• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover
 Index
 Introduction
 Home beautifying with plant...
 Trees
 Shrubbery
 Lawns
 Foundation plantings
 Acknowledgement






Group Title: New Series - State of Florida. Department of Agriculture ; no. 102
Title: Beautifying the home with trees, shrubbery and lawns
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002882/00001
 Material Information
Title: Beautifying the home with trees, shrubbery and lawns
Series Title: <Bulletin> New Series
Physical Description: 97 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: <1936>
 Subjects
Subject: Landscape gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Ornamental horticulture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "November, 1936."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002882
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002456322
oclc - 41556038
notis - AMG1648
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Index
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    Home beautifying with plant life
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Trees
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Shrubbery
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Lawns
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Foundation plantings
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Acknowledgement
        Page 98
Full Text


NI:-w SERIES No. 102


Beautifying the i6h
iu'th -

Trees, Shrubbery

and Lawns


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
N ATHA N M A YO, Corniinim'er
TAI.LAI IASSEE





INDEX
PAGE
In tro d u ctio n ....... ................. .. ..................... 3
Acknowledgments .... ....................... .. 98
Foundation Plantings .................................. ....
Illustrations ........ .-.. .9.. ..... ............. ..... ......... 77-97
H om e Beautifying ......... ............ ....... .. ......... 4
B orders ........... ... ..... ...............-- .. ............ ..------------------ 5
Hedges and W ind Breaks ........ .. ........................ 7
H u us ......... ... ................ ........ ...............------- .----- ..- 8
L aw ns .............. .................... ...... 5
Low G round P landing .. .... ..... ........ ....................... 8
N natural G gardening Style .... ............ ... ... .................. 5
Ponlds .......6.................................
R oads ----..... ... ........ ..--------------. ... --------...-------.. 5
R o ads ---,- -.--------------- ------------------------ -- -- ----- ------------ -.
R ock C lu m p s ........................... ............6........ .. ....... 6
S h a d e .............. ................. ..................... ........... 5
Show y P lant .................. ............. ..... ................ ...--- 8
U se of "C row 's N est" .............. .... ........................... 4
\ ild G ardens ............ ............ ................... 6
L aw ns ................. ..... ...... ... .... ............. ................ 68
Chinch Bug Control ... .......... ............. ... ... 75
D u sts ....................................... 76
Liquid Sprays .. .. ................ 76
Fertilizing before planting ........... 72
Fertilizing established lawns ..... ................. .. 74
G ra d in g ... ... ........................ ........ ................. 72
Green lawns during inter ................ 74
\ ow ing ................. ......... .....---- -7
P preparing the soil .. ................. ................ 71
Sow ing seed ......... .................3............... 73
Treatment for old lawns ........ ............ 73
V a rie ties ... ................ ................. 6 8
B erm uda ......... ............. .......... 68
C a rp et .. ......... .. ................... ... 69
Centipede .......... ............70
St. A ugustine ................... ..... 71
St. L ucie .... .................... .......... 69
\\ aterin g ..... ........... ........... ...... ... 74.





I N D E X-Continued
PAGE

Shrubbery ....................... -- --------- .. ............---- 5
Australian Tree Fern ....................................... 57
Bread Fruit Plant ........--....-- .. --......... ------. -- 58
Cherry Laurel ..................--------- ..........------- -------------- 59
Florist or Winter Blooming Gardenia ......................-...... 60
Golden Feather Palm .............................. ............... 61
Hibiscus ..............-.....------- -------- ------ ------------- 62
Hydrangea ............--------------- ---------...... -----..... 62
Oleander .......-...~....--............------ -----. ----------- 63
Pittosporum Tobira ....-..............-----.-- .......---- 64
Severinia Buxifolia ....-....................- --- -----....------ 65
Star Jasmine .........--- .......--........ ------ --------- 65
Yellow Bell .............--.......... ------......----- 66
Yellow Plumbago ......................-------- --------. 66
Plants or Vines as Screens .........---..--------......------ 67
Trees ....................... -----------...............- ---------------- 9
Common Name Description ...........---------................. 27-56
Conifers ..................-..- ...... ------ -- -----.......--------52-56
Index of Common Names .....................------........--.-- 12-13
Native Trees of Florida .......................-............. .... 14-26
Pruning ............................ .. ----.. ---- .........------ 11
U utility .................................. ... ....... 9
Varieties ..................... ...---- ....... -------------- .. 11









Introduiction


According to history the discovery of Florida )v Ponce de
Leon. was on Easter Sunday. The mass of bloom that greeted
this early explorer compelled his admiration and he forthwith
called the new land "Pascua Florida," which means the "Feast
of Flowers."
Further exploration disclosed blooming and ornamental plants
in great profusion and tile early settlers were so pleased with the
floral effect that the territory soon became known as the "Land
of Flowers."
Since that time both naturalists and botanists of world-wide
reputation have visited the State to study the unusual variety
of plant life and numerous books have been written describing
the exceptionally wide range of trees. shrubs. flowering plants
and evergreens native to Florida.
The settling of the State together with the growth of industry.
however h ha had its usual effect and a great deal of the natural
beauty has been destroyed. As a result new arrivals to the State
question the feasibility of growing the plant life so necessary for
"IHome Beautification." Many hundreds of varieties of flowers
and plants can be raised very successfully in Florida. if the same
attention given in other states to soil. rootstocks. varieties, cul-
tivating, fertilizing, spraying and pruning is observed. Climatic
conditions in Florida give the State a very distinct advantage
over most every other State.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HOME BEAUTIFYING WITH PLANT LIFE
When constructing a new home a very careful study of the
existing trees, plants and shrubbery should be made before re-
moving any of them. Denuding a tract is often a serious mistake.
In many instances it is futile to attempt improvement on the
natural conditions as they exist. The greatest landscape artist,
Mother Nature, will never be equalled by human plans and only
through a study of Nature's plans can new ideas relating to plant-
ing be improved.
There is vast meaning back of everything created and placed
by this Supreme Intelligence, so much in fact, that human in-
tellect is slow in grasping its full import. The rhythm and
harmony in growing things needs to be learned to be appreciated.
Natural conditions used as a foundation or central idea, when
embellished, will bring out the maximum beauty in the home
surroundings.
It is best to carefully analyze the entire landscaping plan
before any clearing is done, any roads or pathways cleared, or
foundations dug. Nature's green bosom is ready to receive any
structure to be built and if "correctly dressed" with green "gar-
ments" it will merge into its surroundings with such pleasing
effect as to appear a homogenus part of the growing things
around it.
"Repose thyself at the feet of Nature and learn."

Use of a "Crows-nest"
A portable "crows-nest," built about 15 feet high, consisting
of a light weight frame or scaffold made preferably of 1x3 ma-
terials and that can be moved about easily is equipment that
every home builder can use to distinct advantage.
On one side the strips serve as steps and a platform at the
top with a guard rail will enable the builder to obtain a birds-
eye view of the grounds. When placed on the spot of the con-
templated building site a map or plan can be sketched of all
the natural surroundings, elevations, streams, etc. This assures
scientific and natural procedure.

Natural Gardening Style
Nature is the only natural planter we know. Single trees have
been set like lone sentinels by this great architect-gardener.
The effects of lavishness, profusion, massiveness and solidarity
are all parts of the Natural Plan, which reflects harmony in all
its perspective and nearby effects. The planting that gives
lasting satisfaction in home-landscaping is that which uses the





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


natural laws of where, how and what to plant. The more in-
tensively this master plan is studied, the more certain the suc-
cess will be. The dwelling rightly should he considered an
integral part of the landscape, the same as the roads. bridges and
planted vegetation.
Lawns
The open spaces and meadows found amidst forest, on moun-
tain tops and in the valleys gave the first concept of lawns.
The shape of the lawn may he left to individual taste. Severe.
straight lines of the formal type or graceful curves that blend
into the general layout may he achieved. If the greater part
of it is visible from the dwelling it will produce a more pleas-
ing result when compact.
An open space in front or at the side of the dwelling should
be the location of the lawn. Florida's climatic and geographical
conditions are such as to demand that they be fully taken into
consideration in any landscaping if mistakes are to be avoided
in the final result.
Shade
Shade is needed as a protection against the continued direct
rays of the sun and plenty of sunlight is likewise necessary to
prevent dampness within the home. The growth of mildew
must be guarded against. Every side of the dwelling should
receive its share of sunlight. All surface water should drain
away from the house. Puddles and very moist places are hreed-
ing places for mosquitoes and other insects.

Borders
The border planted around the lawn and the plants used for
this purpose are important steps in producing natural effects.
Such plantings are more satisfactorily done after the house is
built: then the views from different positions inside the house
mayv e obtained as well as those from the outside, and from
the top of the temporarily built "crows-nest."

Roads
The first winding road was the outgrowth of the path made
bv wild animals in their avoidance of natural harriers in their
path. In laying out a winding road or path the existing trees.
plants, and other natural conditions should determine the direc-
tion ithe road or path will follow.




6 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Natural Guides In Landscaping
Rock gardens, cool-retreats, ponds, vistas of lake or stream
in their natural state furnish a safe guide for these phases of
landscaping.
Ponds
A small pool containing top-minnows and native fish will
prevent the breeding of mosquitoes. Bank the pond with trees
or well selected shrubs and an individual beauty will be added.


A POOL LIKE THIS MAKES A DELIGHTFUL SPOT IN THE LANDSCAPE

Rock Clumps
Any mass of rocks that are to be covered with plants should
always appear as natural ledges or formations, their location
properly being on the side or edge of a slope. Unless certain
of where and how to place them it is better to eliminate them,
as much skill is necessary to set up a rock-ledge. Loose ma-
terial carelessly piled together serves as a foundation for this
kind of planting.
Wild Gardens
Native pine forest land can be converted into a wildwood
garden. The wild shrubs and flowers growing thereon may be
added to by others to be had in the neighborhood and the plant-
ing thus completed.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


-.. E
"~-. .* -';i~L;~

;~~r;i3,
\ O '-''I HIOI


A ROCKERY I i~ Tnfoiicm~. SF.j rI\(.

IlJ('(Ic(s (tlll andi lWn Breaks
I)o .,et ak garden startiedI in some locations~ it is neessarv to
pIlant wcinl Ibcraks of t rrc(' or Ihetgles'~ of shirubsh to p~rotcct the
gardien wnaid nt i ml and frost. t 1is being particularly true of
locations~ fronting on large bodies' of w water.




8 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Hu nus
Much of Florida's pincland which is generally so loose that
it fails to retain the fertilizer applied to it, needs humus. Any-
thing which, when decayed will make mold, should be used to
rebuild these soils. Make a compost heap of leaves, grass from
the lawn, rotted limbs, old wood and weeds, and when fully
decayed it can be used as a dressing for the land, the trees and
the plants.
Planting
A very little knowledge of plant life teaches us that plantings
made in dry, hot or windy weather are most difficult to grow.
A cloudy day with little wind and a liberal supply of water will
protect the planting.
Showy Plants
Some landscapers advise against the use of plants with showy,
variegated foliage such as Crotons, Acalyphas, Pandanus, etc.,
but a study of tropical vegetation shows that these plants with
such gorgeous colors were developed under the influence of
light and heat. Many sections of Florida are adapted to their
cultivation, and these unusual specimens of Nature's handiwork
are as much a part of the landscape garden as the bright feathers
of birds. The colors of the spectrum are alike found in the
gems from the mines, the flowers in the woods, the minerals
of the mountain fastness, the animal life of the plains and for-
ests, the fowl of the air, the fish of the sea, and the soils of the
earth, clearly indicating that they belong to plant life in the
landscape of Home Beautification.
Low Ground Planting
In designing walks in lowlands better results are obtained by
laying them out, as far as possible, on the higher part of the
land being landscaped. In marshy spots a liberal use of broken
rock, bricks, tile and concrete blocks will furnish a good founda-
tion for the path.
i





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


TREES
The growth of trees is a marvel of tile ages, in the contempla-
tion of which our thought is carried back to the period of greatest
antiquity. Some trees. namely, the M1acrozamia of Australia, are
reputed to be over 12,000 years oldl.
From the small well cared for tree in the grove or orchard to
the mighty trees in tile Western Forests. there is a symmetry
and grandeur found in no other growing things.
The towering. massive Redwoods in Sequoia National Park
arc some of the oldest growing things on earth. Some of these
awe-inspiring giants were stalwart sentinels growing mid Na-
ture's green-clothed parks when the Pharaohs of E lgpt were es-
tablishing their kingdoms and probably before pyramid building
became the obsession of those early rulers. Within the long
span of life of these grand old patriarchs of the forest they guard
secrets that would be riddles to a Sphinx.
A comparison of this marvelous plant life with the short per-
iod of human existence is all sufficient to give man pause in his
concept of the order. the expansion of growth, the deep mystery
of these mighty monarchs, truly the rightful kings of this globe.

Utility
The utility of trees is almost unsurpassed. From them we
obtain shade from the sun and shelter from the storm: fruits
of almost innumerable variety: material for building ships.
business houses, homes, for making articles of clothing, tan-
ning material, dyes, saps. gums. sugar. medicinal properties,
chemicals, insulating material, charcoal and when tile tree de-
cays it forms food for other plant life. and if burned the gases
arising are put to use by Nature's laboratory. and the ashes
enrich the soil.
A beautiful story is found in the act of Judge W. H. Jackson,
former Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court.
On his plantation there grew a white oak tree on the crest
of a hill. A view of his plantation could be had from this
point and it was the habit of Judge Jackson to climb this hill.
rest beneath this grand old tree with its symmetrical branches.
and there, no doubt. ponder some of the mysteries of growing
things.
In the will made by the Judge he gave "to the tree, the land
on which th the tree grew. because of the great love he bore for it."
He wanted to protect this tree against the onslaughts of "civiliza-
tion" and this deed recorded in the civil court at Athens over
117 years ago is still a matter of record.





