• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Christmas Eve and Other Storie...
 Main
 Just in Time and Other Stories
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Uncle Sam's library for the boys and girls in his United States of America ;, <1>
Title: Uncle Sam's library
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002793/00001
 Material Information
Title: Uncle Sam's library for the boys and girls in his U.S.A
Series Title: Uncle Sam's library for the boys and girls in his United States of America
Alternate Title: Christmas Eve
Annie and the elves
Just in time
Physical Description: 48, 48, 48 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crosby, Nichols, and Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Crosby, Nichols, and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1853
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1853   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Separate title pages and paginations.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks pages 19-30 in "Annie and the elves, and other stories".
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002793
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224193
oclc - 10245202
notis - ALG4454
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
        Front cover 3
        Front cover 4
    Title Page
        Front cover 5
        Front cover 6
    Front Matter
        Front cover 7
        Front cover 8
        Front cover 9
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Christmas Eve and Other Stories
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Just in Time and Other Stories
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 9
        Page 11
        Page 13
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Back Cover
        Page 52
    Spine
        Page 53
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The Baldwin Library
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LIBRARY,
FOR
T-lE IBOYS AND ~G~
IN HIS


BOSTON:
CROSBY, NICHOLS AND COMPANY.
1853.


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UNCLE SAM'S LIBRARY,
FOR THE


IN HIS
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.


THE CHRISTMAS EVE.
GEORDIE AND HIS DOG.
STORIES AND LEGENDS.
THE PICTURE ALPHABETS.
ALL FOR THE BEST.
THE ESKDALE HERDBOY.

















I





















































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4































THE GOLD PIECE.








^CHRISTMAS EVE,
AND

OTHER STORIES.

FROi- TH GERAN.
^I-r^ FBOr~[ TI-E (:EBMAN.


B O'S T () N :
U Fi'4UX NI LA-1-i- S. AND (OM PANY.
1853.


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STORIES.

CHRISTMAS EVE.
-VENING had come over
the earth, the sacred eve
of Christmas, and a poor
e woman was sitting with
her two children in a little
room of a small house in the suburbs.
The father of the children had died after
having been ill for a long time, during
which he had earned nothing, so that
he had left his family in extreme poverty.
(5)


i'I


~~.aJ..-.- -


. 6

lg _








CHRISTMAS EVE.


The mother too was unable to earn any
thing, for she had to stay with the
youngest child and nurse it, and take
care of it, because it was ill all the time.
Now the poor mother was sitting crying
to herself, for she had no wood to warm
the room, and on that day when all
others were rejoicing and parents every
wlhe'-o were li.litin-, up Chri tna1s trees"

For the information of my little readers I will say that in
Germany, Christmas Eve is a great festival in every family,
especially for the children. For them the parents prepare a
,Ch .iris-, Trci., generally a young pine, which is hung all over
with ;ilt -lrpp1, '. nuts, strings of raisins and almonds, and
choice ,-r..in: ..-~i iry, all of which glitter beautifully in the light
of very many small colored wax tapers, which are placed among
the dark twigs of the pine, while at its foot the children find
their presents. They take great pleasure in t1-, .:rull- :r'.li,'
the tree, admiring its beauty and dancing in their joy. As long
as the tapers are burning in all their glory, and the gilt apples
and sugar toys are glittering they hardly look at their beautiful







CHRISTMAS EVE.


for their children, she had to sit in the
darkness, because the last drop of oil in
the lamp was burned up. When the
elder boy heard his mother sobbing, he
threw his arms around her neck and
said: "Oh, mother, if we only had a
light! If I could only see you I be-
lieve I lshould~'not be so cold, and you
would not cry so any more if you cO:l-d
see us." At this the poor woman alniost
broke her heart with grief; then she put
her hand in her pocket and said: Go,
my child, and get some oil; here is my
last penny, I meant to have 1,boght
bread with it to-morrow, but who knows
presents. Of course they take great pains to please their
parents all the year round, lest they should lose the benefit of
a fine Christmas Tree, for only good children have a Christmas
Tiee..


4
LA







8 CHRISTMAS EVE.
but the holy Christ may give us bread
in some other way." The boy took the
money and ran to get some oil, and as
he went he looked to the right and left
to see if there were any where a window
illuminated with the lights of a Christ-
mas tree. But only poor people lived
in that street, and most of the houses
were dark; but here and there a faint
oil hlmp shone through a small and dim
window pane.
The boy went farther and farther till
he reached the broad street full of stores,
all lighted up with splendor. In the tall
houses there lived rich families, and at
the large windows Christmas trees were
shining brilliantly. Finally he came to
the inrket-place where booth stood next







CHRISTMAS EVE.


to booth, and he could not enough won-
der at all the magnificent things exposed
for sale, the sweetmeats, the painted
toys, and the brilliant Christmas trees.
He went about here and there, looked at
one thing after another, and was so
happy that he did not feel that his hands
and feet were growing numb with cold.
At last he came to a booth which was
lighted up more finely than any of the
others, and a great many people were
crowded together before it; as he looked
in, he forgot every thing else, for there
he saw all that his mother had told him
so often about the holy Christ wrought
finely and beautifully in wax. The Vir-
'gin Mary was sitting in a stable holding
the infant Christ on her lap; and b1efuio


--~~P~---l.^- ..i-....:--- ---l..--1U-..- -~:^._. 1







CHRISTMAS EVE.


