Article Title: New-York, July 6. Another printing of the articles of capitulation at Pensacola and Jackson's reasons for taking the town.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 7/14/1818




NEW-YORK, July 6.
By the arrival of the schr Gold Huntress, from New Orleans, the editors of the mercantile Advertiser have received a file of New Orleans papers to the 13th of June, one of which contains the articles of capitulation of fort St. Charles, Barancas, in Pensacola, to the army under the command of Major General Jackson.
The Capitulation consists of 23 articles, which occupy two columns of a New-Orleans paper.The following are among the most important of the conditions required. The garrison to march out with the honours of war, their arms to be stacked at the glacis, where they were to remain until the troops were embarked for Havanna, when they will be returned. The officers and troops to carry with them their personal effects. All titles legally derived from the crown of Spain prior to this date to be guaranteed and respected. The garrison to be transported to Havanna on account to the U. States ; and Spanish rations allowed where they do not exceed those of the U. States. A competent number of vessels to be furnished for embarking the personal effects, papers c. of the Governor, and those in the civil and military offices, to be delivered up without inspection. The sick and wounded to be maintained by the U.S. The garrison of Pensacola to enjoy the same privileges as the garrisons of Barancas. The provisions actually found in the two places to be appropriate for the Spanish troops. Individuals disposed to remain in Florida, to be respected and protected. The officers and troops to be transported to Pensacola where they shall remain until embarked for HavannaThe Alabama Chief now in the Fort, named Opayhola, shall be included in this capitulation : the governor engaging that he shall never return to Florida. A free toleration to all religions granted. Any Spanish vessels arriving, to be freely admitted.
Art. 19The capitulation is made under the confidence that the general of the American troops will comply with his offer of returning integrally this province in the state in which he received it as stated in his official letter. ApprovedAnd the restoration made under the conditions expressed in Gen. Jackson's communication to the Governor of Pensacola, dated 23 May, 1818.
Head Quarters, Division of the south.
PENSACOLA, May 29th, 1818
Major Gen. Andrew Jackson has found it necessary to take possession of Pensacola. He has not been prompted to this measure from a wish to extend the territorial limits of the U. States, or from any unfriendly feeling on the part of the American Republick to the Spanish government.The Seminole Indians, inhabiting the territories of Spain, have for more than two years past, visited our frontier settlers with all the horrors of savage massacrehelpless women have been butchered and the cradle stained with the blood of innocence. These atrocities, it was expected would have early attracted the attention of the Spanish government, and faithful to existing treaties, speedy measures adopted for their suppression.
The obligation to restrain them was acknowledged, but weakness was alledged with a concession, that so far from being able to control, the Spanish authorities were often compelled from policy or necessity to issue munitions of war to these savages, thus enabling, if not exciting them to raise the tomahawk against us. The immutable laws of self defence, therefore compelled the American government to take possession of such parts of the Floridas in which the Spanish authority could not be maintained. Pensacola was found in this situation, and will be held until Spain can furnish military strength sufficient to enforce existing treaties. Spanish subjects will be respected ; Spanish laws will govern in all cases affecting property and person : a free toleration to all religions guaranteed, and trade alike free to all nations.
Col. King will assume the command of Pensacola, as military and civil governor.
The Spanish laws, so far as they effect personal rights and property, will be enforced. Col. King will take possession of the archives of the province, and appoint some confidential individual to preserve them. It is all important that the records of titles and property should be carefully secured. He will cause an inquiry to be made into all the landed property belonging to the King of Spain, and have possession taken of it. The claims of property within the range of gun shot of fort Carlos de Barancas will be scrupulously examined into and should they prove valid, a rent allowed, but possession in no wise given. This property is necessary to the United States, and under its laws may be held, an equivalent being paid.
The revenue laws of the United States will be established, and Capt. Gadsden is appointed to act as collector, with full powers to nominate such sub-officers as, in his opinion, will be necessary to the faithful discharge of the trust imposed on him. He will apply to the governour of Pensacola for military aid in all cases where it may be necessary to correct attempts at illicit trade.
(Signed) ANDREW JACKSON
Maj. Gen. Commdg.



