This Days Mail - Charleston, June 2. Rumours of a British move against St. Augustine
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Title: This Days Mail - Charleston, June 2. Rumours of a British move against St. Augustine
Alternate Title: Minerva and Mercantile Evening Advertiser 6/23/1797 2:1
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Minerva and Mercantile Evening Advertiser
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 6/23/1997
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 0000000-1
oclc - 747453844
System ID: UF00002331:00001

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Article Title: This Days Mail Charleston, June 2. Rumors of a British move against St. Augustine.
Author:
Published in: Minerva Mercantile Evening Advertiser
Place of Publication: New York, NY
Publication Date: 6/23/1797




THIS DAY'S MAIL.
KINGSTON, (Jam.) APRIL 29.
The Nigre hove too off Jeremie before the vessels from thence left it, and information was received
from her, that General Simcoe had commenced his military operations with considerable eclat, having
attacked six or seven posts of the Brigands in the neighborhood of Port au Prince, and put upwards
of seven hundred to the bayonet.
CHARLESTON, JUNE 2.
The Spanish general some time since said to have been in Georgia, is gone to St. Augustine. His
arrand was to see Gen Clarke, who was suspected of being in the British interest; whether the
suspicions were just, or otherwise, Clarke is certainly now on his way to St. Augustine, to assist in its
defense against the British.
A major de Bent is a principal in the plan for sending about 2000 men, French and others (Probably a
great many Americans from the back parts of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Kentucky)
to defend St. Augustine against the expected attacks of the English, or more probably to take
possession of it in the name of liberty and equality.




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