her the s'h:.herds were kneeling, wor-
shipping the holy child, and all around
were cows and sheep, and above the
child were waxen angels with silver
wings. The boy had never seen any
thing so beautiful, and I don't know how
long he would have stood gazing at it if
a crowd of new comers had not pushed
him aside. Then he suddenly remem-
bered that his mother was sitting in the
dark at home with his little sister, and
that he had come out to get some oil.
But how he was frightened when he felt
that the penny had fallen out of his be-
numbed hand. He began to weep aloud,
but though the crowd an lund him were
constantly going inte'the booth to buy
things, and carrying the beautiful arti-






CHRISTMAS EVE.


cles they had bought past him as they
went out, no one asked what was the
matter, and he remained unnoticed in
his grief. Then he went slowly back
through the lighted street, but now he
looked neither to the right nor the left,
for he no longer took pleasure in any
thing. At aIl:,t he came into the dark
street where his mother lived. And as
he thought how sad his iimther would
be about the lost penny, lhe iI nC't
make up his mind to go hl1aiu Iat
down on a great stone and wept bit-
terly.
"Ah," thought he, "the Christ (hild
to-day brings gladness to all, and only
leaves mother and me more unhappy
than ever." So he sat a great while till







CHRISTMAS EVE.


at4last he heard the watchman on the
corner calling the hour; he came down
the street with his lantern and sung:
"In the sacred, silent night,
Christ, the Lord, came down from Heaven;
Peace to us he brought, and joy
To every pious soul hath given."

Then, by the light of the lantern, the
boy saw something shining on the snow
before him, and picked it up to play with.
But the watchman came up and asked
why he sat there in the street in the
dark and cold and did not go home. In
tears the child told how he had lost his
mother's last penny, with which lie had
gone to get oil; how his mother had wept
all the time since his father had died,
and how he could not bear to see her






CHRISTMAS EVE.


grieve for her last penny. "Well, come
with me," said the kindly watchman, I
will give you some oil, and then you must
run home quickly, for your mother will be
troubled about you. And as he took the
child by the h1aInl he felt something hard
and asked what it was. The child showed
him the shining thing he had just found
in the snow. There," said the watch-
nm1n, "see what the holy Christ has sent
you! That is a gold piece; for a gold
piece you can get more than a handful
of Ipcni.s. Now your mother can buy
bread and wo:od to-morrow." At this
the boy was lull -'1. delight, and after he
had got the oil of the watchman he ran
home to his mother and told her every
thing that had happened, how he had







14 CHRISTMAS EVE.

lost the penny and found the gold piece.
Then the mother wept but it was for joy,
and 1she: took her children on her lap and
taught thenmi to thank the holy ('Cirit
child lc-Lius he e had reiiienil'm ed their
poverty and made t lheiu si_ rich.


.m










r


i





THE COCKEREL AND THE HENS..

SLI ERE was once a great fa- n-
a- yird, in w-.ich there lived a
Hl s :l..iBl ii in" cnekerel with
*i.i "iv:es, awhlepilCvfh-n., ,-
ld1c atInl wN-hite, grey anli.d h1.iwn, l.oth '
-.4


4 ,






16 THE COCKEREL AND THE HENS.
with and without crests. They all lived
in great peace and harmony, for every
thing went well with them, and every
day they got. a large pile of barley corns
for their food. Only one thing troubled
them, that their eggs were always taken
away and they many times could bring up
a brood of chickens. The hens had often
hid their nests, sometimes in the wood-
shed, sometimes in the barn, so that the
eggs might not be found, and once they
had saved up a mountain of eggs. But
the girl who fed them found their eg,--
mountain and carried it to the city and
sold it.
Indeed it was no more than natural
that the eggs should be. hundl, for as
,soon as a hen laid one, she set up such







TIE COCKEREL AND THE HENS.


a noisy cackling that itwais heard in the
farthest corner of the flrini-yard, anl :i.dll
the hens came running to:-t:ttliV' to loluji4.
at the w ..iir. Some L'--,stel lv white
it was, others praised its beautiful slhale,
and o(i,.:-i.-* disputed whether it w-,:ull I
hatch a pullet or a cockerel. About this
the hens very often fell into a qiirriel,
so that at last there was such a chatter-
ing, that all the servant-maid had- to do
was to go wvheri.thI: noise was in order
to lb sure of finliiin the eggs.
SThei old cockerel was troubled at. the
:' l::o uf the eggs quite as much as the
hens, if not more. One day after he 'had
been walking up and down thinking, in
a corner of the farm-yard, he flew upon
the edge of the watering trough, shut. his
2
4.






18 THE COCKEREL AND THE HENS.

1 eyes, and crowed, a loud and piercing
cock-a-doodle-doo." So at this well-
S nl:,own call, the hens came rushing and
tunbl:ing from all sides and formed a
clucking assembly around the cockerel.
Then, although he was much agitated
and troubled in his mind, he made a very
strong speech to the meeting, and told
the hens that he knew perfectly well how
often they had to mourn over the loss of
their eggs, and that after long reflection
he could think of no better advice than
to leave the farm-yard and go off into the
woods. If they were willing to do this
they should get lup early the next day.
A loud clucking announced their assent
to this proposition, and all of them went
rather earlier than usual to roost, so that






THE ('::' F1K E1L AND THE HENS.


