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Group Title: Hewet's illuminated household stories for little folks ; vol. 7
Title: Beauty and the beast
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002655/00001
 Material Information
Title: Beauty and the beast illuminated with ten pictures
Series Title: Hewet's illuminated household stories for little folks
Uniform Title: Beauty and the beast
Physical Description: 32 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Thwaites, William H ( Illustrator )
Hewet, Henry W ( Publisher )
Brown, Loomis & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Loomis & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1855
 Subjects
Subject: Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1855   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1855
Genre: Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: "With illustrations by W.H. Thwaites, engraved by the best artists"--Series statement on cover.
General Note: Engraved col. t.p. bears imprint: New York, Loomis & Co., engravers and printers; series statement on ill. cover has imprint: New York, H.W. Hewet, publisher, no. 12 Dutch St.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by N. Orr.
General Note: Colored frontispiece "printed in oil colors by Brown, Loomis & Co."
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002655
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002250716
oclc - 46942184
notis - ALK2467
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Content
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















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:yS V BEAUTY OFFER TO MARRY THE RF.AST (WHO IS A NOBLE
PRINCE IN DISGUISE) TO SAVE Hoi LIFE.

S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

L HERE was once a merchant who
Shad three daughters: Beauty was
the youngest of the three. She
had been called "Beauty from her birth, on ac-
count of her great loveliness. Charming modesty,
A 1





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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. i

kindness, and frankness were always beaming in her ,
face. She was beloved by all, and was most dear i
to her father, who had lost his wife, for she was his
chief companion. Her two sisters were also beauti-
o fil in their forms, but they were vain, haughty, and
untruthful.
The merchant was once very rich. He was the
owner of a large fleet of ships, which used to sail all
over the world. It so happened, that when they
S were once all assembled in the Persian Gulf, a
most frightful storm arose, and the whole of the
9 merchant's fleet was lost. In the midst of one
of his most splendid feasts, a breathless messenger ei
rushed into the company and announced the disas- C
ter of the loss of his ships. The poor merchant was
ruined. j
lie had nothing of all his great riches left but a
small house in the country. He was not, however,
neglected, for Beauty supplied all his wants. She


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SBEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

soon forgot her grief for the change of fortune.
She found it quite as easy to be happy without jew-
els and fine clothes as with them. But Beauty's
contentment did not attend her sisters: they pined
at their altered state, despised their mean clothing,
refused to help in the work of the house, leaving all
the drudgery to their kind sister, and even re-
,-proached their father for their misfortune. They
Were truly miserable. So their beauty passed away,
whilst Beauty's looks were not only preserved by
her cheerfulness, but they became even more lovely.
S Beauty had always doted on flowers. When she
S came to the cottage she became her own gardener;
and her nosegays were not less fragrant, nor less
brilliant, than her rare flowers when she was rich.
Her garden was a pattern of tasteful arrangement:
all sorts of flowers bloomed there except roses; and,
strange to say, though she often planted them, they i
always disappeared in the night.

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After some time, good news was brought to the '
r merchant of the safe arrival in a distant port of one
of his most precious cargoes, which had been thought i
Sto have been lost when the great shipwreck of his
vessels happened. It was necessary that the iner-
I chant should go to the port, and he resolved to start .
Son the next day. He called his three daughters
.: together to tell them of the news.
' "Tell me, daughters," said the merchant, "what
presents shall your father bring for you on his re-
Sturn from his journey ?"
"Bring me," said the eldest, "a watch encircled
With diamonds, which plays the most seraphic
music; a girdle of the purest crystals, bracelets & ,
studded with precious cameos, and a chaplet of
rubies: you may also bring any pearls of the size of
walnuts, if you meet with them, and-"
S"Hold, sister," said the second, "you will ruin our
father before it comes to my turn. I will only ask
4

-- -----








4I




BEAUTY AND THE LEAST.


