• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Back Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Main
 Spine






Group Title: Frost's juvenile series
Title: An alphabet of quadrupeds
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002678/00001
 Material Information
Title: An alphabet of quadrupeds comprising descriptions of their appearance and habits
Series Title: Frost's juvenile series
Physical Description: 128 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lippincott, Grambo & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lippincott, Grambo & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: c1852
 Subjects
Subject: Mammals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal behavior -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1852   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
General Note: "With numerous illustrations."
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002678
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221671
oclc - 23453209
notis - ALG1898
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Back Cover
        Front page i
        Front page ii
        Front page iii
        Page 130
    Frontispiece
        Front page iv
    Title Page
        Front page v
    Copyright
        Front page vi
        Front page vii
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Spine
        Page 131
Full Text





A te.0-A)P',

OUVO)RUPEDS














































~;
rji`~






















































i






'A


IqbexiIe


eNies.


A
I r
i. X




u
~.
\'1


*L jlK
r

.it


rof i


L''


"' ^ is
is~ ";rrp
1.




I .
_i; z---... zid,
A*'4W**b1;A-
(R_ftnlft--_ ;;--!i-,,, -i __ :k *ijg.,r4li"., .1 t i". _.
,;;,t'.4t.171 6UP3
z: M-M .-*irwliii -q+: In. 1;vm o .:
... --- .:
02 Z .- .I_. z t4 _---- i; .. .= 9.7177 M,
.0ez-f-17 -!4t--t."I.-Ii- _:,t:;r 1. -_ t: is _;. t ,- .
_:::,;:::; I I -1 ;- : ; lp _. ; -ii 1_ 1".; __
.Tt. ____ ___--==,-_j -;-'.l :., zi-..' 1" -':z '"!ZFt_ ':; ___ J. .F7 _FIH ii :, -;!- -- -;t=;!--- t__ .
.. .... .z. j7_ -, -- -
;ti -, -----.
--------- ,=-.===- -_- -, ,-i_;_
:_:S-l !!-M.---T,, --. --7-! ';,_!---- -- ` ,,-, -.I., !'- -,--'--";-,-,;.-.-'.-.;Z::::i:;-..::i-,t ;.-:,"---,ji--;,- ---. .. .!. -
;,,::-j:;-!- -,:!., __ 1 __ =_T%_-_i,,_ii.-! I;!
-, __ ; r
wt z__;,;:i!; 1 _-, -- l;IIIII- __
_____ ". -F '17 ,' __
-t;=I---_-=;;! ; ,iA vzl FIZi _, ,: ";f-`_jt Ll. -
!4 _. _-wy ..,
;l i -Tj '.'- !:---
.. !z-- _;S, _: .
-, l,,n4l.-w;: 4 7 -, -;::, -;-II..It t-zl;.-,-l;-Fl--t- 4 W,;---.. ,j-11"
-ziz_ ,:,::, :;4, --! ..i;i
-- n: _:, -.:;__=; ...;;-,-.;;,L;;;_, ; -.r.- -
lin'. .i
_;t, K. =J;. --- ----- _J---.-tiiiFHii li-I.-l'., I ,
I -
4__H"' ii- -- _2111:01 =, i-I-11, i .--:a.: :;i :U1._ ?
;--.i,* iiil-tllxina :;_ '+-' -- -- I- '!.- .-':- ;_- -,-,--- i---_A-i'l*__.;ffF!t
-
;:;
t., ____
t., ;:;___
!* , M : I _. .._
i:q-K;44Hi!K__.-_ti 1 __ -_- -- 1 ---* ; :---,,z;,--,:-.-,zs;*"-l-.!.:-::7.,-, ,I,-,.tit'S';. !=';it --.:,t-- -:; _ji
., ,*;k; ,
li,;l 4 --.-t t*_- ,.-!:;:;t2 -
; ;, ,, ..
-_ 1_-`. .*-;`! -- %';I' -'.Z% 1".
i, -t..'-Rt_ I I I -1 `,;*_. '' _V__T; -i : ...