10 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

A tablet has been placed on this 350-year-old monarch by the
people of the district, stating that the tree has title to the land
which it occupies, because the former owner of the land loved
the tree.
Thousands of visitors visit this unusual tree and pay homage
to the tree and to the memory of the man who had grasped some
of the meaning of Nature's love for man.
Oliver Wendell Holmes is quoted as saying: "What a strange
underground life is that which is led by the organisms we call
trees! These great fluttering masses of leaves, stems, boughs,
trunks, are not the real trees. They live underground and what
we see are nothing more than their tails."
In the determination of the life of trees or plants, water is
perhaps the most important single factor. Plants are prin-
cipally water, the chemical analyses showing the water content
to be from 55 to 95 percent. Plants take up enormous quan-
tities of water and for every pound of water remaining in the
plant structure 95 to 99 pounds of water are transpired or evap-
orated through the leaves. To make a pound of dry matter
or solids in plants there will be taken from the soil between
500 and 1,000 pounds of water, or from one-quarter to one-
half ton.
Native Trees
The species of native trees in Florida are exceptionally large,
and tie number of those introduced from other sections of the
globe is perhaps larger. This gives a very wide range of selec-
tion and makes possible good plantings for every type of land-
scape.
Trees native to the temperate zone and the tropics are alike
found growing in the different localities of the State.
Transplanting of trees from the wild usually is not successful
and for this reason nursery propagated trees are best to plant.
The trees raised by a good nurseryman will have better root
systems and development than most trees taken from the woods.
When the trees are planted they should be placed at the same
depth as when growing in the nursery. Good manure, well de-
cayed leaf mold, with small quantities of muck, if available,
mixed with the soil placed around the roots will assist in the
growth of the trees. Steamed bone meal and tankage is also
used, the application of commercial fertilizer being used after
the tree has begun growth in its new location.
Use only the top soil that is removed from the place the trees
are planted. The subsoil should be discarded.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Covering the trunk and larger limbs of large trees with Sphag-
nu111 moss, which is tied in place, will protect the trees that are
transplanted. This moss should e kept damp for several weeks
to assist the root system to resume its natural functions. Span-
ish moss may be substituted but it does not retain moisture so
well.
Deciduous trees are generally transplanted during tile cooler
winter months or when they are hare of foliage.
Plants moved to new locations during the summer months
should be kept shaded.
Conifers are usually transplanted with their original hall of
earth adhering to the roots.

Pruning
The art of pruning must he acquired through practice. Trees
should be pruned to assist their growth as well as to attain the
desired shape and symmetry that brings out the harmony of
the planting. If in doubt it will he best to employ sonie one
skilled in tlie art. All cuts should be clean and without ragged
edges. Covering the cut portion with a tar preparation to ex-
clude micro-organisms will protect the tree and give greater
assurance of a healthy tree or plant.

Varieties
The list of trees available for Florida plantings is very large.
Only a portion of these trees is illustrated. but a list of most of
tlese trees will be found at the end of this chapter.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


INDEX

COMMON NAMES OF TREES


A cacia .......................................
A gyneja ......................... ........
Alexandrian Laurel
American Elm ....-__...-
Anatto -----......-. --
Australian Pine ..- -. _

Bamboo --. -
Banucalag -..... ..
Baobab .... ... .............
Bead Tree ..............................
Beefwood --- -- -
Bischofia -----.-
Black Olive ---- ---...
Brazilian Pepper Tree ...........
Buttonwood ......---.....-----

Cajeput _- _- -------_--__
Calabash Tree .
Camphor Tree ...........................
Candlenut .................................
Candle Tree -_ -- -----
Cannonball Tree ---_--_
Cape Chestnut
Cape Pittosporum ..................
Carob -
Cassia-Bark Tree -----
Catalpa -----
Catesbaea ... .....................
Chaste Tree ............................
Cherry Laurel ---- ._.-
China Berry ------ -
Chinese Pistache ----
Circassian Bean .................
Citrus ......................................
Coral Tree -
Crab Apple --

Dalbergia -- ...- .........
Desert W illow -.................. .
Dogwood (Flowering) ............
Dombeya ------n
Dwarf Elm .....--- ---

Ear Tree --..----.........
Empress Tree ---- ......
Eucalyptus or Gum -......

Fat Pork Tree ............
Fig Tree ......... .............
Flame Tree -.._.... -.... .-....._..
Florida M aple ....................


Floss Silk Tree .......................
Fountain Tree ..... .............
Fringe Tree -----... ..........

Geiger Tree _..... ----.. _-_-__-.
Glossy Privet ............ -
Gum --...................-..

Hackberry ---- ......
Hayata -...---_. __.... .............
Heliotrope Tree -_.. _---__.
Hemp Tree ........__
Hickory .........
Hinau Tree -.................
Holly .-__-.--._.. .._- ...........
Horseradish Tree

Indian Bean .......-- -

Jacaranda .. --...........
Japanese Varnish ......................
Japan Wood-oil Tree ...
Jerusalem Thorn
Judas Tree ..

Kaffir Bean ...........
Kapok --....
Kentucky Coffee Tree ...........

Linden Basswood
Loblolly Bay ...- --_....... --
Locust ...............

Madeira Redwood ..............
Madras Thorn ................_._
Magnolia ......_-._- _..
Mahoe ........... -
Mahogany ............._._.__
Maidenhair Tree .......-___- --
Mango ---- ...........
Manilla Tamarind ...---- ----
Mock Orange _l----------.......
Monkey Apple .........
Moreton Bay Chestnut -.........
Mountain Ebony _. __-.
Mulberry --...........
Mu-oil Tree --..........

Oak ...................- --.
Olive .--. ..-.........-
Old Man's Beard .-- ___
Orchid Tree ........... -





BEAUTIFYING THE IOME


INDEX

COMMON NAMES OF TREES-Continued

PACE
Paper Mulberry ........ 39 Tallow Tree
Parasol Tree ........... 40 Tamarind
Pecan ..... ... 10 Temple Tree ......
Physic Nut ............... 40 Texas Umbrella Tree
Pink Cassia 40 Traveler's Palm
Plane Tree 0 Traveler's Tree
Poonga Oil Tree 40 Tree of Heaven
Poplar 40 Tropical Almond
Pudding Pipe ... 40 Tulip Tree
Phoenix Tree ......... ... 10 Tung-Oil Tree
Pride of India 40
Punk Tree .. 40 Victorian Box
Purging Nut .. .... 40 Vitex .


Queen's Crape Myrtle
Queen's Flower
Queensland Nut


Rain Tree .........
Redbud
Red Cedar
Red Cotton Tree
Red Maple .......
Red Sandalwood
Royal Palm
Royal Poinciana
Rubber Tree


Sacred Bo Tree
Sandbox
Satinleaf
Sausage Tree ..
Scarlet Maple
Seagrape
Seaside Mahoe
She-Oak .... ..
Silk Cotton Tree
Silk Oak
Silk Tree
Silver or Soft Maple
Soapberry
Southern Magnolia
Southern Sugar Maple
St. John'- Bread
Stopper .......
Sugarberry
Swamp Maple
Sweet Gum
Sycamore


:Water Elm
Weeping Willow
While Elm
Wild Black Cherry
Wild Olive
Woman's Tongue Tree

Yellow Elder ...
Yellow Poplar
Ylang-Ylhng

CONIFERS
Arbor Vitae ...........

Bunva-Bunya

Chinese Fir
Cypre-s
Cypres.-Pline

Florida Yew

Indian Cedar

Juniper and Cedar ..

Monkey-Puzzle
Moreton Bay Pine

Norfolk I land Pine

Pine

Stinking Cedar






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA *


SECTION WlIHERE FOUND


Florida or Southern sugar maple ....Western .... ..... -- .........
Southern sugar maple ....................Western ............. .......
Soft, silver, white maple ............... western
Red, swamp maple ...-...........-... All except extreme south ..
Box elder. Sugar ash ....-.. .. .... Northern ...........

Poisonwood. Hog gum ....................Extreme southern .---.............
Sumac. Dwarf sumac ........................All except south ................--
Mango --....-.. _---... ......... .....Southern -. ..............

Pond, custard apple .........................Southern ........--............
Pawpaw --.................................... Northern ........... -

American holly ..................---All except southern ...........
Hybrid holly .-.. ..................-... Walton county ................-----
Dahoon ...... ....... ............. .... .All sections ........... ... ..--
Myrtle-leaved holly. Dahoon holly Northern .......................
Krug's holly ..._...........................-. Extreme southern -...............-
Yaupon. Cassena ............................. Northern .......................
Deciduous lolly. Possum haw ...... Northern ...--- ------..........
Winterberry ......... .......-..- ........ Western ............... ........... --

Hercules club. Devil's walking
stick -...-....-..... .............. ..... Northern .................................

Hornbeam, blue beech, ironwood ..Northern half ....-......-..-.....
Hop hornbeam ....................... Northern half ...................
River, red, black birch ...............Northern ...............
Sweet, black birch ..-......... Western ...................
Smooth alder .............-.....-- .. Northern ---..-- ..................
Sudworth's Check List of the Forest Trees of the United States.


COIMMnON NAME


BOTANICAL FAMILY

ACERACEAE




ANACARDIACEAE


ANNONACEAE

AQUIFOLIACEAE








ARALIACEAE

BETULACEAE


BOTANICAL NAME

Acer floridanun
Acer floridanum villipes
Acer saccharinum
Acer rubrum
Acer negundo (Negundo Negundo)

Metopiium toxifernm
Rhus copallina
Mangifera indica

Annona glabra
Asinine triloba

Ilex opaca
Ilex attenuata
Ilex Cassine
Ilex Cassine myrtliolia
flex Krngiian
liex vomitoria
llex decidua
Ilex decidua Curtissii


Aralia spinosa

Carpinus caroliniana
Ostryn virginiana
letula nigra
Betula lenta
Alnus rugosa






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


CoMMON NA.E

Ci llill ........ ...............
Black calabashli tree .............

Geiger tree .........

Strongly rk ....... ........-...

GmlInI .lilllbo. CGul elemi .

Cinnianmn-bark. Wild cinnamon

Caper tree ..... ....... .....
:y-leaved c(aper Itre ....... .

Floridn elder
Florida elder. Florida elderberry
Southern. ruaity l blakhaw
Small vibuli rnum ....... .

Papqayu. Pawpw .........

False boxwvood ..
Wahioo. Strawberry Iushi .
Rhacoma
Boxwood. Florida boxwood ......
M aytenius -....... ..........

B lack olive ....... ..................
Tropicl almond -
IButtonwood ------
Buttonwood. White buttonwood


SECTION Wi'ElIl FOUND

W western .... ..
Extreme soutllherl ...........

Extreme southern ----- -

Extreme houillieltern ....

Soullhern (:o.slal .......

Extreme sollthern ....

Southern Coalstal
Southern .........

All sectionsI ........
Northern half .......
Northern ......
Northern half

Southern ....

Keys .. .... ..
Northern
Extreme southern ......
Extreme southern -...-...
Extreme soulll ern ......

Elliotts K ey ....................
Southern .
Southern Costal ......
Southern Coastal ..


BOTANICAL ICaMM.L

BIGNONJACEAE


BORRAGINACEYIE



IIURSERACEiI E


CAINELACEAE

CAPPAR HI)ACEIE


CAPI'HI'OLIACEI E




CIuCICACEAIE

CELAS'IRACEAE





COMIIUE7',ICEAE


13oTAN IC.L N.AM e

Calt alp a bignoao ides
Ennllagina cucrrbitina

Cordial Sebestenua L. (Sebesten
Sebestena)
l3nurreria ovata'M 1Iier,

BIn rsera Siuarn in, (Elauphriu nm
Simaruba)
(cinellia IVinteriana

Capparis janmiacensi
Capparis cyUalnopIh alloph ora

Sam bucus inii'rniedia
.ulflbucfls Simpsonii
V iburnumm ritfidiilumn
IViburnum obh,(atOfli

Carica papa)(ya

Gyilnda l aifolia
EIttoniimii s atropurpureams
(Ihazcona Crossopetlnion
Schaeffcriva frutescens
Marmitenims ,hylrllntahoidles

10IBlui' Ida uceras
T'lermnainnl Catappa
Conocarjous erecla
Laguncularia racenmosa







NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


CoMMONN NAME
Groundsel tree ....... ......... .
Clustered groundsel tree
Flowering dogwood .................

loughleaf dogwood ....... .
Blue dogwood. Dogwood
Cornel ...- .. ......
Ironwood. Red liti. Le:therwood
Titi. Black titi ............

Persimmon. PIossumwood ...
Persimmon ...--....
Mountain Iliurel ......... ..
Sourwood ..----..
Xolisma. Tili ....---.-..

White wood. Guiana plumn
White wood, big Guiana Ipu ....
(Cral)wood. Poisonwood
Manchineel ..........
Otmheite gooseberry
Savia ...............
Tallow tree ....

M ilk-tree ..........
Beech .
Chinqu pin ...........
Chinquapin ...---- ...... ...


SECTION WHIIERE FOUND
....A ll sections ---.- .... ......... ....
....A ll sections _--... ... ................
...Central and northern ......-----

--.Western ...........
....GGadsden county
... Northern ......
.. Northern ......
...Northern ..........