they might get a good sleep before start-
ing. The next morning the cockerel
waked up his wives with a sort of low
crowing, and they started in perfect
silence out of the farm-yard. But as the
last of the hens left the yard, he flew
upon the gate and crowed an exulting
"Cock-a-doodle-doo," and then all went
on further and further till they got into
the woods. There they made a great
nest in a thicket for their eggs, and at
night they roosted on the trees. For a
while they got on pretty well, only the
hens cackled so loud when they laid their
eggs that once the fox heard it, and came
stealthily up at night and carried off a
white brood hen from her nest and
smashed the eggs. For the old cockerel







20 THE COCKEREL AND THE HENS.
this was a great affliction, and after it
the hens went about looking quite down-
hearted. And when the autumn wind
shook the leaves from the trees, and the
hens often had to scratch all day without
finding a kernel of any thing to eat, they
went to the cockerel and begged him to
lead them back to the farm-yard. There
they said it was true their eggs were
taken away from them, but they had a
warm roost and good food; here in the
woods the fox broke their eggs and Ait
up themselves into the 1largin.
The cockerel, who had himself priva tcly
begun to long for the heap of barley corns,
agreed at once to go back, but :id\ ii.j.-d
the hens for the future to leave off cack-
ling so as not always to 1,L-:.tiy where






THE COCKEREL AND THE HENS.


the eggs were. But they were not dis-
posed to be advised by him. They said
that when they cackled they did it be-
cause they knew they had done a good
thing; but that he often set up his nose
without any reason; at least none of
them had ever seen that he had laid an
egg, and so he had nothing to say about
the matter. Then the Cockerel was
ashamed and held his tongue and led his
family back to the farm-yard where they
SIf'll upon the ih .p of barley corns with a
very keen appetite. There they live to
this very day, and have the same sort of
food, the same cackling and the same
trouble.









THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.

MAN once lived with his wife
and child, happy and contented,
for they loved each other, and
God had given them every
thing good and necessary. In the morn-
ing the man went out to work and the
child remained with her mother at home
and played, and her mother told her
pretty stories, such as she liked to hear,
and caressed her tenderly; or else she
went with her into the garden, and the
child gathered and ate the sweet straw-
berries and the finely flavored raspber-
ries. And when the father came home
(22)












k
L






































THE CHILD AND HER SICK I-MiE.'

THIE CHIILD AND H-EE SICK MOTH''IER.'






THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN. 2;

at night they were all three happy be-
cause they were together. In this way
they lived for some time till at last the
mother became feeble and ill and h.id to,
go to bed. Then the father went sorrow-
fully to wbrk in the morning, and was
more sorrowful at evening when he saw
that the -lff;ier grew no better. But
the ch ild remained with her mother, and
when she was told that she might go
alone to the garden she had no wish to
go, but would hide her face on her mo-
ther's bed and weep. At last the mother
felt that she must die, and called the
child to her and said: "I shall soon go
away from your, for our dear Father in
Heaven is calling me to himself; but if
you are good and kind I will come some







26 THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.


times to see you, my darling, and if it is
God's will take you where I am in
Heaven." Soon after the mother died
and was buried in the garden, and the
father was very unhappy and shed tears.
The child was unhappy too, and would
like to have gone to heaven with her
mother, but as she hoped her mother
would come to see her or take her to her-
self, she was soon consoled again. But
her father was sorry for the child, because
she would have to be alone while he went
away to work, and so he married another
wife to be the mother of the child. But
she was a bad woman and did not love
the child and did not speak to her, nor
even look kindly at her. She took no
care of the child, nor did she wash her







TIE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.


clothes nor mend them, and when she
went to bed at night the new mother did
not arrange her little bed for her. This
made the child unhappy, and very often
she went into the garden and sat down
on her mother's grave, and said: "Ah,
-dear mother in Heaven, come and take
me away." But when the bad woman
saw the child sitting on the grave, she
was angry and drove her away, for she
could not bear that the child should
think of the departed one, and she saw
plainly that she had no love for her se-
cond mother. And when she saw the
child eating strawberries and raspberries
as she had been accustomed to do when
Sher own mother was living, she beat her
severely, for she would not let the child






THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.


have the berries, but wanted to eat them
all herself. At last she became so bad
to the child that she would not let her,
go into the garden at all, and when she
went there herself she fastened the child
up in a dark room. Then the child
would break into loud lamentations and
weep for she was afraid in the darkness.
" Oh, mother, in Heaven," she said once,
when she was shut up there, Oh, come
and take me away." Then a bright
light came into the dark chamber, and
her mother, in white robes, beautiful and
loving, just as she had been in life, only
much more beautiful, took the child on
her knee and kissed her and caressed her
and told her stories just as she had used
to do. But now they were stories of





































THE MOTHER APPEARING TO THE CHILD.
THE MOTHER APPEARING: TO THE CHILD.


9-.. mptK--




I





THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.


Heaven, about the eternal gardens of
paradise, where imperishable flowers
bloom and flourist-where heavenly sweet
fruits ripen, where the angel-children
play joyous plays and dance the celestial
dances, and sing their hymns before the
throne of God our father. The child was
happy to hear this, and became still and
quiet and finally went to sleep. When
the bad woman came from the garden
and went into the chamber to fetch the
child, she found her pale and asleep in
one corner, and woke her up with hard
and -unkind words.
At evening the child told her father
how her mother in heaven had been tc
see her, and what she had said to her.
At this the father was thoughtful, and






32 THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN.


though he told the child it was only a
dream, it made him heavy hearted, for
he loved his first wife much more than
the second, and knew that the latter was
not a good mother to his child. But as
he did not know how bad she was, he
was silent and said nothing about it.
After that, whenever the child was shut
up in the dark chamber, she was calm
and quiet, for she did not stay long alone
in the darkness. Her mother in Heaven
came to see her with a soft, clear light,
and comforted her and told her about
Heaven and the Angels. Then the child
grew more and more full of longing for
the heavenly delights and begging her
mother at every visit to take her with
,- her, but the mother always said it was