;- _:,_1 ,; t-.t-7..v:_t_.__t ._ ;:;___ ,,-;!.,;.*tz: .* "' .. --;I; .
;_ I _------ 11 ......
,; -- -4- ,::* ,,.:,
z;Kn;F7_;4 .. -
--_, -r -_-- _-N.- I- -.=-jll
-!..ti-.!"-;-,-I!:-,:-,--7'--!:t:11-=* I .'_tl: ;, :;!7; ;. 1. .l... =- -= -zKi
.11 -_ 't ,* i il
'; -4- -, -1 I I -
1, -',- _.T= _... '_ '""t
I_ 4I,-.t-;7i __ __
,-. -. ,_ , ,;z
,.,.,, ...... 1-1 --7- --_-_`F_,,:
-7 ---- --- --_-__.___ __._l__.__l-_-r t ;,:;F i: I-,,-- -
it:; _,!-.--_-.:',;!- t-",,t ;-.z-.%.f-.;.iw-.-:-;k- -F.-Iliz t_ 1 ,
_. _- -- t., ,71 ,--c;.
-T., it fi ;,_-,;t -ii-iti -4. i;
... --; ,- -, K-1Z 11 _t t I
:.i2_i-__, 0--- i ,; i _-=_-.-; 7 -;' .- Ai
I __ _-o ,MUW
.. -.- 41 i UiR :_
------- 7- ;t -'-', -!--;';-fup 'Me .1
; ----- -,"T'lit 'i 'z _;_ -- ,azi "' ,-, -: *i ;
-M ,t!'"_,i ; ,%.! .i-ii---` ,* L i ; rimil,
... i ., j:,;-j;-- ,,:-,,: -;-.t ---:-_7,-.-tg' -4 ; ..
., ... .lr -__-- -, -- -- ,11-ii, ; I I. ',Ie W
--- i` I -- -- itt=Iil--;_'-- ..
,-,. .-----;=;W -.
,;-,--,- e:__-.J_!7z:i;:_; llrlll. :I
-------- -- '- ;,-. ----
-! -i* i-7-.-,- ii,;5,--Js tk-,Vi :-,; i7 i ---i,,t_;! -_ :Li; _-iui=!_j* __
'i -, `- -.- ,, ..;. :,' 'n __ ---- ItTI;
71-- -=! -: - -,- - .,
1-_-; -,-,-_iiziz.: ,*z,,:i --_._.: .: ",;=-;! .-
I_ *:,`i.F't -- ': --,, I .- 11
1! '-!"7-__' %77tt---_ ,' -, tll iii ,-_T -;"zi::"ji, -- _44 -
=:t _!- 4 - t:_I* ,, -:;t.!q=;_ .. .4, --
,:-,--t7:,t!_-:- `- _'-.`,,4;-.-- _,--, _- I... -. -,-' j, --,-,7-;; --.n:..-l;jl-;-,S-,-4;_-7, ;: I i 'I ",_-tt-It, .-
:t, -7 ___1 __ I~ I
';!*!!!' -!t-_!, : -;,-,.- _7,___ ,7 m
,...-,"* :.i.*..zi;::;.Z-:i- ---.-- -- ;' .1-tol I. 4..tii
5::-,I.,!.--i--:,. `,' 4 -. i-,.- -; q, -.._.-7:.:,,- __ ,f r Kt:;-,i7. :;;:;- !!J;
,-_'_,-, ,---:-_-:---1TE_.-- --------- 7. :7_1!_-_i tj-_-.:---rz;_-t:;-- _!.=
,- I ; : .,:i-,:;!-
t-:; --- --- _- I .. -: ...... .-
_;I- _%I' I!i; -hrttl I .",
ii.*-ft.".t.* -, -, ----- I" __ _.- .-'I- ..-,-',; ,,: --,--,,--*-,-,; ,,-,,.--- -!?:.!!z.--=;--:;T. !isl*qt; i: -;--I--- -- ..-_ _"
'4 ` -*,-,zt,'it...::i-ti:.71:i'-;-., 1; I '! .,_:!- -- ` ,_ tz _! ;-
-__'_ --i '7,_ __ '::--:-,iii4i-ii,i::":-..I t;-.?_t-;!-,=!;-;-- !-,=zz:,--74
---1 't_;-_-.,- -, _j __
'i.i'.-':ii:.z,;i;;rt,-,;,,,-',, ., _- .... : -7:11,t -1-z .'- -I- -Fr -
::-_mt-.-_-_-!--z 7j i. .. _
_- ,-- .1 .iiz
-.- ". 1, I __ :---i- -- ,F-f:
I:`- ,_. .,_-- tl;'t .-;;_v T___
-- I : ,_; .-i---.;,L--;-, __ lii*iz;t-%.-_-;tl =.I.;-_;.., -,;Si: I _- :
liz'zi_-, ------7i-: =--,-- 1:
1--l-, StYl I z -7
N. 1.
,t--_;:!%.!- ; ---,- ---- _ %* ""z;1-1,-l;*.,r,;-;",.,. ,:;Z_;:_,_ "; -1 --- -, ,.i, -t ` -i-7 -
_--_ 7_-.'.__,__ .___ -_::-I-,--,:;-tt-_ -_ .- --_:*=_`=-IHE!zfl -!_ ; -'!'
,it!,.--!,4"z.-iz-t;1-;,-',-i:-7v.'i '. --- ',J"..:-, --".
--;t;- *q- -;!*L t = "' i-., fft._,S-Y T -
.;, ; : -.iKz. .-
.: .;=; zz .L.- .:t ... ;-,-_---', __ ,.- .; ;?, .. ,
-- -, __ T: "I
;F;.=_;i__'iz` N .-
-;t: ` --, vo: --,-- '. -. --: ."!, ;'- I- --:i-z"
; -
;i*:, --------- i. __ ___
'- -- ." ,_'- --;, t I _",
R ; ii;*,4-_'.Ytl.; 11 -:- ___ _E2 ..L:;;11*.:_-;t n, -.-,l-:-zl,'-"--,-_ f;- i!,iK'K*'-i-.-_t,.'17 __
11 1.! ... 7z -_I!z._
T; ; I ......... i.-,_!:-;:--K;E-#,; ; -;;, -- .
-- --- -Jja .1 -I,--- -!t=:_I'4i----.--,::.-- ;t, -,
- ` ,--
... !_ ..... ':_-:!. -.- ___._ ..