THE MERCIIHANT, BEAUTY'S FATHER, ON HIS JOURNEY T"II:l1ll A DAliK FOREST IN TIE
MIDST OF A U~tEAT bTll:Ml.


for a few of the most splendid Persian turbans, two

or three dresses of the richest point lace, a variety




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BEAUTY AND TIHE BEAST.

of Cashmere shawls, and a tortoise-shell cabinet in-
laid with gold, to hold them all."
The merchant then turned to Beauty, and said,
~ Well, Beauty, and what shall your present be 7?" .N
I wish for nothing, father, but your safe return."
>[j, "Nay, child, you must make a request." i
Well, then, dearest father, as roses won't grow
Sin myr garden, bring me a rose."
The sisters could not help laughing at her modesty.
On the morrow the merchant started on his jour-
ney. Beauty was in tears at his departure. But
her sisters could not suppress their joy at the pros-
S pect of their new finery, and seemed to care but
little for their father's absence. r
The merchant arrived at the port, and found his
vessel. He arranged all his business, and made the
purchases, extravagant as they were, which his eld-
est daughters had requested. He mounted his Arab
steed, and commenced his journey homeward.
6

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
Towards evening he reached a forest of pines and
Scedars, through which lay his way. The evening i
Swas sultry and oppressive. The sun descended be-
low the horizon. The merchant was so wrapt up
with his thoughts of home, that he forgot to guide
his horse, and left him to take his own way. The
} i animal's noiseless tread, as his hoofs fell upon the
Soft ground, did not awaken the merchant from his
Y N- trance. Thle scene grew gloomy. Presently thunder,
boomed in the distance. Leaden-looking clouds, 2
folded one on another, covered the amber-tinted sky,
and large drops of rain pattered on the merchant
before he was roused from his own thoughts. He .
K looked about him, and saw that he had lost his road.
On all sides the forest seemed equally dark and im-
penetrable. Up came the distant thunder, roaring
-crash! crash! as if the heavens were split. Then
came thick darkness again, and the rain poured
4L down. The horse was stupefied with fear, the mer-
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BEEAUT'Y AND) TIlE BEAST. VA

chant hardly less so. During the lull of the storm,
a sweet sound was lieard, as if it said-
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SOn! merchant, on!
Tlhy journey's near (done

>, And at the instant a small blue light was seen ,


clapped his spurs to his steed, urging him in the
direction of the light. The light expanded into a -
h large soft flame, and then disappeared. In its place
was seen the portal of a palace. A tablet above the
J ^ entrance was inscribed in glittering letters,-
Enter without fear;
All are welcome here!

The merchant read the inscription, and pressed V /
against the golden gates, which opened without
noise; and entering the first door he came to, he
stripped himself, and enjoyed a delicious warm
bath. Upon quitting it, his wet clothes had
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.


From the bath-room he proceeded to the supper-
room, and there found a delicious repast prepared,


rTHE BEAST THREATENS THE ME.CHIANT'S IFE BEC US E HE IAS PLUCKED A
FORBIDDEN ROSE.


at which he made a most hearty meal. When he
had satisfied himself with one dish, another of a dif
ferent kind was placed in its stead.


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i, During the progress of the feast, his ears were i
filled with most exquisite music. When all was fin-
r'" ished, the merchant departed for his sleeping apart-
S mrnent. Having offered up his grateful prayers, and 7' j
i especially for his deliverance during the storm, the
n merchant retired to his bed, and instantly fell into d1
S a refreshing sleep.
The next morning was bright and peaceful, and K r
Sthe merchant awoke quite refreshed from his fatigue.
Every thing was ready for his toilet and his break- :
j fast. After breakfast, the merchant walked in the
Gardens of the palace. Such gardens he had never j
Seen before. Shrubs and flowers which he had
always thought most rare, in this garden appeared A'i
to grow almost wild. The flowers made him think
of Beauty. He searched for a rose-tree, but could
see none. Strange, thought he, that there should be j
no roses in such a garden! At last, entering an i
arbor, he found some roses within it. The mer-
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

S chant plucked a rose. Suddenly a monster seized
h im.
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I! "Ungrateful wretch," said the Beast, "is this the
way you repay the kindness you have received? cj
You take refuge in my palace from the storm; you
Share treated with the best that I can bestow upon
you, and in return you steal my roses Your life
",, -is forfeited for your baseness."
The poor old man trembled beneath the grasp of
S the monster. I
My lord 1" he said falteringly; my lord-'
Call me by no such title !" interrupted the mon-
ster; call me as I am-call me Beast !"
"Sir !"
Did you hear me say, call me Beast ?"
"Pardon me, Beast, I knew not I was offending?"
Were the roses yours?" The merchant gave
no reply. "Why then did you pluck them ?" Still
no answer was returned.
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

Answer me instantly !" said the Beast.
I cannot," replied the merchant; for he did not
l wish to involve his daughter in his trouble.
v You cannot ? You die unless you answer."

