• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Carlot shipments: Florida vegetables...
 Preliminary summary: Florida fruits...
 Weekly business review
 Orange shipments in boxes
 Table of citrus shipments...
 Record of thirty years of total...
 Florida citrus shipments
 Record of Florida citrus auction...
 Citrus plantings in Florida






Group Title: New Series Bulletin - Florida. Department of Agriculture ; no. 121
Title: Fruit and vegetable crops of Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002289/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fruit and vegetable crops of Florida a compendium of information on the fruits and vegetables grown in Florida
Series Title: Florida. Dept. of Agriculture <Bulletin new ser.
Physical Description: 36, iv p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Department
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1945
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: published by the State Department of Agriculture.
General Note: "August 1945"
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002289
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001963054
oclc - 29734250
notis - AKD9736
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Foreword
        Page 3
    Carlot shipments: Florida vegetables rail and boat, fifteen seasons by months
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Preliminary summary: Florida fruits and vegetables for 1944-45 season
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Weekly business review
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Orange shipments in boxes
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Table of citrus shipments in boxes
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Record of thirty years of total interstate orange shipments in boxes
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Florida citrus shipments
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Record of Florida citrus auction sales
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Citrus plantings in Florida
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text




New Series Number 121


Fruit and Vegetable


Crops of Florida



A COMPENDIUM OF INFORMATION
ON

THE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
GROWN IN FLORIDA





PUBLISHED BY THE
STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

NATHAN MAYO
Commissioner




TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
August, 1945


~I


New Series


Number 121











Fruit and Vegetable


Crops of Florida



A COMPENDIUM OF INFORMATION
ON
THE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
GROWN IN FLORIDA


0


PUBLISHED
STATE DEPARTMENT


BY THE
OF AGRICULTURE


NATHAN MAYO
Commissioner





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
August, 1945
















FOREWORD

So many inquiries have come to the office of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture concerning the fruits and vegetables
grown in this state that this publication is offered as an
answer to those interested in the leading agricultural crops
of Florida.
For further information address the office of this pub-
lication.
NATHAN MAYO
Florida State Commissioner of Agriculture.






4 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Carlot Shipments Florida Vegetables Rail and Boat,
Fifteen Seasons by Months

While we have not made a record of the number of requests
the Bureau receives for data showing the annual volume, monthly
total, peak shipping periods or the usual time of lightest ship-
ments of Florida vegetables, they would easily run into third
thousands. Growers, State and Federal officials and various
agencies find such information indispensable in basing theiq
studies and plans upon factual data. In connection with postwar
air transportation; inland waterway, deep harbor, port develop
nent, drainage and canal projects; rate hearings, establishing
base periods for ceiling prices; providing Quartermaster Centers
daily and seasonal volume of supplies of fresh fruits and vegetal
bles in shipment,-and in filling many more similar calls for such
information,-accurate data of the amount of products shipped
or that has moved in one or more seasons or in certain parts
thereof in the past, are greatly in demand. We have served tha
demand for many years. The following compilation is given to
provide a quick-reference table of monthly shipments and each
season's total shipped volume of Florida vegetables, running back
to the 1928-29 season. The tables are self-explanatory.
-NEILL RHODES, Assistant Commissioner.

GREEN BEANS limass included)
Season Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Total
1928-29 160 203 119 432 687 1276 371 3 3251
1929-30 9 298 993 591 45Z 390 594 728 58 4113
1930-31 224 1019 333 214 272 433 760 995 65 4315,
1931-32 330 1330 1403 1254 876 456 264 987 41 6941
1932-33 407 597 603 1515 1375 1332 1425 597 17 7868,
1933-34 204 1522 1279 1454 1049 1321 1429 1007 63 9328
1934-35 37 955 508 65 1401 1508 1509 399 17 6399
1935-36 144 1028 246 717 949 772 885 633 37 5411
1936-37 271 1145 1185 1262 470 537 841 363 65 6139
1937-38 151 850 651 736 865 1103 1473 192 21 60441
1938-39 303 1223 894 663 520 404 835 258 37 51371
1939-40 153 432 430 500 59 53 854 691 25 3197
1940-41 203 893 603 380 88 78 319 304 31 2899
1940-41* 357 1624 1528 1171 610 634 1262 1019 179 8384-
1941-42 17 525 884 501 144 103 410 560 101 3336W
1941-42* 72 1346 2299 1582 667 725 1378 1031 101 9202g
1942-43*- 127 882 1004 851 510 184 1063 1181 83 59431
* Truck included.
** No boat shipments, truck shipments unavailable. Freight and express.
carlot only.
$ 2 cars in July; I car in July; t 28 cars in July.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA


CABBAGE

Season Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Total
28-29 35 547 1076 1390 76 12 3136
1929-30 75 500 528 799 344 25 1 2272
1930-31 1 200 617 718 1106 569 46 6 3263
31-32 19 229 329 430 379 124 11 1521
1932-33 17 141 414 732 1054 418 97 2873
33-34 184 952 916 981 221 70 12 3336
34-35 1 26 45 179 1008 832 104 1 2196
1935-36 24 201 311 654 692 35 1917'
936-37 3 139 311 402 455 221 8 1539
937-38 1 72 252 709 1710 565 26 7 3342
1938-39 89 322 526 591 100 2 1630
939-40 3 153 587 611 954 1804 146 1 4259
940-41 2 61 263 243 623 855 222 1 2270
1940-41* 14 179 541 591 1166 1612 459 6 4568
941-42 167 406 748 1054 1072 120 1 3568
941-42* 1 232 865 1464 2133 2100 236 1 7032
942-43** 4 283 754 789 1593 889 205 17 4534
STruck included.
No record of any boat shipments, truck unavailable. Freight and c/1
express only.



CELERY

fSeason Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Total
928-29 1 651 2442 2565 2011 1124 37 8831
929-30 102 1329 2563 2338 2154 1219 147 9852
R930-31 73 996 1694 2210 2965 279 27 82451
931-32 336 1223 1649 1476 1987 1175 85 7931
932-33 38 1225 1403 1828 1568 885 40 6987
.933-34 34 901 1351 2173 2313 1527 44 8343
1934-35 15 336 1514 2136 2003 1218 29 7251
1935-36 1 681 1601 1940 2131 1068 158 7580
1936-37 29 1537 1461 1965 2332 1715 51 9090
1937-38 109 846 1507 2390 2136 1471 41 8500
1938-39 117 1073 1838 1744 1695 1505 59 8031
l939-40 36 1053 1362 2020 2413 971 31 7896
11940-41 396 1040 1091 1702 2372 1765 471 8837
1940-41* 447 1258 1379 2143 2754 1997 540 10518
1941-42 38 974 1378 2398 2299 1855 177 9119
1941-42* 47 1193 1706 2829 2660 1934 177 10546
1942-43** 580 1172 1569 2008 1506 1520 202 8557
* Truck included.
** No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail freight and express c/1
Shipments only.
1 car in July.






6 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



CUCUMBERS

Season Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Tot
1928-29 63 16 5 397 1221 483 2185
1929-30 5 106 54 9 202 581 30 98'1
1930-31 66 215 20 154 1097 83 1635
1931-32 37 82 10 22 85 14 379 49 678
1932-33 39 98 13 97 201 101 4 55
1933-34 57 151 68 5 5 200 338 4 828
1934-35 26 127 30 19 438 255 894
1935-36 19 210 46 5 1 256 273 26 83
1936-37 31 38 14 1 63 228 155 14 544
1937-38 20 93 26 109 920 275 1443
1938-39 41 127 16 135 282 294 895
1939-40 43 42 23 3 190 741 143 1185
1940-41 19 158 8 3 134 669 30 10211
1940-41* 64 280 28 7 5 3 320 1431 79 2217
1941-42 17 76 36 1 163 830 58 1181
1941-42* 78 180 82 8 4 5 330 1022 58 176 1
1942-41** 54 76 10 3 2 96 204 9 4615
Truck included.
** No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail Freight and express carlot
shipments.
$ 7 cars in July.


TOMATOES

Season Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Total
1928-20 392 586 1235 1589 1971 2036 125 7934'
1929-30 4 47 177 638 1379 1437 2560 215 6457
1930-31 130 400 387 457 562 494 2495 502 5427
1931-32 35 310 559 909 1890 1541 1016 24 62841
1932-33 28 308 608 1059 1824 1971 398 5 6201
1933-34 27 398 768 1114 1955 2057 1342 36 7697,
1934-35 4 219 314 9 16 1119 3732 1748 14 7175
1935-36 75 352 249 341 961 1008 2918 140 6044
1936-37 4 176 233 555 1117 1351 1306 829 56 56301
1937-38 76 214 181 1079 3597 4474 2053 7 116811
1938-39 11 141 317 763 1378 2211 2556 1382 15 8774
1939-40 65 288 334 20 1 345 3454 749 5256
1940-41 194 597 441 336 104 112 1662 246 36921
1940-41* 359 1013 993 732 429 363 2918 873 7680
1941-42 7 273 241 427 568 489 600 2266 164 5035,.
1941-42* 12 461 567 776 938 1070 1201 2550 164 7739 ,
1942-43** 1 290 523 492 753 362 375 1500 71 4367 I
* Truck included.
** No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail-Freight and express carlo,
shipments.
:1: 3 cars in July.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 7


POTATOES

Season Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Total
1.28-29 5 37 1013 2932 1061 7 8 5063
1929-30 2 30 183 543 1906 2068 23 23 4781*
1930-31 1 17 24 80 303 2186 4042 183 39 6877t
k931-32 7 7 39 204 887 647 721 62 31 2605
1932-33 11 195 751 1927 1107 35 8 4034
933-34 9 52 399 1086 2399 1704 43 13 5705
934-35 41 106 386 732 923 1718 21 5 3932
935-36 20 84 439 661 1659 1088 24 3985
936-37 4 119 372 976 1506 2709 1060 24 3 6773
937-38 95 207 777 1804 3352 1180 2 7417
1,938-39 1 106 353 689 1165 1652 1457 18 5441
939-40 37 261 275 393 1195 4052 79 6292
940-41 62 295 373 704 589 2098 82 1 4204
1940-41* 12 107 414 474 913 802 2452 94 4 5272
1:941-42 120 362 445 875 1085 2619 31 3 5540
1941-42* 3 157 504 542 1040 1351 2750 31 3 6381
1942-43** 69 385 499 714 30 1753 1305 1 4756
Truck included.
** No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail-Freight and express carlot
I shipments.
I 3 cars in August; 1 car in August; t 1 car in September.