...A ll sections _. ... ... .. ........
...Dude county ...............
. W western ... .............
... western -. .. ..............
... N northern alf ..... .. .............

.. Extreme southern ............
... K eys ............ ......
Extreme southern .. ....-
-- Extreme southern --
- Extreme south mainland ........-
K eys ........-- --- ....... ... ..............
_- N northern .................. .. ...---..

... Extreme northwestern ...........
... Northern .......... .
....N northern ......... ...........
....N northern ............... ....... .... .._


BoTANIcAl. FAMILY
COMPOSITIIR

CORNACEIAE




(:1RILLACEAEl


EBEIACEAIlE

ER(ICACEAEE



EUPHORBIACEICAE









FAGACEARI1


BOTANICAl. NAME
larclharis halimilolia
lBaccharis glomnertlilolia
Cornus florida (Cynoxylon
floridlum)
Cornits asperifolia
Cornts alternifolia
(:orltus stricta (Svild strict)
Cyrilla raceniflora
(:liltonia monophylla

D)iospyros virginianan
Diospyros rirginiana Mlosieri
Kalmia latifolia
Oxyldendrurn arborertum
Lyomnn lerruginear (Xolisma
Ierruginea)
Drylpeesi lateriflora
Drpeltes diversilolia
GvYmntlihes lucida
llippoinane Mlnciniilla
C(ic'it disticha
Savina bahamensis
Sapiium sebiferum (Triadica
sebifera)
Sapitum glandulosium
Fagus grandifolia
Casitanlea pumfila
Castanca alnifolia floridana






NATI\VE 'RE'S (O)F FLOOR II)A-Continued


(C MO-sN NrA M


HOTANsICAI. FAMILY


1lark oa:k
Turkey. crulb. bl1ac'kjack oa4:k
11%I-brid oak
Redi. Sp:l aniii o)ak
S%%anipl. led, %%amp11 Spani~i) oa:k
Sai r1)1 ed1 oank
Bilackjac'k. b~arrens. oak









11%bri oak1
X\:jter oa:1k
1I:l)ridl oak

I:Laurel, '%al low oa:k
Blue jack. Ilurke\, c innamonl44 oak
Oak
11bixnd Oak
I lvlril Oa1k
Ilix rid Oak
f1'( ridl Oak
Xl~ rtle. svirui oak
L~ive oa4k
Liv e oatk, tsi lv iv~e oa4k


Chapman11lI, Cha:pma:n hite oa4k
I'hit oaik
1'4.l oak41 444 a
P'in. hbi~tard ~idInite oaik
OveCrcuLp oa1k
(:o%. bas1 ket, .'.%ai :41)P Iemnu oa1 :k
(:les'illII, 4lhilluI~llapin Oa4k


N%17v :l rll, : IIE 1O. I

Northern half
we'er:11 :on111ov r

Wetern
We c-ern
o ,1.1114.1-1
IIot 1 hell)

Oka1oona c'tlountIN
.Nortlhern
All except1 extlreme ,owtlh
No)rthler to I4 Lee l(-oiiIit
Orange and V(4l1'illj c0111)1ies
Alachuja anid I u',ai (44)Iltil'
Co)Ilumbia voUntl%
Seminl 114 Cco il) I






Northeastll
All secItilon
All Sectionl,
Pen in' lar an nort1111hern

.Central and14 soiithea~t
Nea:r Guolf and14 in Central
Cenutral and)4 ',%C.htern
N oi i lerti

CentIral an1)d N',% 'ter1
Nortihern
Nordic hern pen1ins~uIa r & NWe~terii
\Ve'tern


FAGACEAE


()uercus rllittinlal
Quercrus (:4l14sbalei
Qn erels 11"(lteit 'Toll
QOercnus rubru
Querc,:s ro bra pJrag4)(l4e'efOi(
()hecruls rllbra lecp yCIoI1la14
Qn4ercts nI41ri1ladjica
Qurcyos Bus.41ii
Quercn.s it igra
Qucrcmus rl'4losa0
QVurcus JP41ll4.
Q)uercus laurifolia(
Qiuercus cinereal
Qiterris cin, real derstatolob4 ata
Quercus ('((duct,
Quercus s,,bintegra
QOrcrus ol'ie40'nsi s
QOucrc414s dii bia1
(Qnercns imivrlifolia
Qnercus lirginrt(ana
Queremus ge414 ,ina(10. (Q. vIrgina(10(
gem in ala)
Quercns lirgirnjana l',rescens
Q.,ercus (Chaapnmanii
Qiucrcu.s a/lb)4
Quercurrs stelleaft
Querc,,s .tel'nlta t3argallrett1
Quercus (Ilustrina
()uercus I,'rata
Quercuis Prinu.s (Aichl (iXii)
Querctis Mulehlenbergii


HOTANIAi. NAME






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


COMMON NAME
Witch hazel
Sweet gum. Red gum .
Red buckeye ..
Georgia buckeye ..


Walnut. Black walnut
Bitternut. swamp hickory

Water, swamp hickory ........
Water. narrowleaf water hickory
Shaghark, shellbark hickory .....
Mockernut, bullnut, red hickory
Mockernut hickory .
Pignut, paleleaf hickory
Pignut hickory
Florida hickory
Red, sweet bay. Fla. mahogany

Swamp, swamp red bay
Lancewood
Sassafras. Saxifrax
Misanteca
Camphor ...

Cat's claw. Long pod ..
Julibrissen. Silktree ..
Woman's tongue tree .
Wild tamarind
Huisache. Opopanax


SECTION WIIEKH FOUND
Northern .
All except extreme south
Northern
Escambia county
Dade county
Western
Western

River swamps
River swamps
Western
Northern half
Northern
.Western
All except extreme south
East coast
All sections


All sections
Southern Coastal
Northern
Dade county
Peninsular
Extreme southern..
Central and northern
Southern
Extreme southern
All sections


BOTANIC(:AL. ILY
11AMAMELII)ACE,1 E


HIIPPOCASTANACEAE


JUGLANDACEAE


LAURACEAE


LEGUMINOSAE


BOTA~m\ N.IC F.

Ilhrnflrnhe'li. nmacroplYlln
Iiqn hidnmnabar sty-raciflua
Aescubms pariai
Afesculus georgianit
'I'nlisin pjedlicellaris
Juganus fligra
Ilicoria cordijorn, is. (Carvo
cordijormnis)
licoria aqualica. (Carna alqultica)
Ilicorin (uau(Itaica( sirstalis
I icoria o01(11. (Carvoa o1(11am)
Hlicoria albat. (Car va a tlba)l
lifiorin albn subcoriacen e
Ilicoria pailidmi. (Carvo pullida)
Ilicoria glabra megnc(Irpal
Ilicorin florid (inn
Persea IBorbonlin ('I'Tncnln
Ilorbonin)
I'ersen pulb'scens. (P. palu.sIris)
Ocotea Catercsb-vanac
Sassafras officiunle. (S. Sussnirns)
Misfflntl'( triantdrar
(:fin lImon(tuI, cmnphorn

Pithecoloi iii in nzgis-cati
Albizzin julibrissin
Albizzin lebbek
L~ysilorna bahantenrrsis
Aracrin Fnrnesiaina. (IVacheilia
knrnesiana)






NATIVE TR EES OF FLO )R IDA-Continued


COMMON NAME

Leiutellaet
Tamarind
Red-bud. Judas tree
Honey locustl
Water locut



Jamaica dog I ood

Erythrina
I)a;llb rgia

(:ork\ood

Spanih Iba) onlet
Spanil dagger

(Crape niyrtle


SHECt IO Vl FO:lll- U OINI
Keys
Extreme soul lirn
Northern half
Northern
NorthernI
Penllil. 11iir
So lI11 herii
Extreme souIlIern

Extrenie .nsouthe'rn
Southern Coi.-uill
Soutlllw'.ternt

Apalachicola Iasinl

Northern
Northierni


EI'ery s(.et tion


Magnolia All .scl ion?
Sweet bay All sections
(Ctlillilu 'ler tree. largt-lhe;aved(
rc iumnlber Iree' Norlthern
Sollnhrn c.oI u eiitlr tree We'lerni
Tulip Iree. lPoplar, Yellow iipoplar Nirtlhern


ExIremne soitllilern

Ext relme southern
Extremne southern


Locu.l-herry

Seasid e mnalioe
Malhoe


HLOTMN(:.I. FASMI
ILEGUMINOS.AE


1, IT:NEI<.ACEAE

LILIACEAE



M.IA1;NOACAE E


MAlII 'IGllACEAE

MIALI ACEAE


HotI1'tIC. N %MI.:
Let,'IIcIIa gFllaucat
Tal'rnrindus indica
Cercis cantadlrensis
Gleditsia triaranilhu
Gleditsia aqutalica
Parlkinsonia anciuleltrn
P'oincitran regia
Sesbatnia grandiflora. ( Agai
grandiflora)
Ichthllomethia piscipula
Erytirinat arborea
Dtlhbergia Sissoo

Leiitneria flotridana

SYuccn taloifolin
Yucca gloriosa

Ingerstroemia indicr

Maignolia grandiflora
Mignoolia rirginiana tiustralis

Mlagnolia nimacrophiyll
Matgnolia plyramita t
Liriodendron Tuilipilera I.

Ilyrsonimai hridat

Thespjesia popultea
Hiliiscus tiliaceis. ('arilliumn
tiliaceumtn)







NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued

SECTION Wll"mnI FOUND BOTANICAL FAMILY


Tetrazygia ........-............-- ..-----..- .--.Extreme southern .......................

Chinaherry. China-tree -.....-..... All sections ............................
Mahogany. Madeira ........................ Extreme southern ........................

Red mulberry ----.......................-All sections ......-....-........
W hite mulberry -.............................. Northern ................... ........
Black mulberry --.........-................. Peninsular .--.---.... ----..-
Paper m ulberry ................................N northern ......................................

Wild fig. Wild rubber .................. Southern ...................----------............
Wild fig. Golden fig. Wild rubber ..Southern ..................... ..

Horseradish tree--------- .Southe..................Souter.....................

Myrtle, wax myrtle, candleblrry ....All sections -- ___ -

Odorless wax myrtle .-----....__. _--.. Northwestern .-...--__... -........

M arllerry ..........................................Southern Coastal .........................
M yrsine ------........ .. ...........................So then ....... ...........................

Spanish, gurgeon stopper ................Southern Coastal ........................
Stopper. White stopper .-........ Southern Coastal .. ....
Red stopper ......... ........ .--- Keys --- -------
Red stopper ..-...........-..........- Keys ------- -
Naked stopper ........Sou Cost............................ ..S n
Stopper -- -----.................. .Southern Coastal ..........................

Stopper ............... ...-- ................. Keys .......- -------------..


MELASTOMACEAE

MELIACEAE


MORACEAE






MORINGACEAE

MYRICACEAE


MYRSINACEAE


MYRTACEAE


COMMON NAME


BOTANICAL NAME

Tetrazygia bicolor

Melia Azedarach
Swietenia mnahagoni

Morus rubra
Morus alba
Morus nigra
Broussonetia papyrilera. (Papyrius
papyrifera)
Ficus brevifolia
Ficus area

Moringa Moringta. (M.
pterygosperma)
Myrica cerifera. (Cerothamnus
ceriferus)
Myrica inodora. (Cerothamnius
inodorus)
Icacorea paniculata
Rapanea guianensis

Eugenia buxilolia
Eugenia axillaris
Eugenia rhombea
Eugenia confusa
Eugenia discrana
Eugenia simpsonii. (Anamonmis
Sinmpsonii)
Eugenia longipes. (Anamomis
longipes)






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


COMMON NtAME

Stopper
Cajelput
While spiceN ood ... .
Spicewood .

Blolly. Porkwood. Pigeonwood

T'upelo. Black. sour gum .
Water, \\iaimp black gum .
Sour l Inplo. Ogeechee liim .
'Tipelo. cotton guin

White w\ood
ilog piluni. talloww ood

WVater. pop ashl
Water, swampp ali
White a..h
Green asht
Pumllpkin aish
SN\ amnp privet
Fringe tree. Old mian's Ibeard
Wild olive. )evilwood
coconutt
Bluc(can;icer. liog c.aliiage palm
Ro:al palin
Saw cabbagltei palml

Silver, thatch pal i...


Stc'IOs WillIIE FOUNDII)

. Extreme southern

Southern
Extreme southern .
.Keys

Exitr Ile southern


.Northern
.Northern
Northern
Northern


Southern
Southeril and central

Norhellrn
Northern ;ind solutlhestern
Western and central
Western area
Western area
Nort hern ;Irta
Northern area
..Northern and central

Extreme south ..
Few keys .
Extreme south
Extreme south

Extreme south


BOTANICAL FAMILY

MYRTACEAE


NYCTACINACEAE

NYSSACEAE


OLACACEAE


OLEACEAE


PALMACEAE


BOTANICAL NAME

Eugenia bahamensis. (Aniamomiis
bahamensis)
Mehllleuca leucadendron
Calyp trian thes pallens
(Calyptranthes Zuzygiumn

Torrubia longifolia

Nvssa sylvatica
Nyssa biflora
Nyssa Ogeche
NVssa aqualica

Schoepfiat chrysophylloides
Ximenia atmericana

Fraxinus caroliniana
Fraxinus pauctiflora
Fraxinus anlericanat
Fraxinus penins ylrianiica lanceolata
Fraxinus profunlda
Forestiera aciimtinala
Chionantihus virginica
Os)manthus tamrircanus
Cocos nutifiera
Pseudophoienix rinifera
Roystonea regia
Acoelorraphe wrightii

Coccothrinax argentia. (C.
juicunda)









COMMON NAME

Cabbage palmetto
James palmetto
Thatch palm
Brittle thatch, silver-top palmetto
Thatch pailn
Key thatch palm .....