Article Title: "Capture of Pensacola Gen. Jackson's Farewell Order. Prediction that within the year 'a new Star will be added to the Federal Constitution . . . The State of Florida.' "
Author:
Published in: Concord Gazette
Place of Publication: Concord, NH
Publication Date: 7/14/1818




By the Mails.
Capture of Pensacola
The capture of the town and fortress of Pensacola is amply confirmed, though Gen. Jackson's official account of the event has not been promulgated. The laws of the United States are in full force in this Ex-Spanish capital ;a custom house has been established there ;Capt. Gadsden (an aid to Gen. J) appointed Collector ; and Col. King of the United States army, left in the military command of the placeand virtually of the colony.Whatever mystery may hang over these events, we are confident they will in time be found to be the result of system ; and show that energy as well as secrecy are not confined to cabinets of Kings. Such events cannot be the result of chance. One thing we think, is certain, that the part of Florida now held by the troops of the U.S. will never revert to the Crown of Spain ; and, we venture to guess, that before a year has revolved, a new Star will be added to the Federal Constitution, and that Star be the State of Florida.
Gen. Jackson's Farewell Orders.
H. Q. Division of the South, Adjutant General's Office, May 29, 1818.
FELLOW SOLDIERSYou were called into the field to punish savages and negroes, who had in a sanguinary manner used the tomahawk and scalping kife, upon our helpless citizens on the frontier. You have pursued them to Mikisuky, St. Marks, Sewaney, and lately to this place, through an unexplored wilderness, encountering immense difficulties and privations, which you met with the spirit of American soldiers, without a murmur. Your General anticipated a close of the campaign on his return to Fort Gadsden ; and hailed the hour with feelings of gratitude to heaven, at the prospect of relieving you from your labours, by placing you in quarters and returning you to your homes. But how great was the disappointment, when he heard of the recent murders, committed on the Alabama, by a party of the enemy from Pensacola, where they were furnished with provisions and ammunitoin by a friendly powerUnder this state of things, you were marched encountering difficulties which you alone can properly appreciatemeeting on the way the protest of the Governor of West Florida, threatening to employ force if we did not immediately evacuate the country. This new and unexpected enemy was soon taught to feel the impotence of his threats. You entered Pensacola without opposition, and the strong fortress of the Barances could hold out but one day against your determined courage.Your General cannot help admiring the spirit and military zeal manifested, when it was signified, that a resort to storming would be necessary, would do injustice to his own feelings did he not particularly notice the judgment displayed by his Aid-decamp, Capt. Gadsden of Engineers, in the selection of the positions of the batteries, and the gallantry of his second aid, Capt. Call, and Capt. Young of the topographical engineers, in aiding him to erect the works, under the fire of heavy batteries, within 400 yards ; as well as the skill and gallantry of Capt. Peters, Lieuts. Mindon and Spencer, in the direction and management of the nine pounder, and that of Lieuts. Sands and Scallion, charged with the management of the howitzer.
Capt. M'Keener of the navy, merits, as he has on several occasions, my warmest thanks for his zealous co-operation and activity in landing two of his guns (should an addtitional battering train have been necessary) and gallantly offering to lay his vessel before the water battery, in the event of storming the upper works ; his officers and crew deserve his confidence.
The General assigns to Col. King the command of Pensacola and its dependenceies, and that part of the 7th department lying west of the Appalachicola and Chartahoochie rivers ; until otherwise ordered by General Gaines. The Colonel will take measures to have the volunteers now at Pensacola relieved, preparatory to their return march. The Tennessee volunteers will be rationed for five days and will forthwith move for fort Montgomery where they will receive further orders.
The General, in taking leave of Col. King and his command, tenders to the officers and soldiers an affectionate farewell.
By order, ROBERT BUTLER,
Adjutant General.



