist in the spread of the "r.i-v I rave the cutting* on the lawn a* thev will -up-plv plant fooiI for the grass. \X ilh neb care at -lateil interval* the lawn will keep in the be*t of comlition.
ii titer in v
The soil on which gra- i- growing should im- kept iuoi*t ami thi* i* aeeompli*hetl more satisfactorily through the ue of an uiiilergrouml watering system than any other melhoil. \ thorough wetting two or three limes each week is heller than light *prinkling* daily. Thi* *y stem of watering permit* the application of water at night when the loss of moisture through evaporation is lowest.
During tin- rainy season, from June to september, very lillle watering is necessary.
Fertilizing the Established l.nu n
If the grant* rutting* are left on the lawn when it is mowed very little fertilizer will be needed. Nitrogen fertilizer applied every month, and two pounds of sulphate or muriate of potash spread on every thousand square feel of lawn surface, with five pounds of super-phosphate applied once a year should keep the lawn in a vigorous state of growth.
The nitrogen element can he supplied through the use of cottonseed meal, castor meal, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, leiinasalpeler, ami other nitrogen fertilizers.
\X believer the r.i begins to lose its dark hiitii color the nitrogen fertlizer hoiihl lie used.
The lawn must be watered immediately after applying the fertilizer to prevent burning the grass.
\ very good treatment in addition to fertilizing is to cover the lawn to a depth of about three-fourths of an inch with good manure or muck once each vear.
Green I.nuns During If inter
Italian rye grass is used for winter sowing where green lawn* art- desired during the winter month*. The lawn* 11111*1 he kept well mowed until the advent of warm weather when


75 4~
the winter grasses will die out. If the grass is not CUt frequently the winter grasses will choke out the first planting of permanent lawn. The winter seed should he sowed when the top soil is applied. Two ami one-half pounds of winter grass seed will sow one thousand square feet of lawn. Kentucky Blue grass seed is also used for this purpose hut the cost is higher than for Italian rye grass seed.
Lawn of St. Augustine Grass With Wf.ll Grouped Shrubbery Plantings of this type are used for corners or screens as the Shrubs can be kept at medium height with very little effort.
CHINCH BUG CONTROL
The Chinch hug has a disagreeable odor ami when full grown is about one-fifth of an inch long. The body is black with wings that are nearly white, each wing having a black spot in the center. The young are reddish in color and are wingless.
The insect does its damage by sucking the plant juices. It can he killed only by contact insecticides, such as dusts or liquid sprays.
Dusts
Dusts may be purchased ready for application or the ingredients bought and mixed at time of application.
A dust containing about 2r/f nicotine, known as SnufF Number Two, has proven effective. It is harmless, easily applied, will not burn the grass and valuable as a fertilizer. In applying it select a dry day when the sun is shining.


76
DEPARTMENT OK AOKK 1 l.Tl RE
Twenty-five to thirty-five pounds for even thousand square feet of lav* 11 i the usual treatment. The lawn should not In-watered for several days after treatment.
( oarse ground tohai-i-o. which has a lower nicotine eon-tent, anil cost* less, if applied during the early stages of chinch hug infestation, will prove satisfactory as a control measure. If the coarser ground tobacco is mixed with hy-tlrated lime of an equal weight its effect is increased.
V -n I ph.ii< 11 no- dust containing '*>' f nicotine is a good insecticide. Seven pounds of this mixture should he applied to each thousand square feet.
\n insecticide made of fifty percent free nicotine in fifty pounds of hydrated lime costs less to apply.
One of the strongest contact insecticides known is calcium cyanide. It is highly poisonous and care must he used in applying it or it will hum the grass. It is always applied when the grass is thoroughly dry. and the lawn is kept dry for several hours after application, or the sprinkling system is kept running continuously to keep the gas washed down. If this insectieide is used, take an old broom and sweep the lawn immediately after it is put on the grass so that it is spread evenly. This will also brush the poison down among the stems where the bugs are eating.
Do not let the dust enter your mouth nor breathe it. The fumes must be kept out of sleeping quarters, ami the cans containing the material must not be opened inside any room. This dust, when useil as directed, will destroy chinch bugs, crickets, moles, and other pests that attack lawns.
Liquid Sprays
V liquid spray is made of 1(H) gallons of water to which lias been added one pint of nicotine sulphate and about live or six pounds of whale oil or laundry soap, or as a substitute for the soap, a pound of calcium casemate. To reduce the cost of the spray certain oils acting as nicotine sulphate activators may be used and the amount of the nicotine sulphate is correspondingly reduced.
Other liquid sprays are made of derris or pyrethrum compounds.
Do not mow a lawn that is infested t.....-losely, ami keep
the lawn well watered.


