Article Title: Two articles. First: a letter from Gen. Gaines, Jan. 26, reporting on Creek attacks, Col. Arbuckle, a council of Seminoles and Miccosukees, and slave running on the Florida border. Second, on Aury at Amelia Island.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 2/17/1818




From the Georgia Journal, Extra, Jan. 26,
LATE AND IMPORTANT.
(OFFICIAL.)
Copy of a letter from Maj. Gen. Gaines, to the Governor of this state, received last night by express.
Head Quarters , Hartford
(Geo.) Jan 23, 1818
SirBy a letter just now received from brig gen. Glascock, I am informed, that a party of Indians concealed to the swamp of Cedar creek, 7 miles east of Flint river, yesterday morning, fired upon and killed Mr. Thomas Leigh, assistant wagon-master, and Samuel Lofters, of captain Avera's company of Georgia militia. The waggon-master had been sent out with a small party of men and a drove of pack-horses, laden with provisions ; which by a prompt and judicious arrangement on the part of major Heard were secured, with the residue of the party and horses. Gen. Glascock immediately ordered a detachment under major Morgan, in pursuit of the Indians.
By a letter from col. Arbuckle, of the 18th inst. I learn, that the Indians were to assemble near the mouth of Flint on the 21st, for the purpose of concerting measures for the destruction of the inhabitants on the Chatahoochie, and the reduction of Fort Scott. The latter they calculated upon starving out. Fort Gaines it was apprehended would be attacked. One of the inhabitants (Mr. Weaver) had been killed near the near the Fort ; a house had been burnt, and some other property destroyed.
The detachment and vessels, under maj. Muhlenburgh, with military stores, arrived at Fort Scott without any material loss, other than that mentioned in my last, although incessantly annoyed by a very large force from each shore from the 15th to the 25th of December. A supply of provisions, ordered in November last, had not reached the Appalachicola at the date of col. Arbuckle's letter (the 18th inst.) The troops were then without meat, but had engaged nearly on month's supply upon the Chatahoochie, part of which left Fort Gaines under a strong guard on the 16th. The supply of flour at Fort Scott is sufficient, allowing full rations of that article for the troops there, until the middle of next month ; and the arrival of sixty thousand rations from New-Orleans is daily expected ; and even should this supply fail, I have not a doubt of having a competent supply sent down the Flint and Chattahoochie, in time to prevent the troops from suffering.
I have been thus particular in communicating to your excellency the state of our supplest, as well as the movements of the enemy, from an impression, that a knowledge of these subjects would be acceptable to you and beneficial to the state over which you presideas well from a wish to draw from you, a free communication of your view, and wishes, upon whatever relates to the public service, connected with my command.
I have seen in the newspapers, with equal surprise and indignation, the attempts that have been made to lull the public mind into a belief, that the hostile Indians desire peace and are willing to lay down their arms ! Sir, there will be no peace until those Indians are severely chastised.
The Chiefs were required to surrender the offenders ! It was deliberately resolved in a large council of the Seminoles and " Red Sticks" at Mickasukee, that the offenders should neither be punished nor surrendered.
Some of their chiefs have triumphantly asserted, that we cannot beat them !that we never have beaten them, except when we had " Red people to help us." It is not extraordinary they should entertain these opinionsthey know little or nothing of the strength or resources of our countryand whatever information they have derived from their white friends (British officers and traders) could have no tendency to give them favorable impression towards us. They must be beaten before we can reasonably calculate upon peace.
It is well known that seven of our citizens were killed by those Indians in the two years immediately succeeding the late war with England. Their chiefs admitted this, and among the number was a woman and two children (Mrs. Garrett of this state).
The principal chief, Capichimico, is notifying the warriors of the resolution of the chiefs in council, added that, " the day never should come when he would give up or punish a red man for killing a white man." These facts have been communicated to me by Indians, and through interpreters who I believe to be men of truthnor have I a doubt but these facts were well known to those philanthropic writers of peace, who have had the sagacity to discover, that hostilities were commenced by the troops, under my command, on the 20th November last ; and that we are the aggressors.
It is not an act of war, according to this doctrine, to massacre and scalp seven unoffending persons, and among them a woman and her infants ! What number then, I would ask, the massacre of which would constitute an act of war ? Sir, my own humble impressions upon this subject are, that the wanton massacre of an infant not yet able to lisp the enviable declaration of " I am an American citizen," should be as promptly avenged as if fifty of fifty thousand citizens had been massacred. When reparation is refused by the nation (whether red or white, civilized average) to whom the offenders belongthe nation itself becomes accountable, should be chastised for the outrage.
I have little confidence in the expectation of obtaining any considerable aid from the friendly Indians ; even should they join me, the loss of their chiefs may induce them to follow the example of the warriors under Perry may, and go over to the enemy ; and I owe it to myself and to the public service to apprise you, of the existence of a spirit of opposition, tending to counter-act my efforts, having recently manifested itself in what is deemed to be the friendly part of the Creek nation ; originating, as I have reason to believe, with some evil disposed white persons, actually engaged in smuggling Negroes into the United States from East Florida. A considerable number, as I am credibly informed and believe, have been taken to the immediate vicinity of the Creek agency. It rests with the agent to detect or explain this apparent violation of law: The movement of the troops the active general hostility of the Indians near the Florida line, will have a strong tendency to render this abominable traffic difficult and perilous ; hence I expect to be honored with the ill-will of every one engaged in it.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. EDMUND P. GAINES. Maj. Gen'l com'g
His excellency
William Rabun SAVANNAH, Jan. 29.
From Amelia IslandWe have accounts to Tuesday evening last, at which time affairs remained in statu quo. The American land and naval forces were still in Amelia. Aury and his followers had not left the Island ; and it is believed he will remain there until he hears of the final decision of congress, relative to keeping possession of Amelia, which he expects will be given up to him. Immediately on surrendering to the American authorities, Aury sent his secretary to Washington City, with despatches, remonstrating in high terms against the proceedings of the president, and stating certain claims which he has to the Island of Amelia, c. Three vessels under the Mexican flag were at St. Mary's repairing, in order to be ready to take the commodore and his heroes away should they be obliged to go.
January 30An English brig is reported to have arrived at Tybee last night, from Liverpool ; but we have not yet been able to learn anything from her when our paper went to press.