THE DEAR MOTHER IN HEAVEN. 33

not time yet and she must wait. And
as the child grew paler and more -ikt,
and often looked out of the window to-
wards Heaven with folded hands, the bad
woman was io:l i- unkind and hard to her
and fastened her up oftener in the dark
chamber. Once when she shut her up
there and went to bring her out again
from the darkness, the child looked much
i;,A:.il than usual, and when she called
her, did not stir. Then she saw that
she was dead. The mother in heaven
had been with her and rocked her to
sleep, and promised her that she should
wake up in Heaven. And there the child
has a robe of light like the angel-children
with whom, she plays in the gardens of
God.










THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


N the dark Hartz mountains,
just where the little stream
called the Bode flows between
the high hills, there stands a
lofty and steep rock whose
base is wet by the waters of
the stream. This rock is
called the Horse's Footprint, and its sum-
mit is covered with the most beautiful,
great trees, such as oaks, beeches, and
birches. On this rock there stood once,
many hundred, hundred years ago, a
splendid royal castle. In this castle
there dwelt a king with his only daughter,
(34)







THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


the beautiful princess Pimpinella. The
princess had many suitors, fo she was
known far and wide as the most lovely
of king's daughters, but she rejected all
these aspirants for her favor, because she
was in love with a shepherd who daily
led his flocks down the hill by the castle.
Among the suitors of the princess there
was a great giant, a cruel magician with
a most horrible fright in his looks, and
of him the princess lived in constant fear,
for she would not have him for a husband,
and he had bl:ecome very angry, and
threatened her with the most terrible re-
venge if she should have any body else.
But the princess persisted in her refusal,
and so it happened, when she had wan-'
dered too far 1,eyond the limits of the







THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


domain belonging to the castle, in search
of flowers, the wicked giant was lying
in wait for her, and took her on his arm,
and in spite of her cries for help, carried
her violently down the mountain and
stepped with her over the stream and
carried her up the steep rocky shore on
the other side where his strong castle
was situated. There he kept the poor
princess in close confinement through a
whole long winter, and watched her day
and night. But the shepherd, who had
seen from a distance how the giant car-
ried off the princess, was too weak to go
to her assistance, but determined to see
if he could set her free by stratagem.
At last by spring he had contrived a way
to do it. He tapped the young birch






THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


trees, and from the sap which ran out of
them he prepared a strong, sweet, intoxi-
cating drink. With this he started for
the castle of the giant. He found the
monster lying before the gate of the
tower, which led to the place where the
princess was imprisoned, stretched out
in the sun to warm himself. The shep-
herd offered him the drink; the giant
thought it was excellent, and kept ask-
ing for more and more till at last he lost
his senses and fell asleep. The shepherd
made use of the moment to open the gate
and lead the princess from the tower.
SIn haste and silence they led the giant's
horse from the stable and mounting it
rode swiftly away. They soon came to
the precipice, beneath which they saw






THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


the Bode flowing, and on the opposite
side the royal castle glittering in the sun-
shine. Then they thought they were
safe, and dismounted from the horse,
and began to dance for joy. But unfor-
tunately the giant had been awakened
by the hoofstrokes of the horse, which
had echoed among the mountains like
thunder, and was hastening after the fu-
gitives. His long arm reached the
clouds and rolled them together into a
threatening storm, and his voice roared
the most fearful threats against the ter-
rified pair. What could they do in this
extremity? Behind them was the pur-
suer, the cruel giant; before them the
precipice and the foaming stream. But
the princess was determined not again













































































































Yu~;i~ir-a*uU~-.ri..i._riulr.. 1----- -- I~r ...., .. _~~~bii~-i~













L.

-I-

-' '-'-






r:I -'
1f(~ ;& L -- :



C-. r. I)



,-~. L W Y -
.r '
~ 'I,,,
'I""





ESCAPE F THE PRINCE







THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


to fall into the bihnds of the monster;
she leaped once more upon the giant's
horse, and the shepherd with her, and
they urged him to a mighty spring so
that he bore them safely across to the
rocks on the other side. But at the
moment when they were hanging over
the abyss the princess was shaken on the
horse and the golden crown fell into the
water which rose up hissing to receive
it. Then the royal castle on the rock
instantly dis,.ipp.-iared with a loud noise.
The princess and the shepherd were
saved, but with the royal crown the
castle had vanished and the kingdom was
lost. The giant knew this and laughed
scornfully on the opposite rock, so that
the mountain quaked with the sound.






THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


After this Pimpinella married the shep-
herd, and became a poor but happy shep-
herdess, and for a long time fed her flocks
with him in contentment on the Hartz
mountains. The giant changed himself
into a great black dog, and kept watch
beside the stream so that no one should
attempt to recover the crown from the
water. For whoever should draw the
crown from the water was to be king,
and the sunken royal castle would build
itself up again on the cliffs. Many were
attracted by this, and came and tried to
get the crown, but they fished up nothing
but shining golden trout, and when any
one went there to try it at night, he was
so fiercely set upon by the black dog,
that he had to run away as quickly as







THE IIORSE'S FOOTPRINT.


possible. Thus the king's crown lies
there to this day in the water, and when
the sun stands over the valley, or the
full moon shines at night, it can be seen,
gleaming, sparkling, and glowing in the
stream, and some travellers, who have
gone over the mountains in the night,
declare that they have seen it as the
water spirits were playing with it among
the waves. For my part I cannot say
whether this is really so or not, but it is
certainly true, that whenever a youth or
maiden shall come with a heart as pure
as the waters of the Bode, and fish for
the crown with joyous faith and humble
heart, the dog will have no power over
him, and the water spirits will cast the
crown into his net, and he will be king,






44 THE HORSE'S FOOTPRINT.

and a glorious and happy time will begin
for the poor dwellers in the dark Hartz
mountains.
And if any one doubts this story, let
him only go to the valley on the Bode,
and climb to the place of the horse's
leap and see the immense footprint which
his mighty hoof made in the solid rock,
and then look down into the stream and
see how something glitters and shines in
its waves.


















THE INDIAN GIRL AND THE CROC-'
ODILE.

I--- lIE back of the crocodile is
1 covered with hard scales, but
its eyes and the skin of its
throat are very tender, and
the knowledge of this has saved the
lives of many poor Indians and negroes.
I will tell you how a young Indian girl
(45)







THE CROCODILE.


escaped from the jaws of a crocodile, by
her courage and presence of mind. When
she was seized by the monster, there was
no one within reach to assist her; she
was dreadfully hurt too, yet in the midst
of her pain and alarm, she remembered
what she had often been told, and tried
to find the eyes of the crocodile; she put
her fingers into them with such violence,
that the pain obliged it to let her loose.
It had bitten off part of her arm, but
the poor girl contrived to reach the
shore in safety, by swimming with the
hand she still had left.
There are several ways of taking the
crocodile. In some places they are
hunted with dogs, which are traini:'1 for
the purpose, and armed with spiked col-






THE CROCODILE.


lars. In the island of Java, they are
sometimes caught with a hook fastened
to a cord made of loosely twisted cotton.
This sort of line is used by the Javanese,
because, as soon as the crocodile has
swallowed the hook, he tries to bite
asunder the cord, and his teeth, instead
of dividing the loose cotton rope, only
pass between its fibres, and all the cap-
tive's attempts to bite it through are in
vain. When once secured in this man-
ner, he may be safely attacked and de-
stroyed.
The natives of Siam take them in nets,
by placing three or four across a river,
so that if the crocodile should break
through the first, he may be caught in
one of the others. When he feels him-







THE CROCODILE.


self fastened, he begins to lash the watei
with his enormous tail; the natives wait
patiently till he is quite spent with his
struggles, and then come up in boats,
and kill him by piercing the tender parts
of his body with spears.
We are told that a Ineri:, will some-
times venture to go into the water and
attack a crocodile, armed only with a
knife. He wrLaps his left hand and arm
around with thick leather, and takes the
knife in his right hand. As soon as the
animal approaches him, he puts out his
left arm, which it directly seizes in its
mouth, but its sharp teeth do not bite
through the tough leather covering, and
the negro kills it, by stabbing it in the
throat, where the skin is very tender.




I"l"""%gda~iin~~
n ; ---il --


I
irbrul*E~







IA A. N I E t

E LIVES,

S OTHER S STORIES.






I -




BOSTON:
CROSBY, NICHOLS, AND COMPANY.
"' 1853.












STORIES.



ANNIE AND THE ELVES.
'. "EAR little Annie was
very unhappy, for her
d-'i' M mother was sick, and
: L the people in the vil-
large said she would die.
SAnd the child sat day
and night at her mother's bedside, and
grieved for her mother and wept a good
(5) .






ANNIE AND THE ELVES. 7

finally she could not tell which way to
turn. At last she came to a little brook
that flowed through the midst of the
woods, and sat down all weary in the
grass, under a tree on the bank, and be-
gan to lament: Oh, if I had only staid
at home! How mother will be worried
about me, she will die and will never
give me another kiss, and I shall not see
her again!"
While Annie was lamenting in this
way the moon rose, and the white star
flowers and the yellow daisies peeped out
around her, and the tall trees cast long
dark shadows and made strange figures
on every side, and the child began to be
alarmed in the loneliness. She nestled
herself close together, wrapped her hands







ANNIE AND THE ELVES.


if she hardly touched the ground at all.
She went up to a beautiful blue bell and
took hold of its stem and moved it gen-
tly backwards and forwards so that the
bell began to ring with low sweet tones
through the wood. At once the silent
forest became alive with little figures in
white robes and silver girdles, which
came from under mosses and grasses,
from the clefts of old trees, and from
among the rushes by the brook side. In
their hands they carried little silver wa-
ter pitchers, and ran ab6ut there and
there with them, watering the grass and
the flowers. The one with the silver
crown stood quietly leaning against the
stem of the blue bell looking at the labor
of the others, who had scattered them-





ANNIE AND THE ELVES.


and wide, and the little ones made a ring
around the mullien and began to dance
their nightly dances, and to engage in
all sorts of plays. Some caught each
other, some played hide and seek, and
others played see-saw on the flowers and
spiders' webs.
Only the queen stood apart and took
no share in the games. But how was
Annie astonished when she saw the queen
of the fairies coming up to her. She came
close to her and stood still for a moment
and then said in gentle and friendly
tones: "I have seen you crying, dear
human child; what is the matter? Per-
haps I can help you." Then Annie told
timidly how her mother was very ill, and
would die, and how she had lost her way







ANNIE AND TIE ELVES.