Loblolly, oldfield, meadow pine .

Pond, loblolly, marsh and black
pine ....
Sand, spruce, oldfield, and scrub
pine ... ...
Shortleaf, yellow pine
Spruce, white, lowland-spruce
pine .. ... ...
Longleaf, southern, yellow pine
Slash, swamp, saltwater pine .
Bald, deciduous cypress ....
Pond cypress .. ....
Red cedar...

Southern red, Balrhadoes cedar

White cedar, juniper

Sycamore, Buttonball .....

Sea grape ..... ....... .
Pigeon plum ..

Australian silk oak ......


NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued

SECTION WIIEItE FOUND) BOTANICAL FAMILY

All except extreme western
Extreme south
Extreme south .. ALMACEAE
Extreme south
Extreme south
Keys -.. .

Northern PINEACEAE


Northern

.Coastal
Northern

Northern
All except extreme south
Near coasts, including keys
All sections
All except extreme south
Northern

Peninsular

Northern
Northern

.Southern coastal ....
.Southern coastal

Lower peninsula


PLATANACEAE

POLYGONACEAE


PROTEACEAE


BOtANICAl. N.%mt:

Sabal palmetto
Sabal JanIIEsiesiatn
Thrinux floridlna
T'hrinax tnicrocarpa
T'hrinax 1"enll(Ubilndiana
TIhri,,uar keyensis

15iruin Tuethi


I'iutus serof inn. (I'. rigida serotinl)

Pinu s clnisus
Pin us echinala

Pains gClabra
Pin us pIavii.tris
oinus caribaeie,. (I'. EIllioii)
lITaxoulio nt disfichu nt
TIaxidiurn izsceenslens
Jiiniperus virginiaiin. (Snbinas
airginianra)
Jurnipf'rus Iucan).n. (Sabina
barbadensis) (I. barbadensis)
Chumanlrecyparis thrhvoides
I'latnnus occidentadis

Coccolobis u sifera
Coccolobis Iiiirifolia

Grerdillb robssstn






NATI'IVE ,'FREIS O F FIO)RIDA-Corttirmed


COMMON NAME

Darling plumn, red ironwood
Black ironwood
Yellow-wood. Indian cherry
Soldierwood. Nakedwood
Nakedwood

Wild coffee. Nakedwood


Mangrove
Crabalpple
Crabapple
Pear
Service. shad. Junelerry
Hfaw. Hlawthorn
Wild plum. Sloe
Wild plum
Chickasaw. yellow Ipumn
Iog, wild plum. Sloe
Wild cherry. wild black cherry

Cherry laurel, mock orange

West Indian cherry
Coco-pluni
(oco-plum

Fever tree. Georgia bark
l'rincewood
Hittonblush l
Seven-year apple


SECTION WIIERE FoU:NI)

Extreme soullhern



Keys

Extreme southern


Southern coastal

Western
Gadsden county
Northern
Northern
Most in northern
Central Iand western
Wakulla county
Northern
All but southern
.Central and northern

All except extreme south .

Dade county ... .
Southern coastal counties
Dade county

Western
Extreme southern
All sections
Southern


IBOTAN ICAL FAMILY

RhI.4MNA(:EA E


RI1YPOI'HIORIA CEAE E

)OSA (:EA CE


RUBIACEAE


BOTAN. ICAL N.vmE

RIe' Vnosia sepitetitrintlis
Krugidlendron ferr'otto
Rhiotiitis carnlittiatio
(;oltjbritio rchtiata
C:olubrina cubenrsis


(:olubritial arborescetis. (C.
Colubritio)

Rhizophort MatIgle

Mltlis tiigrst ifolit
Moalus bracteat o
P ryrs comtiurnis
Anulanch ir richi titidetsis
(:Craalegus (Nearly 50 splecie,)
I'rimtuts atntericoti
I'rtimuos otinericotrit floridaon
Prnmus atigitstifolia
Prutius unibellata
Primnus serotin(. (Paldus vir-

Primnus corolitintn. (Laitrocerasus
caroliniionai)
Primnus oy rfiolina
Chrysobalatius icoro
(Chrrsobolanus icaco jehlocarpir

Princkney,, pubens
Exostemo caribaeurn
Cepholanthi us occidentohis
Sen ip clusiijolia






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


COMMON NAME


SECTION WHERE FOUND


BOTANICAL FAMILY


BOTANICAL NAME


Hamelia .......................- ...... Southern ..........................
V elvetseed ........... -..................... Keys ............................................
Balsamo ....................................... Southern -- -- --
W ild coffee ......-- ...............................Southern Coastal .....---... --..
Bahaman: wild coffee ....................... Keys .....-........----

Hercules club. Toothache tree.
Prickly ash .......--...........................--All sections .. ..........

Wild lime ---.... --........................... Southern Coastal ........--.

Satinwood. Yellow-wood ................Keys ....---- -
Hoplree ----. -..-.--.......---...... Northern _. ---- ---
Balsam Torchwood .-.---....--..........- Extreme southern .- --
Torchwood .-------.... .-------._-Extreme southern .................
Sour, Seville orange .....--.................Peninsular .--.--. --.-
Sweet orange ___-_. __...... Peninsular --- -........
Florida rough lemon ........ Peninsular .............

Southern cottonwood. River and
necklace poplar ............................Western --..- --------
Black willow ...................................... Northern
Black willow -....-. ......................... Western ---..
Black willow .-....-.............-..... ... Western --- -- ...

Soapberry -..--...__-- --...-- Extreme southern -- .......
Soapberry ---- ----- ---.-Peninsular ........--.......- ....
Inkwood, ironwood --.......... ---- Extreme southern ........................
W hite ironwood ............. ..--------Keys ....................................... ...
Cupania .......- .......... -------... Keys .............................................
D odonca .......--- ................................. ......Keys .......... ... .................


RUBIACEAE


RUTACEAE


SALICACEAE




SAPINDACEAE


Hamlelia patens
Guettarda elliptica
Psychotria nervosa
Psychotria undata
Psychotria bahamensis


Xanthoxylumn clava-Herculis

Xanthoxylaum Fagara. (Fagara
Fagara)
Xanthoxylhim flavitm
Ptelea trifoliata nollis
Amyris balsamnifera
Almyris elemif er
Citrus Aurantiumn
Citrus sinensis
Citrus Linionia


Populus deloides virginiana
Salix nigra
Salix longipes
Salix longipes venulosa

Sapindus saponaria
Sapindus margisnatus
Exothea paniculata
Hypelate trifoliata
Cupania glabra
Dodonea microcarpa






NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


COMMON NAME

Satinleaf .
Mac.sic. Wild olive
Bustic
Tough buckthorn
Gum-lastic ..
liuckthorn
Saffron pliuin
Wild dilly
Sapodilla. Dilly

'Paradise Tree. Bitterwood
Ilitterlhun l
Tree of heaven
Alvaradoa


Potato tree


SECTION WIHEAr FOUND

Southern Coastal .
Southern (oastal .
Extreme southern .
..Northern half
Northern
Northern
Southern (Coastal
Keys
Extreme southern

Lower Coastal
. Extreme southern
Northern
..Extreme southern


Southeastern Coastal


Pa raol tree. Japanese varnish
tree

Silverhell
Silver ell
Little Silverbell

Snowdrop tree. Two-%ving silver-
hell
Styrax ...

Bay cedar .........


Northern

Western
Western
Northern


BOTAMNiC.u. FAnMI.Y

SAPOTACEAE









SIMAROUIACEAE


SOLID ANACEAE


STERCULIACEAE

STY RACACEAE


Gadden anld Leon counties
Restricted western


Southern Coastal


Sweetleaf. Horse sugar Northern


SURIANACEAE

SYMPLOCAC.EAE


BOTANICAL. N.\AME

Chrysophyllumn oliriforme
Sideroxylon foetidissinuI n
Dipholis salicifolia
Humnelia teniax
BHumelia Innuginosa
Ilumelia Ivroides
lBuinelia anigustifolia
Minusops parriflora
Achras sapota

Simarouba glauca
Pi'ertnmia pentandrai
AilanIthus glandulosa
Alcaradoa amorphoides

Solhnum i erbascifolium


Firmitana simplex

Halesia carolinitana
Hanlesia caroliniana mollis
Ilhlesia parriflorn


Halesia diptera
Styrax grandifolia

Surinna imaritima

Synplocos tinctoria





NATIVE TREES OF FLORIDA-Continued


SECTION- WHERE FOUND


Stinking cedar. Torreya .............. East bank Apalachitola-river ....

Florida yew ........................... -- .....Liberty county ..... --
Loblolly bay .. ...... ..................Northern- ._......... .......... ...........
Joewood. Sea myrtle -..............- Southwen -aind Keys-.- .....-..
Basswood ------.............. .......Central ........ .. .......
Florida linden. Basswood ..-.-Western .
Basswood ....... ..... ....... ........ .r. Northern ............. -
Wahoo. White basswood .......... Leon and Gadsden counties ...
White basswood ................Gadsden county .:.......... ......
White basswood -... ....Gadsden county ......................

Basswood --........ ............. ......... ......Central and western ..............
American, white eln ................... Northern .................................
Wahoo. Winged, cork, red eln ..... Northern ........................................
Slippery, red elm ........................... W western ......................................
W after elm. Planer tree ................. Northern .................. ..........
Sugarberry, hackberry ..................All sections .................................


Small's hackberry ..........---...
Georgia hackberry ................
Florida trema --- -
West Indian trema .......
Farkleberry. Tree huckleberry -


-Western ----
Western ............- .
Extreme south ...............
.Extreme south ...... ...-....... ....
..Northern --------- ........


Fiddlewood ....................................... Southeastern Coastal ...................
Blackwood. Black mangrove ......Southern Coastal -..-....._............


COsMMON NAME


---...............Keys ......................................... ZYGOPHYLLACEAE


BOTANIC.AL FAMILY
TAXACEAE


TIIEACEAE
T1IEG.PIRASTACEAE
T/I'ILIACEAE







ULMACEAE








VACCINIACEAE

VERBENACEAE


BOTANICAl. NAME
Torreya taxifoliu. (Tumion
taxifoliHum)
TaIxis floridana
Gordonia Lasianthus
Jacquitnia keyensis
Tilia crenoserrata
Tilia floridana
Tilia floridana oblongifolia
Tilia heterophylla
Tilia heterophylla niven
Tilia heterophylla namphiloba.
(T. apposita)
Tilia georgiana. (T. pubescens)
Ulmils americana
Ulmius alata
Ulinms unlva
Planera aqualtica
Celtis Laevigata.
(C. mississippiensis)
Celtis laevigata Smallii
Celtis pumila georgiana
Trema mollis. (T. florildana)
Trema Lamarckiana
Batodendron arboreum.
(Vaccinium arboreum)
Citharexylon fruticosum
Avicennia nitida
Guniacuml sanctum


Lignumvita .





IEAl TIFYIN(; THE HOME 27

CO)\lMON NAME DESCRIPTION
The following li.t of evergreen and deciduous trees growing
in Florida has been arranged alphabetically according to their
conmm1on names. The botanical name follows.

We believe thi- arrangement will prove more satisfactory to
the home owner.

()nly an abbreviated description has been given.

Before planting. unless a complete knowledge of the trees to
be planted is possessed. it would be well to consult a reliable
horticulturist.

The Department of Agriculture. Tallahassee. Florida. will
gladly co-operate in either supplying further information or di-
recting the writer to the proper sources for obtaining it.

Acacia (Acacia auriculiformis). Southern area. This species
of acaria is of medium size. thick-foliaged and symmetrical.
The tree has few pests.

The species t Aracia longifolia) is an erect shrub adapted
to dry and exposed locations in the Southern and Central
areas.

(Acaria macrantha) is a low spreading, small tree with fol-
iage of a bluish or steely color and is adapted to the Peninsular
section.

Agyneja (Agyneja impubes). This upright, small, deciduous
tree is found in the Northern. Central and Southern areas:
reaches a height of 25 feet and is adapted to sandy soils. It
hears ver% small flowers.

Alexandrian Laurel (Calophyllumn inophyllum). Southern
area. Native to the Southern Coastal region. Of medium height,
bearing small. white, fragrant flowers.

American Elm. I See \Vater Elmn 1.
Anatto (Hixa Orellana). Central and Southern areas. A tree
that grows about 20 feet high and is a source of dye. Bears at-
tractive rose-colored blossoms. The pulp from the fruits is used
to obtain orange-colored dye for coloring rice. soups, butter,
cheese and other articles of commerce.

Australian Pine (Casuarina). Also called Beefwood and She
)ak. Central and Southern areas. Adapted to a wider range





28 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

of ornamental uses than any tree in Florida. including wind-
breaks and hedges. Grow well on acid and alkaline soils, sands,
calcareous rocky soils, mnuck, etc. The species are numerous,
the flowers showing some variations.