FOUNDATION PLANTINGS
I Ik- following pages with illustrations show plantings for different types of houses.
i'l.mi- have heen selected to harmonize with the size ami architecture of the house. Substitutions may be made. It is always best to consult a recognized landscape gardener he-fore planting.
Willi the use of a variety of plants careful attention must he given to proper fertilization, pruning, thinning, ami replacements will he found necessary.
Good effects are not obtainable unless the plants are robust, and thrifty in growth with abundant foliage.
The purpose of planting grass, shrubs ami trees is to make a harmonious unit of the buildings and their surroundings.
Suggested Plantings for Different Section* oi Florida
NORTHERN CENTRAL
I Jasmine Primulinium or 1 Foundation Planting of Plumbago
Abelia Crandiflora Capensis or Rlue Leadwort
SOUTHERN 1 Jasmine Simplirifolium or Thryallis Braziliensis


78
department ok \gkicl iii .'he
Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 arizona cypress
2 arliorvitae aurea conspieua
3 alielia grandiflora
i i.i trustruin 1.11< i11(ini ."i i'ittnsporiim toliria 7 podocarpus sinensis
8 cherry laurel
') cedms deoilara
CENTRAL
1 arizona cypress (Cupressus)
Arizonica Oblonga Claucat
2 arborvitae aurea conspieua
(Thuja Orientalist
3 codiaeum (Crotonl
\ wax privet (Ligustrum Lucidum) h golden dew drop
(Duaranta Plumieri)
6 palm (Cocos PlumosaJ
7 palm coconut (Cocos .\uciferaj X palm (If ashinglonia Robusta)
') indian cedar (Cedrus Deodaru)
southern
1 ligustrum lucidum
2 podorarpu> sinensis .'! crotons
I \' al> pliia
5 duranta plumieri
6 palm (Cocos Plumosa)
7 coconut palm
8 palm (If ashinglonia Robusta) () podoearplls nepgi


Suggesteil Plantings far Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN CENTRAL
1 Lignstrum Lucidum or 1 Acalypha or
Nandina Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Spiraea Vanhouttei or 2 Crotons or
Abelia Granditlora Phyilanthns (Joseph's Coat)
SOUTHERN
1 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons)


Ktl
DEPARTMENT OE \(.KIi 1 III KK
<-
Suggested Plantings for Different Section* of Florida
NORTHERN I Pittosporum Tobria Ligustrum Lucidum 3 jasmine Primulinum or
Spiraea Vjnhouttei
CENTRAL
1 Pittsporum J'ohria
2 Watt Pri\et I Ligustrum Lucidum)
3 Jasmine SOI THERN
1 Pittosporum Tohria
2 Ligustrum Lucidum
3 Jasmine Simplieifolium


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Climbing Roses or Wisteria
2 Flowering Quince
3 Vibernum Japonicum
4 Ilex Vomitoria I Sheared)
CENTRAL
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Acalypha or Plumbago
3 Crotons
-I Eugenia (Myrtijolia) (Sheared)
SOUTHERN
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Mosaic Plant (Acalyphu)
3 Codiaeum (Crotons)
4 Australian Pine I Sheared)
(Casuarina Equisetijolia)