PEPPERS

ISeason Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Total
1928-29 8 26 78 225 415 412 524 184 7 1879
q1929-30 28 98 77 80 242 344 473 318 11 1671
930-31 18 204 263 260 282 213 272 229 376 37 2154
1931-32 6 139 313 273 368 262 301 232 108 6 2008
1932-33 2 93 119 351 389 438 515 373 101 1 2382
1933-34 39 184 180 89 162 296 463 194 1 1608
1934-35 5 113 169 33 82 193 305 383 132 9 1424
935-36 39 56 87 21 127 510 731 386 24 1981
936-37 11 90 172 368 279 303 268 220 144 25 1880
937-38 5 102 159 141 207 463 568 603 209 2457
938-39 6 145 132 212 188 249 311 430 146 7 1826
i1939-40 6 85 106 104 29 3 33 119 243 29 757
1940-41 9 141 92 69 37 53 37 112 245 15 810
k1940-41* 13 225 226 208 180 215 178 391 556 63 2255
!1941-42 13 62 127 131 60 80 41 172 176 7 869
1941-42* 23 152 306 332 229 306 252 256 176 7 2039
1942-43** 16 218 263 206 142 80 127 187 102 11 1352
* Truck included.
* No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail-Freight and express carlot
shipments.





8 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



LETTUCE (Romaine included)

Season Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. Tota
1928-29 61 378 363 146 169 1117
1929-30 68 189 145 56 98 4 560
1930-31 52 244 189 205 221 29 940
1931-32 147 123 89 69 12 4401
1932-33 43 84 113 120 86 17 465,
1933-34 39 132 120 54 68 7 420
1934-35 55 50 72 82 53 4 316
1935-36 38 125 59 35 63 4 324
1936-37 13 96 116 53 42 1 321
1937-38 42 83 82 66 84 3 360
1938-39 22 66 79 51 12 3 233
1939-40 46 98 97 70 38 22 371
1940-41 8 63 52 48 39 18 235$5
1940-41* 9 85 86 77 106 90 467th
1941-42 2 16 31 66 22 9 147
1941-42* 3 33 56 110 66 26 296-
1942-43** 12 52 51 18 47 16 197
Truck included.
No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail-freight and express c/i ship.
Inents only.
S2 cars in May; 5 in June; f 7 in May; 1 7 in June; 1 in May


EGGPLANT

Season Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Tota:
1928-29 1 14 45 88 48 5 201
1929-30 21 42 2 4 2 2 11 53 61 9 207
1930-31 40 72 7 6 1 3 4 9 40 25 208"
1931-32 13 21 25 18 28 57 61 41 21 286{
1932-33 26 30 2 1 5 51 90 73 53 9 340
1933-34 13 6 9 18 11 8 56 102 47 3 273
1934-35 15 9 20 2 31 55 42 6 180;
1935-36 4 2 6 2 39 78 79 18 228
1036-37 14 15 18 19 5 15 28 39 69 18 240
1937-38 9 11 4 4 3 52 119 66 8 276f
1938-39 6 26 21 29 6 39 51 64 54 6 302
1939-40 1 1 2 1 6 11
1940-41 3 3 2 2 41 16 4 71
1940-41* 40 79 45 46 39 30 43 139 147 49 657
1941-42 4 4 1 9 8 8 29
1941-42* 55 127 91 62 35 29 59 39 8 3 508
1942-43** 3 9 9 4 17 51 82 175
* Truck included.
"* No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail-Freight and express carlol
shipments.
$ 1 car in September. 1 car in August.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 9


ESCAROLE


Nov. Dec Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Total


928-29 U NA V A I L AB LE
929-30 UNAVAILABLE BY MONTHS 693a
1930-31 715a
931-32 426a
1932-33 608a
1933-34 827a
934-35 "527a
935-36 615a
1936-37 788a
1[937-38 818a
1938-39 83 226 163 195 79 51 21 818
1939-40 62 165 204 161 135 106 50 883
C940-41 64 125 92 34 98 121 39 573
1940-41* 78 174 136 58 138 143 49 776
1941-42 33 159 161 157 197 88 23 818
941-42* 39 188 197 183 211 92 24 934
4942-43** 59 233 199 112 161 188 51 1003
STruck included.
** No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail freight and express c/1
shipments only.
Unofficial, no separate report, monthly shipments unavailable.


GREEN PEAS


Season
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1940-41*
1941-42
1941-42*
1942-43"^*


Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. Total
11 18 1 30
3 3 6
1 5 56 49 19 130
4 19 58 56 6 2 146t
1 16 119 144 51 331
99 285 262 93 5 7451
1 23 66 266 126 4 486
6 25 298 363 35 727
7 152 185 23 35 12 414
1 34 356 172 102 1 666
18 49 106 7 7 187
1 55 179 1 9 25 270
4 5 S 1 10 5 81
20 115 44 28 48 45 302
60 57 6 7 130
2 37 115 114 50 33 352t
18 72 21 2 2 115


* Truck included.
** No boat reported, truck passing unavailable. Rail-Freight and
express shipments.
t 1 car in June; 2 in May; 1 in May.


season






10 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE





STRAWBERRIES


Season Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Total
1928-29 1 172 675 706 73 6 1633
1929-30 107 359 439 594 174 48 1721
1930-31 16 194 442 772 393 45 1862
1931-32 146 599 531 225 222 37 1760
1932-33 71 511 936 421 127 18 2084
1933-34 30 396 511 618 274 1 1830
1934-35 3 112 686 407 155 1363
1935-36 8 83 155 593 233 10 1082
1936-37 9 488 447 193 132 2 1271
1937-38 121 592 195 10 6 924
1938-39 29 332 396 144 18 919
1939-40 1 6 127 89 223
1940-41 5 3 7 29 7 51
1940-41* 103 146 203 319 300 53 1124
1941-42 6 31 12 9 58
1941-42* 9 130 325 238 212 4 918
1942-43** 3 12 22 8 13 3 61
* Truck included.
** Truck unavailable. Rail and express carlot shipments.




WATERMELONS


Apr. May
36 3355
281
1
2 660
3 1587
303
1 1136
106
424
1 1548
1295
19
22
24
55
260


June July Aug. Total
6985 106 10,482
6726 1667 8,674
7843 1478 8 9,830
4256 365 40 5,323
2483 159 1 4,233
3235 308 1 3,847
4512 182 5,831
3379 403 1 3889
3346 461 2 4,233
3871 186 5,606
2070 58 3,423
3555 1419 2 4,995
4500 504 5,026
5307 071 0,002
5006 504 5,565
2800 303 3,363


* Truck included.
*a Road guard stations closed before truck shipments began.
* No boat reported, truck unavailable. Rail only.


Season
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1940-41*
1941-42*a
1.!)42-43**






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 11


Preliminary Summary
Florida Fruits and Vegetables for 1944-45 Season

By FRANK H. SCRUGGS
Market News Specialist
Florida State Marketing Bureau

Florida comes through again with a very successful fruit
and vegetable season after a discouraging start with a hurri-
cane last October. Many millions of boxes of citrus were
destroyed and many seed beds and fields of newly planted
vegetables were ruined.
While our total volume produced this season, figured in
carload equivalents, was only 239,000, as compared to 261,-
197 carloads in the 1943-44 season, still we got around $287.-
560,469, as compared to $294,633,098 for the 1943-44 crop.
This volume, of course, includes rail and truck shipments,
volume canned or otherwise processed, as well as local con-
sumption within Florida. The value is the estimated f.o.b.
Florida packed value of rail and truck shipments together
with the price delivered paid by canners and an estimated
value placed on the estimated local consumption.
All of our figures and estimated values will be checked and
double checked during the summer but we have enough data
on hand to say that we think the figures herein give a fairly
good picture of the 19144-45 fruit and vegetable season.
F.O.B. Returns in Florida
Our total production of citrus should approximate 156,520
carloads, worth around $201,560,469, packed f.o.b. Florida
points.
Our 1944-45 vegetable production should total around
72.000 carloads, with an f.o.b. packed value of $79,000,000,
as compared to 70,219 carloads and an $87,328.394 value in
the 1943-44 season.
Watermelons, strawberries, limes, avocados, etc. should
have a season volume (July to June, inclusive) of 11,000 car-
Sloads, worth around $7,000,000.
From the above estimates we obtain a total production of
fruits and vegetables which amounted to 239,000 carloads,
worth $287,560,469.






12 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Citrus
Average auction prices to May 26 were $4.46 for all
oranges, and $4.23 for grapefruit, and $4.83 for tangerines,
which is equivalent to approximately $3.54 and $3.35 and
$3.80, respectively. For 1943-44 season the average f.o.b.
return was estimated at $3.10 for oranges, $2.47 for grape-
fruit, and $3.70 for tangerines, and these include returns
from private sales as well as auction sales.
If we conclude that the total rail and truck carloads of
citrus had a gross f.o.b. value of $1,700, as compared to an
average f.o.b. value of $1,470 in 1943-44, we can estimate
that 72,683 rail and truck carloads will be worth $123,561,-
100, as compared to 92,614 carloads worth $136,183,033 in
the 1943-44 season.
If we conclude that 14,250,000 boxes of oranges were can-
ned at $2.70 per box at canning plants, for a total of $38,-
475,000, and 15,150,000 boxes of grapefruit at $1.95 per box,
for a total of $29,542,500, we have a combined total of $68,-
017,500, as compared to a similar total in 1943-44 of $53,-
523,794.
If we compare the total of $191,578,600 for rail, trucked
out, and canned citrus this year with the comparative total
of $189,706,827 for the 1943-44 season we see that the pres-
ent season will exceed that of 1943-44 by $1,871,773, ex-
cluding local State consumption.

We have not estimated the volume or value of the local or
Florida consumption, but the total gross value should not be
any lower than the $9,981,869 estimated for last year for 10,-
337 carloads.
Vegetables
There are no detailed records kept for prices of vegetables
as are kept for citrus by several agencies. We work on these
estimates during the summer by reviewing and studying the
day-to-day market prices in the terminal markets, by check-
ing with Florida sales agencies and government agencies,
particularly the U. S. Agricultural Statistician in Orlando.
Almost, with the exception of potatoes, each vegetable
has had its weak market period but this is usual in any sea-
son. Rail and truck shipments combined are herewith com-
pared to such combined shipments for the 1943-44 season.





FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 13

Beans have suffered most of the time, not so much from
demand at fair prices but because of unfavorable growing
conditions which caused much poor to fair quality to be
offered. A drop of 2,152 carloads from the 9,087 carloads
last year indicates the yield condition better than words.
Cabbage was in the doldrums practically all the season,
and the season was unsatisfactory for both volume and
prices. There was a drop of 1,906 carloads from the 8,494 in
the 1943-44 season.
Celery volume was very good, with an estimated 11,410
carloads, as compared to 9,750 carloads last year. Except
for one or two bad periods, the f.o.b. prices have been good.
Good quality brought very good prices in April and May
and June, but there was considerable ordinary to fair quality
at lower prices. The 11,800 acres were the heaviest of rec-
ord, and were approximately 50% more than before the War.
Cucumber shipments reached 1,421 carloads, as compared
to the unsatisfactory 1943-44 season, when only 654 carloads
were shipped. The f.o.b. prices have been about as much as
the law (O.P.A.) allows, more or less. The 1944-45 season
may be considered satisfactory, particularly as compared to
the light volume yield in the 1943-44 season.
Escarole showed an increase, with 1,340 carloads as com-
pared to 1,127 last year. The f.o.b. prices were unsatisfac-
tory much of the season. Escarole suffers from an over-
production in Florida as well as in other States. Similar
marketing conditions prevailed last year. Escarole may be
suffering from under consumption. It is a vegetable for
which native Americans need to acquire a taste. The entire
volume shipped from all States is probably less than 2,500
carloads.
Pepper carloads were 2,500, as compared to 2,647 last year.
Market demand at the ceiling prevailed much of the season
for good stock, but the dry weather caused poor quality in
some sections. This season was hardly as profitable as last
year, but it cannot be classed as a bad year for the State as
a whole.
Transportation
Freight and truck shipments of all fruits and vegetables
should be around 138,821 carloads, as compared to 154,716
carloads for the 1943-44 season.
Citrus, with an estimated 72,683 carloads, will be consider-
ably below last season's 92,455 carloads. Both oranges and
grapefruit out-of-State shipments were less, but tangerines





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


were around 300 carloads more than last season. Mixed
citrus, rail and truck carloads, were 2,746 carloads less than
the 1943-44 season.
O.D.T. regulations and embargos were a general but not a
ruinous handicap.
Vegetable out-of-State movement is estimated at 57,048
carloads, as compared to 55,191 carloads for the 1943-44
season. Beans, with 6,935 carloads, showed a decrease of
2,152, and cabbage with 6,588 showed a decrease of 1,906 car-
loads, but potatoes with 7,853 carloads in prospect should
show an increase of 2,145, and tomatoes with 8,335, an in-
crease of 571 carloads over the 1943-44 season. Mixed car
and miscellaneous vegetables with 9,562 carloads showed an
increase of 1,000 carloads. Cucumber movement of the
State amounted to 1,421 as compared to the light shipments
of 654 for the 1943-44 season. Escarole showed a 213 car-
load increase over the 1,127 carloads last year. Celery move-
ment of 11,410 carloads was 1,660 more than the 9,750 ship-
ped last year. Eggplant, peppers, lettuce and peas showed
a slight decrease from the 1943-44 season.
The strawberry rail and truck movement of 307 carloads
showed a 120 carload increase over the 1943-44 movement of
187 carloads or equivalent.
Watermelon shipments out-of-Florida for the 1943-44 sea-
son amounted to 6,683 carloads and we have a tentative
estimate of a surprising 8,613 carloads for this season. We
have shipped 6.110 by rail and truck as of June 15th, the date
of this summary.
A total of 9,090 carloads of fruits other than citrus is
estimated for this season as compared to 7,070 in the 1943-44
season. Truck movement of citrus will be around 4,873 as
compared to 7,027 carloads last year, vegetables 10,963 as
compared to 11,538, and for all fruits and vegetables 16,872
carloads as compared to 19,480 for the 1943-44 season.
Canning
Many readers will be surprised to know that the volume
of citrus canned will not be so far short of the record volume
of 31,341,811 boxes composed of 10,912,501 boxes of oranges
and 20,429,310 boxes of grapefruit in the 1943-44 season.
This summary is being written June 15 and the canning
season is not entirely over, but there are prospects of at least
14,250,000 boxes of oranges and 15,150,000 boxes of grape-
fruit, for a total of 29,400,000 boxes for the 1944-45 season.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 15

The average price paid by canners for oranges this season
is estimated at $2.70 as compared to $2.02, and grapefruit
at $1.95 as compared to $1.53 for the 1943-44 season.
Beans and tomatoes used for canning are not likely to
exceed the 3,200 carloads estimated for that purpose last
year. The prices paid this season for beans was around
$1.57 as compared to $1.37 per bushel in 1943-44. Canners
paid 59c per bushel for tomatoes last year, but it is doubtful
if any could be bought for less than $1.00 this year. The
tomato market for shipments has been excellent for most of
this 1944-45 season.
We will have more accurate information on canning some
time later, and this will be shown with the final 1944-45
season figures in our Annual Report to be released around
September 15.
For those who like to study comparative figures in tabular
form we show the 1943-44 and 1944-45 rail and truck ship-
ments.
1943-44 1944-45
Rail Truck Rail Truck
Oranges ..- ......... .... 51,405 5,240 40,880 3,657
Grapefruit _.....-...--..........-- 13,441 830 8,554 500
Tangerines .. ......... 3,856 957 4,396 716
Mixed ..... ......... ............. 16,726 13,980
TOTAL CITRUS --............... 85,428 7,027 67,810 4,873
Beans and Limas ................. 6.596 2,491 4,675 2,260
Cabbage ... 6,378 2,116 5,135 1,453
Celery .. ....- 9,349 401 11,010 403
Corn ...... -. ..---.. ------- 18 163 39 100
Cucumbers ----... 405 249 971 450
Eggplant ........-...--------- 246 480 280 350
Escarole .- .----...-.- 1,120 7 1,316 24
Lettuce .. ...... .. 207 54 145 51
Peas ..... .--- 153 77 84 55
Peppers -... .... ..-........... 1,805 842 1.600 00
Potatoes .- -. .......... 5,282 426 6.933 920
Tomatoes .__... --..............-- 4,592 3,172 5,335 3,000
Mixed & Miscl. Vgs-..-..-......... 7,502 1,060 8,562 1,000
Total Vegetables ...........--...... 43,653 11,538 46,085 10,963
Strawberries ..---... ----.- 23 164 44 263
Watermelons ---.. ....----------- 6,116 567 8,000 613
Other Fruits .-_..-.... .---.- 16 184 10 160
Total Non-Citrus -.............. 6,155 915 8,054 1,036
Total Vegetables and
Non-Citrus ......-..... 49,808 12,453 54,139 11,999
GRAND TOTAL .......... ........ 135,236 19.480 121.949 16,872





10 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



Weekly Business Review

Prepared by the Research Division
The Florida State Chamber of Commerce


Sunday, March 4, 1945

Production of vital metallic and non-metallic minerals in
Florida contributes appreciably to the war effort, the
research division of the Florida State Chamber of Commerce
reported today in its weekly business review.
Florida is not generally considered a mining state, yet in
1941 it produced $21,112,277 worth of mineral products. War
demands have increased this total considerably, especially
in the metallic field.
The state stands first in the nation in the production of
phosphate, mining 70 per cent of the nation's total. Produc-
tion in 1941 was 3,367,797 long tons valued at $10,239,778
at the mines. In 1943 value at the mines was $12,089,477.
Reports from the U. S. Bureau of Mines are in for only the
first six months of 1944. As usual, Florida led the five
phosphate producing states, the state's volume being more
than three times that of Tennessee, the second ranking
state.
Phosphate mining developed so rapidly in Florida after
its discovery in 1888 that the state soon took the lead in the
production of this commodity and has maintained the lead
ever since. Commercial production consists chiefly of land
pebble, found largely in Polk and Hillsborough counties, and
hard rock in a narrow belt in the west central part of the
state, centering at Dunnellon. With these two types is asso-
ciated a considerable portion of soft phosphate, large quan-
tities of which are now being marketed.
Florida has four metallic minerals in commercial quantity
and quality. They are ilmenite, rutile, zircon and monazite,
found in Florida's beach sands. Before the war ilmenite,
rutile and zircon were shipped in vast quantities from India
and Australia. When the war stopped shipments, Florida






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS CF FLORIDA 17

production was greatly enlarged. During the summer of
1944, 2,000 tons of ilmenite and 300 tons of rutile were being
mined monthly from operations near Jacksonville and this
volume was expected to be doubled in 1945. Value of rare
minerals reached an estimated $2,250,000 in 1944.
Production of commercial limerock in various parts of the
state reached 6,712,064 short tons, valued at $5,991,147 in
1942, according to the latest available figures. Coquina,
fuller's earth, kaolin, clay, sand and gravel, mineral waters
and oil contribute to the mineral production in the state.
Florida's commercial fishing industry stands today four
times greater in value than in 1930 and accounts for 12 per
cent of the nation's fishing business, the research division of
the Florida State Chamber of Commerce reported today in
its weekly business review.
Ranking high among the state's products, all phases of
the commercial fishing industry in Florida grossed $20,500,-
000 in 1943, an estimated more than $25,000,000 last year
and is expected to exceed $30,000,000 in 1945.
In 1943, the last year for which detailed figures are avail-
able, Florida's commercial fishermen caught 336,892,679
pounds of fish valued at the docks at $13,207,710. The 1930
catch of 120,415,000 pounds was worth 84,645,700. All
related by-products, such as shark liver oil. rich in vitamin
"A". sharkskin leather, shark steak and fillet, fish body oils,
principally menhaden and shark, fertilizer, poultry and ani-
mal feeds, buttons and novelties from fish scales and shells,
and tropical fish had an estimated value in 1943 of nearly
$5,000,000.
Some 10,000 fishermen are engaged in the fishing industry
in the state. Fresh and frozen fish are distributed by 246
wholesale establishments and 21 concerns manufacture sea-
foods and fish by-products. A fleet of more than 8,000 boats
sail Florida waters.
Although a late arrival in menhaden production, Florida
now accounts for 25 per cent of the dry scrap produced by
the entire menhaden industry. Leaders in this industry
visualize an expanded market for menhaden through re-
search, particularly in the development of fish cakes and
canned menhaden and roe for feeding needy foreign peoples
as well as for the development of a new home market.