-4." __-,!:7-= __,_ ,:.,;* .-q --
-l..ut:-l !i --- ;7 __ 7* 'i."i"z"";i-_-.-,-..--;--':;,' -, .: m-
_, = .. 7A_ -,-"*----, -, ,-- L_ !, -_,_-_--- __ _,',;!.:z!';----,,,,,,-:'-t, tii,
"I ". "tt J ;t. 1. iii.5:_'_z_ t
!;- ,; ,
li: t .14 .- .*ti;zv!--_77: -!- -- ;_ ; iH I -1 4p-_Uz-4-.' ----- -
_ii fliE H^iti-- ` - -T;'M ';-_li- ;,*_`-*- -1 -: ,
, ,;, ii; j; 't*- N ,- W ";',vt:--,-:',-'i'.i J ... ,7 :it .t -
.;-., ;:`,^ 11.'.E,.-;;; -- -; ---,-- -, : I '! i. i: 7z i za i zl. -;-4 -- -- --- -,
__it :_,;:---l' -_,iv_ _'i : -;- -, *--; -, ,: ,, -, ._T ,Q __'! I .'T'.... .,; _-
E';_!-,' .:r-=:-. .,_,,:;- -! y','--,--,',7- It ; ': ,___!: ,l, -- --.- .: -
--,- ,-*i-,-,-. t_!,.._*_,_:._,.- ,,, -:i--i'. ,i' .i !, -__,_!_?. t== ':
tv __ -;:= _- --;-_` --- I_ -i a -:--F---.m .-:-
:;:_"*. ic; =7_ -;:. _! 1 ." _;____,;. __, -, ,
....,..-. W____ ,_ ,--, I I .ivi: i,, .---- I ___ ____.__,__Ifzr
'- .7 =;F;:_-l:z---'t!:_!__ _,_!-.. -_". .A !.-,--:---;i,i;..F.F,.I ,!,
.4. '-" "',' -: ` '; -i-,",;-'*-,-.--,;-,-.--,.;.-,:--.-I,'' ._..- ..j--"Z--zil:- .il_ 'T :;f
: ii;v. ,.,. ;- ,_;i lzQ -;ai:i;-ii, _-:`-,; "
,*.!'Ilvn; .t;, ;_
,:.;t;_:o- ; i-!-,;:7::_---,,,--- "'.-
---- ,l -. -, 1,--,,-` "-;," '-- '-, ,i:-z-11---i;;.,;-----'-.;., _-_; ;
'i*-7i;; ,-;.Z n-i: _T,.,,;. --it -, -, ; : ,_ __ ,, 1;
F;. .'a :::
:n!,', ` -t-i* ,- ,_ -""F-,.*,lit!;;-';z--z.i,-:,- :;j:_!q7. It:
1-1. ... .1. _,- -- ----- I----- -; 1;-_ wl;tt_Al_ 7:-, ,,!, __ :4 -...!.
I:i;- -_7ati-.j ..- .'- , -- ,;Ur ,;_,-r,- ;
t !: 7t, __V '.. ,! =-=-=r-Z
__ 1 ; -,ii--;---;,::-- ,,:: _: :.,., I K ".] -; T. 7 i -.1 'ri- ,j -` -- .'.;--;' ,zt.
wz -, --- ,, .- _.__tw Z- I, t;.7tsl
.tz--vwz. i!zi; _,:_j- t.*II _i`
I;:z l;i`K--_-__- i f i ;ii. -,-
nim, --- _I! `,',,.:-- _l-,-.-, -,"t-' ,, T -. --* .-' _'-- ;, .i I I -;I! t;z_
_- -.1. -j --z,-----
tt-t.--;--.,.-,.,-,i-,:,-.,.,, ... - - _. H- -`i
:;___NY-12 *-;;-*--- t, ,; --i-.-,-!'----,t,.--,------t:,---"-':'zi:--.-,-"-- -- --- a-- QH51.' .tetqq;v -
R!'Ji4li; 'i,- n -,, -, :-;j"-- `4', ',:A:-ziii_' -, .4a I- .
"'t. 'i* ,,- -i:% -.--.- .. `F -!, ___ -- ., _-t't' -
.- .dt ...... _1 i .__. _iA _. .w_ _: z_ __ ... ..--tri
**'-zn---Z;:",:-""ll", H; -'---- 11, I --"ti!-.=--._;;--.l,.,j itZk
--- -- --. lz- ,,- -, ",%.;, - ,- ___. .i.;-.-_i;-;, &, "t, ,.".. __ `_ I . _
__J4, -_,,, __',i,,--_I?,.K; _n ."! =ZtF
!- ,; : -T _, __
:-,,;---,,.--*i--I i,,-_.,,;;"i:,.-: _-* -_ .-- "-,- ,:-*-*-*,--I-:-,!:-.-,.!:--,, ... !; -; ,--- `-.t. I
__ -1. -7 -_ v ------ __ i _____,.i-,.7 -------
-- -- i !M'.,.,i-,izl,,- ,7L --- t! ,-` -_i. _-- -'T-.,;",- ..- ....... __ -
`;S,,47,F-i-"_ -4 _____ ---- -- i ,_:l_,:--- 4
I ;_,:==_j;77.--_
.4, r7 i 4 -_ "T --:!_-;ZiJi .tT-Z',-`
;, 7 ,r -,., i i __ -1 -I. -, 1; _- ___ -1,; ;,3.-. __ THz
--:-t simisli _: ,I. -. --- ;- -- '41Ki;,;--H-.-_i. -----:t:nzt:r,-- *-l'.1'. _l!_!__!;
: t" .. _._;__"tvi:._.-7.ir- :;-,-,-;,,-___ -_,,-,_ ,,__', -;-- -- --
-- __ ---- .. I --- i .- --;.__.!7 -;--__-_ -.11 =3,i
is*":1-,"Hit'!; _11*. ;, --;; ,: ,14,zij, -_ -
q'i I __ __ --- .7'---" : -- -:- 'i;.H:Ki'-;.-:
ii =!_.-:!;lZ;l;-;; :-:.; -ill i-,-q -"", I I _-- -1- _zl 4-..,; ,4; -_-.-7.-'T-_,._-- --._ I~~ -J7;.'71- --- --- ------ --f;jz ,