K_^ "Spare my answer, Beast, but take my life."
v |,- "It was your youngest daughter who asked for
S the rose! I see your astonishment, but I know all.
SStill, as you were too noble -o tell, and were ready
/ to suffer for her sake, I will spare your life for the ii

Present. I will lllow you to return home and take "
S leave of your children ; but you must return here in
a week, or send some one in your stead. Take the |
rose and begone."
The merchant stooped to pick up the rose, which .
had fallen from his hand in his fright, and when he '
turned to thank the Beast, the monster was nowhere ', )
to be seen. The fatal rose seemed at once to wither: 11
+he merchant put it into his bosom, and hastened
through the gardens. 2 .



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I i BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

S The merchant proceeded at once to t]
, where he found his horse already saddled
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BEAUTY, BUSY AT IER SP1NNIN(;-W'IIEFI. IN HERT FATII-T.' COUNTRY HOUSE, OBSERVES IIIS
APPIOAIC' AFTER UIS LONG ABSENCE.

dashed out of the stal)le towards the entrance gates.
They sprang open at his approach. The horse flew
through the forest, seeming scarcely to touch the
13






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; i BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

ground with his hoofs, and continued going at the
fastest rate. In the evening the merchant, almost
Sbroken-hearted, reached his cottage.
Beauty was seated under the cottage porch, spin-
ning. She appeared to be anxiously watching the i
horseman's approach. The instant she saw that it i
Swas her father, she sprang from her seat towards,
h him, and in a few seconds the father and child were
Locked in each other's arms.
Beauty's face was radiant with joy: the father
-J- looked very sad.
S "Oh, father!" exclaimed Beauty, with fear and
pity, why that look ? Tell me, tell me, what has hap-
pened." "
SMy poor child, thou art the innocent cause of
my grief! Here, my child, take the rose you asked
for, it will cost thy father his life !"
The merchant took the withered rose from his

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

i the flower, which began instantly to revive; but she
Sell fainting to the ground, terrified at her father's i
: 4 O words. The merchant carried her into the cottage,
and related to her all that had occurred. As soon ]
c as the merchant had finished his account, Beauty's I
> face brightened, and she said smilingly, Oh father, '
Syou shall not return: it was for my sake that the
Smisfortune happened, I alone will bear the punish- >.
Sent. Frightful as may be the monster, and terri- .
,ble the death he may have in store, I will go."
No entreaties of the father could alter her mind:
K her resolution was made. Your life, dearest father,
Sis more valuable than mine. If you were gone, who
S would support and protect my sisters ?"
The week had nearly passed, and Beauty was full
of preparations for her departure. She took leave
of all her friends, giving each one some token of her i
love. She sought to turn away her sisters' unkind-
ness, and offered them the choice of whatsoever she
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1 i BEAUTY AND TIE BEAST.

possessed. They, finding that she was really going,c

Pretended to be in great grief; but in their hearts
~ they were glad, for they were full of jealousy at her
superiority over them.
y. .The morning for departure came. The merchant
)insisted on accompanying his daughter, and seeing /
S her safely to the monster's palace. They mounted L
their horses and set off. As soon as they arrived at
Sthe cedar forest, the merchant's horse darted into
Sthe midst of it, as though he knew the right path,
r 1$ and Beauty's horse followed close to the other.
S Beauty thought she had never seen a wood so

Grand and yet so beautiful.
WThen they reached the golden gates of the
palace, the inscription,

Enter without fear,
All are welcome here,

glittered more brilliantly than at the merchant's first
entrance. The gates instantly flew open. Beauty's
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TILEI MIL'CIJANT AND Bib DAITGHTER HEAL'rfl ALARMED AT SIULIT OF TIlE BEASdT