18 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Research in dehydration resulted in the establishment of
a new mullet dehydration plant at Fort Myers last October.
The plant cost $120,000 and has a daily capacity of 60,000
pounds. Double production in 1945 is expected.
Related to the fishing industry is a new agar-agar plant at
Jensen. The plant will cost $20,000 and will have an initial
capacity of from 100 to 200 pounds of dried agar daily, using
from 1,000 to 2,000 pounds of seaweed.

With much needed improvement in merchandising in addi-
tion to these new developments, the fish industry may be
relied upon to contribute increasingly to the state's economy.
The average man will not read the attached mass of figures
so I have summarized the data as follows:
Boxes
Season 1913-1914 thru 1916-1917 (Before the U. S.
entered War): Common average Florida Or-
ange Auction Price .. ......... $2.97
Average total shipments Florida and California 24.811.660
Season 1917-1918 thru 1919-1920--War Years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $5.14
Average total shipments Florida and California 19,190,661
Season 1920-1921 thru 1923-1924--4 years after
the War: Common average Florida Orange
Auction Price ..............._. ... .$........... $3.99
Average total shipments Florida and California 29,313,502
Season 1924-1925 thru 1927-1928-4 years: Com-
mon average Florida Orange Auction Price_ $4.69
Average total shipments Florida and California 30,314.697
Season 1928-1929 thru 1931-1932-4 years: Com-
mon average Florida Orange Auction Price .. $3.62
Average total shipments Florida and California 10,554.410
Season 1932-1933 thru 1935-1936-4 years: Com-
mon average Florida Orange Auction Price. $2.67
Average total shipments Florida and California 42,450.731
Season 1936-1937 thru 1939-1940-4 years: Com-
mon average Florida Orange Auction Price... $2.47
Average total shipments Florida and California 50,532,294
Season 1940-1941 thru 1942-1943-3 years: Com-
mon average Florida Orange Auction Price..... 2.99
Average total shipments Florida and California 59,199,231

C. A. GARRETT.


July 18, 1944


Kissimmee, Florida.







FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA


ORANGE SHIPMENTS IN BOXES


Seasons
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
*1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
*1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
*1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
*1934-35
1935-30
*1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
*1939-40
*1940-41
19.11-42
*1942-43


Florida


.468
.79
1.12
1.56
1.94
1.23
1.18
1.45
1.62
.81
1.36
1.46
1.13
2.45
.675
1.70
5.36
1.28
.36
.64
.37
.78
.91
.29
.27
.14
.60
.70
1.17


5,570,715
5,626,260
5,222,955
4,558,830
3,075,530
5,275,100
6,612,480
7,495,200
6.821,280
9,032,760
12,358,800
9,308,520
7,467,840
8,868,240
7,065,360
13,574,520
7,664,0140
15,736,610
10,834,176
13,464,485
14,511,496
14,010,560
14,236,916
17,190,976
21,679,591
27,422,640
19,582,760
22,539,382
21,134,711
28,927,202


$2.89
2.67
3.19
3.14
5.12
4.89
5.40
3.77
4.97
4.16
3.06
4.71
4.61
3.81
5.62
3.15
4.62
3.40
3.30
2.44
2.70
2.56
3.00
3.22
2.24
2.09
2.35
2.36
2.83
3.79


California


20,931,372
18,303,054
17,508,414
21,525,042
7,908,978
18,216,198
16,483,698
22,319,682
13,662,726
23,546,292
22,007,370
17,407,698
23,113,860
26,409,306
21,677,964
33,878,922
21,161,448
30,394,056
28,973,868
26,662,944
25,245,528
33,677,028
27,993,966
20,264,244
34,552,518
27,833,190
33,601,260
34,111,852
38,548,356
32,755,316


$2.82
3.05
3.46
3.36
5.07
4.96
5.15
4.18
5.42
3.92
3.81
5.48
4.79
4.84
5.62
4.38
5.69
3.82
3.25
2.94
3.14
3.27
3.34
4.07
3.12
2.82
3.07
3.17
3.58
5.23


Total
26,502,087
23,929,314
22,731,369
26,083,872
10,984,508
23,491,298
23,096,178
29,814,882
20.484,006
32,579,052
34,366,170
26,716,218
30,581,700
35,277,546
28,743,324
47,453,442
28,825,488
46,130,666
39,808,044
40,127,429
39,757,024
47,687,588
42,230,882
37,455,220
56,232,109
55,255,830
53,184,020
56,651,234
59,683,067
61,682,518


The first figures to the right of the Seasons are the "on the tree"
price I received from my Seedling Oranges. The last figures after the
totals represent the National Non:Agricultural index for that season.
The auction averages, both California and Florida, are for the period
when Florida fruit is on the market, October through July. The
shipments for both California and Florida are shown in the totals.

*Freeze February 1917 Freeze January 1927 Freeze December
1934 Freeze January 1937 Freeze January 1940 Freeze No-
vember 1940-Freeze February 1943.
*"Med-Fly.

Two storms in the summer of 1928.

I am not a prophet, or the son of a prophet. I will leave the reader
to guess what will happen to citrus prices after the close of World War
II. Will the price hold up as it did after the First World War? Note
the total production of oranges and the Florida average price for the







20 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


seasons 1919-1920. Then note the Florida average five years later and
again ten years later. For the season 1920-21 Florida canned 2,000
boxes of citrus. Through July 8 this season 31,019,410 boxes were
canned. At the close of World War I the National Debt was some 29
billions. It is estimated that by June 30, 1945 the National Debt will
reach 258 billions. The amount of War Saving Bonds and Stamps held
by the average consumer is not known. My guess is it will total many
billions and will be a potent factor in the purchasing power of the con-
sumer after the War.
Compiled from statistical records of the Florida Citrus Exchange.

C. A. GARRETT,
July 18, 1944 Kissimmee, Florida.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 21



TABLE OF CITRUS SHIPMENTS IN BOXES


Florida California Texas
Grapefruit
Season All Citrus Oranges Only Only
1886-87 1,260,000 840,000 0
1893-94 5,055,367 2,230,960 0
1894-95 Freeze Dec. & Feb. 2,808,187 1,908,360 0
1895-96 147,000 2,878,500 0
1902-03 1,147,491 8,921,220 0
1916-17 Freeze Feb. 7,648,995 21,525,042 0
1918-19 8,770,640 18,230,947 0
1917-18 5,581,610 7,908,976 0
1925-26 13,781,660 21,915,945 200,000
1920-27 Freeze Jan. 16,695,168 24,999,024 361.000
1927-28 13,696,720 20,328,640 524,000
1928-29 Medfly 24,229,760 33,898,626 753,000
1929-30 14,152,680 19.196.066 1.510.000
1930-31 29,831,815 32.728.752 1.153.000
1933-34 23,877.244 25.711.851 1,055.352
1934-35 Freeze Dec. 24,383,092 38.818.521 1,983.021
1935-36 23,038.281 30,414.593 2,069,268
1936-37 Freeze Jan. 30,774,852 19.450.000 6.589.668
1937-38 31.584,937 30,170,000 6,655,383
1938-39 42,173,127 27,833,190 7.487.190
1939-40 Freeze Jan. 28.074.986 33,001.260 7.261.200
1940-41 Freeze Nov. 34.507.849 34,116.852 7.034.000
1941-42 31,477.148 38.608,476 7.558.400
1942-43 Freeze Feb. 41,582,596 33.860.211* 8,803,218
1915-16 8.370.045 17,508,414 0

*As of October 31, 1943.
Florida: Includes rail. boat and truck shipments. California: 1918-19
through 1942-43 furnished by the California Fruit Growers Exchange
and represents rail and boat shipments. Prior shipments from rail-
road reports. Texas: 1933-34 through 1942-43 are rail, boat and truck
shipments-prior seasons, production.
Compiled from statistical bulletins of the Florida Citrus Exchange.


The effect of a freeze on citrus production in Florida is indicated
in the table above. Note how quickly Florida recovers production
within two years after a freeze, except after the disastrous winter of
1894-95. Not until nine years after those two freezes did Florida ship-
ments amount to more than a million boxes.
In addition to the freezes noted, I recall several storms during the
seasons 1921-22; 1926-27; two in 1927-28; and in 1933-34. Some were
more or less localized while others affected a large area of citrus
Florida.
This picture is not complete without the record of storms and freezes
in Texas and California. Unfortunately, that information was not






22 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

available at the time of this report. I have written numerous letters
to both Texas and California attempting to secure this data. The infor-
mation I have received in reply has been incomplete.

November 3, 1943. CHAS. A. GARRETT.
Kissimmee, Florida.


Dr. II. G. Hamilton kindly arranged the non-agricultural income
index for the thirty years covered in these tables using one base for
the entire period. I had four sets of figures using four bases and I
found it difficult to connect them up.
C. A. GARRETT,
August 23, 1944. Kissimmee, Florida.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 23


The average man will not read the attached mass of figures
so I have summarized the data as follows:
Boxes
Season 1913-1914 thru 1916-1917 (Before the U.S.
entered the War):
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price.... $2.97
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California ....................................... 24,811,660
National Debt at close of 1917, $2,975,618,586.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1916-17, 56%.
Season 1917-18 thru 1919-1920-War Years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $5.14
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California ... ..._.. ..........-_. .. .. .... 19,190,661
National Debt at close of 1920, $24,297,918,412.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1919-1920, 81.2%.
Season 1920-21 thru 1923-1924-4 years after the War:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price ... $3.99
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California ....-.. ............ ...- ..-... __... ..... 29,311,028
National Debt at close of 1924, $21,251,120,427.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1923-1924, 90.2%.
Season 1924-1925 thru 1927-1928-4 years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $4.69
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California ...... ......... ... ......... .... 30,314,697
National Debt at close of 1928, $17.604,290,583.00
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1927-1928, 102.6%.
Season 1928-1929 thru 1931-1932-4 years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $3.62
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California -._.-. ................._. __. .. ... 40,554,410
National Debt at close of 1932, $19,487,009,766.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1931-1932, 73.5%.
Season 1932-1933 thru 1935-1936-4 years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $2.67
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California -..-.....- .. ........--_....................... 42,450,731
National Debt at close of 1936, $33,778,543,494.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1935-1936, 84.8%.
Season 1936-1937 thru 1939-1040-4 years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $2.47
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California --_ __............... -.. __ .. ......... 50,531,794
National Debt at close of 1940, $42,967,531,037.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index 1939-1940, 100.1%.
The Government purchased Season of 1937-38,
825,000 boxes; 1938-39, 209,000 boxes; 1939-40,
859,000 boxes.