--- .... .. -,, ;_ici 4 "--,:'!-.----",E--;i---,-:--,i-i-,i"--:-;.7;z--';,!.--'--i,;-;- -:,.
-, '- .- _-:__, -_, i I-, .'wtl ;! I W i3IL`;l ...... -.It,-- 1, --t -,
:---:: --------- :t-;
'. __ .. ,,, i --l-
.... ii_ m I ;Nm ,wv,iF, _N L ,i,!, .,
1_.:: 'EKES E:;zjj : & -- -i,- ; i- *ia!i .'zi;-.--:--"-,"--'i-.,--:; %, -.- -Ii`_ -,,!',--,,!, =.-;, :
=:_- -- -- -FI-t,-;-,.i-!-,: :! -1 _7=:. __;--_::- -lA!:;--z--._- -
_;. -,.:!.'.' -, j
:- ,..i ;v HT:EE'_'- -;: ,',z__ :- -.-:-4-,. -, i=,: iI-;_,;;;t:;, !_-_--- -Ea:_:- i,=-: _;.,- ,-,:T,'5- !
_Lzi t:-4,'C,_:-i;i!- ; :' -tw. t'=:__;i;;4--K m, "" I :Iil:`,- _' % _:-1-::.;t:!,--7;!;-.1-1
HTH "_',:_-' 'i_"' .,'-iK -__ --:;- ,- __-,
7:__a,_.i_7-4t-,,t*?-_ _-:.-;_-_,Z.,_: %,:Izz __ :-'-I-- __i.--._HE;;_7zUTa
z,-:;',.-_---,.:..,."..* 11, --- __ !.-, ---_--.-_'.!_'-z- ;' ,.-'; t, Z" _i;*_,
,R:IT; !- ;_ i- I .1! .!_7i: tt:ZL. ;t -.-____._l.- .
.- i ""' '"-:: 4 a. -4-_ Z. ;'l
`' ----.---- i ` --- ,7. _-, .:0-i,!-t.;",.'-,;;--,-i',','.-:!!- -,i---,I;;..!.--.i;z;;zL.-..,.i-;;"..,-.
_!.z.-pq _.ti=_..1;- z. is__AIti` ; i I; -
i-T.q-,;zz;iii7_ t1jil _;" _;7-:=: -,: H' .-- Y_;,. ,___t- --- -;, -.-,;:, -- P-:*-::i, :-
;:i t;=_v___:=u ::_*4,__'47 :, t __,.!
-;.. ,-- I ------ ': -!----, I -








