Article Title: Extract of a letter from St. Marys, dated March 20th. From the Savannah Museum. Account of the taking of Amelia by an unnamed eye-witness.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 4/15/1812




Insurrection of East Florida.The following letters contain a more particular detail of facts on this subject, than the one we published yesterday :
AMELIA, March 20, 1812.
" Since writing you on the 15th inst, acknowledging the receipt of your favor of the 27th ult. unexpected events have taken place in this province. Saturday evening after writing you, I was informed there was a revolution in the province, and that the revolutionists had planted their standard on a Bluff, opposite St. Mary's. I could not credit it till next morning, when I saw the standard. The Gun Boats were then dropping down the river, and by the next day were all, to the number of eight, at the mouth of the harbor of Amelia. The Commodore was waited on to know what were his intentions. He replied that he came for the purpose of protecting property, and all would be sacred, and that we might consider ourselves under the protection of the American flag. After this assurance I made myself easy and waited the result, which was as follows : On the 17th, the revolutionists sent down a flag of truce from the Bluff, where they were encamped to the number of about 220, demanding a surrender of the place, and inviting the inhabitants to join in the cause, which was refused, and the inhabitants prepared themselves as well as they could for a defence. On the 18th in the morning, four of our Gun Boats came up and anchored abreast of the town.Soon after the revolutionists embarked. As soon as they got within sight of the town, a flag was sent with the surrender of the place. In the afternoon they landed and took possession, hoisting a flag with the motto Vox Populi lex Salutis. But I was assured that it was to be delivered up to the United States troops the next day, which was accordingly done, and sixty came down from Point Petre for that purpose, subject to the orders of Gen. Matthews, who is the chief negociator in the business for the United States. A Custom House is to be established here to-morrow agreeable to our own usage. All property afloat in the harbor is considered to be under the protection of the American flag. The revolutionists are now going against Augustine, they say 800 strong.
People here are very much divided in their opinions respecting its falling into their hands. Should it hold out any length of time, the British, no doubt, would have a force to co-operate with the Spaniards. Should it be surrendered to the Revolutionists, it will be given up to Gen. Matthews, as well as the whole province. There is large reinforcements expected from Georgia, and from every appearance, in my opinion, the province may be considered as belonging to the United States. One article of the capitulation says, that all goods now in the place, and all that have been legally entered and paid duties, shall be exported into the United States free of any other duty ; but this has been left out, as I understandit is not yet settled."
FROM THE SAVANNAH MUSEUM.
Extract of a letter from St. Mary's, dated March 20th.
" The Insurgents or Patriots, formed a camp on Rose's Bluff, opposite St. Mary's, at the same time the Gun Boats were ordered to proceed down the Sound, when they were moored, their guns loaded, and every man to his stationseveral signal guns were fired by the Commodore ; the Insurgents then embarked in boats from Rose's Bluff, and proceeded to Amelia Island, where they landed, Col. Lodowick Ashley at their head, and demanded the surrender of the Island to the Patriots, which was refused by the commandant, but who requested a parley until he could send a deputation to Commodore Campbell, who was then sailing up and down the harbour, to ascertain whether he would assist the Insurgents in case they ever resistedthe Commodore's reply was, that he would assist the Insurgents. The island was then surrendered to Col. Ashley, and the flag of the Patriots was immediately displayed on the ramparts of the fort, which was soon succeeded by the flag of the U. States. The U. States troops are now in possession of the Island of Ameliathe country of East Florida in possession of the Patriots, and the town of Augustine and the Garrison in possession of the soldiers of Ferdinand the 7th. The Governor of that place is determined to hold out the last extremity."



Connecticut Courant 4/15/1812 2:3
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002383/00001
 Material Information
Title: Connecticut Courant 4/15/1812 2:3
Physical Description: Unknown
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 0000000-1
oclc - 747451710
System ID: UF00002383:00001

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( TXT )


Full Text


Article Title: Extract of a letter from St. Marys, dated March 20th. From the Savannah Museum.
Account of the taking of Amelia by an unnamed eye-witness.
Author:
Published in: Connecticut Courant
Place of Publication: Hartford, CT
Publication Date: 4/15/1812




Insurrection of East Florida.The following letters contain a more particular detail of facts on this
subject, than the one we published yesterday :
AMELIA, March 20, 1812.
" Since writing you on the 15th inst, acknowledging the receipt of your favor of the 27th ult.
unexpected events have taken place in this province. Saturday evening after writing you, I was
informed there was a revolution in the province, and that the revolutionists had planted their standard
on a Bluff, opposite St. Mary's. I could not credit it till next morning, when I saw the standard. The
Gun Boats were then dropping down the river, and by the next day were all, to the number of eight, at
the mouth of the harbor of Amelia. The Commodore was waited on to know what were his intentions.
He replied that he came for the purpose of protecting property, and all would be sacred, and that we
might consider ourselves under the protection of the American flag. After this assurance I made
myself easy and waited the result, which was as follows : On the 17th, the revolutionists sent down a
flag of truce from the Bluff, where they were encamped to the number of about 220, demanding a
surrender of the place, and inviting the inhabitants to join in the cause, which was refused, and the
inhabitants prepared themselves as well as they could for a defence. On the 18th in the morning, four
of our Gun Boats came up and anchored abreast of the town.Soon after the revolutionists embarked.
As soon as they got within sight of the town, a flag was sent with the surrender of the place. In the
afternoon they landed and took possession, hoisting a flag with the motto Vox Populi lex Salutis. But I
was assured that it was to be delivered up to the United States troops the next day, which was
accordingly done, and sixty came down from Point Petre for that purpose, subject to the orders of
Gen. Matthews, who is the chief negotiator in the business for the United States. A Custom House is
to be established here to-morrow agreeable to our own usage. All property afloat in the harbor is
considered to be under the protection of the American flag. The revolutionists are now going against
Augustine, they say 800 strong.
People here are very much divided in their opinions respecting its falling into their hands. Should it
hold out any length of time, the British, no doubt, would have a force to co-operate with the Spaniards.
Should it be surrendered to the Revolutionists, it will be given up to Gen. Matthews, as well as the
whole province. There is large reinforcements expected from Georgia, and from every appearance, in
my opinion, the province may be considered as belonging to the United States. One article of the
capitulation says, that all goods now in the place, and all that have been legally entered and paid
duties, shall be exported into the United States free of any other duty ; but this has been left out, as I
understandit is not yet settled."
FROM THE SAVANNAH MUSEUM.
Extract of a letter from St. Mary's, dated March 20th.
" The Insurgents or Patriots, formed a camp on Rose's Bluff, opposite St. Mary's, at the same time the
Gun Boats were ordered to proceed down the Sound, when they were moored, their guns loaded,
and every man to his stationseveral signal guns were fired by the Commodore ; the Insurgents then
embarked in boats from Rose's Bluff, and proceeded to Amelia Island, where they landed, Col.
Lodowick Ashley at their head, and demanded the surrender of the Island to the Patriots, which was
refused by the commandant, but who requested a parley until he could send a deputation to
Commodore Campbell, who was then sailing up and down the harbour, to ascertain whether he would
assist the Insurgents in case they ever resistedthe Commodore's reply was, that he would assist the






Insurgents. The island was then surrendered to Col. Ashley, and the flag of the Patriots was
immediately displayed on the ramparts of the fort, which was soon succeeded by the flag of the U.
States. The U. States troops are now in possession of the Island of Ameliathe country of East Florida
in possession of the Patriots, and the town of Augustine and the Garrison in possession of the
soldiers of Ferdinand the 7th. The Governor of that place is determined to hold out the last extremity."




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - - mvs