24 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Season 1940-1941 thru 1942-1943--3 years:
Common average Florida Orange Auction Price $2.99
Average total yearly shipments Florida and
California _-.........--....... 59,338,923
National Debt at close of 1943, $136,696,090,330.00.
Non-Agricultural Income Index, 1942-1943, 180.4%.
Season 1940-41 the Government purchased 95,000
boxes; 1941-42, 77,000 boxes; 1942-43, 3,482,000
boxes.
The O.P.A. placed a ceiling on Florida oranges on
January 11, 1943.
The reason I compiled all the figures was to find out, if possible, why
I received $2.45 "on-the-tree" for my Seedling oranges nine years
after the close of the First World War.

C. A. GARRETT,
August 24, 1944 Kissimmee, Florida.






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 25


RECORD OF THIRTY YEARS OF TOTAL INTERSTATE
ORANGE SHIPMENTS IN BOXES WITH YEARLY
AVERAGE AUCTION PRICES

sons Florida Auc. Av. California Auc. Av. Total


I 1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
*1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
*1926-27
1927-28
S1928-29
'*1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
!*1934-35
1935-36
I 1936-37
*1937-38
1938-39
1*1939-40
*1940-41
1941-42
*1942-43


.468
.79
1.12
1.56
1.94
1.23
1.18
1.45
1.62
.81
1.36
1.46
1.13
2.45
.675
1.70
.536
1.28
.36
.64
.37
.78
.91
.29
.27
.14
.60
.70
1.17


5,570,715
5,626,260
5,222,955
4,558,830
3,075,530
5,275,100
6,612,480
7,495,200
6,821,280
9,032,760
12,358,800
9,308,520
7,467,840
8,868,240
7,065,360
13,574,520
7,664,040
15,736,610
10,834,176
13,464,485
14,511,496
14,010,560
14,236,916
17,190,976
21,679,591
27,422,640
19,582,760
22,539,382
21,134,711
28,927,202


$2.89
2.67
3.19
3.14
5.12
4.89
5.40
3.77
4.97
4.16
3.06
4.71
4.61
3.81
5.62
3.15
4.62
3.40
3.30
2.44
2.70
2.56
3.00
3.22
2.24
2.09
2.35
2.36
2.83
3.79


20,931,372
18,303,054
17,508,414
21,525,042
7,908,978
18,216,198
16,483,698
22,319,682
13,662,726
23,546,292
22,007,370
17,407,698
23,113,860
26,409,306
21,677,964
33,878,922
21,161,448
30,394,056
28,973,868
26,662,944
25,245,528
33,677,028
27,993,966
*20,264,244
34,552,518
27,833,190
33,601,260
34,111,852
38,548,356
32,755,316


$2.82
3.05
3.46
3.36
5.07
4.96
5.15
4.18
5.42
3.92
3.81
5.48
4.79
4.84
5.62
4.38
5.69
3.82
3.25
2.94
3.14
3.27
3.34
4.07
3.12
2.82
3.07
3.17
3.58
5.23


26,502,087
23,929,314
22,731,369
26,083,872
10,984,508
23,491,298
23,096,178
29,814,882
20,484,006
32,579,052
34,366,170
26,716,218
30,581,700
35,277,546
28,743,324
47,453,442
28,825,488
46,130,666
39.808,044
40,127,429
39,757,024
47,687,588
42,230,882
37,455,220
56,232,109
55,255,830
53,184,020
56,651,234
59,683,067
61,682,518


46%
47
55
64
75
81
81.2
75.5
72.9
84.4
90.2
93.1
99.6
101.8
102.6
106.3
104.4
91.6
73.5
62.3
69.7
74.8
84.8
94.6
89.7
90.6
100.1
120.4
148.4
180.4


Total shipments and auction prices compiled from statistical records of the
florida Citrus Exchange. The first figures to the right of the Seasons are the
!'on-the-tree" prices I received from my Seedling Oranges. The last figures
after the totals represent the National Non-Agricultural index for that season
-Source, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The auction averages, both Cali-
fornia and Florida, are for the period when Florida fruit is on the market-
hctober through July. The shipments for both California and Florida are
shown in the totals and are for the entire season.

*Freeze, February 1917; Freeze, January 1927; Freeze, December 1934;
reeze, December 1937; Freeze, January 1940; Freeze, November 1940; Freeze,
February 1943. A disastrous freeze occurred in California January 1937. Two
Iorms in the summer of 1938.
.*Med-Fly.

The first World War started in 1914. We entered that War April 6, 1917.
rhe Armistice was signed November 11, 1918. U.S. declared war against Ger-
many and Japan in December 1941. The Wall Street crash occurred October
1929.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Florida had an auction pre-rate season 1934-35 No control of shipmen
was attempted after the freeze of 1934. The agreement was suspended tl
summer of 1935. The next agreement was in 1936-37. A volume pro-rate wil
past performance and current control as the base was only used (volume pr
ration) once before December 26, 1936. The agreement was suspended tl
Spring of 1937. The present agreement, grade and size, was first used in tl
Spring of 1939 and is still in effect.
MY CANNING RECORD -Field boxes used for canning oranges-1935-3
212,744; 1936-37, 550,377; 1937-38, 1,108,910; 1938-39, 1,183,870; 1939-4
3,952,111; 1940-41, 3,848,538; 1941-42, 3,896,026; 1942-43, 6,284,740.
I am not a prophet, or the son of a prophet. I will leave the reader to guei
what will happen to citrus prices after the close of World War II. Will tl
price hold up as it did after the First World War? Note the total shipments <
oranges and the Florida average price for the seasons 1919-1920. Then note tl
Florida average five years later and again ten years later. For the seas(
1920-21 Florida canned 2,000 boxes of citrus. Through July 8 this season 31
019,410 boxes were canned. At the close of World War I the National Del
was some 24 billions. It is estimated that by June 30, 1945 the National Del
will reach 258 billions. The amount of War Saving Bonds and Stamps held 1
the average consumer is not known. My guess is it will total many billions all
will be a potent factor in the purchasing power of the consumer after the Wa

C. A. GARRETT, I


August 24, 1944


Kissimmee, Florida






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 27


FLORIDA AND CALIFORNIA ORANGES
Commercial Shipments /1 and Ten Auction Average Price


FLORIDA CALIFORNIA
1943-44 1944-45 1944-45 1943-44
SShip- Ship- Ship- Ship-
e eek mnents Auct. ments Auct. ments Auct. ments Auct.
Finding Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Cars Avg.
Sept. 30 _._.... 1 $ 54 $ 1625 S 1896 $5.83
act. 7 ....... 1 392 1480 1843 5.85
,et. 14 ... 49 1062 4.45 1264 1581 5.85
t. 21 ... 342 4.20 1003 4.31 842 5.42 *1850 5.86
et. 28 ..._ 871 4.37 840 5.42 *1500
ov. 4 ...__.1579 4.36 590 5.42
Mov 11 -. 2053 4.30 295 5.42
otes: /1 "Commercial Shipments"-For Florida includes rail, truck, and
proportion of mixed cars.
For California includes all domestic shipments-Subject to correction.
Estimate.





FLORIDA ORANGES
Early, Midseason and Valencias


1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45

Seasons Shipments (cars) _.- 58,080 52,335 60,021 68,619
Whipped to Oct. 21st _......_ 634 86 366 393 2,511

left for Shipment..--.......... 57.446 52,249 59,655 68,226
SShipped to Date (Oct. 21) 1.1% % 2% .6% .6%
auction Average to Date ..__. 2.55 83.48 $3.91 $4.20 $4.35
auction Average from Date $2.35 $2.83 $3.79 $3.90
Computed from U. S .D. A. Crop Estimate.
Figures are for interstate and intrastate commercial shipments exclusive of
government purchases.
SSource: Compiled by Growers Administrative Committee from records of
Federal-State Market News Service and the Florida Citrus Exchange.






28 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FLORIDA AND TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT

Commercial Shipments /1 and Ten Auction Average Price


FLORIDA
1944-45


1943-44


*TEXAS
1944-45


Week
Ending


Ship-
ments Auct.
Cars Avg.


Sept. 16 1
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 7 .. 6
Oct. 14 149
Oct. 21 ..-. 339
Oct. 28 380
Nov. 4 .-- 442
Nov. 11 __ 611


Ship-
ments Auct.
Cars Avg.


Ship-
ments
Cars


3.65 65
3.45 509
679
811
1017


Auct.
Avg.


3.48
3.54


Ship-
ments Auct.
Cars Avg1




313
1024


Notes: /1 "Commercial Shipments"-For Florida and Texas includes rail, trucl
and proportion of mixed cars.
* Texas shipments subject to correction account of late truck reports.


FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT.
Seeded and Seedless


1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-4


Seasons Shipments (cars) -
Shipped to Oct. 21..


22,496
1,458


18,875
970


Left for Shipment .-..._...... 21,038 17,905
% shipped to Date (Oct. 21) 6.5% 5.1%
Auction Average to Date .....-- $1.90 $2.51
Auction Average from Date_ $1.91 $2.52
Notes: t Computed from U. S. D. A. Crop Estimate.


18,888
1,288

17,600
6.8%
S2.61
$3.15


19,496
495

19,001
2.5%
$3.67
$3.56


2,21


* Figures are for interstate and intrastate commercial shipments exclusive I
government purchases.
Source: Compiled by Growers Administrative Committee from records
Federal-State Market News Service and the Florida Citrus Exchange.