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Article Title: Two articles. First: a letter from Gen. Gaines, Jan. 26, reporting on Creek attacks, Col.
Arbuckle, a council of Seminoles and Miccosukees, and slave running on the Florida border. Second,
on Aury at Amelia Island.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 2/17/1818




From the Georgia Journal, Extra, Jan. 26,
LATE AND IMPORTANT.
(OFFICIAL.)
Copy of a letter from Maj. Gen. Gaines, to the Governor of this state, received last night by express.
Head Quarters , Hartford
(Geo.) Jan 23, 1818
SirBy a letter just now received from brig gen. Glascock, I am informed, that a party of Indians
concealed to the swamp of Cedar creek, 7 miles east of Flint river, yesterday morning, fired upon and
killed Mr. Thomas Leigh, assistant wagon-master, and Samuel Lofters, of captain Avera's company of
Georgia militia. The waggon-master had been sent out with a small party of men and a drove of
pack-horses, laden with provisions; which by a prompt and judicious arrangement on the part of
major Heard were secured, with the residue of the party and horses. Gen. Glascock immediately
ordered a detachment under major Morgan, in pursuit of the Indians.
By a letter from col. Arbuckle, of the 18th inst. I learn, that the Indians were to assemble near the
mouth of Flint on the 21st, for the purpose of concerting measures for the destruction of the
inhabitants on the Chatahoochie, and the reduction of Fort Scott. The latter they calculated upon
starving out. Fort Gaines it was apprehended would be attacked. One of the inhabitants (Mr.
Weaver) had been killed near the near the Fort ; a house had been burnt, and some other property
destroyed.
The detachment and vessels, under maj. Muhlenburgh, with military stores, arrived at Fort Scott
without any material loss, other than that mentioned in my last, although incessantly annoyed by a
very large force from each shore from the 15th to the 25th of December. A supply of provisions,
ordered in November last, had not reached the Appalachicola at the date of col. Arbuckle's letter (the
18th inst.) The troops were then without meat, but had engaged nearly on month's supply upon the
Chatahoochie, part of which left Fort Gaines under a strong guard on the 16th. The supply of flour at
Fort Scott is sufficient, allowing full rations of that article for the troops there, until the middle of next
month ; and the arrival of sixty thousand rations from New-Orleans is daily expected ; and even
should this supply fail, I have not a doubt of having a competent supply sent down the Flint and
Chattahoochie, in time to prevent the troops from suffering.
I have been thus particular in communicating to your excellency the state of our supplest, as well as
the movements of the enemy, from an impression, that a knowledge of these subjects would be
acceptable to you and beneficial to the state over which you presideas well from a wish to draw from
you, a free communication of your view, and wishes, upon whatever relates to the public service,
connected with my command.
I have seen in the newspapers, with equal surprise and indignation, the attempts that have been
made to lull the public mind into a belief, that the hostile Indians desire peace and are willing to lay
down their arms ! Sir, there will be no peace until those Indians are severely chastised.
The Chiefs were required to surrender the offenders ! It was deliberately resolved in a large council of
the Seminoles and " Red Sticks" at Mickasukee, that the offenders should neither be punished nor
surrendered.
Some of their chiefs have triumphantly asserted, that we cannot beat them !that we never have