a bridge so that we can go over it quiet-
ly and safely, I will thank you for it, and
show you the way home." Annie rose
up quickly, ready to follow the queen
who walked on before her, and conducted
her to a place in the brook where the
reeds and rushes were plenty. The child
pulled the longest reed stalks and laid
them close together across the brook, and
covered them with rushes; it was not
long before the bridge was ready. The
queen nodded approval to Annie, and
went to the great bell flower and rang it
for the third time. Then the little people
left their plays and dancing and gathered
around the queen again, and she walked
toward the bridge and the whole array
went after her. Softly, but quickly, the







ANNIE AND TIE ELVES.


ral places, but when she went up to it,
t- was only a white flower. Then Annie
at down in the grass, and she was so
hiredd with walking and with all the won-
derful things she had seen, that she went
right to sleep. As she woke up the next
morning, she did not know whether she
had been dreaming or whether what she
thought she had seen was true, but the
words of the fairy: When it is day you
will find something in the grass that will
make your mother well," still sounded
plainly in her ears. So she looked around
her, and the most beautiful strawberries
met her eyes among the grass. At this
Annie did not dodbt as to what the fairy
had meant, and so she picked her little
apron full of them, and hastened home










LITTLE BEE TRUNKHOSIE.


; ; VERY fine summer morn-
s ing the sun used to shine
-i clear and warm on a bee
house that stood in the
corner of a great flower-
garden. Then it would become too warm
for the bees in their small bed rooms,
and they would come out and rub their
eyes and brush their wings off neatly
and very quickly, all the time making a
gentle hum, and then they were all
ready to fly away to get honey. Then a
very large bee would come out. This
was the queen, and she used to count
2 (17)














































































r'









LITTLE MARIAN AND THE PIGEONS.

LITTLE MARIAN after
passing an hour in the
pigeon house, where
tame pigeons were kept,
expressed to her father
Sa desire to know all
about their natural history. This led
to a conversation, of which the following
is a faithful report.
FATHER. The pigeon tribe is extensive.
There are between twenty and thirty
varieties of them. They usually hatch
two young ones. It is singular that the
crops of the old ones should produce a
3 (33)






LITTLE MARIAN AND THE PIGEONS. 35

recorded on this subject which would as-
tonish you. I think they will travel at
the rate of nearly forty miles an hour.
M. But suppose the pigeon should
settle any where, and be shot ?
F. It is possible that this may be the
case; but to guard against any danger
on this account, persons who employ
them fasten the same intelligence to the
wings of several messengers; and it is
not probable that they should all fail.
Commercial men have employed them
to convey the prices of stock, and of dif-
ferent articles, by which they have cleared
large sums. Thus they have been sent,
on the arrival of steamers, from Nova
Scotia to Boston and New York, with
considerable success.
9






LITTLE MARIAN AND THE PIGEONS. 37

of pigeons on record, are those of Wilson,
the American ornithologist. He tells us,
that in the western beech forests, he has
seen congregated millions. They occupy,
as a resting place, a large extent of fo-
rest. When they have frequented one
of those places for some time, all the ten-
der grass and underwood is destroyed;
the surface strewed with large limbs of
trees, broken down by the weight of the
birds; and the trees themselves, for
thousands of acres, are killed as com-
pletely as if destroyed with an axe.
Not far from Shelbyville, in Kentucky,
this admirable naturalist informs us,
one of these pigeonries extended through
the woods forty miles in length and seve-
ral in breadth. As soon as the young






LITTLE MARIAN AND THE PIGEONS. 39

tudes of pigeons, their wings roaring like
thunder, mingled with the frequent crash
of falling timber; for the axemen were
at work, cutting down those trees that
seemed to be most crowded with nests;
they continued to fell them in such a
manner, that they might bring down
several others; by which means the fall-
ing of one large tree sometimes produced
two hundred young ones of a good size.
On some single trees there were upwards
of one hundred nests.
M. There are always two young ones
in a pigeon's nest, sir.
F. Not in the nests of these pigeons,
Marian; a circumstance that is remark-
able, and for which we cannot account.
It was dangerous, says Wilson, to walk















4j

.C 4-
THE PASNGRPIEN







LITTLE MARIAN AND TIE PIGEONS. 43

F. Truly, they must. Wilson forms a
very rough estimate on this subject. "If
we suppose," he says, "a column I saw
to have been one mile in breadth,-and
I believe it to have been much more,-
and that it moved at the rate of one mile
in a minute for four hours,-the time it
continued passing, would make its
whole length two hundred and forty
miles. Again, supposing that each square
yard of this moving body contained three
pigeons, the square yard in the whole
space multiplied by three, would give
two thousand, two hundred and thirty
millions, two hundred and seventy-two
thousand pigeons! An inconceivable
multitude, and yet, probably, far below
the actual amount. Computing, that













THE RAVEN.
N the centre of a grove,
near Selborne, there stood
an aged oak, which, though
shapely and tall on the
whole, bulged out into a
large excrescence about
the middle of the stem. On this a pair of
ravens had fixed their residence for such
a series of years, that the oak vwaddis-
tinguished by the name of the Raven
tree. Many were the attempts of the
neighboring, youth to get at this eyry;
and each was ambitious of surmounting
the arduous task. But when they ar-
rived at the swelling, it jutted out so in
(47)











JUST IN TIME,
AND


BOSTON:
CROSBY, NICHOLS, AND COMPANY.
1853.







STORIES.