I
ii T .II

/CO~i


1

I


I ,


u
rl


THE MENAGERIE.






AN ALPHABET

OF


QUADRUPEDS.


COMPRISING DESCRIPTIONS OF THEIR


APPEARANCE AND HABITS.


WDTOO NUMER OLLU1TRU@N.





PHILADELPHIA :
LIPPINCOTT, GRAMBO, & 00.
s .


















Entered aooording to Act of Congress, in the year 1852,

BY LJPPINCOTT, GRAMBO, & CO.,

in the Clerk's Ofoe of the District Court of the United States,
in and for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.





















































b



























































r)-














































































r
























r
r
\.






































































0








ALPHIB EI OF QUFbD PIBW .

SAPE.
APuB play many~od4 tricks, and try to
act like6 aen, for they are very ond of
imitating every thing they see. 'Thy are
also very rischieMoas, and sometimes
spiteful, ; they sohold be ei$er ti up
in a sa6 plaoe .r well t1d1.
Apes are a species of monkeys. They
live in a couRtry called Africa, wlere
there area great many forests, and where
the trees are much larger than any ai
the settled parts of Am.ica. The a8W
cen climb to the top of the very tallest

e', ,.
:i o. ..




ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.


trees, and cling to the branches in safety.
They are very quick in their motions,
and can fling themselves from tree to
(tre with great readiness, holding on with
their long arms and legs. In their na-
tive woods, they are very wild; they go
on all fours; and sometimes visit the
Negroes' huts and fight hard battles with
the inhabitants, throwing sticks and
branches with great dexterity. They are
usually of a dull brown color, but some
are black, and others grey. They should
be fed upon bread soaked in water, and
any kind of fruit that may be convenient
to give them.; they are very fond of nuts
and biscuit, both of which may be given
them in moderation.


8




















































*




























BEAR.








BEAR.
BBAB.

THE bear is found urop mand North
America, but it is among the iy regions
around the North Pe, that he attains
his greatest size and flerenes s. On of
his principal modes ofattac is em-
ployment of his fore-legs in bugg.tg -s
t enemy, and few creatures can resist the
crushing embrace of 'a large bar.
The people of the cold countries, where
he mostly lives, make bedding and
clothing ot:the skins, and either eat the
fat or melt it into oil for their lamps.
Bears, when at rest, are in the habit of
constantly sucking their p#ws, which
(11) ,7 ,




12 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
curious custom has puzzled many wise
men to explain.
The bear is a good swimmer, and often
takes to the water; he climbs well, but
in descending trees always comes down
backwards. His sight is sharp, and his
hearing and smelling is excellent. He
walks easily on his hind-legs, and in
that position can support heavy burdens.
Though his gait is awkward, he can, if
he pleases, go at a great pace. He is
said to grow to about his twentieth and
live to his fiftieth year. Some bears.are
*black, others brown, and a, few grey, but
those in cold countries are always white.











p













q

















- [4r









cow.


THe cow is a very useful, and well
known animal. The cow furnishes us
with an abundance of good sweet milk,
which we put into our tea and coffee, or
make into butter and cheese. The flesh
is most excellent food, and is called beef.
England is a famous country for beef,
which is of such a g qu tit that the
people have an old so about it, called
the "Roast beef of old land." The
hide is made into leather, and is much
used in the making of shoes.
The cow is a very quiet animal, and
will hurt no body, it feeds upon ,
(15)
k '^-;i&J





ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.


which it swallows and brings up again.
before digesting it, and chews a very long
while, and on that account is called a
ruminating animal.
Cows are of different colors, some red,
white, black, and others spotted. The
cow will live to the age of fourteen or
fifteen years, and its age may be known
by the rings or knots on its horns, for a
new ring grows every year. A great
many country people are employed in
selling milk to the people of large cities
and towns, and are called "milk people."
Before the white people came to America
there were no cows, but now they are
raised in great numbers, especially in the
eastern country.


16



























II























\ -- '




















> .. .i
'











/ im
-4ni;_L
ii ';HMS


DOG.




4



DOG.

Doos are most faithful, attaeld crew
tures. They are of all sizes, from the
large Newfoundland dog, as big early
as a donkey, down to the little lap4o
no bigger than a kitten. 'Dog are of
various colors, and their skins oIal kinds,
the hair sometimes smooth ,nd close,
like a grey hounded ; M e very
rough and shaggy a* ter-
rier sometimess mnoo& lik
sillk as in- aspanieL
They are soon taught be obdent
and become very clever. The As herd's
dog knows every sheep in the flck. The
T^ .< -^ *
-J ./




ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.


house dog knows the sound of his mas-
ter's footsteps. The Newfoundland dog
will rush into the water to save any one
from drowning. There are many inte-
resting Wtories about dogs, which will
please you very much to read when you
are older and better able to understand
them.


9 .


20





































r

V',4

2


I






1


EEHANTo






,


ELEPHANT.

How heWy .nd iQnuey tb ephant
looks I yet he is ery:active, and able to
do mway t :,with yo
ho- a si yr b a 1
take it up i l~cr i p'
it ~Were thetjje ) Iper
same trunk he is able t&*
tre *to trike so hard
would kl-, m ..n..
he is sed ride upon
horses. He is a very good swimmer.
He is born chiefly in warm climates.
His tusks are ivory, and are very useful
for handles of knives, and many o.ter
fP





24 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
things. His trunk serves him instead
of a hand to feed himself with, and to
hold and carry what he pleases.
He is very clever, and soon learns to
do whatever he is taught. His temper
and nature are kind, but when he is
teased he become very fierce. He eats
grass and bay, but no fle h.
Below is an elephant hunt.












































































II











-C




,w


r


All











04


/7'


'V


'" 1 \


5' jr
4

uu'.


li'"


f










FISHER.

THIS is the name of an animal found
in the northern and middle states of
our country, at d in Oanada. He is
called the fisher, by the hunters, proba-
bly from his fequentin the lakes and
river shores. i:t he watchh fish
like the otter. He; ra of the
hunter of their or dead game,
and he kills squi rabbit, and wood
chucks. In the picture he ii represented
as killing a rabbit.
The fisher was formerly abundant in
the state of New York, but he is seldom
found there now. He was greatly de-
(27). -




28 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
tested by the hunters, on account of his
robbing their traps of beaver and other
valuable game. His flesh is unfit for
food. and his fur is of very trifling value.















































4..


whI

IS




24






























GOAT.