AUSTnALI.AN PINE (Casuarina Cunninghamiana)


Bamboo. Very good for mass planting or wind-break. Will
grow throughout the state.
Banucalag (Aleurites trisperma). A member of the same
family as the Tung-oil, having similar characteristics and bear-
ing large flowers.
Baobob (Adansonia digitata). Southern area. The Baobab
tree is of interest because of the immense diameter of the trunk
when advanced in growth. The white flowers are borne in mid-
sunller.
Bead Tree. (See Red Sandalwood).
Beefwood. (See Australian Pine).
Bischofia (Bischofia javanica). Central and Southern areas.
Is a fast growing, tall tree with foliage of a bronze hue.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Black Olive (Bucida Buceras). Southern area. A native tree
that is resistant to wind damage, growing about 40 feet high.
Brazilian Pepper Tree (Schinus terebinthefolius). Southern,
Central and parts of Northern areas. Small evergreen which
bears clusters of small bright red fruits.
Buttonwood. I See Plane Tree I.
Cajeput Tree (Melaleuca leucadendron). Known also by the
name of Punk Tree. Southern to Central areas. Grows to med-
ium height. producing white and pale yellow flowers that attract
honey bees. Resistant to effects of salt water.
Calabash Tree (Crescentia Cujete). Southern area. Medium
size, bearing dark brownish-purple colored flowers.
Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum ramphora). Northern, Cen-
tral and Southern areas. A large tree with round, spreading


B M(B)oo
head that grows to a height of 50 feet: an evergreen with incon-
spicuous flowers.
Candlenut ( Aleurites moluccana). Is a member of the same
family as the Tung-oil: has similar characteristics and bears a
profusion of large flowers.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Candle Tree (Parmentiera cereifera). Southern area. Grows
to a Imedium height, producing white flowers. The fruits re-
semble long yellow candles.
Cannonball Tree (Couroupita guianensis). Southern area. A
large, erect tree bearing unusually large flowers that are reddish-
yellow on the outside and crimson within.
Cape Chestnut (Calodendrum capensis). Southern to Central
areas. A large evergreen tree hearing large lavender-colored
flowers in the spring.
Cape Pittosporum (Pittosporum viridiflorum). Northern and
Central areas. Rather rapidly growing tree that attains a height
of about 25 feet.
Carob. (Se St. John's Bread).
Cassia-Bark Tree (Cinnamomum cassia). Central and South-
ern areas. The bark of this tree is used as a cinnamon bark
substitute.


BLACK OLIVE-(Bucida Buceras-Jucaro)
Catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides). Also known as the Indian
Bean. Central and Northern areas. This native tree is round





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


headed and attains a height of nearly 50 feet. The flowers are
white and purpllish-bro(wn splotches and stripes of yellow.
Catcsbaea (Catesbaea spinosa). Southern area. A spiny ever-


CAMPHOR TREr-(Cinntlnzonmtli Ctmlphora)
Suitable for any Section of Florida
green that grows about 15 feet high, bearing creamy white
flowers.
Chaste Tree. (See HeImp Tree .
Cherry Laurel (Priuns caroliniana). Known also as the Mock
Orange. Northern and central areas. A native evergreen thriv-




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


ing on well drained soils and attaining a height of 35 feet.
Deep green foliage and bearing small white flowers in early
spring.
China Berry (Melia azedarach). Known also as the Pride of
India. Northern, Central and Southern areas. Attains a height
of nearly 40 feet, producing a dense shade. The variety known
as the Texas Umbrella Tree (M. umbraculifera) is more sym-
metrical, producing lilac-colored flowers in late spring.
Chinese Pistache (Pistacia chinensis). Northern and Central
areas. A broad, round-topped tree with short trunk and heavy
branches.
Circassian Bean. (See Red Sandalwood).
Citrus (Citrus). The many species of citrus are described in
a separate bulletin published by the State Department of Agri-
culture at Tallahassee, Florida. Such well known species as the
orange, grapefruit, lime, lemon, tangerine, citron, kumquat,
and others are fully described.


Cocos PALMS-(Cocos Australis)
Not Affected by Cold Weather; Has Blue-green Curved Leaves
Coral Tree (Erythrina Poeppigiana). Central and Southern
areas. Grows to a height of about 35 feet and bears bright red
flowers during late winter.
Crab Apple (Malus angustifolia). Northern area. This native





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 33

deciduous tree bears fragrant pink blossoms in early spring.
Dalbergia (Dalbergia Sissoo). Central and Southern areas.
Resembles the Poplar, somewhat: grows to a height of 75 feet:
hears white flowers.
Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis). Northern area. A small,
deciduous tree with willow-like foliage. Bears trumpet-shaped
flowers that vary in color from white to pale purple, with yellow
splotches.
Iogwood. Flowering (Cornus florida). Northern and Cen-
tral areas. This native tree, when in bloom in early spring, is
truly a thing of beauty.
Dombcya (Dlonbeya Wallichi). Central and Southern areas.
The Dombeva attains a height of 25 feet. Its flowers are pink.
It grows rapidly.
Dwarf Elmn (Ilmus pumila. Northern and Central areas.
Fast growing to a height of 45 feet. Round top.
Ear Tree (Enterolobiumn cyclocarptum). Southern area. A
huge. wide spreading tree with fern-like foliage. Bears small
hiite flowers that have a green tint. The pods produced resemble
tlie humalln ear, accounting for its name.
Empress Tree (Paulowuina tomentosat). Northern area. Rapid
growing. reaching a height of about 1-5 feet. The flowers are
pale violet, marked bv two yellow bands.
Eucalyptus or Gum (Elucalyptus). Central and Southern
areas. There are several species of this genus in Florida. Some
of themI arei known )v the conIlimmon names of gray gum. red
gum. blue guinm. desert gum. and red mahogany, swamp ma-
hogany.
Fat Pork Tree. (See Monkey Apple I.
Fig Tree (Flicus). Also known as the Rubber Tree. Cen-
tral and Southern areas. Among the hundreds of species of itis
genus there is a wide variation in their foliage and fruits. The
Department of Agriculture at Tallahassee. Florida. has pub-
lished a bulletin on Fig Culture for those who are interested.
Flame Tree (Poinciana regia). Southern to Central areas.
Is considered Florida's most popular flowering tree with its
lintely cut foliage and scarlet flowers which have an upper petal
that is tinged with yellow.
Florida Maple. I See Southern Sugar \laple).
Floss Silk Tree (Chorisia spciosa). Southern area. The trunk
and branches are covered with heavy. sharp spines. The pink
flowers appear in early winter.




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Fountain Tree (Spathodea campanulata). Southern to Cen-
tral areas. An evergreen attaining a height of 70 feet; the large,
scarlet flowers being very attractive and account for its growing
popularity.
Fringe Tree(Chionanthus virginica). Called also by the name
of Old Man's Beard. Northern and Central areas. This native


EUCALYPTUS
tree bears greenish-white flowers and attains a height of 30
feet.
Geiger Tree (Cordia Sebestena). Southern area. This small,
slender, round-topped tree is a native of the Keys; bears large
orange-colored flowers.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Glossy Privet (Ligustrurm lucidum). Northern and Central
areas. Ised both as a shrub and a small tree. Bears white flowers
in the spring.
Gum. I See Eucalyptus).
Hackherrv (Celtis laevigata). Known also as the Sugar-berr-.
Northern, Central and Southern areas. Its broad, spreading head
reaches a height of 75 feet.
Hayata (Koelreuteria formosana). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. Bears small yellow flowers in early October.
Heliotrope Tree (Ehretia acluminata). Northern and Central
areas. Derives its name from the odor of the small, white flower
which appear in the spring. Attains a height of 15 feet.
Hemp Tree (Vitex Agnus-castus). Known as the Chaste Tree
also. Grows to height of about 20 feet, producing small lilac-
colored fragrant flowers during the summer.
Hickory (Hicoria). Northern. Central and Southern areas.
Two species, the Mocker Nut (H. alba) and the Fig Nut (H.
glabra) grow extensively in the Northern area.
Hinau Tree (Elaeocarpus denata). Southern to Central areas.
The tree produces a mass of creamy white, saucer-shaped flowers
that resemble a spray of lilies of the valley.
Holly (Ilex). Northern and Central areas. There are 13 known
native trees of this species in Florida. seven of which should he
classed as shrubs.
Horseradish Tree (Morigna Moringa). Southern area. A small
tree hearing sweet scented yellowish white flowers. The roots
of the tree have the odor and taste of horseradish and have been
used as a substitute.
Indian Bean. (See Catalpa).
Jacaranda (Jacaranda acutifolia). Southern to Central areas.
The lavender blue flowers and the delicate fern-like foliage
borne by this tree makes it a favorite. Attains a height of 40
feet.
Japanese Varnish Tree. ( See Parasol Tree).
Japan Wood-oil Tree (Aleurites cordata). Is of the same
species as the Tung-oil and hears numerous large flowers.
Jerusalem Thorn (Parkinsonia aculeata). Northern. Central
and Southern areas. Grows to about 30 feet high and( produces
small, bright. yellow flowers in early spring.
Judas Tree. (See Redbud).
Kaffir Bean Tree (Schotia latifolia). Southern to Central areas.
A small tree growing about 30 feet high and producing rose-
colored blossoms in early spring.
Kapok (Ceiba pentandra). Also called the Silk-Cotton Tree.
Southern to Central areas. This huge, massively buttressed





36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

tree is one of the most distinctive found in the areas where
grown. Bears great numbers of pink or greenish-white flowers.
Kentucky Coffee Tree (Gymnocladus dioica). Northern and
Central areas. This is a large attractive tree, the seeds of which
were once used as a substitute for coffee.
Linden Basswood (Tilia floridana). Northern area. Native


JERUSALEM TlHRN-fParkinsonia Aculeata)


upright growing with broad head. Honey produced from its
flowers is stated to be of exceptional quality.
Loblolly Bay (Gordonia Lasianthus). Northern and Central
areas. This native tree grows best in moist soils. Bears large,
white, fragrant blossoms for nearly three months during the
summer.
Locust (Gleditsia delavayi). Northern and Central areas. The
Honey Locust and the Water Locust are the best known.


Madeira Redwood. (See Mahogany).
Madras Thorn (Pitecolobium dulce).
Manila Tamarind. Central and Southern
thorny, quick growing tree, free from pests.


Also known as the
areas. A spreading,





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 37

Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) also known as the Southern
Magnolia, the (.11. tirgiana) known as the Sweet Bay, and the
(M. macrophylla) known as the Cucumher Tree, are all native
to Florida. The large. creamy white, strongly scented flowers
are horne from April to June. There are other varieties intro-
duced from other countries.


, N


MAG.c;sot.l.\ (Young Tfree -(Magnoliceawe)
M3ahoe Ilibiscus tiliaceus). Southern area. Attains a height
of 30 feet and grows well near the seacoast. Bears hibiscus-
like flon\ers of pale yellow. The Mountain Mahoe (Ilibiscus
elatus) produces some flowers in summer and masses of red
blooms during the winter.


j^^w





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Mahogany (Snceitenia Mahagoni). Also called Madeira Red-
wood. Southern area. This native mahogany does not exceed a
height of 50 feet, neither does it make a dense shade.
Maidenhair Tree (Ginkgo). Northern area. A slender tree
that produces fan-shaped leaves which drop off in the late fall.
Mango (Mangifera indica). Southern to Central areas. This


MOUNTAIN EnONY-(Banhinia)
evergreen is generally planted for its fruit; makes
factory ornamental tree.
Manila Tamarind. (See Madras Thorn).
Mock Orange. (See Cherry Laurel).


a very satis-


Monkey Apple (Clusta rosea. Known also as the Fat Pork
Tree. Southern area. The flowers have fleshy petals.
Moreton Bay Chestnut (Castanospermum australe). South-
ern to Central areas. A tall evergreen that produces large yel-
low flowers.
Mountain Ebony (Bauhinia). Also known as the Orchid Tree.
Central and Southern areas. The flowers of these trees are
large and resemble orchids. They appear in the winter and
spring months. There are several varieties, each bearing dif-
ferent colored flowers.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Mulberry (Morus). Northern, Central and Southern areas.
The native Red lMulberry (M. rubra) and the two introduced
species, the White Mulberry (M. alba) and the Black Mulberry
(M. nigra) make rapid growth and are adapted to all sections
of the State.
Mu-oil Tree (Aleurites montana). Belongs to the same famiil
as the Tung-oil. Produces large flowers.
Oak (Quercus). Northern, Central and Southern areas. Flor-
ida is credited witl 30 native species of oaks, many of which
are planted for both shade and ornament.
Olive (Olea europaea). Southern and Central areas. These
