-:
OKI' \K IAIK.NT OK M.RH I LIT KK
Suggested Plantings lor Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN.
1 \rborvitae l">ramidali*
2 Alwlia (iranditlora '.\ < !cdru- IVodara
I Spanish Rayon**!
Ru-h Honeysuckle
CENTRAL
1 Arlionitae I'yramidalis (Thuja)
2 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulium) .'! I'alm Corns I'lumosa
I Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Aloijolial .5 W eeping or Trailing Lantana (Lantana Delicatissima)
SOUTHERN
1 I'odnearpus Sinensis or
Sheared Australian Pine
2 Ja-mine Simplieifolium
3 I'alm Coconut
I Spanish Bayonet Trailing Lantana


HKU Tin IM. THE HOME
83
\
Suggested Plantings jur Different Sections oj Florida
NORTHERN 1 Arborvitae Aurea Conspicua 2 Palm (Cocos Australis)
3 Nandina Domestica
4 Ficus Repens
CENTRAL
1 Palm (Cocos Plumosa)
2 Palm (Phoenix Roeheleni)
3 Carissa Crandillora
I Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
SOUTHERN
1 Coconut Palm (Cocos Nucifera)
2 Dwarf Date Palm
(Phoenix Roeheteniil
3 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
4 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)


.".I
DEPARTMENT OK AGRICULTURE
Suggested Plantings lor Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 (limbing Roses or Eicus Repens
2 Azaleas or Altelia Grandiflora
CENTRAL
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Crotons or Azaleas
SOUTHERN
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons, assorted
varieties)
porch-


VfV-
Suggested Plantings fur Different Sections of Florida NORTHERN CENTRAL)
1 Spanish Bayonet
2 Flowering Quince
3 Sheared Ilex Vontitoria ^ I'iltosporum Tohria
t Ahelia Grandiflora
1 Spanish Bayonet
2 Crotons
3 Podocarpus (Sheared i
4 Century Plant
5 Duranta
SOI I HERN
1 Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Aloifolia/
2 Codiaeum (Crotonsi
3 Australian Pine (Sheared)
(Casuarina Equiselifolia)
4 Century Plant Agave
(Americana Varigata)
5 Golden Dew Drop
(Duranta Plumieri)


+
DEPARTMENT OK AC.RICULTl RE
Suggested Plantings fur Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Ligustrum Nobilis
2 Hydrangea
.'1 Kicus Repens I Sh-ar-tl)
Cherry Laurel (in parkway i
CENTRAL
I Hibiscus (Sheared hedge i Hydrangea
Eicus Repens (Climbing Fig) (on pillars, side of house and awning i Cherry Laurel (l.auro cerasu* Caroliniana) (Shearedin parkway
SOUTHERN
1 Hibiscus (Sheared) or Acalypha
2 Dracaena (Assorted colors i
3 Kicus Repens
( ik'onut Palm I in parkway i


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Arborvitae Compacta
2 Vibernum Suspensum
3 Podocarpus Sinensis
4 Abelia Grandiflora
CENTRAL
1 Arborvitae Compacta (Thuja)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons)
3 Japanese Yew ( Podocarpu*
Macrophylla Sinensis)
4 Golden Feather Palm
(Arecu Lutescence) Climbing Fig (Ficus Repens) I On wall and front of house I
SOUTHERN
1 Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Crotons
3 Podocarpus Sinensis
4 Tccorna Capensis
<5) W\ Al)


Suggested Plantings lor Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
CENTRAL
1 Lipistriini
2 Vibemum Suspensuiii
3 Cocos Australia
1 Wax Privet (Ligustrum Lucidumt
2 Jasmine ( Jusiminum Primulinum)
3 < incus Plumosa Palms
SOUTHERN
1 Ligustrum Lucnlum
2 Jasmine (Simpticifolium)
3 Royal Palm


-:
BEAUTIFYING THE HOME
89
Suggested Plantings far Different Sections oj Florida
NORTHERN
1 Climbing Rose
2 Flowering Quince
3 Spiraea Thumbergi
4 Cocos Australis
5 Arborvitae (Tall i
6 Jasmine Primulinum
CENTRAL
1 Bougainvillaea /Crimson Lake!
2 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
3 Codiaeum (Crotons)
4 Zamia. Cycad (Coontie)
5 Arborvitae (Aurea Conspieua
Thuja)
6 Jasmine (Jasminum Simplicijolium)
SOUTHERN
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
3 Codiaeum (Crotons)
4 Zamia, Cycad (Coontie)
5 Arborvitae (Aurea Conspieua
Thuja)
6 Jasmine (Jasminum Simplicijolium)