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horse placed itself at once near some steps of marble
v with golden rails, in order that Beauty might alight.
SHaving done so, and her father being dismounted
aX also, both horses ambled off to the stable. The Ci'
.u merchant and Beauty passed into the arcade. Over ri .
one door was inscribed, "BEAUTY'S APARTMENT." j
1 The door sprung open as she touched the enamelled (
\. handle. The room contained the choicest sofas,
Tr/< chairs, stools, and ottomans, of all shapes, high- pi
.- seated, low-seated, soft, hard, warm, cool. The
!i' carpets were of the richest velvet, the hangings of
satin, powdered with golden stars, and the finest
( lace. In one recess of the room was a library; in
another, all kinds of musical instruments; in another,
cabinets of prints; in another, screens covered with
the finest paintings; in another, materials for needle-
work. Adjoining to this apartment were Beauty's
dressing and bed rooms. She entered the former,
where she found every article for her toilet pre- Xf
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
pared. Yet she lacked heart and courage to touch
any thing, and sank down listlessly into a chair.
She raised her drooping eyes, and beheld a transpa-
rency at the end of the room thus inscribed: Y I
Welcome Beauty, banish fear; r
You are queen and mistress here!
Speak your wishes, speak your will,
SSwift obedience meets them still.
Having changed her dress, she went in search of
her father. They found a magnificent feast pre- v
SI pared for them. Every thing was brought and re-
moved by invisible agency. During the repast, Is
delightful music was performed.
"Certainly, father," said Beauty, "the Beast must
possess excellent taste; and if I am to be killed, he l
surely intends first to fatten me!"
A magic flute played a few bars of music, then a
voice said-
The Beast is near,
And asks leave to appear.
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*1i I-Im- very tloug'tltfull for a master iln his own I i
House to make such a request! I tremble at his l
comingg" th(louglit Beauty. j
S The merchant then spoke: Appear, Beast, if it
b le your pleasure. '
1, A door slrung open at the further end of the
saloon, and the Beast entered. The room was so
Long that Beauty could not discover his features;
but as he came nearer, his hideous appearance began
to be seen, and Beauty clung to her father's arm for
'-Q protection. He saw and pitied her alarm, and at
once spoke to the merchant: Merchant, you have
well redeemed your word. If this be the daughter
who has come in your stead, I trust, though absent
from those she loves, that we shall find means to
soothe her regrets, if not to make her time pass agree- )
ably. Of my palace she is the mistresss.' Hi
The voice which uttered this speech was most mu-
sical, and its kind expression emboldened Beauty to



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BLAUTY AND TlE BE AST.

to0k oup. Se crave a toayce 1w)it the exce do'i D i
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to ask you, Merchant, to stay here with your daug'h-
ter: on the morrow you must take leave of each K
other."
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i, BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. "

"Your kindness, Beast," answered the merchant, I
"i is already much more than we were entitled to ex- it
pect, and makes us feel most grateful to you. We
are prepared to submit to your will in all respects." &>/%
,f Making a graceful bow, the Beast said, "Farewell!: ,"
I;^\ As soon as he had gone, the music recommended, ,
and a concert was performed, after which the mer- .
\' chant and his daughter retired for the night.
On the morrow the merchant departed with great
-r grief, and returned home.
At first, Beauty felt inconsolable at being alone.
S But there was no help for it; and as she was too |
S wise to give way to her sorrow, she sought to find k
means of interesting herself in various occupations, ec
Whatever she wished for, seemed to come at her
command.
Long before the first day had passed, she had
felt so lonely, that she quite welcomed the magic ]
flute, and the sounds-



."----- ---










/ BEAUTY AND TIHE BEAST.

The Beast is near,
And asks leave to appear; 1

and was really glad to answer, Appear, Beast !"
SShe shuddered as he approached, but her fear wore
off as the Beast stayed. When the clock sounded
f ten, he bid her a respectful "Good night." The next i
S lday she got more used to the place, and even looked
S.out for the time when the magic flute should sound. ,
SWhen the Beast appeared this evening, she looked
, calmly at his ugliness. She was more than ever '^^
i( pleased with his conversation. Day after day thus
Passed, the Beast appearing every evening. Thus
Sthe time passed for more than half a year; when one
f \7
evening, after Beauty and the Beast had been con-
versing, he took her hand. Beauty thrilled, but not
with delight: he had never done so before. Beauty
quietly withdrew her hand, at which the Beast (f
sighed deeply, and suddenly he bid her adieu !"
Some days after this, the Beast again took Beauty's
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-,, BEAUTY A ND TiHE BEAST. '
S handl, and she suillered it to remain. The Beast then \ 7
S' esaid, .1Beauty, will you marry me i Impossible !" I
replied Beauty. Tie Beast groaned deeply, and
left as if she felt the greatest grief. The next night h
no Beast allppeared. Beauty listened anxiously for ).
Sthe sounds of the flute, but none were heard. The yi
i evening seemed to hler the dullest which she had
'4. passed since her arrival. The next evening came, and ,
C2 still no Beast. "What can this mean e" thought she;
is the Beast never to appear again I would sooner s^
'.) h],ave his presence, with all his ugliness, a thousand ;
times more, than tllis constant abnlsence." She had '
S scarcely acknowledged thlie thouglit to herself, be- '
fore the flute so.Iunlded, and Beast entered. IHe f
looked melancholy and pensive, except when Beauty ji"
was talking to him. At the usunl hour he departed.
As he was leaving, Beauty said, I hope, Beast, 'i !
you will come to-,morrow ."
"It is a great alnim to my unhappiness, Beauty, to ..
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BEAUTY AND THIE BEAST.


hear that my visit is not absolutely disagreeable to

you."