LIVE OAK-(Quercus)

trees make satisfactory growth in well drained soils but rarely
produce any fruit.
Old Man's Beard. (See Fringe Tree).
Orchid Tree. (See Mountain Ebony).
Paper Mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera). Northern and
Central areas. Grows to a height of about 40 feet; produces
orange-red fruits which are liked by birds.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Parasol Tree (Firmiana simplex). Also known as the Phoenix
Tree and the Japanese Varnish Tree. Northern and Central
areas. Reaches a height of 40 feet. The trunk and branches
are smooth. The flowers are small.
Pecan (Hicoria pecan). Northern area. While this tree is
planted for shade it likewise produces a supply of nuts for
winter use. A bulletin on Pecan culture is obtainable from the
Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee, Florida.
Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas). Also called Purging Nut.
Central and Southern areas. A small tree bearing green-colored
flowers. The fruits contain seeds that are purgative, but poison-
ous.
Pink Cassia (Cassia nodosa). Southern to Central areas.
Small tree that bears rose-scented, pink flowers in profusion.
There are several other species, all of which bear attractive
blossoms.
Plane Tree (Platanus occidentalis). Also known by the names
of Buttonwood and Sycamore. Grows to over 100 feet high in
the Northwestern area with heavy branches.
Poonga Oil Tree (Pongamia pinnata). Quick growing, med-
ium size tree having thick foliage that is resistant to heavy winds.
Poplar (Populus). Northern and Central areas. The native
Cottonwood or Necklace Poplar (P. deltoides), the Lombardy
(P. nigra) and the Carolina are planted in the Northern areas.
Pudding Pipe (Cassia fistula). Southern to Central areas.
Small tree producing an abundance of yellow flowers.
Phoenix Tree. (See Parasol Tree).
Pride of India. (See China Berry).
Punk Tree. (See Cajeput Tree).
Purging Nut. (See Physic Nut).
Queen's Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia speciosa). Southern
to Central areas. Also known as Queen's Flower. The pink
flowers appearing in early summer are produced while the tree
is quite young. The common deciduous Crape Myrtle (Lager-
stroemia indica) may be had in pink, purple, red and white
flowering varieties.
Queen's Flower. (See Queen's Crape Myrtle).
Queensland Nut (Macadamia ternifolia). Southern to Cen-
tral areas. A tall tree with dense foliage bearing flowers about
the size of the leaves. The seeds or nuts are edible, but have a
very hard shell.
Rain Tree (Samanea Saman). Southern area. Gets its com-
mon name from the fact that the leaves fold together in darkness
or cloudy weather. Attains an immense size.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 41




/ I z


PL NK OR C JIJPLT THEE (Alelaleicna Leitcadendron)





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Redbud (Cercis canadensis). Also called the Judas Tree.
Northern and Central areas. One of the first native trees to
bloom. The rosy, pink flowers are borne in profusion. The
species alba bears a white flower.
Red Cedar. (See Juniper and Cedar).
Red Cotton Tree (Bombax malabaricum). Southern to Cen-


ROYAL PALM--(Oreodoxa Regia)
Growing in their wild state in extreme Southern part of Florida
tral areas. Large, heavy buttressed tree bearing red blossoms.
Red Maple (Acer rubrum). Also known as Scarlet and Swamp
Maple. Native to all parts of Florida. These trees grow up-
right and form a narrow head; will grow well in the shade of
other trees. The deciduous "foliage turns to yellow and bright
scarlet in the late fall.
Red Sandalwood (Adenanthera pavonina). Also known by
the names of Bead Tree and Circassian Bean. Southern area.
A moderate-size evergreen with small, feathery foliage. The
flowers it bears are yellowish in color.
The Royal Palm is one of the most striking of the Palm family;
adapted only to the southern part of the state; are grown in





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


the Central portions to some extent along the Atlantic and Gulf
coasts.
Royal Poinciana (Poinciana Regia). Southern and warm sec-
tions of Central areas. A small tree that is prized for its flowers
which are produced in large masses. Should be planted in pro-
tected locations.
Rubber Tree. See Fig Tree .
Sacred Bo Tree (Ficus Riligioso). Southern area. A mem-
ber of the Fig Tree family: grows well on poor soils that are well
drained.
Sandbox (Hura crcpitans). Southern area. An upright de-
ciduous tree bearing small red flowers. The dried pods pro-
duced by this tree were used at one time for containing sand to
blot ink, prior to the introduction of blotting paper.


ROYAL POINCI ANA-(Poinciana Regia)


Satinleaf (Chrysophyllum oliviforme). Southern to Central
areas. This native tree with its coppery-colored leaves is very
attractive.
Sausage Tree (Kigelia pinnata). Also known as the Fetish
Tree. Southern to Central areas. A small tree bearing fruits





44 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


SACRED Bo TREE-(Ficus Riligioso)


SEA GRAPE-(Coccobolis Uvifera)





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 45

which strongly resemble sausage suspended by cords. Bears
brownish-red flowers.
Scarlet Maple. (See Red Maple).
Scagrape (Coccolobis uvifera). Southern to Central areas.
This native tree is best adapted to the coastal regions.






























S... .'. .

SILK OAK-(Grevillea Robusta)
Recommended for Southern and Central Sections
Seaside Mahoe (Thespesia populnea). Southern area. Na-
tive tree of medium height with yellow flowers that turn pur-
ple with age.
She-Oak. (See Australian Pine).
Silk Cotton Tree. (See Kapok).
Silk Oak (Grevillea robusta). Central and Southern areas.
An evergreen that grows upright, the leaves of which have a





46 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

white, silky appearance on the lower surface. The large gol-
den yellow flowers appear in April. Tie species, Grevillea
Banksii, produces red flowers.
Silk Tree (Albizzia Julibrissin). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. Has fern-like foliage with flowers of pink.
Silver or Soft Maple (Acre saccharinum). Native. Northern
area. Is a large deciduous tree with a heavy branched head. The
branches are brittle and break in windstorms.
Soapberry (Sapindus marginatus). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. A novelty that attains a height of about 30 feet.


STOPPER-(Jambolan Plum)-(Eugenia Jambolana)


The pulp of the fruit contains saponin which will form a lather
in water. Has been used as a soap substitute.
Southern Magnolia. (See Magnolia).
Southern Sugar Maple (Acre floridanum). Also known as the
Florida Maple. Native and found in the richer soils of Central
and Western Florida.
St. John's Bread (Ceratonia siliqua). Also called the Carob,
which is referred to in Bible history. Southern to Central areas.
An evergreen of slow growth.
Stopper (Eugenia). Lower Peninsular and the keys. The com-




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


mon names of sonc of the different species are: Red Stopper,
Naked Stopper, Spanish Stopper, etc.
Sugarberry. (See Hackberry).
Swamp Maple. (See Red Maple).


SwEET GUUm-(Liquiidanbar Styracillita)


Sweet Gum (Liquidambar styraciflua). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. The native Sweet Gum grows vigorously and
the deciduous foliage turns to beautiful yellows and reds during
the fall.
Sycamore. (See Plane Tree).
Tallow Tree (Sapium scbifcrum). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. Free from insect pests; grows about 30 feet high.





i18 DEPARTMENT OF AGIICULTUIE

'The wax coating on the seeds is used both for making candles
and soap in China.
Tm'anridl (Tamnarundus indica). Southern area. This de-
cidutous tree is large, round topped. with low hanging branches.
Desirable where a large tree is wanted.
Temple Tree (Plurneria). Southern area. A stocky tree of
low height bearing very fragrant purple flowers. There are
several other varieties that have different colored blossoms.


TEx.%-, UNIIIHI:I.L.% TItuE-0(.lia A :edarnclc Unabrucifi'ra)


Texas IUmbrella Tree (lMelia Umbraculifera). Northern. Cen-
tral and Soutlern areas, except in sections where Citrus Trees
are grown. The citrus white fly attacks it. Bears lilac flowers
in late spring.
Traveler's Palm. ( See Traveler's Tree .
Traveler's Tree (Rarenala mnadagascariensis). Southern area.
This tree is closely related to the Banana and is also called
Traveler's Palm. Derives its name from the watery fluid stored
in the base of the leaf stalks. and which is supposed to be a
substitute for water. It has the appearance of an open fan.
Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus glandulosus). Northern area. A
large, deciduous tree of rapid growth. with large, spreading





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


branches. The odor of the flowers and foliage is objectionable
to most persons.
Tropical Anlond (Terminalia Catappa). Southern area. This
large tree grows tall and is adapted for planting along the coast
or inland. Bears almond-like fruits.


TRAI-ELEB'S P!.L-I-(RatyaneIa)


Tulip Tree (Liriodendron Tulipifera). Known also as the
Yellow Poplar. Northern and Central areas. This native tree
is one of the largest that grows in America: has a straight trunk
and hears tulip-shaped flowers with greenish white petals that
are orange colored at their base.
Tung-Oil Tree (Aleurites fordi). This tree is grown com-




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


mercially and also used for ornamental plantings. Produces an
abundance of large flowers.
Victorian Box (Pittosporum undulatum). Central and South-
ern areas. Has attractive, dark green foliage; grows to height
of about 30 feet.
Vitex (Vitex quinanta). Northern and Central areas. Reaches
a height of 30 feet; bears purple or lavender flowers.


WoMAN's TONGUE TREE-(Albizzia Lebbek)


Water Elm (Ulmus americana). Known also as American
Elm and White Elm. Northern and Central areas. A long-lived
tree that attains huge size on fertile soils in bottom lands.
Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica). Northern area. The
trunk is short, the head spreading with long branches. Grows
to a height of about 35 feet.
White Elm. (See Water Elm).
Wild Black Cherry (Prunus serotina). Northern and Cen-
tral areas. A native tree that grows well in sandy soils to a
huge size.
Wild Olive (Sideroxylunm foetidissimum). Southern area.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 51

This native tree has a heavy trunk and reaches a height of
nearly 70 feet. The yellow, olive-shaped fruit, when ripe, may
be eaten.
Woman's Tongue Tree (Albizzia Lebbek). Southern and
Central areas. This tree is adapted to a wide range of soils;
has a broad top and spreading limbs. The flowers are greenish-
yellow.
Yellow Elder (Stenolobium stans). Central and Southern



~iji~c~:-~


ARBORVITAE AREA NANA-(Thuja)
Coniferous evergreens have a wide number of uses, especially in Central
and Northern Florida

areas. This native grows over 20 feet high and produces bright
yellow blossoms in the late fall.
Yellow Poplar. (See Tulip Tree).
Ylang-Ylang (Canangium odoratum). Southern area. A fast
growing tree bearing long. greenish-yellow flowers from which
perfume is made.





52 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

CONIFERS
Among the Conifers grown in Florida are:
Arbor Vitae (Thuja). Aromatic evergreens of which there
are several varieties, some of which are native.
Bunya-Bunya (Araucaria bidwillii). Northern, Central and
Southern areas. Not affected by heavy frosts.


BUNYA-BUNYA PINE-(Araucaria Bidwillii)


Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata). Northern and Cen-
tral areas. An evergreen with~ whorled branches. Slowr growing.0
Cypress (Cu~pressus). Three species of Cypress are adapted
to the Northern area; the Italian Cypress (C. senipervirens),
the Arizona Cypress (C. Ariz~onica) and the Portuguese Cy-
press, sometimes called the Cedar of Goa, (C. lusitanica).





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


ITALIAN CYPREss-(Cupressits Sempervirens)





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Cypress-Pine (Callitris robusta). Lower parts of Northern
and Central and Southern areas. Rapidly growing and adapted
to a wide range of soils. Has an appearance somewhat like the
Cedar. Other species are also planted.
Florida Yew (Taxus floridana). Northern area. Native to the
eastern bank of the Apalachicola River.


INoIAN CED.AR-(Cedrus Deodara)


Indian Cedar (Cedrus deodara). Northern and Central areas.
Grows with a regular pyramidal outline and has a blue-green
color. Makes an ideal living Christmas tree.
Juniper and Cedar (Juniperus). There are two native species
(J. lucayana) and (J. virginiana), both of which are commonly
called Red Cedar.
Monkey-Puzzle (Araucaria araucana). Symmetrical and
pyramidal in shape. Planted in all sections.
Moreton Bay Pine (Araucaria Cunninghamii). Has a ten-
dency to turn rusty in some sections.
Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria excelsa). Used extensively
as a potted plant.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 55

Pine (Pinus). There are seven native species of Pine in Flor-
ida and although they are seldom planted, those that are grow-
ing on a building site are generally left to grow.


- *


STINKING CEDAR-(Torreya Taxifolia)
Photo of Tree Growing in the Grounds of the State Capitol

Stinking Cedar (Torreya taxifolia). Northern area. Found
in a very limited area on the eastern bank of the Apalachicola
River and in one county in Georgia. The leaves, twigs and wood,
when crushed, give off a fetid odor.
Yew (Podocarpus). These evergreens are found in the North-
ern area and will grow in shady places. There are several species.





56 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


JAPANESE YEw-(Podocarpus Macrophylla Sinensis) (Sheared Specimen)
Very desirable for formal plantings at entrances or corners. May
be sheared to grow in many shapes. Also used as a tub plant.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 57

SHRUBBERY
Only thrifty, robust looking shrubs and bushes having an
abundance of foliage will produce harmonious and satisfactory
plantings. Most of these plantings are made with the expec-
tation of their permanent location in the place they are planted.
and it is poor economy of both expense and satisfaction, to
plant second class plants because they may cost less. Good
plants need not he expensive unless the variety is a rare one and
difficult of propagation.
Florida offers such a wide range of color, shades, sizes, shapes
and styles in the plants available for landscaping that any effect
desired may be attained. Beautiful plants are found in every
section of the State.
The proper time to transplant shrubs and bushes is between
December and March first while the plants are in a dormant
state of growth.


ALSTRALIAN TREE FERN-- Alsophila Australis)


The Tree Fern should have a shady protected location as it is very sensi-
tive to wind and sun. Requires a moist soil. This beautiful fern will more
than repay the home owner for the time and care given it.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


BREAD FRUIT PLANT-(Monstera Deliciosa)


Tropical vine with large lacy cut leaves. Requires shade and should be
grown near a tree or some kind of support.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


CHERRY LAUREL-(Prunus Caroliniana) (Sheared)

An exceptionally good plant for hedge or specimen planting as it can be
kept almost any desired shape by shearing regularly.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FLORIST OR WINTtR BLOOMINC GARDENIA-tGardenia f eitchii)
(Grafted

It has been found by grafting the Gardenia Veitchii on a root-knot proof
root stock that it produces a plant for landscape uses which otherwise could
not be used; has a blooming period of about four months.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


GOLDL-, F. THER PumIA(.4recu LuIf-rCenzs)

Requiiire ,I ienhij.i-shaded location; miake, it bhusby, vomlact plant. Very
de-irahiIcb a- a pot groin ii palm for interior r (lecoria ion.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HIBISCUS
Is a fast growing shrub and has many uses in the landscape scheme.
Among the newer introductions there are many shades and colors. The plant
is tender and easily frozen but generally sprouts from the root and blooms
again in a few months.