JUST IN TIME.
SoS the Count of Sayn sat one
night beside his young and
i lovely bride, to whom he
had bean but recently espoused, lo
(5)






JUST IN TIME.


and gone. The Count of Sayn lay be-
neath the shadow of a palm tree on the
far off plains of Palestine; the few of
his vassals whom the wars had spared
reposed around him; they all slept away
the noontide heat in this grateful, cool
spot. As he slept, lo and behold! the
same angel, who had bade him go forth
from his home, appeared again to his
view, in the vision of a dream, and tell-
ing him that his pilgrimage had now ex-
pired: the heavenly herald commanded
him to rise at once, and return without
delay to the shores of the Rhine. With-
out delay he accordingly arose, and at
once set out on his journey. In due
time he reached the vicinity of his own
dwelling.






JUST IN TIME.


palmer, took up his station with the men-
dicant crew whom he had accompanied
thither in a corner of the inner court-
yard.
"' Tell your noble ladye,' said he to the
almoner, who came round with the dole
customary on such occasions-' tell her
that a poor palmer from Palestine would
fain speak one word with her.'
"The priest retired to execute this er-
rand; but the lady was not to be spoken
with: at that moment she was approach-
ing the altar to wed his rival. Such was
the answer he received. He now has-
toned to the chapel; in the tumult, he
entered it entirely unperceived. The
chaplain stood at the altar; the expect-
ant pair stood before him; the bride






JUST IN TIME.


proceeded as if nothing had happened.
The fair dame, who had now partially
recovered, headed the table; seated be-
side her was her intended bridegroom.
Again did the Count of Sayn obtain ad-
mission to their presence, in the bustle
and excitement of the hour and the cir-
cumstance, and again did he stand before
his wife and his friend in the garb of a
mendicant pilgrim.
"'Ladye,' he spake, approaching the
head of the table, where she sat in grace-
ful pride-' ladye, give me a cup of wine,
for God's sake!'
"The menial crew would have chased
the poor petitioner from the hall: but
the gentle dalin:e forbade them to touch
him: she then complied with his request,






JUST IN TIME.


"'My friend!' exclaimed the bride-
groom elect, kneeling at the poor palmer's
feet.
"' Forgive us! forgive us!' supplicated
both in the most touching accents-' for-
give, forgive!'
"The guests and the vassals thronged
around the group, and made the welkin
ring with the boisterous greeting they
gave their master.
"Raising the suppliants, the good na-
tured count embraced and forgave them;
then taking his right place at the board,
the remainder of the night was spent in
true German convivality."
The legend adds, very judiciously, that
"he never afterwards opened his lips on










ANNIE, THE NIGHTINGALE, AND
SWALLOW.

(SEE FRONTISPIECE.)
~ ". NNIE.-- Oh! what a shy
Little bird you are!'
Nightingale. Yes, I own
SI am a very shy bird; but
what does that signify?
You, my dear young lady, think no worse
of me for that, I dare say. I am told
that I can sing to please you better than
any of my feathered relations; and at
night, when all is still and silent in the
woods and groves, I pour a most enchant-
(15)


































TIE NIGHTINGALE.






ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


may be aware of our gifts, though we are
not to be proud of them!
I will now introduce you to my friend,
the swallow. I am going to congratulate
him on his arrival in this country, for
you know he has been absent for some
months, and you may, if you like, come
and listen to our conversation, which,
though rather dry, perhaps, may teach
you something relating to our habits that
may be new to you.
"Well, friend swallow, welcome back
to your chimney. How do you like it
after your long sojourn in other lands ?
it must, I think, be very close and mur-
ky, much worse, and even darker than
my abode in the forest amid the shades
of night."






ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


would have been the victor at last, had
not a large company of my friends come
all at once to my aid, on hearing me
sound an alarm, which you may be sure
I did to the very utmost of my powers.
I was finally the conqueror, and made it
quit the scene, poor animal, in fear and
trembling, when immediately an owl
came near us, as much as to say, Touch
me if you dare!' This was a fresh cause
for combat; and we had quite a battle.
My cousins, the martins, who live very
near to us, and all my own family were
engaged in this skirmish; and an ani-
mated and a fearful one it was!
Then, as to the swarms of insects that
we put to death, it is quite incredible to
many people, and would indeed give
































THE SWALLOW.





























4
,


- -


--







ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


Nightingale. Why really, Swallow, you
almost frighten me."
Swallow. Don't be alarmed, dear Phi-
lomel; I will never hurt any one so kind
and tender-hearted as you are!"
Nightingale. "Thank you, Swallow, go
on then."
Swallow. "I was going to tell you,
Philomel, how much I love that voice of
yours: oh! it is so soft, so soothing, that
I almost envy you. I wish we swallows
could sing as well as you do; but by na-
ture we seem all of us to be able only to
sing, 'twitter, twitter, twitter;' which,
at the very highest or softest tone of our
voices can never be melodious to ears
like yours. However, I suppose we must
all try to be satisfied with the talents


.-`- ------- ------


25






ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


kind Providence has given us, and do the
best we can.
"They tell me I can fly very swiftly,
which is one good thing, you know; and
will you believe me, I can take a drink
of the pure limpid stream just as easily
while I am on the wing, as if I were sit-
ting on my own nest, which is a most
convenient thing; for I might perch my-
self for a long time in the chimney before
I should have any chance 'of obtaining
a drop of such beautiful water as I often
see flowing in the plains below. Thus
you see I have nothing to do but fly
gracefully towards it, touch the surface,
and in an instant the thing is done, as I
pursue my journey through the air. So,
after all, I do believe I need not be
'i


26







ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


ashamed of myself, for if I have not a
sweet voice, I have other things to make
me content."
Nightingale. Oh, no, Swallow, indeed
you have no need to be ashamed of your-
self; to be able to sing a song is but of
small importance, when compared to the
wonderful things you can do! Why, if
-I should meet a cat, I should be so ter-
rified, that I believe I should never be
able to defend myself from its sharp
claws. But I thought you were going
to tell some more of your amusing stories,
when, instead, you began to praise my
voice, which has greatly disappointed
me.'
Swallow. "Oh, dear Philomel I will
not disappoint you, if you are not tired.