The Beast continued his evening visits as before;

but he never again mentioned the subject of mar-


THE MERCHANT 18 REJOICED TO SEE 1118 PArGIlTER ElEATTT DOME AGAIN, AND RISES
FROM HIS SICK-BED TO WELCOME HER.

riage, or took Beauty's hand. He was as kind and

agreeable as ever; but oftentimes Beauty thought

he seemed very sad: she feared to ask him the
25






"----- ,- ..-.-........... ..
i/- ->


) BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

cause. She asked herself over and over again, "Can
I marry him?" and then the thought of his excessive
hideousness rushed into her mind, and she reluctantly j
Answered, "No."
In the midst of all this new life, Beauty did not
Forget her own home, and often longed to hear how '
her father and her sisters fared. One day as she
was standing before a large mirror, she exclaimed, "
C "Oh that I could see what my father is about !" At
S that instant a reflection of her home appeared in t
t .the glass. In one room were her sisters trying on
some new gowns. In another room lay her father
Son a bed of sickness, so feeble that he could scarce i
hold any thing. Beauty screamed, and nearly )
swooned away. At that instant the magic flute
sounded, though it was but noon, and the Beast
came in. He found Beauty sobbing: he gently took
her hand, and said, "Beauty, what ails you ? are
you ill ?" "No, Beast, no; but I have just seen the
26
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

election of my old home in the mirror, and my
father I fear, is at the point of death."
Then you wish to visit him ?"
Oh yes, Beast, it would indeed be great joy and &,
comfort to do so: perhaps it may be the last time ;
[ shall ever see him alive."
"Take the rose which your father first gathered,"
aid the Beast; "and as long as it is in your posses-
ion, you have only to wish aloud, and your wish
will be gratified instantly."
0 Beast! believe me, I am most grateful for
your great kindness."
"There is only one condition I have to make,"

said the Beast, which is, that you are not absent c
more than a week. Even that time will appear like
ages to me!"
You may rely on my return within the proper
iime. Farewell!" Beauty extended her hand, and
ven shed tears at leaving the monster.
27
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-- --- --- --- '"


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--










V E1EAUTTY AND THE BEAST.

Adieu, Beauty, adieu !" and the Beast took
her hand and pressed it to his lips. .He then left the




100111 SOlTOWttlly.
When the Beast had gone, Beauty took the rose
I wih I were at home." And saying this, she





placed her hand. before her eyes to wipe away her
teas she B adTY ANrcel remoE her aSTnderchief
W 1i ilk






Adieu, Beuty, adieuntly, and the Best took was
,-p' her hand and pressed it to his lips. He then left the .! i :
l'. room sorrowfully. j!l ;






Sopien ty her eldest sid ter, tho staroo the rose eing





ier, an(l sai(-
Well, Beauty indeed who would have thought j
of seeing you? We thought you were dead long
ag and aced eit in ha eaten up b hy your i lo monster. ,
;'-:, kk I wish I were at home."1 And saying this, she ,,
.'1[" placed her hand befol'e her eyes to wipe away her -
;.- tears: slie had scarcely removed her handkerchief i _,,.
.,S.' 'when, instead of b)ein" in her apartment in the 1





B:lace, there fw herself on her sister's neck, and notes
heedittg her knkind reetintl, kissed her dooHow is
my father? is h elt te, o state t seeinalive
2of seeing you We thought you were dead long/li1
ago, andl perhaps eaten up by your monster/." /I; Is
Beauty threw herself on her sister's neck, and not ,1 fjL
heeding her unkind greeting, kissed her. How is
my father ? is he alive _J'^ _
28 V

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T. }: -2 --
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BEAUTY AND T1E BEAST.


6,: J t Alive!. !ye., nnd much 1)etter; but no thanks to yo?/o?\

nur'singo. We thought you had quite forgotten us." ,
ll.-A-







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BEAUTY AND THF. PpINCF. (woo WA- F)PMVPLT TnE EAST) W% ELCOMED ON TrFT1 1~ '^-.
MARnIAGE BY THE PRINCES SUBJECT;.