1943-44






FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA


ESTIMATED DISPOSITION OF FLORIDA CITRUS
(in 1 3/5 bu. boxes)
Disposition of early, midseason and Valencia Oranges, 1942-43
and 1943-44 seasons.
Disposition to January 15th: 1942-43 Season 1943-44 Season
interstate Shipments _..._ .....__... ... 8,211,073 11,000,000
Express Shipments ........... -- ......................- 170,800 260,000
government Purchases, Fresh -................
government Purchases, Processed ...... ....
itrastate Shipments _...- ...... 146,536 150,000
exports .........-- -.-........ --- 1,498
aterstate By-Products _............- 24,424 25,000
annery, Commercial _.---.-..- ...------------- 1,310,495 1.130,000
intrastate, Non-Commercial ...-.. .._ 512,939 675,000
TOTALS ................---------.......... ...... 10,377,765 13,240,000
U. S. D. A. Crop Estimate ---......-......-....-- 37,200,000 39,500,000
remainder of Crop ..........- .-...--.... 26,822,235 26,260,000
r Disposition of seeded and seedless Grapefruit, 1942-43 and 1943-44
seasons.
Disposition to January 15th: 1942-43 Season 1943-44 Season
interstate Shipments ..._ .................. 2,456,744 2,720,000
press Shipments .................- -- 54,800 65,000
government Purchases, Fresh .......... -
:overnment Purchases, Processed ......---
ntrastate Shipments ............-...-.................. 46,906 55,000
exportss ................. ----
nterstate By-Products ...... ---........... 3,523 16,000
Cannery, Commercial ...... -.-. ..............- 6,729,422 4,400,000
Intrastate. Non-Commercial -.....-........ 317,252 255,000
TOTALS ____..... .....-... 9,608,647 7,511,000
S. D. A. Crop Estimate ._.... ........... .. 27,300,000 25,000,000
Remainder of Crop ....-.....-.......---.. ....--.-_-- 17,691,353 17,489,000
Tote: Disposition for last two weeks of 1943-44 season is Estimated.
SCompiled by Growers Administrative Committee.

FLORIDA ORANGES
Early, Midseason and Valencias
1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44
seasons Shipments (Cars) 48,322 58,080 52,335 59,880 t164,000
(Shipped to Jan. 15th .......-. 26,100 21,652 16,804 17,840 23,122
Left for Shipment _. 22,142 36,428 35,531 42,040 40,878
%/o Shipped to Date (Jan. 15) 54.2% 37.3% 32.1% 29.8% 36.1%
Auction Average to Date $1.89 $2.12 $2.57 $3.62 $3.68
Auction Average from Date $2.69 $2.44 $2.91 $3.88
Approximate Number of Boxes
Per Car to Date (Rail and Truck) 480 490
Computed from U. S. D. A. crop estimate.
Figures are for inter and intrastate commercial shipments exclusive of
government purchases.
Source: Compiled by Growers Administrative Committee from records of
Federal-State Market News Service and the Florida Citrus Exchange.






30 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FLORIDA AND CALIFORNIA ORANGES
Commercial Shipments /1 and Ten Auction Average Price
(Government Purchases Excluded and Shown in Parenthesis)
FLORIDA CALIFORNIA
1942-43 1942-43 1943-44 1943-44
Ship- Ship- Ship- Ship-
Week ments Auct. ments Auct. ments Auct. ments Auctj
Ending Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Cars Avg.1
Oct. 2 2 $ 1 $ 1776 $5.31 1625 $5.4'
Oct. 9 12 2 1597 5.57 1480 5.41
Oct. 16 44 3.91 50 1541 5.37 1264 5.4;
Oct. 23 307 3.91 348 4.20 1416 5.34 842 5.4;
Oct. 30 __ 723 3.95 883 4.38 1138 5.32 840 5.4:
Nov. 6 958 4.09 1516 4.36 903 5.40 590 5.4'
Nov. 13 ___1182 3.66 1978 4.30 713 5.54 295 5.41
Nov. 20 _.1421 3.82 2551 4.27 591 5.89 508 5.4J
Nov. 27 ___ 1225 3.50 2406 4.17 567 5.83 1251
Dec. 4 -____ 1362 3.16 2035 3.54 1025 5.70 1904 5.31
Dec. 11 .._...1925 3.90 2606 3.52 1642 6.51 2231 5.3(
Dec. 18 .. 2975 5.08 2826 3.67 1598 7.00 1647 5.3'
Dec. 25 __..1339 4.37 1350 4.00 1086 6.41 1832 5.3'
Jan. 1 __1146 3.70 1203 3.84 1284 4.64 1561 5.1
Jan. 8 1728 3.15 1618 3.41 1499 3.86 1538 4.3
Jan. 15 __- 1491 2.57 1749 3.38 1309 3.56 *1110 3.7;
Jan. 22 __ 1372 2.67 1191 3.75 *1290
Jan. 29 .......1572 2.97 622 4.59
Feb. 5 ___ 1689 3.13 1169 4.76
Notes: /1 "Commercial Shipments"-For Florida includes rail, truck anc
proportion of mixed cars.
For California includes all domestic shipments-subject to corrections.
* Interstate prorate plus estimated intrastate shipments of 250 cars.

FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT
Seeded and Seedless
1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44
Seasons Shipments (cars) 16,154 22,496 18,875 18,893 t19,00(
Shipped to Jan. 15th -.....-...-- 8,265 7,661 6,138 5,824 5,80E
Left for Shipment ...._... 7,889 14,835 12,737 13,069 13,19]
% Shipped to Date (Jan. 15) 51.2% 34.1% 32.6% 30.8% 30.6%
Auction Average to Date $2.08 $1.84 $2.30 $2.74 $3.46
Auction Average from Date $2.17 $1.94 $2.62 $3.31
1942-43 1943-44
Approximate number of boxes
per car to date (rail apd truck) 440 49(
Notes: t Computed from U. S. D. A. Crop Estimate.
* Figures are for inter and intrastate commercial shipments exclusive ol
government purchases.
Source: Compiled by Growers Administrative Committee from records oJ
Federal-State Market News Service and the Florida Citrus Exchange.







FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA 31


FLORIDA AND TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT
Commercial Shipments /1 and Ten Auction Average Price
(Government Purchases Excluded and Shown in Parenthesis)


1942-43
Shin-


FLORIDA
1942-43
Shin-


*TEXAS
1943-44 1943-44


jeek ments Auct. ments Auct. ments Auct. me
ending Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Cars Avg. Ca
pt. 18 __ $ 1 $ $
ept. 26 0
t. 2 5 4
t. 9 -...... 187 3 328
t. 16 ....... 591 3.36 153 631 4.05
let. 23 .... 506 2.30 338 3.67 546 3.14 5
-t. 30 347 2.15 377 3.57 629 2.66 6
oV. 6 311 2.78 439 3.53 693 2.79 8
iov. 13 .... 362 3.07 612 3.92 692 3.03 10
ov. 20 409 3.26 531 3.58 753 2.87 9
ov. 27 ... 385 2.76 482 3.56 603 2.68 7
c. 4 _...335 2.50 389 3.23 586 2.44 5
ec. 11 336 2.79 359 3.23 716 2.58 8:
ec. 18 3... 77 3.44 363 3.54 654 2.90 5
ec. 25 262 3.32 197 3.95 357 2.81 3'
in. 1 399 3.33 378 3.95 512 2.74 4'
an. 8 487 2.84 555 3.63 379 2.84 8'
n. 15 ...... 524 2.51 632 3.15 644 3.05 81
n. 22 ...... 527 2.67 1089 2.94
an. 29 -.-5..- 543 2.65 928 2.88
.eb 5 ... 528 2.64 801 2.61
totes: /1 "Commercial Shipments"-For Florida includes rail,
proportion of mixed cars.
ITexas Shipments subject to correction account of late truck reports.


ip-
nts
rs


65
09
79
11
17
58
60
45
38
82
69
76
01
00


Auct.
Avg.






3.48
3.54
3.46
3.02
2.70
2.98
3.04
3.07
3.00
3.01
3.11


truck and


FLORIDA TANGERINES
S1 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44
masons Shipments (cars) 5,282 5.742 4,536 7,473 t6,500
hipped to Jan. 15th ........ 4,778 3,906 3,250 4.009 5,494

eft for Shipment ... 504 1,836 1,286 3.464 1,006
o Shipped to Date (Jan. 15) 90.4% 68.0% 71.6% 53.6% 84.5%
Auction Average to Date ** $2.67 82.47 $3.47 $3.64 $4.40
auction Average from Date $3.08 $2.27 $3.76 $3.56
'pproximate Number of Boxes
Per Car to Date (rail & truck) 490 480
I Computed from U. S. D. A. crop estimate.
Figures are for inter and intrastate commercial shipments.
*All prices are based on 1-3/5 bu. standard box.
Source: Compiled by Growers Administrative Committee from records of
Federal-State Market News Service and the Florida Citrus Exchange.


Sh


Shin_





32 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



FLORIDA TANGERINES
Commercial Shipments /1 and Ten Auctions
Average Price

1939-40 1940-41 1911-42 1942-43 1943-441
Week Ship- Auct. Ship- Auct. Ship- Auct. Ship- Auct. Ship- Auct
Ending ments Avg. ments Avg. ments Avg. ments Avg. ments Av{
Oct. 30 106 $1.92 S $ $ 1 $
Nov. 6 ...__ 111 3.12 13 3
Nov. 13 .. 393 3.00 95 4.25 3 14 4.68 8
Nov. 20 ... 357 2.90 266 4.06 58 5.18 68 6.54 31 4.
Nov. 27 .. 514 2.52 385 3.23 235 4.00 231 6.30 90 4.1
Dec. 4 .... 509 2.36 491 2.76 380 3.58 518 4.90 411 4.7
Dec. 11 .. 714 2.64 577 2.54 426 3.68 522 4.64 952 4.
Dec. 18 .. 634 2.92 547 2.63 560 4.44 557 5.68 918 4.
Dec. 25 .. 254 2.98 268 2.85 493 4.32 673 6.12 889 4.
Jan. 1 476 3.02 688 2.24 399 3.16 586 3.38 655 4.
Jan. 8 .- 320 2.48 314 1.58 342 2.50 459 2.08 886 4.
Jan. 15 307 2.30 262 1.73 354 2.54 378 2.26 653 4.
Jan. 22 .. 198 2.55 300 2.12 312 2.86 469 3.46
Jan. 29 144 3.22 370 2.17 253 3.26 644 3.80
Feb. 5 35 3.30 280 2.27 228 3.42 655 3.34
Notes: /1 "Commercial Shipments" includes rail, truck and proportion i
mixed cars.
* All prices are based on 1-3/5 bu. standard box.