90
DKPARTMENT OK AORICI 1 TLIRE
Suggested Plantings jar Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Uielia C.randitlora
2 (locos Australis
3 Podocarpus \Iaki
4 Bci| of \miual-
CENTRAL
1 Mixture of Ootons anil Acalypha.
with Ficus Repens on house
2 I'alni Cocos Plumosa
3 Native Pine with Alamanda I Hid of Annuals
SOUTHERN
1 Mixture of Crotons and Acalypha
2 Royal Palm
3 Coconut Palm
4 Red of Annuals


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Spirea Thumbergi
2 vibernum Suspeosum
3 Flowering Quince
CENTRAL
1 Golden Dew Drop (Duranta
Plumieri/
2 Crotons (Codiaeum/
3 Bougainvillaea Purple
( Sandcriana G labra I
SOUTHERN
1 Golden Dew Drop (Duranta
Plumieri)
2 Crotons (Codiaeum)
3 Bougainvillaea Purple
(Sanderinna Glabra)


92 -+
DEPARTMENT OE AC.RICI LURE
Suggested Plantings far Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Jasmine Primulimim
2 Mielia Grandillora
3 Alielia Cfrandillora
\ Pillosporum ( Sheared I ."> Spanish Bayonet
CENTRAL
1 Jasmine (Jasminurn Primulinum)
2 Crotons (Codiaeuml Golden Dew Drop
(Durantu PiuntieriI
4 Arborvitae Compacta (Thuja)
5 Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Atoi folia/
solTHERN
1 Jasminurn Simplieifolitim
2 Crotons
3 Duranta Pluinieri
4 Podocarpus Maki I Sheared!
5 Spanish Bayonet
f0


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN
1 Severiana Buxifolia
2 AiVlia Grandiflora
3 Podorarpus I Sheared)
4 Cocos Australis
CENTRA I.
1 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulinum t
2 Wax Privet (l.iguslrum luata)
3 Yaupon Holly (Ilex Vomitoria)
4 Palms (Cocos Plumosa) St. Augustine
(Stenotaphrum Secundatum >
SOI THERN
1 Carissa Grandiflnra
2 Chalcas (Orange Jasmine)
3 Eugenia Hookeriana (Sheared)
4 Coconut Palm


NoH I'HERN
I Pitloinn ( Sheared > '.! \ ilx-rnum Sii|irnsum .1 (Innfedcrali' l.i-iiiine or Climldng Rote
1 l.icu-lrum I.tiridiim
2 Crotons
.'t Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
SOUTHERN
1 Moilllc Plant (Acillypha)
2 Crotons (Cotlineutn)
3 Itouc-invillaca (Crimwn Lakrl I in of Crntiirrdr Grass


Suggested Plantings fur Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN I CENTRAL
1 Podocaipnt Sinensis
2 Climbing Rose
3 Ahclia Crandillora
4 Azaleas
5 Japanese I'rinmlinnni (> Ilex Yomitoria
1 Podorarpus Sinensis
(Japanese Yew)
2 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
3 I'alm Areca Luteseens
(Golden Feather Palm)
4 Azaleas
5 Jasminum Pubescence
(Star Jasmine) A laupon Holly (Ilex I omitoria)
SOUTHERN
1 Podocarpus Sincii-is
2 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
3 Palm Areca
4 Chalcas Paniculata
(Orange Jasmine)
5 Carissa Grandiflora
6 Palm Phoenix Roebeleni

CD
0
PORCtr-


% DEPARTMENT OK \GR1( IETIRE
-j.--*
ILLUSTRATING THE RESULTS OE GOOD LANDSCAPING


BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 97 -*~
\CKMIW I.IIM.MI \T>
Acknowledgment is mailt' to the I'nited States Department of Horticulture, Agriculture experiment Station. Gainesville. Fin., and Mr. John Geiinaro, Landscape Consultant, Tampa.


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