HYDRANGEA
A very showy plant during the spring and summer with its large bloom
and rather heavy foliage. Is adapted to shady and part shady locations, and
when severely pruned about mid-winter will produce an abundance of bloom
and new foliage in early spring.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


OLEANDER (or Nerinm)


A most effective shrub adapted to Florida. May be used as a hedge plant
or for mass plantings. They bloom in profusion in a wide range of colors
during the spring months.




61 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


PIrrosPoRuM ToBIRA (Sheared)
Very good for hedge, foundation planting, or specimen. Will grow well
in most sections of Florida and stand considerable salt spray, making it de-
sirable for coastal planting.

r(lil JH 1 II"I LM^ -tlIHV ""r ^


PROSTRATED JUNIPER-(Juniperus Chinensis Pfitzeriana)
This low spreading Juniper is excellent for corners or borders. Grows
well in central or north Florida.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 65


SEVERINIA BUXIFOLIA
A dense, slow growing, hardy shrub of the Citrus family, is very good
for foundation planting, hedges or specimens.


STAR JASMINE-Jasmtninum Pubescens)
Almost indispensable as a foundation or landscape plant. It has periodic
crops of star-shaped white flowers and can he grown as a shrub or vine.





66 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


4-^Y v( I


YELLOW BELL-(Bush Allamanda)
May be trimmed to grow as a bush or trained as a vine. It bears its wax-
like yellow flowers practically all year. Freezes easily, but generally sprouts
up from the roots.


A lt, -


YELLOW PLUMBAGO-(Thryallis Brasiliensis)
Bears beautiful yellow flowers profusely during the summer. Suitable
for Southern and Central sections.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 67

Plants or Vines as Screens
Either plants or vines will serve to hide unsightly buildings
or views but they should be planted to serve as the background
for lawns or plants that do not grow high and varieties adapt-
able to the region should always be employed. Yellow jas-
mine. honeysuckle, and Virginia creeper are suitable for North
Florida, and for South and Central Florida. trumpet vine. wis-
teria. honeysuckle. jasmine. allamnanda, hignonia. and thundergia
are among the plants recommended.




68 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

LAWNS
A properly designed and correctly planted lawn in its emerald
beauty adds ornamentation to its surroundings and it conveys
tile impressions of peace, repose and tranquility.
Beautiful lawns may be had by any home lover in any section
of Florida. The building of a good lawn involves proper soil
preparation, good grass seed, plenty of water and sufficient
attention and care. Grass needs plenty of water and if the soil
is poor, plant food must be added through fertilization.
VARIETIES OF GRASS
The varieties of grass generally used in Florida are: Bermuda,
St. Lucic, Carpet, Centipede and St. Augustine.
Illustrations of lawns planted with these varieties are given
herein and descriptions of them follow.

Bermuda Grass
This makes a very attractive lawn when planted on proper
soil and under good care it compares with the Blue grass of
Kentucky. Loam or clay-loam soils are best for its growth. It
also grows well on some sand soils or muck. Soils having a
heavy subsoil that retain moisture are necessary when Bermuda
grass is planted in light soil. Ample moisture supply must be
provided.
When Bermuda is allowed to form seed heads it will grow to
a eighth of 6 to 12 inches.


-'"** '"': t '" ---
." *- ;. '._ '" ,., < -,
* z- -:* -r.^ ; .::. _'. -*.. *-.. : ^



LAWN OF BFR-.IUDA GRASS




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Lawns planted with Bermuda grass should be cultivated at
regular periods to assure a vigorous growth. Should the lawn
begin to thin, spading it up will prove beneficial.
This grass will not grow well in the shade.
Bermuda grass may he grown either from seed or the set-
ting of the plants. The growth is through rootstocks and surface
runners. Seed requires about three weeks to germinate. If soil
and other conditions are good germination may take place
within two weeks.

St. Lucie Grass
This grass is a strain of Bermuda. It does not have the under-
ground rootstocks typical of Bermuda and is easy to eradicate
should any change in the lawn be desired.
The leaves of St. Lucie grass are coarser and when grown in
shady places it becomes lighter in color.
The same class of soils suitable for the growth of Bermuda
grass will produce good lawns of St. Lucie.
The sod will remain dense for a longer period of time than
Bermuda.
The only disease which seems to affect St. Lucie grass is
leaf spotting which has been prevalent along the East Coast
of Florida.
Carpet Grass
The spreading of Carpet Grass is by means of surface run-
ners only and under good conditions will produce a dense sod.


LAN OF CARPET GRASS
LAWN OF CARPET GRASS





70 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

but it should be planted in a good moist soil. It will grow to
a height of six inches and if allowed to form seed the stalks
will grow over nine inches high. The tendency of the stalks
is to bend and if allowed to grow without frequent mowing
considerable difficulty will be experienced in cutting. This grass
is one of the best pasture grasses raised in the State.
With good supply of plant food and ample moisture Carpet
grass will grow on any type of soil. Drought and insufficient
moisture will cause the grass to die out.
Carpet grass seed will germinate within fifteen to twenty
days.
Centipede Grass
The short leaves of medium fineness of this grass grow to
a heighth of three to four inches, spreading by means of sur-
face runners and under proper care will form a very dense sod.
This grass was introduced in 1918 from China and is bet-
ter adapted to dry, sandy soils than any other lawn grass grown
in Florida. Drought will cause the grass to wilt and become
dry but it regains its normal strength and vigor quickly. Its
vigorous growth has crowded out all other grasses in some
localities.

















LAWN OF CENTIPEDE GRASS
Centipede grass does not require the attention that other
grasses do, thriving with less water and mowing. After becom-
ing established it will remain a beautiful lawn for an indefinite
period, if given ordinary care.
High, dry sands and heavier soils have produced many at-
tractive lawns of Centipede grass in every section of Florida.




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 71

St. Augustine Grass
Lawns of St. Augustine grass are more common than any other
in Florida.
The plants with their coarse, tender leaves, when kept well
watered and fertilized will put forth vigorous growth and make
a very satisfactory lawn. If the grass is permitted to grow with-
out cutting it will attain a eighth of nearly twelve inches.
Proper care given to the lawn assures a dense sod, the grass
growing equally as well in the shade as in locations receiving
abundant sunshine.

















L.twN OF ST. AUCLSTINE GRASS

This grass will grow well on practically every type of soil
found in the State and can be maintained in good condition if
moisture and the necessary plant food are supplied.
The grass spreads through surface runners.
The desirable dark green color is obtained only through
proper fertilization, and, being resistant to cold, these lawns
frequently remain green throughout the winter months.
Chinch bugs attack St. Augustine grass. The methods for
their eradication as given in the last pages of this bulletin should
be carefully followed. Chinch bugs multiply very rapidly and
strenuous effort should be made to control them.

PREPARING THE SOIL FOR MAKING A LAWN
An underground watering system should be installed, if pos-
sible, as no other method of watering a lawn assures such an
equal distribution of moisture. Plant life contains from 55%





72 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
to 95'; of water and ample moisture supplied at regular inter-
vals is necessary for continuous, vigorous growth. When in-
stalling such a system it should be done before the soil is pre-
pared for the grass seed. Trenches about twelve inches deep,
properly spaced, are dug and the water pipes laid in the bottom
of them. These pipes if laid level will give a more equal dis-
tribution of water. Uprights or outlets are placed at regular
intervals.
Grading
The entire plot to be seeded should be thoroughly spaded,
the soil pulverized and raked smooth. Then the soil must be
well watered so that it will settle and become firm for plant-
ing. Grade so that there will be a slight slope away from the
house.





I.I
-.v.














LAWN OF ST. ALGUSTINE GRASS

Dwellings of this type should have formal foundation plantings for the
most satisfactory results.
Fertilizing Before Planting
If the soil is deficient in fertility or is very sandy. manure or
rich soil must be used. A clay subsoil about a foot below the
surface is ideal for retaining moisture and for permanent lawns
it is economy to take out the poor soil, put in a foot of clay and
a laver of rich soil about six inches deep on top. There will
be little, if any, difficulty in maintaining a lawn so prepared. in
perfect condition.
Before seeding, about ten pounds of super-phosphate, two
pounds of muriate or sulphate of potash and two pounds of





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 73

cottonseed meal applied to every thousand square feet of lawn
surface will supply the needed plant food to the young grass
when it begins to grow. This fertilizer may be broadcast and
then worked thoroughly into the soil.

Sowing the Seed
Before planting any grass seed find out the grade of purity
and the germination of the seed. The seed you plant should
be free of weed seed. Good Bermuda or Carpet grass seed will
germinate in about three weeks. The young grass grows slowly
at first and if weeds are present it will be necessary to weed the
lawn. Weeds can be controlled through mowing after the grass
is well established.
For every thousand square feet of lawn about two and a half
pounds of Bermuda or Carpet grass seed are required. The
better method of sowing the seed is to scatter the seed across
the plot in one direction, north to south, and then follow by
broadcasting the seed from east to west, using half of the amount
of seed for each seeding. Rake the lawn well to cover the seed,
water thoroughly and keep moist until the grass has obtained
a good stand.
A lawn may be obtained quicker by setting the plants. They
will grow faster and there will not be the difficulty of weeds.
The soil is prepared in the same manner as for seeding.
Small trenches are made about ten inches apart alnd the run-
ners or plants are set every six inches. Each plant must be
covered with soil when planted to prevent driving out and they
should be planted deep enough to protect them. Water thor-
oughly after planting and keep the soil moist until the plants
are firmly rooted. The grass plants may be purchased from
nurseries, or seed firms. Some farmers in the State raise plants
of these varieties of grass. Two pounds of runners are suffi-
cient to plant one hundred square feet of lawn. They are broken
into five inch lengths. These plants must not be planted upside
down.

Treatment For Old Lawns
The first thing to do to restore an old lawn is to cover it with
muck, rich soil, or manure which has been pulverized, to a
depth of about a half inch. The grass should not be completely
covered. Following this treatment with plenty of water, the
grass will take on more strength and within a short time the
lawn should show decided improvement. Some bare spots may
have to be replanted but this will not be so expensive as to
make an entirely new lawn. Neglect is perhaps the cause of





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


most unsightly lawns. Plant life needs food and moisture just
as humans do.

Mowing
A fast growing lawn needs to be mowed every seven to ten
days. Mowing too close weakens the plants. The mower should
be set to mow about one inch above the surface runners. Mow-
ing will keep down weeds and assist in the spread of the grass.
Leave the cuttings on the lawn as they will supply plant food for
the grass. With such care at stated intervals the lawn will keep
in the best of condition.

Watering
The soil on which grass is growing should be kept moist and
this is accomplished more satisfactorily through the use of an
underground watering system than any other method. A thor-
ough wetting two or three times each week is better than light
sprinklings daily. This system of watering permits the applica-
tion of water at night when the loss of moisture through evapora-
tion is lowest.
During the rainy season, from June to September, very little
watering is necessary.

Fertilizing the Established Lawn
If the grass cuttings are left on the lawn when it is mowed
very little fertilizer will be needed. Nitrogen fertilizer applied
every month, and two pounds of sulphate or muriate of potash
spread on every thousand square feet of lawn surface, with five
pounds of super-phosphate applied once a year should keep the
lawn in a vigorous state of growth.
The nitrogen element can be supplied through the use of cot-
tonseed meal, castor meal, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia,
leunasalpeter, and other nitrogen fertilizers.
Whenever the grass begins to lose its dark green color the
nitrogen fertilizer should be used.
The lawn must be watered immediately after applying the
fertilizer to prevent burning the grass.
A very good treatment in addition to fertilizing is to cover the
lawn to a depth of about three-fourths of an inch with good
manure or muck once each year.

Green Lawns During Winter
Italian rye grass is used for winter sowing where green lawns
are desired during the winter months. The lawn must be kept




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 75

well mowed until the advent of warm weather when the winter
grasses will die out. If the grass is not cut frequently the win-
ter grasses will choke out the first planting of permanent lawn.
The winter seed should be sowed when the top soil is applied.
Two and one-half pounds of winter grass seed will sow one
thousand square feet of lawn. Kentucky Blue grass seed is
also used for this purpose but the cost is higher than for Italian
rye grass seed.


0 4;- "


LAWN OF ST. AUGUSTINE GRASS WrITII WELL GROUPED SHRUBBERY
Plantings of this type are used for corners or screens as the Shrubs can
be kept at medium height with very little effort.

CHINCH BUG CONTROL
The Chinch bug has a disagreeable odor and when full grown
is about one-fifth of an inch long. The body is black with
wings that are nearly white, each wing having a black spot
in the center. The young arc reddish in color and are wingless.
The insect does its damage by sucking the plant juices. It
can be killed only by contact insecticides, such as dusts or liquid
sprays.