1943 1944

DISPOSITION OF FLORIDA CITRUS

(in 1 3/5 bu. boxes)


VALENCIA OlRA
Total Toll
Week Ending Seas
1/-1


Interstate Shipments .........
Express Shipments .. .
Gov't Purch., Fresh
Gov't Purch., Proces'd
Intrastate Shipments .....
Exports ....... ._........ .....
Interstate By-Prod'ts ._._
Cannery, Commercial _-...
Intrastate, Non-Com. _.....


TOTALS ....... .......... ......
Remainder of Crop 17,500,000

Remaining last Year 18,100,000


EARLY & MIDSEASON
NGES ORANGES
d This Total Total This
on to Week Ending Season to
1/2 M: /A
557,675 9,350,848
.. 35,400 209,400


SEEDED GRAPEFRUIT SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT


Tota
eek Ei

82
6


15,909 108,330 4

2,500 13,350 2
124,825 761,596 484
34,000 572,000 10

770,309 11,015,624 591
10,984,376

10,641,086


LI Total Thii Total
hiding Season to Week Ending

;,825 1,439,292 74,539
;,900 22,800 6,900

,203 33,132 1,601

,760 10,620
,693 2,123,922 121,173
,350 184,950 3,066

,731 3,814,716 207,279

9,685,284 10,20
10,929,490 9,49


TANGERINES


Total This Total
Season to Week Ending

701.440 295,243
22,800 18,400


12,812 2,643


529,292
29,040 25,500

1,295,384 341,786


1,44
2,47


'4,616
7,051


Released by Growers Administrative Committee, Lakeland,
Florida.
Source: Inter, intrastate and export shipments-Citrus
Inspection Bureau.
Express-Federal-State Market News Service.
Interstate By-Products and Cannery-Florida Citrus
Commission.


* According to U. S. D. A. crop estimate released
January 10, 1944.


Total IThis
Season to

1,789,510
99,000


14,221


151,750

2,054,481

15,519
9,195








1944-1945

DISPOSITION OF FLORIDA CITRUS
(in 1 3/5 bu. boxes)


VALENCIA ORAt
Total Tota
Week Ending Seas
10/8 1


Interstate Shipments....
Express Shipments _-
Gov't Purch., Fresh....
Gov't Purch., Proces'd
Intrastate Shipments
Exports -.. ....-
Interstate By-Prod'ts
Cannery, Commercial -
Intrastate, Non-Com.


TOTALS --- .

Remainder of Crop* 25,000,000


NGES


EARLY & MIDSEASON
ORANGES


Il This Total
on to Week Ending
0/8 10/8
193,910


3,250


9,840

207,000


SEEDED GRAPEFRUIT SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT


TANGERINES


Total This Total Total This Total Total This Total Total This
Season to Week Ending Season to Week Ending Season to Week Ending Season to
10/8 10/8 10/8 10/8 10/8 10/8 10/8


222,617 260,133
- ----- -------

5,018 1,240



11,275 66,400

238,910 327,773


26,761,090


393,097


3,176


98,400

494,673


20,505,327


105,245


20


5,600

110,865


161,340


24 ..


8,400 .

169,764


14,830,236 4,700,000


Released by Growers Administrative Committee, Lakeland,
Florida.
Source: Inter, intrastate and export shipments-Citrus
Inspection Bureau.
Express-Federal-State Market News Service.
Interstate By-Products and Cannery-Florida Citrus
Commission.


* According to U. S. D. A. crop estimate released
October 11, 1944







FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS OF FLORIDA

RECORD OF FLORIDA CITRUS AUCTION SALES
CARS SOLD & PER BOX AVERAGE


aar Lots
43-44
42-43
941-42
P40-41
839-40
38-39
27-38
36-37
935-36
34-35
43-44
42-43
)41-42
1940-41
P39-40
938-39
937-38
P36-37
935-36
34-35
)43-44
942-43
)41-42
40-41
939-40
938-39
937-38
936-37
)35-36
934-35
43-44
342-43
'941-42
40-41
39-40
'938-39
p37-38
936-37
)935-36
034-35

iar Lots A
p43-44 9
942-43 11
)41-42 14
U40-41 16
)39-40 14
)38-39 20
537-38 16
936-37 16
b35-36 12
134-35 14


New York ..........
44



S- -... ... ....... ......
it li


... .... ................. ..
All Other Seaboard.-..-. -----
It i1



i4 t I
...... ..............


1t it
... ..............






All Seaboard ............e..o ..
4 -- -- ---4







.. ................
it II
All Se .... ..............



If it

.................... .



It it



IIt I
ll Varieties ........Auctions.........

,283 52.3 8,474 47.7......... ..
S 4 ..................










,724 55.5% 11,819 44.5%
,4204 51.7% 15,334819 48.3%
,715 55.4% 11,847 444.6

4420 51.7% 15,334 48.34/
,045 50.9% 15,508 49.1%
,555 50.3% 12,388 49.7%
,207 51.0% 13,639 49.0%
,04 509 550 91
,55 503 238 07
,275.0 363 00


Orgs.
6,329
6,774
9,053
10,089
8,758
12,440
10,228
9,112
?7,503
8,243
3,475
3,458
4,753
4,966
4,371
6,577
5,527
5,103
4,425
4,397
9,374
10,232
13,006
15,055
13,129
19,017
15,755
14,215
11,928
12,640
12,849
13,606
17,133
18,971
16,836
25,224
20,686
17,932
14,780
15,890


All Seaboard
Auctions
13,643 76.8%
17,634 77.6%
21,905 82.5%
24,321 79.7%
21,377 80.5%
30,649 88.0%
24,686 77.7%
24,706 78.3%
19,589 78.5%
21,482 77.1%


Grfrt.
2,628
3,411
4,519
5,035
4,765
6,389
4,881
5,376
3,928
4,893
477
1,536
1,966
2,230
1,871
2,636
2,185
2,757
2,061
2,359
3,787
4,947
6,485
7,265
6,696
9,025
7,066
8,133
5,989
7,252
4,264
5,604
7,325
8,823
7,583
10,926
8,555
10,197
7,765
9,759


Tangs.
326
1,485
1,152
1,425
1,192
1,851
1,311
1,557
1,124
1,071
162
870
462
576
420
756
554
801
548
519
482
2,355
1,614
2,001
1,612
2,607
1,865
2,358
1,672
1,590
644
3,399
2,005
2,717
2,143
3,663
2,513
3,424
2,398
2,197


All Other AllAuc.
Auctions AilVar.


4,114
5,075
4,638
6,190
5,185
9,164
7,068
6,847
5,354
6,364


23.2%
22.4%
16.5%
20.3%
19.5%
23.0%
22.3%
21.7%
21.5%
22.9%


17,757
22,609
26,543
30,511
26,562
39,813
31,754
31,553
24,943
27,846


Totals
9,283
11,670
14,724
16,549
14,715
20,680
16,420
16,045
12,555
14,207
4,114
5,864
7,181
7,772
6,662
9,969
8,266
8,661
7,034
7,275
13,643
17,534
21,905
24,321
21,377
30,649
24,686
24,706
19,589
21,482
17,757
22,609
26,543
30,511
26,562
39,813
31,754
31,553
24,943
27,846






36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Auction
Averages Orgs.
1043-44 New York ...... --- ---. $3.98
All Seaboard ....... ... ............. ....... 3.94
All Auctions ...........-.... .. .. ....... --... 3.89
Other than Seaboard..... .................... 3.79
1942-43 New York .................. ................... $3.86
All Seaboard ................ ..-.. ..... .. .... 3.81
All Auctions .............. ......... .... ........ .. 3.79
Other than Seaboard __ .......... 3.73
1941-42 New York ................. -.. .. .... $2.86
All Seaboard ........ __. .............. 2.84
All Auctions ........... ..........-..... 2.83
Other than Seaboard _................. 2.79
1940-41 New York ... ..........-... ... .................. $2.37
All Seaboard ........... .. .................... 2.31
All Auctions ............. .. ................ 2.35
Other than Seaboard. ................... 2.34
1939-40 New York -........-._. .... ............. $2.43
All Seaboard ..... ...... 2.39
All Auctions .....-.. ___ ........... 2.35
Other than Seaboard ......... 2.23
1938-39 New York ............. .......... ...... $2.10
All Seaboard .............. ....................... 2.08
All Auctions ..-.......... ............... 2.09
Other than Seaboard _.. .................... 2.14
1937-38 New York ................. ............... ...... $2.26
All Seaboard ......-_..-.. .............. 2.24
All Auctions .......___ ................ 2.24
Other than Seaboard .......... 2.25
1936-37 New York .............. ..... ..-.... .. $3.23
All Seaboard ...._..._.... ....... ..... 3.32
All Auctions .. ..... .. ............. 3.21
Other than Seaboard .._. .................... 3.21
1935-36 New York .............. ..... ......... ............. .. $3.02
All Seaboard .......... ....................... 3.00
All Auctions ... ...... .................... 3.00
Other than Seaboard .._.....-.............. 3.00
1934-35 New York ........... ....._............. $2.61
All Seaboard ............. .. ............ 2.57
All Auctions ............._ .................. 2.56
Other than Seaboard _......... ........ 2.48
Compiled from statistical records of the Florida Citrus Exchi
Garrett.


Note:
State
it


Average Rail
It i
ft "
"


Load to
cf ci
"i "


Auctions
tS


1943-44....
1942-43....
1941-42....
1940-41.._


512.5
529.5
414.2
405.7


51
5
4
41


(Full Box)
Grfrt. Tang. ]
$3.63 $4.32
3.59 4.f
3.56 4.4t
3.28 4.6E
$3.18 $3.
3.13 3.6
3.10 3.
2.89 3.
$2.55 $3.
2.52 3.
2.52 3.
2.56 3
$1.96 S2.4
1.80 2.J
1.91
1.85 2.3
$2.21 $2.
2.14 2.
2.13 2.
2.07 2.
$1.75 $2.
1.71
1.72 2.
1.77 1
$2.20 $2.5'
2.16 2.
2.16 2.
2.16 2.4
$2.24 $2.
2.20 2.1
2.23 2.
2.36 2.;
$2.67 $2.7
2.50 2.
2.57 2.
2.51 2.
$2.04 $2.3
1.98 2.
2.00 2.
2.06 2.
range for Chas.