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Article Title: New-York, July 6. Another printing of the articles of capitulation at Pensacola and
Jackson's reasons for taking the town.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 7/14/1818




NEW-YORK, July 6.
By the arrival of the schr Gold Huntress, from New Orleans, the editors of the mercantile Advertiser
have received a file of New Orleans papers to the 13th of June, one of which contains the articles of
capitulation of fort St. Charles, Barancas, in Pensacola, to the army under the command of Major
General Jackson.
The Capitulation consists of 23 articles, which occupy two columns of a New-Orleans paper.The
following are among the most important of the conditions required. The garrison to march out with
the honours of war, their arms to be stacked at the glacis, where they were to remain until the troops
were embarked for Havanna, when they will be returned. The officers and troops to carry with them
their personal effects. All titles legally derived from the crown of Spain prior to this date to be
guaranteed and respected. The garrison to be transported to Havanna on account to the U. States;
and Spanish rations allowed where they do not exceed those of the U. States. A competent number
of vessels to be furnished for embarking the personal effects, papers c. of the Governor, and those in
the civil and military offices, to be delivered up without inspection. The sick and wounded to be
maintained by the U.S. The garrison of Pensacola to enjoy the same privileges as the garrisons of
Barancas. The provisions actually found in the two places to be appropriate for the Spanish troops.
Individuals disposed to remain in Florida, to be respected and protected. The officers and troops to
be transported to Pensacola where they shall remain until embarked for HavannaThe Alabama Chief
now in the Fort, named Opayhola, shall be included in this capitulation : the governor engaging that
he shall never return to Florida. A free toleration to all religions granted. Any Spanish vessels
arriving, to be freely admitted.
Art. 19The capitulation is made under the confidence that the general of the American troops will
comply with his offer of returning integrally this province in the state in which he received it as stated
in his official letter. ApprovedAnd the restoration made under the conditions expressed in Gen.
Jackson's communication to the Governor of Pensacola, dated 23 May, 1818.
Head Quarters, Division of the south.
PENSACOLA, May 29th, 1818
Major Gen. Andrew Jackson has found it necessary to take possession of Pensacola. He has not
been prompted to this measure from a wish to extend the territorial limits of the U. States, or from any
unfriendly feeling on the part of the American Republick to the Spanish government.The Seminole
Indians, inhabiting the territories of Spain, have for more than two years past, visited our frontier
settlers with all the horrors of savage massacrehelpless women have been butchered and the cradle
stained with the blood of innocence. These atrocities, it was expected would have early attracted the
attention of the Spanish government, and faithful to existing treaties, speedy measures adopted for
their suppression.
The obligation to restrain them was acknowledged, but weakness was alleged with a concession,
that so far from being able to control, the Spanish authorities were often compelled from policy or
necessity to issue munitions of war to these savages, thus enabling, if not exciting them to raise the
tomahawk against us. The immutable laws of self defence, therefore compelled the American
government to take possession of such parts of the Floridas in which the Spanish authority could not
be maintained. Pensacola was found in this situation, and will be held until Spain can furnish military
strength sufficient to enforce existing treaties. Spanish subjects will be respected ; Spanish laws will






govern in all cases affecting property and person : a free toleration to all religions guaranteed, and
trade alike free to all nations.
Col. King will assume the command of Pensacola, as military and civil governor.
The Spanish laws, so far as they effect personal rights and property, will be enforced. Col. King will
take possession of the archives of the province, and appoint some confidential individual to preserve
them. It is all important that the records of titles and property should be carefully secured. He will
cause an inquiry to be made into all the landed property belonging to the King of Spain, and have
possession taken of it. The claims of property within the range of gun shot of fort Carlos de Barancas
will be scrupulously examined into and should they prove valid, a rent allowed, but possession in no
wise given. This property is necessary to the United States, and under its laws may be held, an
equivalent being paid.
The revenue laws of the United States will be established, and Capt. Gadsden is appointed to act as
collector, with full powers to nominate such sub-officers as, in his opinion, will be necessary to the
faithful discharge of the trust imposed on him. He will apply to the governor of Pensacola for military
aid in all cases where it may be necessary to correct attempts at illicit trade.
(Signed) ANDREW JACKSON
Maj. Gen. Commdg.




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