beaten them, except when we had " Red people to help us." It is not extraordinary they should
entertain these opinionsthey know little or nothing of the strength or resources of our countryand
whatever information they have derived from their white friends (British officers and traders) could
have no tendency to give them favorable impression towards us. They must be beaten before we can
reasonably calculate upon peace.
It is well known that seven of our citizens were killed by those Indians in the two years immediately
succeeding the late war with England. Their chiefs admitted this, and among the number was a
woman and two children (Mrs. Garrett of this state).
The principal chief, Capichimico, is notifying the warriors of the resolution of the chiefs in council,
added that, " the day never should come when he would give up or punish a red man for killing a
white man." These facts have been communicated to me by Indians, and through interpreters who I
believe to be men of truthnor have I a doubt but these facts were well known to those philanthropic
writers of peace, who have had the sagacity to discover, that hostilities were commenced by the
troops, under my command, on the 20th November last; and that we are the aggressors.
It is not an act of war, according to this doctrine, to massacre and scalp seven unoffending persons,
and among them a woman and her infants ! What number then, I would ask, the massacre of which
would constitute an act of war ? Sir, my own humble impressions upon this subject are, that the
wanton massacre of an infant not yet able to lisp the enviable declaration of" I am an American
citizen," should be as promptly avenged as if fifty of fifty thousand citizens had been massacred.
When reparation is refused by the nation (whether red or white, civilized average) to whom the
offenders belongthe nation itself becomes accountable, should be chastised for the outrage.
I have little confidence in the expectation of obtaining any considerable aid from the friendly Indians;
even should they join me, the loss of their chiefs may induce them to follow the example of the
warriors under Perry may, and go over to the enemy ; and I owe it to myself and to the public service
to apprise you, of the existence of a spirit of opposition, tending to counter-act my efforts, having
recently manifested itself in what is deemed to be the friendly part of the Creek nation ; originating, as
I have reason to believe, with some evil disposed white persons, actually engaged in smuggling
Negroes into the United States from East Florida. A considerable number, as I am credibly informed
and believe, have been taken to the immediate vicinity of the Creek agency. It rests with the agent to
detect or explain this apparent violation of law: The movement of the troops the active general
hostility of the Indians near the Florida line, will have a strong tendency to render this abominable
traffic difficult and perilous ; hence I expect to be honored with the ill-will of every one engaged in it.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. EDMUND P GAINES. Maj. Gen'l
com'g
His excellency
William Rabun SAVANNAH, Jan. 29.
From Amelia IslandWe have accounts to Tuesday evening last, at which time affairs remained in statu
quo. The American land and naval forces were still in Amelia. Aury and his followers had not left the
Island ; and it is believed he will remain there until he hears of the final decision of congress, relative
to keeping possession of Amelia, which he expects will be given up to him. Immediately on
surrendering to the American authorities, Aury sent his secretary to Washington City, with
despatches, remonstrating in high terms against the proceedings of the president, and stating certain
claims which he has to the Island of Amelia, c. Three vessels under the Mexican flag were at St.
Mary's repairing, in order to be ready to take the commodore and his heroes away should they be
obliged to go.
January 30An English brig is reported to have arrived at Tybee last night, from Liverpool; but we have
not yet been able to learn anything from her when our paper went to press.




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