09.0 482.7 510
16.6 505.9 517
15.8 414.2 414
04.4 401.2 406




CITRUS PLANTINGS IN FLORIDA

Statistics Compiled by the Grove Inspection Department State Plant Board of Florida

Showing Number of Citrus Trees by Counties and Varieties Based on

Tabulation Completed October 15, 1941


Year Total Total Total Total Total
Oranges Grapefruit Tangerine Total Lime Total Satsuma Misc. (1) All Citrus
1919 (2) .... 11,356,414
1923 _...-.. 10,912,716 4,780,496 609,107 (4) (3) 374,908 16,677,227
1928 13,660,461 5,592,187 1,677,042 (4) 528,828 568,201 22,026,714
1931 ..... 14,549,074 6,412,268 1,987.894 (4) 724,768 649,846 24,323,850
1934 ... 15,853,729 6,456,389 1,877,779 (4) 749,589 1,127,287 26,064,773
1941 .... 18,838,263 6,697,858 1,592,473 755,255 85,005 753,739 28,722,593

Note: The figures given in the above tabulations include all trees inspected by agents of the State Plant Board, whether in
grove formation, in small plantings or back yards, and regardless of thrift or condition. They do not, therefore, cor-
rectly represent what are usually regarded as "commercial plantings."
Approximately two years are required to complete an inspection of the citrus plantings of the state. It therefore follows
that the figures shown for some counties may be those obtained as much as two years prior to date of completion of
the inspection.
(1) Lemons, rough lemons, kumquats, etc.
(2) Figures as to varieties not available.
(3) Included as "Oranges."
(4) Included in Misc.








CITRUS PLANTINGS IN FLORIDA


Showing Number of Citrus Trees by Counties and Varieties of Oct. 15, 1941


Orange Trees


Grapefruit Trees


Tangerine Limes Satsumas Misc.* Total


Alachua 1940
Baker 1940
Bay 1941
Bradford 1940
Brevard 39-40
Broward 39140
Calhoun 1940
Charlotte 1940
Citrus 1939
Clay 1940
Collier 1939
Columbia 40-41
Dade 38-39
DeSoto 40-41
Dixie 1940
Duval 1939
Escambia 1941
Flagler 1939
Franklin 1940
Gadsden 1940
Gilchrist 1940
Glades 1940
Gulf 1940
Hamilton 1941


Non- Non-
Bearing Bearing Total Bearing Bearing
63,002 4,725 67,727 4,489 261
711 26 737 119 18
258 66 324 119 43
2,697 808 3,505 164 40
749,415 116,064 865,479 254,706 26,195
166,703 44,640 211,343 19,528 4,498
95 95 3 ........
61,400 4,905 66,305 17,502 65
56,609 6,827 63,436 6,478 219
5,147 1,012 6,159 733 115
14,597 129 14,726 13,838 105
1,424 139 1,563 159 54
188,644 31,707 220,351 265,687 12,282
437,116 16,853 453,969 95,665 586
486 486 52 .. .-__
29,078 7,803 36,881 3,617 1,181
346 12 358 82 ._
18,785 1,332 20,117 1,377 58
188. --...... 188 23 ....
240 ............ 240 39
272 ........ 272 21 ..
5,062 5 5,067 915 2
184 ........ 184 8 ....
351 29 380 31 4


4,750 6,096 40 5,939 1,997 86,549
137 16 21 2,170 465 8,546
162 13 3 1,911 2,395 4,808
204 70 2 681 207 4,669
280,901 32,078 11,887 95 13,014 1,Z03,454
24,026 5,657 20,142 139 10,905 272,212
3 7 ...... 597 362 1,064
17,567 5,733 7,290 23 7,848 104,766
6,697 4,688 206 114 3,779 78,920
848 323 10 5,492 1,035 13,867
13,943 287 2,998 23 3,075 35,052
213 26 1 480 223 2,506
277.969 27,796 268,247 96 148,902 943,361
96,251 34,072 1,593 355 18,413 604,653
52 35 1 52 17 643
4,798 1,393 288 12,839 3,599 .59,738
82 2 4,605 3,956 9,003
1,435 5,261 40 55 172 27,080
23 3 ....... 26 193 433
39 13 1,330 1,037 2,659
21 15 21 22 351
917 153 496 6 1,655 8,294
8 12 388 299 891
35 13 112 150 690


County


Year




CITRUS PLANTINGS IN FLORIDA

Showing Number of Citrus Trees by Counties and Varieties of Oct. 15, 1941


County Year Orange Trees Grapefruit Trees Tangerine Limes Satsumas Misc.* Total
Non- Non-
Bearing Bearing Tolal Bearing Bearing Total
Hardee 40-41 574,824 36,011 610,835 62,738 376 63,114 44,826 1,172 610 21,316 741,873
Hendry 39-40 40,798 1,127 41,925 12,946 68 13,014 1,075 594 36 2,177 58,820
Hernando 1939 101,648 6,492 108,140 25,372 600 25,972 56,282 170 957 2,558 194,079
Highlands 1941 589,551 40,068 629,619 318,139 1,779 319,918 55,770 20,796 173 22,994 1,049,270
Hillsboro'gh 38-39 1,069,137 114,526 1,183,663 266,288 6,788 273,076 83,226 24,169 2,225 59,782 1,626,141
Holmes 1941 152 1 153 16 1 17 4 912 995 2,081
Indian River 37-39 322,484 108,886 431,370 454,516 66,886 521,402 35,066 8,876 53 6,840 1,003,607
Jackson 1940 315 315 36 .. 36 12 ........ 3,083 1,621 5,067
Jefferson 1940 137 137 37 .37 3 ... 8,727 1,632 10,436
Lafayette 1940 291 ........ 291 22 .... 22 9 30 9 361
Lake 37-39 1,567,823 372,631 1,940,454 480,112 22,420 502,532 132,600 19,543 5,611 .38,148 2,638,888
Lee 1939 210,200 4,520 214,720 207,799 153 207,952 7,759 26,228 54 18,933 475,646
Leon 1940 382 ....382 73 ... 73 10 ...... 610 3,450 4,525
Levy 1940 2,215 _........ 2,215 160 ..._. 160 76 2 23 139 2,615
Liberty 1940 112 112 4 4 6 194 73 389
Madison 1940 405 _._405 44 6 50 13 ..197 88 753
Manatee 37-39 294,189 34,546 328,735 346,402 7,934 354,326 8,436 15,549 178 17,221 724,455
Marion 39-40 592,289 58,507 650,796 48,695 318 49,013 27,671 330 2,218 2,416 732,444
Martin 1938 65,201 8,839 74,040 33,359 1,616 34,975 3,070 8,486 59 6,268 126,898
Monroe 1940 3,994 _.. 3,994 2,023 ..2,023 1,722 157,103 1 10,850 175,693 .
Nassau 1940 2,146 243 2,389 213 24 237 77 1 866 379 3,949
Okaloosa 1941 105 30 135 40 3 43 -- 2 395 1,934 2,509
Okeechobee 1940 21,666 5,470 27,136 6,501 164 6,665 1,843 3,350 21 5,989 45,004
Orange- 39-41 2,176,529 236,248 2,412,777 260,538 14,351 274,889 207,103 9,090 2,153 27,007 2,933,019








CITRUS PLANTINGS IN FLORIDA

Showing Number of Citrus Trees by Counties and Varieties of Oct. 15, 1941


Orange Trees


Grapefruit Trees


Tangerine Limes Satsumas Misc.* Total


Osceola 36-39
Palm Beach 39-40
Pasco 37-38
Pinellas 36-39
Polk 39-41
Putnam 39-40
Santa Rosa 1941
Sarasota 37-39
Seminole 40-41
St. Johns 1939
St. Lucie 40-41
Sumter 1939
Suwanee 1941
Taylor 1940
Union 1940
Volusia 38-39
Wakulla 1940
Walton 1941
Washington 1941
TOTAL


Non- Non-
Bearing Bearing Total Bearing Bearing Total
282,649 26,031 308,680 65,155 464 65,619 39,649 2,635 584 11,885 429,252
75,541 28,909 104,450 36,401. 3,186 39,587 7,358 14,245 86 20,672 186,398
412,259 130,840 543,099 105,705 6,101 111,806 39,862 2,504 1,849 24,974 730,094
474,547 22,676 497,223 555,489 14,588 570,077 44,269 9,361 909 34,988 1,156,827
3,640,137 283,791 497,223 1,860,521 17,733 1,878,254 371,240 90,997 1,517 128,247 6,394,183
292,042 29,625 321,667 29,682 465 30,145 43,051 104 3,111 2,458 400,586
90 ....... 90 16 16 -- 1 3,982 2,412 5,601
.169,007 14,215 183,222 78,627 2,584 81,211 2,175 2,387 62 8,783 277,840
436,179 47,293 483,472 50,782 695 51,477 55,980 797 451 5,676 597,853
41,273 3,456 44,729 3,789 258 4,047 1,531 73 1,308 856 52,544
530,420 138,480 668,900 312,194 58,674 370,868 61,174 15,618 16 15,829 1,132,405
127,038 12,686 139,724 10,703 471 11,174 5,070 221 80 2,039 158,308
1,291 184 1,475 130 29 159 28 584 768 3,014
496 496 31 .. 31 20 76 47 670
1,157 189 1,346 103 68 171 58 8' 564 107 2,254
827,473 83,005 910,478 97,406 5,028 102,434 130,575 1,437 2,253 10,221 1,157,398
98 .. .... 98 35 ..35 4 104 218 450
132 55 187 37 22 59 6 1 812 2,947 4,012
354 15 369 44 3 47 3 __ 622 4,173 5,214
16,751,586 Z,086,677 18,838,263 6,418,278 279,580 6,697,858 1,592,473 755,255 851005 753,739 28,722,593


*Includes lemons, rough lemons, kumquats, etc.
October 15, 1941


County


Year




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