Never never sister, I came the instant I knewv
of our father s sickness "
A ell, well, go in and see .him:."
..I X

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------ --





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i ^ BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. '!

S Beauty found her father much better, and both
were rejoiced to see each other again. The merchant I
became quite well before Beauty had been at home jlji:
two days. He delighted in hearing all her news.
She related to him and her sisters how she passed ?
her time at the palace, and how kind the Beast was i
to her.
Beauty's time to return had come, but her rose
was nowhere to be found. As she wandered sadly
about in search of it-oh, joy she espied it upon a
Sheap of rubbish, the rose nearly withered. With
the greatest eagerness she seized it: its faded flow- 1
ers began to revive; she took farewell of all, and
wished herself back at the Beast's palace. In an in- f "
stant she was in her own room. As the evening
drew near, she anxiously looked for the Beast, but
lie came not. Weary, she sat up all the long night, f
believing he certainly would come at last, but no
Beast appeared. In her despair, she seized the rose, .-
30

..__- ",2 "-.- -,4 f.='. ~c-- 0- \ ,,.--,.
...... g 22 -4- '-


I I









Si BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. '

and wished herself in the Beast's presence. Oh, hor- i
r or! there he lay as if dead. Beauty felt his heart
still beating. The Beast uttered a groan, and
looked up. Iis eye feebly opened, and seeing ,'\
Beauty, he said: Beauty, why did you return only
Sto see me die? I could not have believed you I
Should have deceived me. It was impossible to sur- ,
ive your absence; but I am happy to see you once L
.f again before I die." .
< O Beast, do not die! What can I do to save n,
you,.
"Will you marry me ?" faintly murmured the
Beast.
SWillingly, to save your life," answered Beauty C
eagerly.
The Beast seemed to revive, and said timidly,
But not otherwise, Beauty ?"
Yes yes !" replied Beauty, covering her face.
The Beast had disappeared, and she saw at her
P 31





...- ,. -- ,.. - .



K BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

'r{ feet one of the loveliest princes that eyes had ever
b leheld. Loudly roared the cannon, amidst the
3i sounds of the trumpets and timbrels, and all the J'
palace seemed suddenly peopled with bustling }I
crowds engaged in festivity.
The Prince took Beauty's arm, and led her into
\ the palace, where, to Beauty's surprise, she found
her father, but not her sisters. They were changed i
into stone statues, so to remain until they had re-
formed themselves.
The Prince and Beauty were married, to the great
9 joy of all his subjects, and they lived to a good old
age in great happiness. The Prince explained to
Beauty how he had been changed into- a beast by a i
spiteful fairy, to be so until some one would consent
to marry him in his frightful form; and how a good
fairy had given him a magic rose-tree, telling him it I'
would be the means of releasing him from his en- i
chantment.
32


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ILLUMINATED

HOUSEHOLD STORIES
FOR
LITTLE FOLKS.

TH.. series of F .ti Y STOnRIE has for gene-
ration, Ileen lin-teil to and read by Children
with a. inexprei-,ible delight, which other
book, .iive failed to afluord them.
Thtie otrlavo taince of the Stories-tlhe at-
tracii\v' rou.rner of telling thlen-the pic-
tuire in 'icnei y tldecritbed-the mniarvellouii
deeis r- .i'-redl-the reward of virtue and pun-
ishmient o, vice, upon principles strictly in
accordance wiih ethical nlws, as applied to
,iie fnor-i.tion of ceiharatler, render Ihemr
petnl:.-ly adapted to indiice Children to
acvqiiit-l love for reading, and to nid thleni
to citltivit e ithe affection s3 rpathies, fini-
cy. iand itiit;1 nation.
The principle, that good exalpples only
'hlion1ll be iinitaterl, has beCLe loot siglit of ill
ltie Pictorial iomllltlishnient of these t;ln-
d(ard Fairy Stories, upon the assumption
thit indilTerent pictures aie good enough to
give firht impre.r ions of Ait to Ihlillien.
II this holds trite, tliei langluae ind morals
ol iai eiittionthle cast will siutiberve te same
endi; hut lthe fallty of this dogma,,noot-
witi'itanling, no one upon refleclion will
deny.
Thilt tliis edition of these Stories may be
more perl'ect ltan ;'iy otherr extant. the pulb-
lialer hlas egr~olle itolll' it witl esxurlisite spe-
cihens of Miirh Piciorial Art, from which
Chiiloren may tderivoe lio-e nrrect irleas thlit
will mature into the beaitifl and grand.


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