27


. 0 ,' I I







ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


I will tell you of a scene which occurred
the other day, and which I really thought
a piece of very fine sport.
"Do you remember the gate-post at
the corner of the field, near our house ?
Well, one fine day, a cat, looking very
grave and thoughtful, as if in contem-
plation of the beauty of the scene, took
her seat on the top of this gate-post. I
was resolved on having some fun with
her, and accordingly assembled a few of
my friends together to help me. I was
the first to begin, and flew from behind
her close by the ear, when she made a
thrust at me with her paw, but she
missed her aim: 'Another swallow fol-
lbwed my example, and Mrs. Tabby
made the same attempt to catch her;


C-~---- --1 ~---.~-----T;-- ---------T. ------r-a---rr- -- r-r--_-_a
-- I


28







ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


this was followed by another and another,
and so on, until about a dozen of-us had
done the same thing, and each set up a
laugh at our disappointed enemy as we
passed her. We then formed altogether
a regular circle in the air, and played it
off like a wheel at her ear for near an
hour. At last, worn out with disap-
pointment she was obliged to quit her
post, and I never saw any one more
huffed in my life, than poor Mrs. Tabby
was."
Nightingale. This is a most amusing
story, Swallow; pray tell me another be-
fore I go home ?"
Swallow. "Yes, dear Philomel, I will
* relate to you some more strange things
which I have heard, but not seen; how-


--C--~f-l --1 --I-~ --- --I _Ir- _._ ~ ____~_~~~__ __~__ __~ ~ ___~ ~___ __ _~____ ___~_~_~~_ ~_


29






4
30 ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.
ever, I have very good authority for be-
lieving them to be true, as they were re-
lated to me by my dear mama herself,
one of them being actually seen by her
own eyes. A relation of hers built her
nest for two years together on the han-
dles of a pair of garden-shears, that were
stuck up against the boards in an out-
house, and therefore she had her nest
spoiled whenever the shears were wanted.
Thus, you see, even we swallows some-
times do very unwise things; and I sup-
pose my dear mama told me this story
that I might avoid such strange situa-
tions, and be content with the safety of
our chimney, where we are in no danger
of being knocked, about at the pleasure
of our superiors.










ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.


"I often think how very foolish our
poor cousins must have looked, each
time the garden-shears were wanted I
But I have heard another story, which I
think is stranger still, and which shows
what unaccountable things some crea-
tures will do. Another of our relations
built its nest on the wings and body of
an owl that happened by accident to
hang dead and dry from the rafter of a
barn. This owl, with the nest on its
wings, and with eggs in the nest, was
brought as a curiosity, worthy the most
elegant private museum in Great Britain;
so lam told. The owner, struck with the
oddity of the sight, furnished the bringer
with a large shell or conch, desiring him
to fix it just where the owl hung. The


. .. . . .. . ..... -r -Acd . ...... .... .. ..... ......


31







32 ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.

person did as hewvas requested, and the
following year, a pair, probably the same
pair, built their nest in the conch, and
laid their eggs. The owl and the conch,
make a strange grotesque appearance,
and are not the least curious specimens
in that wonderful collection of art and
nature. 'I have given the story, dear
Philomel, nearly word for word as I have
heard it given out, and a very wonder-
ful one I think it is."
Nightingale. "I agree with you, Swal-
low, that these are all very wonderful
stories, and very amusing too. You are
a very good teller of a story, I must al-
low; and I could listen to you much
longer, with great interest; but my little
ones will be thinking me rather long in






ANNIE AND THE BIRDS. 33

returning, so I must bid you good-bye.
Thank you for your kindness, and if you
listen attentively, you shall soon hear
the song that you say you are so very
fond of."

" Sweet are the shades of night to me,
For then I pour my minstrelsy,
While echo gives me back the strain;
Then list, dear Philomel, once again,
And I'll sing the song of love and joy-
The bliss so tender, without alloy,
That we feel in this sequestered grove,
So fitted for fond and faithful love;
We call it the dearest boon on earth,
The liberty given us at our birth;
For we prune our wings, go where we will,
And find our nest all sheltered still,
3






34 ANNIE AND THE BIRDS.,..
So peaceful, and snixg, and soft, and warm,
Our little ones always so free from harm,
That surely nightingales ever should be
Thankful for all that they feel and see;
While a song of praise and of grateful love
Ascends to our Maker in heaven above."


















k o


AdLW-








i-


;1



. -I


THE OWL.

d .












STORIES OF OWLS.

WLS axe nocturnal birds of
prey, and several peculiar
characters inow how admi-
rable y are fitted for
theF which they take
in creation. Tlee of their eyes are
enormous, and admit so much light that
they are dazzled by day, and are better
able to distinguish objects at night. The
eyes look forwards, and are surrounded
by circles of feathers; the beak is curved
the whole .,y, and the openings of the
ears have, in almost every instance, a
piece of skin going half foundd it, like
(371


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Mal


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