Dusts
Dusts may be purchased ready for application or the in-
gredients bought and mixed at time of application.
A dust containing about 29' nicotine, known as Snuff Num-
ber Two, has proven effective. It is harmless, easily applied,
will not burn the grass and valuable as a fertilizer. In applying
it select a dry day when the sun is shining. Twenty-five to





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


thirty-five pounds for every thousand square feet of lawn is the
usual treatment. The lawn should not be watered for several
days after treatment.
Coarse ground tobacco, which has a lower nicotine content.
and costs less, if applied during the early stages of chinch bug
infestation, will prove satisfactory as a control measure. If the
coarser ground tobacco is mixed with hydrated lime of an equal
weight its effect is increased.
A sulphate-lime dust containing 3% nicotine is a good in-
secticide. Seven pounds of this mixture should be applied to
each thousand square feet.
An insecticide made of fifty percent free nicotine in fifty
pounds of hydrated lime costs less to apply.
One of the strongest contact insecticides known is calcium
cyanide. It is highly poisonous and care must be used in apply-
ing it or it will burn the grass. It is always applied when
the grass is thoroughly dry, and the lawn is kept dry for several
hours after application, or the sprinkling system is kept run-
ning continuously to keep the gas washed down. If this in-
secticide is used, take an old broom and sweep the lawn
immediately after it is put on the grass so that it is spread
evenly. This will also brush the poison down among the stems
where the bugs are eating.
Do not let the dust enter your mouth nor breathe it. The
fumes must be kept out of sleeping quarters, and the cans con-
taining the material must not he opened inside any room. This
dust, when used as directed, will destroy chinch bugs, crickets,
moles, and other pests that attack lawns.

Liquid Sprays

A liquid spray is made of 100 gallons of water to which has
been added one pint of nicotine sulphate and about five or six
pounds of whale oil or laundry soap, or as a substitute for the
soap, a pound of calcium caseinate. To reduce the cost of the
spray certain oils acting as nicotine sulphate activators may be
used and the amount of the nicotine sulphate is correspondingly
reduced.
Other liquid sprays are made of derris or pyrethrum com-
pounds.
Do not mow a lawn that is infested too closely, and keep the
lawn well watered.





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 77

FOUNDATION PLANTINGS
The following pages with illustrations show plantings for
different types of houses.
Plants have been selected to harmonize with the size and
architecture of the house. Substitutions may be made. It is
always best to consult a recognized landscape gardener before
planting.
With the use of a variety of plants careful attention must be
given to proper fertilization, pruning, thinning, and replace-
ments will be found necessary.
Good effects are not obtainable unless the plants are robust,
and thrifty in growth with abundant foliage.
The purpose of planting grass, shrubs and trees is to make a
harmonious unit of the buildings and their surroundings.


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Jasmine Primulinium or
Abelia Grandiflora


CENTRAL
1 Foundation Planting of Plumbago
Capcnsis or Blue Leadwort


SOUTHERN
1 Jasmine Simplicifolium or
Thryallis Braziliensis





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Arizona Cypress
2 Arhorvitae Aurea Conspicua
3 Abelia Grandiflora
4 Ligustrum Lucidum
5 Pittosporum Tobria
6 Palm (Cocos Australis)
7 Podocarpus Sinensis
8 Cherry Laurel
9 Cedrus Deodara
CENTRAL
1 Arizona Cypress (Cupressus
Arizonica Oblonga Glauca)
2 Arborvitae Aurea Conspicua
(Thuja Orientalis)
3 Codiaeum (Croton)


4 Wax Privet (Ligustrum Lucidum)
5 Golden Dew Drop
(Duaranta Plumieri)
6 Palm (Cocos Plumiosa)
7 Palm Coconut (Cocos Nucifera)
8 Palm (Washingtonia Robusta)
9 Indian Cedar (Cedrus Deodara)
SOUTHERN
1 Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Podocarpus Sinensis
3 Crotons
4 Acalyphia
5 Duranta Plumieri
6 Palm (Cocos Plumosa)
7 Coconut Palm
8 Palm (Washingtonia Robusta)
9 Podocarpus Neggi


(O

5 3
QD@ ,
CY~) ^-'0


0--/'^-*-





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME






-NOR -2


3-, -Z


~P :t~;; I
C c
-
I:~~~-~ -
'--'


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Ligustrum Lucidum or
Nandina
2 Spiraca Vanhouttei or
Abelin Grandiflora


CENTRAL
1 Acalypha or
Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Crotons or
Phyllanthus (Joseph's Coat)


SOUTHERN
1 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons)


.V





80 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Pittosporum Tobria
2 Ligustrum Lucidum
3 Jasmine Primulinum or
Spiraea Vanhouttei


CENTRAL
1 Pittosporum Tobria
2 Wax Privet (Ligustrum Lucidum)
3 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulinum)


SOUTHERN
1 Pittorporum Tobria
2 Ligustrum Lucidum
3 Jasmiine Simplicifolium





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida

NORTHERN CENTRAL


1 Climbing Roses or Wisteria
2 Flowering Quince
3 Vibernum Japonicum
4 Ilex Vomitoria (Sheared)


1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Acalypha or Plumbago
3 Crotons
4 Eugenia (Myrtifolia) (Sheared)


SOUTHERN
1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
3 Codiaeunm (Crotons)
4 Australian Pine ISheared
(Casuarina Equisetifolia)


PORCH-





82 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Arborvitae Pyramidalis
2 Abelia Grandiflora
3 Cedrus Deodara
4 Spanish Bayonet
5 Bush Honeysuckle


CENTRAL
1 Arborvitae Pyramidalis (Thuja)
2 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulium)
3 Palm Cocos Plumosa
4 Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Aloifolia)
5 Weeping or Trailing Lantana
(Lantana Delicatissima)


SOUTHERN
1 Podocarpus Sinensis or
Sheared Australian Pine
2 Jasmine Simplicifolium
3 Palm Coconut
4 Spanish Bayonet
5 Trailing Lantana





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 83


TW


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Arborvitae Aurea Conspicua
2 Palm (Cocos Australis)
3 Nandina Domestica
4 Firus Repens


CENTRAL
1 Palm (Cocos Plumosa)
2 Palm (Phoenix Roebeleni)
3 Carissa Grandiflora
4 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)


SOUTHERN
1 Coconut Palm (Cocos Nucifera)
2 Dwarf Date Palm
(Phoenix Roebelenii)
3 Mo-aic Plant (Acalypha)
4 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)


I





84 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Climbing Roses or Ficus Rep
2 Azaleas or Abelia Grandiflora


CENTRAL


ens 1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Crotons or Azaleas

SOUTHERN


1 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons, assorted
varieties)





BEAUTIFYING THE IOME


I'--- '


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN CEN
ayonet 1 Spanih Bayone
Quince 2 Crotons
ex Vomitoria 3 Podocarpus I Sh
im Tobria 4 Century Plant
andiflora 5 Duranta

SOUTHERN
1 Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Aloiiolia)
2 Codiaceum ICrotons
3 Australian Pine (Sheared)
tCasuarina Equisetifolia)
I Century Plant Agave
(Americana I'arigtal)
3 Golden Dew I)rop
(Dutranta Plumieri)


TRIAL


eared


1 Spani-h B
2 Flowering
3 Sheared II
4 Pittosporu
5 Abelia Gr


111
4 '1 1


OIC^^ T





86 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Ligustrum Nobilis
2 Hydrangea
3 Ficus Repens (Sheared)
Cherry Laurel (in parkway)


CENTRAL
1 Hibiscus (Sheared hedge)
2 Hydrangea
3 Ficus Repens (Climbing Fig)
(on pillars, side of house and
awning)
Cherry Laurel (Lauro cerasus
Caroliniana) (Sheared-in park-
way)


SOUTHERN
1 Hibiscus (Sheared) or Acalypha
2 Dracaena (Assorted colors)
3 Ficus Repens
Coconut Palm (in parkway)





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Arborvitae Compacta
2 Vibernum Suspensum
3 Podocarpus Sinensis
4 Abelia Grandiflora


CENTRAL
1 Arborvitae Compacta (Thuja)
2 Codiaeum (Crotons)
3 Japanese Yew (Podocarpus
Macrophylla Sinensis)
4 Golden Feather Palm
(Areca Lutescence)
Climbing Fig (Ficus Repens)
(On wall and front of house)

SOUTHERN


1 Ligustrum Lucidumn
2 Crotons
3 Podocarpus Sinensis
4 Tecoma Capensis


2

O 1 OO
q 4





88 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN

1 Ligustrum
2 Vibernum Suspensum
3 Cocos Australis


CENTRAL

1 Wax Privet (Ligustrum Lucidum)
2 Jasmine (Jasiminum Primulinum)
3 Cocos Plumosa Palms


SOUTHERN


1 Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Jasmine (Simplicifolium)
3 Royal Palm


-7




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
Climbing Rose
Flowering Quince
Spiraea Thumbergi
Cocos Australis
Arborvitae (Tall)
Jasmine Primulinum


CENTRAL
Bougainvillea (Crimson Lake)
Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
Codiaeum (Crotons)
Zamia, Cycad (Coontie)
Arborvitae (Aurea Conspicua-
Thuja)
Jasmine (Jasminum Simplicifolium)


SOUTHERN
1 Bougainvillea (Crimson Lake)
2 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
3 Codiacum (Crotons)
4 Zamia, Cycad (Coontie)
5 Arborvitae (Aurea Conspicun-
Thuja)
6 Jasmine (Jasminum Simplicifolium)


2DC3


,
.4





90 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Abelia Grandiflora
2 Cocos Australis
3 Podocarpus Maki
4 Bed of Annuals


CENTRAL
1 Mixture of Crotons and Acalypha,
with Ficus Repens on house
2 Palm Cocos Plumosa
3 Native Pine with Alamanda
4 Bed of Annuals


SOUTHERN
1 Mixture of Crotons and Acalypha
2 Royal Palm
3 Coconut Palm
4 Bed of Annuals





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Spirea Thumbergi
2 Vibernum Suspensum
3 Flowering Quince


CENTRAL
1 Golden Dew Drop IDuranta
Plumieri)
2 Crotons (Codiaeum)
3 Bougainvillea Purple
(Sanderiana Glabra)


SOUTHERN
Golden Dew Drop fDuranta
Plumieri)
Crotons (Codiaeum)
Bougainvillaea Purple
(Sanderiana Glabra)


91


H





92 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Jasmine Primulinum
2 Abelia Grandiflora
3 Abelia Grandiflora
4 Pittosporum (Sheared)
5 Spanish Bayonet


CENTRAL
1 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulinum)
2 Crotons (Codiaeum)
3 Golden Dew Drop
(Duranta Plumieri)
4 Arborvitae Compacta (Thuja)
5 Spanish Bayonet (Yucca Aloifolia)

SOUTHERN


1 Jasminum Simplicifolium
2 Crotons
3 Duranta Plumieri
4 Podocarpus Maki (Sheared)
5 Spanish Bayonet


PATIO 0




a) U-






BEAUTIFYING THE HOME


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
I Severiana Buxifolia
2 Abelia Grandiflora
3 Podocarpus (Sheared)
4 Cocos Australis


CENTRAL
1 Jasmine (Jasminum Primulinunm)
2 Wax Privet (Ligustrum lvwata)
3 Yaupon Holly (Ilex Vomitoria)
4 Palms (Cocos Plumosa)
St. Augustine
(Stenotaphrum Secundatum)


SOUTHERN
1 Caris.sa Grandiflora
2 Chalacas (Orange jasmine)
3 Eugenia Hookeriana (Sheared)
4 Coconut Palm





94 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Suggested Plantings for Di -s o


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida


NORTHERN
1 Pittosporum (Sheared)
2 Vibernum Suspensum
3 Confederate Jasmine or
Climbing Rose


CENTRAL
1 Ligustrum Lucidum
2 Crotons
3 Bougainvillea (Crimson Lake)


SOUTHERN
1 Mosaic Plant (Acalypha)
2 Crotons (Codiaeum)
3 Bougainvillea (Crimson Lake)
Lawn of Centipede Grass





BEAUTIFYING THE HOME 95






iUE prwr


Suggested Plantings for Different Sections of Florida
NORTHERN CENTRAL
1 Podocarpus Sinensis 1 Podocarpus Sinensis
2 Climbing Rose (Japanese Yew)
3 Abelia Grandiflora 2 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
4 Azaleas 3 Palm Areca Lutescens
5 Japanese Primulinum (Golden Feather Palm)
6 Ilex Vomitoria 4 Azaleas
5 Jasminum Pubescence
(Star Jasmine)
6 Yaupon Holly (Ilex Vomitoria)
SOUTHERN
1 Podocarpus Sinensis
2 Bougainvillaea (Crimson Lake)
3 Palm Areca
4 Chalcas Paniculata
(Orange Jasmine)
5 Carissa Grandiflora
6 Palm Phoenix Rocheleni





96 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

ILLUSTRATING THE RESULTS OF GOOD LANDSCAPING


5..


BEFORE PLANTING


EIGHTEEN MONTHS AFTER PLANTING


SIx YEARS AFTER PLANTING






BEAIUTIF'YING TIHE HOME


---'-----~ ---rr-rr ---


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.lafrginaa(IE).M ai cm f Iupiarloiiu Lci~tuij, I'vioiii or Mcbaghlleti (>citia-
ti:aplanrbav: Ctt ;.,avlvbra) Ni g ht I Blooi ng :. rti- Ilaiirra ib. anid Splan i~-
11.1 ,rI,. I tu..,i loifoli,, o.utin ed jbrik.Ir- edun adKalanrhoe-.



















ACKNOW LEDGMENTS

Acknowledgment is made to the United States Department
of Horticulture, Agriculture Experiment Station. Gainesville,
Fla.. and Mr. John G(nnaro. Landscape Consultant, Tampa.




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