GOATS.


WE have not many goats in Ameries, but
you will sometimes see them about the
houses of poor people wholivoen the out-
skirts of large towns aa j es. They
abound in many foreign cor tries, chiefly
those which ae wild, and 'Y high hills
and mountains. These, let thm" be ever
so high, the goat climbs very nimbly and
safely. The goat is a very useful crea-
ture. Its young are called kids, and its
flesh is very good to eat; out of its skin
we make good leather for shoes and
gloves. The goat's milk is pleasant to
drink, .and to make cheese from. It eats
(31)





32 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.

herbs and delights to nibble the bark of
trees. You will often read in the Bible,
that goats in ancient times were offered
as sacrifices. In Switzerland they have
a kind of wild goat, called the chamois.
The cut below represents some Swiss
hunters pursuing the chamois over rocks
and mountains.


All.

IAL
















































.L\ j



























BYNA3.








HYENA.


Tmi hyena is on0e of the mopt fierce
and disapeeable of all animals. The
hyena is by nat ~ r animal;
that is, it se;is its iard
consequently during the day remains
in a state of repose. The hyena has
been unfairly epsented to be perfectly
unta able. f its great fero-
city. If 7 aed, however, and
well fed, it is far ~wm beig savage or
dangerous.
It possesses a great propensity tor pu-
trid and buried carcasses, which it will
hunt, and dig for, and4evour with dis-
(35)




36 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
gusting greediness. Unlike many other
animals, the hyena is an unsociable ani-
mal, for it lives a solitary life among
rocks and ancient ruins. There are two
kinds of Iiyenas, the spotted and the
striped. The figure below represents the
striped, and the other represents the
spotted hyena.-
































