Article Title: "Southern Frontier. From the Georgia Journal. The Governor of West Florida is trying to dissuade the Seminoles from further hostilities; a new force of Patriots has invaded Alachua 'and are determined to hold the country or lose their lives.' "
Author:
Published in: National Advocate [For The County]
Place of Publication: New York, NY
Publication Date: 3/11/1814




SOUTHERN FRONTIER
From the Georgia Journal
Extract of a letter from Colonel Benjamin Hawkins to Major General Pinkney, dated
" Camp, near Port Mitchell, Feb. 16
" A runner who is intelligent, and was sent by me by the Chiefs low down this river, who are connected with the Seminolies, returned this evening. He heard a talk from the Governor of Pensacola to the Simonilies, delivered in this presence to the Chiefs of the villages. The purport was
" That being ignorant people, they should listen to their old Chiefs, and aid them to crush the Prophets, who had deceived them by their lies. As they had misapplied the powder he gave them to hunt provisions for their women and children, he should give them no morethey had deceived, divided and ruined their nation. The British were not expected to posses the country bordering on the tide waters of the Floridasand if they should come, they could not remain long as the United states would drive them off. The Indians had once been deceived by them, and must take care how they trusted them again. It was expected peace would be made among white people every where this year, and it would be right for the Seminolies to help their old Chiefs to destroy the Prophets. The deception played on him was through the fear of his officer under him and second in command, who urged him to let the Prophet's party come and take him by the hand, and to give them some ammunition to hunt for their women and children. The Chiefs he saw were friendly."
If any credit be due to the professions of the Governor of Pensacola, we may calculate from this talk to the Seminolie Chiefs, that no more ammunition will be obtained by the hostile Indians from him. Until further lights are shed on the subject, it may remain doubtful whether his acquiescence in their demands proceeded from fear of them or enmity to us. It is quite likely, that our formidable military force in the Creek Nation may have intimidated the Spanish commandant more than the threats of the Indians ; and that he finds it imprudent to change his tone to them, and to offer the best apology he can to our government
The following statement, handed us by an officer of the Patriots, directly from their camp, and on his way to Washington city, (for the purpose, we presume, of supplicating assistance from the general government) contains we believe, a correct view of their situation and prospects :
" On the 10th of January the Patriots left the St. Mary's river, about 70 strong ; their numbers increased on their march to about 90, and on the 16th of the same month they arrived at the Aulotohewan Indian settlement called Pains Town. On the 18th they commenced a blockhouse, 25 feet square, which they soon reared two stories high, and immediately proceeded to surveying the land. On the 10th of this month the force of the Patriots had increased to 160 men, and by this time I have no doubt they muster more than 200 as recruits were daily arriving.
The Aulotohewan country excels any that I have seen. The cattle, of which there are large numbers in the range are as fat as I ever saw killed in the woods. The land is equal in quality to any in America. Within 7 miles of Fort Mitchell is a large lake, about 5 miles over, and no doubt it communicates with Lake George or the river St. John's which is about 22 miles S.E. of Fort Mitchell.
These waters being an excellent navigation into the heart of the country. On the 25th of January a large water melon was found, which was quite sound and eat well. The wild vegetable poke was growing in abundance at the height of 12 or 14 inches. The orange tree grows spontaneously, and is now ornamented with its yellow fruit. The fort stands prairie, which is 7 or 8 miles wide and 23 long. This district of country is admirably suited to the culture of the sugar cane.
The patriots are well supplied with ammunition and provision. They will raise a crop this season, and are determined to hold the country or lose their lives in defending it."



National Advocate [For The County] 3/11/1814 2:2
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Article Title: "Southern Frontier. From the Georgia Journal. The Governor of West Florida is trying to
dissuade the Seminoles from further hostilities; a new force of Patriots has invaded Alachua 'and are
determined to hold the country or lose their lives.'"
Author:
Published in: National Advocate [For The County]
Place of Publication: New York, NY
Publication Date: 3/11/1814




SOUTHERN FRONTIER
From the Georgia Journal
Extract of a letter from Colonel Benjamin Hawkins to Major General Pinkney, dated
" Camp, near Port Mitchell, Feb. 16
" A runner who is intelligent, and was sent by me by the Chiefs low down this river, who are
connected with the Seminolies, returned this evening. He heard a talk from the Governor of
Pensacola to the Simonilies, delivered in this presence to the Chiefs of the villages. The purport was

" That being ignorant people, they should listen to their old Chiefs, and aid them to crush the
Prophets, who had deceived them by their lies. As they had misapplied the powder he gave them to
hunt provisions for their women and children, he should give them no morethey had deceived, divided
and ruined their nation. The British were not expected to posses the country bordering on the tide
waters of the Floridasand if they should come, they could not remain long as the United states would
drive them off. The Indians had once been deceived by them, and must take care how they trusted
them again. It was expected peace would be made among white people every where this year, and it
would be right for the Seminolies to help their old Chiefs to destroy the Prophets. The deception
played on him was through the fear of his officer under him and second in command, who urged him
to let the Prophet's party come and take him by the hand, and to give them some ammunition to hunt
for their women and children. The Chiefs he saw were friendly."
If any credit be due to the professions of the Governor of Pensacola, we may calculate from this talk
to the Seminolie Chiefs, that no more ammunition will be obtained by the hostile Indians from him.
Until further lights are shed on the subject, it may remain doubtful whether his acquiescence in their
demands proceeded from fear of them or enmity to us. It is quite likely, that our formidable military
force in the Creek Nation may have intimidated the Spanish commandant more than the threats of the
Indians ; and that he finds it imprudent to change his tone to them, and to offer the best apology he
can to our government
The following statement, handed us by an officer of the Patriots, directly from their camp, and on his
way to Washington city, (for the purpose, we presume, of supplicating assistance from the general
government) contains we believe, a correct view of their situation and prospects :
" On the 10th of January the Patriots left the St. Mary's river, about 70 strong ; their numbers
increased on their march to about 90, and on the 16th of the same month they arrived at the
Aulotohewan Indian settlement called Pains Town. On the 18th they commenced a blockhouse, 25
feet square, which they soon reared two stories high, and immediately proceeded to surveying the
land. On the 10th of this month the force of the Patriots had increased to 160 men, and by this time I
have no doubt they muster more than 200 as recruits were daily arriving.
The Aulotohewan country excels any that I have seen. The cattle, of which there are large numbers
in the range are as fat as I ever saw killed in the woods. The land is equal in quality to any in
America. Within 7 miles of Fort Mitchell is a large lake, about 5 miles over, and no doubt it
communicates with Lake George or the river St. John's which is about 22 miles S.E. of Fort Mitchell.
These waters being an excellent navigation into the heart of the country. On the 25th of January a
large water melon was found, which was quite sound and eat well. The wild vegetable poke was






growing in abundance at the height of 12 or 14 inches. The orange tree grows spontaneously, and is
now ornamented with its yellow fruit. The fort stands prairie, which is 7 or 8 miles wide and 23 long.
This district of country is admirably suited to the culture of the sugar cane.
The patriots are well supplied with ammunition and provision. They will raise a crop this season, and
are determined to hold the country or lose their lives in defending it."




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