I








-- 1 .**
~~~ i- ,;.
+r






.a



A;' *
'



-- ,.













+ ,









.. i
ib? .




































do-~LC
41, 7o










THE ibexi ilaktal okind,
and tnh districtit
of the SwtK the most
racefta t- 1 .extremely
active. is r ry 'nd difficult
to be shot, as it aT keeps on
the higbet p ts. Ti hrs of the
ibex ar ijrxgB 'ltty its ak'I is of
a yellow* and it s brd sort and
black. chase of I alt gh
it is not a very at-
tended, at times, with
danger; it has been known, ~e driven
hard, to run full-but at the' untsman,
(39)


:r3:
~.C





ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.


and force him over the rock, although in
doing so, it has at the same time, sacri-
ficed its own life, falling headlong with
its pursuer. The ibex is said to be a
short-lived a~imal. Its flesh is much
esteemed, and its skin is very thin.
Below is a picture of a bear pursuing
a male and female ibex.
ii 7,


IRsM O -w&. .8<
-^- --r ri --





























































a, ;


!t.


4...


~ec;~
=,


"~
+.





,C
:. ;.,
.7
J J"' 1


t
r '-i~Jt


* ._

































JERBOA.








: J JERLQiA.
THIS oddlookin. cratu. has been
also called the two-ged rat; its fore-
legs being so extre. mall that they
can hardly be seen, ~ie t hid-legs
are of enorm length. i is long
and tafted at enr -rl ap-
pearano rat. In-
stead ..l ing. on all
fours~t t the hind
feet, making great and only
uses t1p fore-paws for burrowing, or for
carrying food to its mouth, like a
squirreL These curious little animals
live in holes which they dig under
(w





44 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
ground. They are gentle, harmless,
and not at all timid. Their dwelling
places are very quiet, for they never
fight or quarrel with one another, like
some very bad children I could tell you
about.
























7Z
N
0

-**'li *- '*








*












* C ': ;
: ^ -ir ^ ^ ''



..*' '' *'*^: ..':- "*-.
'" .kU -.^ ^^.
r ^



i *
.I h
i


*': M
.Bi ':-.'i

















































KANXGA R


r









.* .:
TIs 6, celwed i "anga-
too, ha nch


roos had togethe t I b for
they are vety M the
least al" "y, and leap
over higl il their shot
fore feet for ting food in.
their mouths. They babes
and grass, and do not eat .sh. The
mother carri's her young ones about her
in a sortp~w .
The kangaroo is brought from a very
(47)





48 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
large island, a great many thousand
miles from here. We have some in this
country, which you may see by going to
the Managerie, where the keeper will
tell you a great many stories about them.
Their nature is not at all fierce. The
picture below shows the manner in which
the kagaroo leaps.





































































































































'. ~I

,pX:.' '





C


r .


































LLUP AhL?.








LEOPARD.
THb is .a teauti4fl uLimal,
He is oag a nd irked
of oSe Iernt t -his
am&aim its haabns appwiitnce
mar:lsembl~~es ~e. Ee vey fierce.
and sa ~" p. pon those
aimd~ whid ar, e t~, him-
sel" He rdWw v i9 ex eept
when closely purscal, ll- l t an
obstinate resistance bo mthextod*di-
nary flexibility oft hl M "'he can climb
a tree as readily as ast When taken
young, he can be tamed Krt degree.
The flesh of the leopad i said to be





52 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
excellent, resembling veal. The skins
are very valuable, and often sell for up-
wards of fifty dollars. The picture be-
low represents a leopard watching a herd
of antelopes. He is hid Trom their view
behind a rock, and when they come near
enough, he will leap into the herd and
catch one of them.












f



































MOOSE.


L n-









MOOSE.

THIs animal is perhps the only kiad
of deer whose genea1 appearsace can
be led ea sacefaI Th ieadis.l age,
the mae bbrt sad thick, asd the horns;
knotty d -heavy. The bo4, which is
short and clumsy, is mounted on tall
legs. The uetion-of the animal is a sort
of shambling trot The moose inhabits
the northern parts of bth Europe and
America. Itsfleakis a w liked by the
hunters, sad Bt esemnbles beef.
The moose attains to a large size, par-
ticularly the male, which sometimes
weighs eleven or twelve hundred pounds,
(55





00 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.

Their skins, when dressed properly, make
a soft, thick, pliable leather, which is
useful for many purposes. Sometimes
the--moose is attacked by wolves. Here
you have a picture of an unfortunate
moose, who is assailed by a whole band
of wolves. One is on his back, and has
his teeth in the poor moose's flesh.
A













































he


































NYL GHAU.








NThL GRAU.
S.T imal Bs adkiP aJPel.pe bWA
is logger tba ^ gagpOtqgFe

the shoulder. It_ i. ..a powe l and
vicious create ~ igti is not
good. Whegi is about to ne1 an t-
tack, it dpdow ore-eg,
and then d*rqui gives
a 4low witIits heas w i dan-
gereau The ir of the t ghau is
short and close, and is generally of a
slate color in the male, and a tawny red
in the female, except in the. uder parts
(59)





WU ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
of the body, which are always white. Its
fore-legs are longer than its hinder-legs,
and it has the appearance of having a
small lump at its shoulder. It is usually
found in the forests of India, where it
becomes the prey of the tigers and wild
boars. The cut below shows how the
nyl ghau defends himself when attacked.







































































r
r


I
















r


,,


r











r

9
~ ,
"
















































i













0


r)









OL


for man; e mi. Ih and th
wagon, and in oId UI w to tread
out the corn, instd of thrashing as
people do now. I is not so wild or
fierce as the bull, it flesh and kide
are as useful tons. ~ The 's foot is of a
horny substance, e ra is alled a hod
like thato ae bd l and tbteow~ It isiot
like the horse's hoof, because itt s sepa-
rated in two. The horns of the ox are'
(e3).




t)Q ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
madeinto combs, drinking cups, handles
for knives, and other things. The blood
of the ox is very useful, and when boiled
with brown sugar it helps to make it
white. The blood also makes a blue dye.
Boys should not tease an ox, or throw
stones at him. Sometimes they turn on
their tormentors, and gore them with
their horn.

































rV*
2N

v31











I t


PORcUPIIu,


t, I- ~-=i
'~'"_"'~.~.~"lu'~hc~~j~;?+Y~i~S~h








PORCUPINE.


THIs is an animalv whom t1e mnOs
ridiculous stories ae W bep tdod, parti-
culay a se to i *ta powr f dtgrtitg its
qui~l to a con rBlPlhWa-e A wn
attacked, and in is tding
Sits enemies.: a ".' being
an enemy to -be a: per-
haps, a more timid e'W itence.
But still, as a means of d~B nce, theee
quills are of great service to their pos-
sessor, and reserve it from theattack
of most of its enemies; its teeth are very
Strong and sharp; and if it had courage
enough to use them, it wonld become
(67)




ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.


rather a dangerous foe. When full grown,
it measures nearly two feet in length.
Its general color is a grizzled, dusky
black. The upper part of the head and
neck is furnished with long light hairs.
iMost parts of the back and sides are
armed with long, sharp, pointed quills,
which are raised in a threatening man-
ner whenever the animal is excited. The
porcupine sleeps during the day, and .at
night searches for food. Below is a pic-
ture of an odd kind of porcupine. It is
called a Brazilian porcupine.


































-r C







*; (






























QUAUOA.










QUAGGA.

THIs animal is somewbt libthorse,
but most like the soeb ay see
by comparing the two i It is
found in the southern partW.! ca,
living mostly in the plains inl i lerd
It is not so r so bethe
zebra. Its s white, striped wi*-' on the
head and neck, and some w oin the
sides of its body; the tipper parts of its
legs are greyish, and the under parts
white. It is a wild creature, and rather
vicious in temper. It is made to draw
(71)





72 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
by the natives of the country where it is
found, and its flesh is eaten by them.
The quagga differs from the zebra in
his stripes. You may see by the figure
of the zebra, below, that he is striped all
over his body and limbs, while the quag-
ga has stripes only orn the head and the
fore part of the body.





























.~~ ~ *^.' -^












It


RABBIT.


X-lI









RABBIT.


RABBITS are timid little animals, pret-
tily formed, with beautiful long ears.
They run swiftly, and jqmp very nimbly.
Wild rabbits live in woodtr.d burrow
holes in bIagsof-erth hide
themselves fro. b-


black atu ," a
have pink eyes. Their ir is is
used for making hats. Their flesh is
white and very good to eat. The tame
rabbits are kept in very small huts, and
little boys and girls are fond of feeding
(75)





76 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.

them, for they will eat out of their hand,
carrots, lettuce, and other green vege-
tables. Below is a picture of a pretty
kind of tame rabbits with very long ears.

q




























































































__
~u.
~..
'. .
t
'C

;r, F" ~
e .. r
'r9o

..

I ~-~ LZ.~







r~


.;

















r



























d



































8mEUP.









SHEEP.

STHE sheep is perhaps the most useful
animal we have in our country; the flesh,
called mutton, is most wholesome food.
The hair of the skin, called wool, is mae
into cloth, flannel, and worsted. The
skin is made 'hte parchment to write
upon, and tether; er parts
of its body aE Ii"orharps
and vibliai, ;. efi'h neet i is pro-
cured from the sheep which are bred in
Spain. The sheep is very timid and
harmless,.and lives as you often may see
in flocks, feeding on the grass ofthe fields
and mountains. The hills and moun-
(79)
*--..i ". -


*




80 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
tains which are too steep and barren for
growing corn afford pasturage for the
sheep. It very soon knows the shep-
herd who is set over it, and is easily
guided by him. The young of the sheep
are called lambs. Here is a picture of a
Scotch shepherd keeping sheep in the
Highlands.







































/


















.





S o -









d







4


TIGER.

THIs rerybeautiful animal, is called a
tiger, and is a native of India, a very hot
country in Asia. Tigers are very fierce,
and will often kill men, and .animals a
great deal larger than themselves. They
live in the woods and thickets, called
jungles,. Tigers
eat the t tey kill.
We ha Aie ri a few
carried for shw. Th r is as
big as a i, .ad like tle:bat in shape,
but much larger; he has a long tail, and
a handsome striped skin, covered with
short hair, which is used for a variety of
(83)





84 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
useful and ornamental purposes. He is
very active and can spring far, The
tiger has sometimes been tamed by me-
nagerie keepers, but he is a very sly and
dangerous creature, and never to be
trusted.














































C 2%
.'lff'N '"j *
L C "
1f. i~t
II.~ 1C. 'I
b-.' Z,~d "- ; S

:...Yk


N's





















wo









URUS4

Tins name is given 1 te wild bufm
falo, of. wiwh there, are seePa kin
The one represented by our picture.l
the Cape w a
rious part of. t.ea
very form .anmima t&hi ful
looking orookd, sharp
horns. He and hard to
kill. ThehM tiu* worse
enemy t
This in pools
and sw i, and ters at-.
tack him i m with his
terrible horns, an often oveturns a
(87)





88 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
horse and his rider, trampling them un-
der his feet, and goring them with his
sharp horns.
Mr. Cumming, the English traveller
in South Africa, often encountered these
animals, and. had severe battles with
them.
Here is a picture of the American
bison, which is commonly called a buffalo.
































o





:.i "- '





*'I .' -r









'w *' .. .. o .'': 1 ....,i i

.?:: o.*. o: ... :- i i ;































VICUNA.


lol 00









VICUGNA.


THE vicuga has sometimes been called
the Chilian hep, from the name of the
country it inhalt. a- fred with
a fine, valuable &iWl Whih 4 a red
rose oolor on the back, b~ on the
other parts of the body. Vic a as con-
gregate in large ds, and fee4 on grass
and small shrubs, and so long as they
can procure enough of such food, they are
never known to drink 1ey are very
timid, but swift and i se at running.
Their legs are slender and well formed,
and the head tall and erect. Their ears
are long and pointed, and their eyes
(91)





92 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
large and brilliant. From the form of
their feet, they are well fitted to travel
mountainous countries, and are said to
be even safer than mules. The vicugna
is upwards of five feet in height and six
in length. The tame oner will carry a
load of ove fifty pounds, but they are
kept principally for the sake of the wool,
and the flesh, which is said to taste like
mutton. Here is a picture of the llama,
which is like the vicugna in many respects.




















r. I








2,/













' "*; '. *'.: ^ r^ '






.



'. --




























SWOL .








WOLF.


THe wolf~ ~ imeing like a large dog.
He is very ii: and carries off young
lambs a4n di. and eats.
Throng the ar 1 many
wolves, mad the shephardso great
trouble to driie them aw fromin the
places where their sheep feed. We see
in this pi( tRt t ehu killed a
lamb, and ~l ing to et h&.
We have no wolves in U-e -setled
portions of our country, for th whites
hunted and killed them allbecause they
were such troublesome and, dangerous
neighbors. But in the western country,
(95)





96 ALPHABET OF QUADRUPEDS.
and among the forests and mountains,
they are still pretty plenty. Wolves go
about in large packs, or companies, and
having scented their prey, pursue it like
a pack of hounds, uttering the most dis-
mal and ferocious cries.
Blow is a picture of a wolf wd two
cutba

























i i I .r





o ^ *..-.. ..*
, *;, ...;^ ''; .


' :.. y Ii i *y 'i

'y^; ^'o


t4 j~
*L t4\Iy3, \,*7P~i
"'. .~.
~~t ~i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs