• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The Little Mimie
 Spring Wild Flowers
 Bitter Lessons
 Country Pleasures
 Kate Stanley
 Skating
 Remorse
 The Dying Boy
 The Dead Mother
 The Parrot
 Aunt Prudence's Ride in the...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Cousin Cicely's silver lake stories, 5
Title: Aunt Patty's mirror
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002243/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Patty's mirror a collection of pieces in prose and rhyme, for the Silver Lake stories
Series Title: Cousin Cicely's silver lake stories
Alternate Title: Silver Lake stories
Aunt Patty's mirror
Physical Description: 167 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bradford, Sarah H ( Sarah Hopkins ), b. 1818
Smith, Thomas B., 19th cent ( Stereotyper )
Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Howland, William ( Engraver )
Alden and Beardsley ( Publisher )
Wanzer, Beardsley & Co ( Publisher )
Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )
Publisher: Alden, Beardsley & Co.
Wanzer, Beardsley & Co.
Place of Publication: Auburn N.Y.
Rochester N.Y.
Manufacturer: Stereotyped by Thomas B. Smith
Publication Date: 1852
 Subjects
Subject: Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ridicule -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Selfishness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Theft -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- Auburn
United States -- New York -- Rochester
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Cousin Cicely.
General Note: Ill. engraved by Howland, W. Roberts and Lossing-Barritt.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002243
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222518
oclc - 22446656
notis - ALG2763
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
        Front page 2
    Frontispiece
        Front page 3
    Half Title
        Front page 4
        Front page 5
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Copyright
        Page 6
    Front Matter
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
    List of Illustrations
        Page 10
    The Little Mimie
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Spring Wild Flowers
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Bitter Lessons
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Country Pleasures
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Kate Stanley
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Skating
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Remorse
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    The Dying Boy
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    The Dead Mother
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    The Parrot
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Aunt Prudence's Ride in the Cars
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Back Cover
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Spine
        Page 170
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SILVER' LAEE STORIES.


AUBURN:
ALDEN, BEARDSLEY & CO,



















































































tl







AUNT PATTY'S MIRROR;

A COLLECTION OF PIECES


IN PROSE AND RHYME,

FOR THE


SIf VER LAKS ST0ORImt


W~t CIIllustratfons.



BY COUSIN CICELY.
AUTHOR OF "THE BUDGET," ETO.




AUBURN:
ALDEN, BEARDSLEY & CO.
ROCHESTER:
WANZER, BEARDSLEY & CO.
1852.























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 185 by
ALDENf BEARDSLEY & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the Northern District of New York.


STIREOTYPID BT
THOMAS B. SMITH,
216 William t., N. Y.















FRox among the many papers I found in Aunt Patty's
" Green Satchel," I have selected the pieces contained in
the present volume. In a few of these stories it may be
possible that some of my yonag re~das ay find a reflec-
tion of certain features in their own ohracters. If so,
it may possibly do them no harm to take a look into the
mirror of Aunt Patty Pry.











THE SILVER LAKE STORIES,

COMPRISING THE FOLLOWING VOLUMES.

L-THE JUMBLE.
II.-THE OLD PORTFOLIO.
II.-THE GREEN SATCHEL.
IV.-THE CORNUCOPIA.
V.-AUNT PATTY'S MIRROR.
VI.-THE BUDGET.

















cnnhtfts.

po

THE LITTLE MIMIO, 11
SPRING WILD FLOWERS, 86
BITTER LESSON, 40
COUNTRY PLEASURES, .. 8
KATE STANLEY, OR THE EVILS OF EXAGGERATION, 84
SKATING, .. 121
REMORSE, 124
THE DYING BOY, 182
THE DEAD MOTHER, 185
THE PARROT, 144
AUNT PRUDENCE'8 RIDE IN THE S, 158
















Zist of 11tnstraiin s.

Page
THE LITTLE MIMI, Frontisplece
SPRING WILD FLOWERS, .. 87
IRSA TEARING THE COMPOSITION, 47
SUMMEB, .. 79
UNTING HEN'S EGGS, 81
OUR SCHOOL GIBL8, 87
WINTE FROLICS, 122
THE DESERTED OG HUT, 125
THE DYING BOT, 133
KATHLEEN CROSBIN THE HEATH, 186
HE KIND TRAVELLER 141
AGATHA AND HER PARROT, .145














HEN is the new governess coming,
mamma ?" asked Lizzie Walton
of her moher.
"I have just received a letter, saying
that we may look for her by the end of
this week," answered her mother.
"I wonder what she will be like,"
said Fanny. "I hope she will not
be like Miss Hart. She was the cross-
est old thing I ever saw, and she





12 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


made me hate the very idea of a gov-
erness."
I think it was partly your own fault,
Fanny, that Miss Hart was so cross,"
said her mother, "you certainly tried
her temper very much; which I confess
was not of the sweetest. I hope you
will try to do better with Miss Mervyn."
"Have you ever seen Miss Mervyn,
mamma ?" asked Lizzie.
"No, dear, never."
"How did you find her out ?"
"Oh, a great many years ago your
father and Mr. Mervyn were very inti-
mate, and Mr. Mervyn, who was then a
very wealthy man, showed your father





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


a great many kindnesses. For some
years they have had no correspondence
with each other, but a few weeks ago,
your father received a letter from Miss
Anna Mervyn, saying that her father
had been dead about a year, and that
to her great astonishment and grief,
she found that through the mismanage-
ment of his affairs, she was left depen-
dent upon her own exertions for her
support. She speaks too of her help-
less situation, as if she was in feeble
health; but says she is able to teach;
and she applied to your father, of whom
she said she had often heard her father
speak with great affection, to ask him


13





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


if he knew of any situation for her. It
was just after Miss Hart left, and your
father was very happy to offer the
daughter of his old friend, the situation
of governess in our family."
*" Are our cousins to study with us,
mamma ?"
"Certainly, my dear; their parents
requested me when they left, to allow
their little girls to pursue their studies
with you."
"Oh, then there will be four of us;
how pleasant that will be I" exclaimed
both the little girls.
Mr. Walton was a farmer; he had a
beautiful place; but as it was at some


14





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


distance from any town, his children
had not the advantage of daily schools,
and as the little girls were yet too
young to send away to boarding-school,
they had always been under the care
of teachers at home.
The cousins, of whom Lizzie spoke,
were Laura and Emma Granby, the
children of a sister of Mrs. Walton, who
with her husband was travelling in
Europe, and at Mrs. Walton's earnest
desire, had left her children with her.
The little girls had had a long holiday,
and they were now in daily expecta-
tion, and in no small degree of dread,
of the arrival of the new governess.


15





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


On Saturday afternoon, the stage
drove up to the door, and the children
assembled together at the front window,
to catch the earliest possible glimpse
of the stranger, whom Mr. Walton was
assisting to alight from the stage. The
piazza ran along the whole front of the
house, and the steps were at the end,
so that in order to enter the front door,
Miss Mervyn must pass the window, at
which the little girls had stationed
themselves.
"Why, girls," said little Fanny, "she
is lame /"
And deformed too, I declare I" said
Emma Granby.


16





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Just then the new teacher turned
towards them to speak to Mr. Walton,
and Lizzie exclaimed, "But what a love-
ly face she has, and how very young
she looks."
"And what a sweet voice," said
Laura, as Miss Mervyn was now speak-
ing to Mrs. Walton in the hall. The
new governess was now introduced to
the children; she seemed slightly em-
barrassed, but not awkward. She
might be about eighteen years old, and
as the children had said, was deformed
and lame; but her face was very beau-
tiful, her voice was gentle and sweet,
and her manners so amiable, and lovely,


17






18 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
that the children felt certain they should
love her very much.
Miss Mervyn could teach them to
play the piano, she could teach them to
draw, she made their lessons easy by
pleasing illustrations, and when school-
hours were over, she often amused them
by telling them interesting stories. In
short, Miss Mervyn, or Miss Anna, as
the children called her, had not been
long in the house, before Mr. and Mrs.
Walton found that they had indeed se-
cured a treasure; and she was soon
dearly loved by every member of the
household.
Fanny was a bright little creature,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


warm-hearted and affectionate, but she
had one dangerous talent; it was that
of mimicry. She could look, talk, or
walk like anybody she had ever seen;
and I am sorry to say that her brothers
and sisters encouraged her in the exer-
cise of this talent, by laughing at her
imitations. If any person came on
business with her father, or to visit her
mother, who had anything peculiar
about them, no sooner had they left the
house, than Miss Fanny would screw
up her face into an exact imitation of
theirs, or talk with their tones, or walk
across the floor with their precise gait,
while the other children would listen,


19






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


or look on, in convulsions of laughter.
This is a very dangerous habit; it is so
natural for children to like to do what
they do well, that they will sacrifice all
their better feelings, for.the sake of the
applause of those who listen to them.
One day, not a great while after Miss
Anna became an inmate of Mr. Walton's
family, the little girls were all together
in the dining-room. Fanny was in high
spirits, and was amusing the others with
imitations of every one she knew, who
had any peculiarity about them; when
suddenly she exclaimed, "See here,
girls 1" and stooping over, and crooking
her back, she limped across the room.


20






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Laura and Emma Granby laughed, and
said," Capital !" Lizzie said, "For shame,
Fanny!" but I am sorry to say that
Lizzie laughed too; while Mary, the.
servant girl, who was in the room,
turned around and rebuked her sharp-
ly.
At that moment the door partly open-
ed, and was almost immediately closed.
again. It was Miss Anna, who was
coming in for a book, but as she opened
the door she caught in a mirror the re-
flection of little Fanny, and recognizing
the perfect imitation of her own form in
a moment, and hearing the applause
bestowed upon Fanny, she drew back


21





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


before the children saw her, and pained
to the very heart, retired to her own
room.
That evening, after the lessons were
all over, Miss Anna said, "Children, if
you will all come to my room, I have a
story to tell you." The little girls were
delighted,.for Miss Anna's stories were
always so interesting, and it was not
long therefore before they were tapping
at Miss Anna's door. "Come in," said
her gentle voice, and they all entered
her room.
She was sitting in her easy chair,
looking paler than usual, and rather
sad, and the children thought they saw


22






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


traces of tears on her face. When they
were all seated Miss Anna began:
"There was once a little girl who
lived with her parents, in a beautiful
and happy home; she was an only
child, and was greatly petted, and in-
dulged, and had everything that heart
could wish. She was called very pret-
ty; her figure was as light, and fairy-
like, as little Fanny's, and she was at
once the darling, and pride of her fond
parents. This little girl was growing
up to think that she was to be admired,
and praised, wherever she went, and
that no wish of her heart was to be de-
nied; and God took the means to sub.


23





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


due the pride and vanity of her heart,
and to make her feel that all earthly
dependence is vain.
At one time, she took it into her
head that she wanted a swing-a very
high swing; and as soon as she made
her wish known to her father, he ordered
the swing to be put up, between two
very high trees, in a grove near the
house; and whenever this young lady
wanted to swing, a man was ready to
wait upon her. Her mother was very
anxious about this swing, and feared
that her little daughter might be injured
by it; and she always cautioned James
not to swing her very high.


24





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


One day when James was swinging
her, the little girl called out:
"Swing me higher, James !"
"I am afraid, Miss," he answered;
"your mother said I must not swing
you very high."
"Oh, there is no danger, James, and
I tell you I will go higher; higher!
James, higher Swing me till I go
straight out from where the rope is
tied." James did very wrong, and
obeyed the wilful child, when suddenly
the rope broke, and she fell from a great
height, directly upon her back. She
was taken up insensible, and for some
time it was feared that she was dead;


25





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


I cannot describe to you the agony of
her fond parents; indeed, the effect of
the shock, and distress of mind, was so
great upon her mother, whose health
was already delicate, that she sank under
it, and from that time failed very rapidly.
For long weary months, the child lay
upon her bed of suffering, and when at
length she left it, it was to find herself
a hopeless cripple. But. before that
time, she had seen her mother, who had
long been confined to he bed in the
same room, close her eyes in death, and
she heard almost with her dying groan,
the cry,' Who will watch over my help-
less little one ?' "


26






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Here Miss Anna, who had long been
quietly wiping away her tears as she
talked, paused, completely overcome
by her feelings, and covering her face
with her handkerchief, she wept bitter-
ly. The children looked at each other
sadly; they had for some time suspect-
ed that Miss Anna was telling them her
own story, and so it proved, for she
soon said:
"I see children, that you already
know whose story I have been telling
you, and I may as well tell the rest of
it in my own name. I cannot describe
to you the feeling of mortification, and
distress with which I first surveyed my


27





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


altered form in the glass. I who had
been so proud of my light, delicate
figure, who was always dancing, and
singing, so light-hearted, and gay, was
now, and must ever be, a misshapen
cripple. I was at first rebellious, but
better feelings came at length, and I
seemed to hear Him, who used to make
the lame to walk, saying unto me, 'I
will not say to thee, Be thou restored,"
but I will give thee grace, and strength,
to bear whatsoever I may put upon
thee.' It was a struggle for years, be-
fore .I could say from my heart, 'Thy
will, oh God, be done I' It was my
daily, and nightly prayer, that I might


28





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


be wholly resigned to his will, and at
length I think my prayer was answered.
"But bitter trials awaited me yet.
I so far recovered as to be able to pur-
sue my studies; and my father, who
had once been so proud of my personal
appearance, now devoted himself to the
cultivation of my mind; and yet with
great caution, lest he should overtask
my strength. I had drawing-masters,
and music-masters, and pursued other
studies with my father, but none of
these were ever made tedious to me.
I did no more than I liked, but it was
a pleasure and amusement to me to do
what I could. Oh, how thankful I am


29





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


now for my father's care and kindness,
in this respect.
"Years passed on, and I in some
measure regained my cheerfulness, in
the quiet of my home, and the society
of my dear father, who was my only
companion; till I entered my seven-
teenth year, when it pleased God to
take my dear father from me; and this
heavy blow was followed by the tidings
that through the mismanagement of his
affairs I was left penniless. For a time
I was completely crushed; thrown out
upon the wide world, in my helpless
state, with no friend to lean upon. I
at length thought of my father's early


30






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


friend, of whom I had often heard him
speak with great affection, I mean your
own excellent father, Lizzie; and the
result of my application to him was my
kind and cordial welcome under his
roof.
"It was not without a shrinking of
heart," continued Miss Mervyn, "that I
came among new faces, and new scenes;
but your kind welcome, drove away all
such feelings, and made me feel at home
at once. Now dear little Fanny, do
not think me harsh, or unkind, when
I say, that my feelings were deeply
pained to-day, when I saw the image
of a crooked form reflected in the mir-


31





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


ror, which I could not for a moment
doubt, was intended as an imitation of
mine. Do not cry so bitterly, dear,"
said Miss Mervyn, drawing Fanny to
her, and kissing her cheek, "I do not
say this merely to find fault with you,
but only for your good. I know it was
thoughtlessness; I know you would not
willingly hurt my feelings; you possess
a dangerous talent, Fanny, and one
which there is a very strong temptation
to exercise. It is always pleasant to
us to do whatever we can do well, and
whatever brings us the praise of others;
and let me say that I think a large
share of the blame, rests with those


32






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


who encourage and applaud you. All
our habits good or bad are strengthened
by exercise, and if you go on, my dear
little Fanny, mimicking the peculiari-
ties of every one you see, you will at
length make yourself very disagreeable;
people will be afraid of you, and you
will do yourself great injury."
Oh, Miss Anna," sobbed Fanny, it
was very cruel; can you ever forgive
me?"
"Certainly, dear, I have forgiven you,
and the only reason I have given you
this little sketch of my own life, was to
lead you, when.you are inclined to
mimic the defects or deformities of those
3


33






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


you see, to think how much suffering
they may have endured; and to lead
you to be thankful to God, who has so
far preserved you from such a calamity."
Miss Mervyn's story, I am happy to
say, had a lasting effect on little Fan-
ny; she made a strong effort to conquer
the evil habit which had gained such
power over her. Often when some per-
son with an unfortunate peculiarity left
the house, she would rise from her chair
and prepare to imitate them, but on
second thoughts she would take her
seat, and catching up her work, would
say, "No, I will not do it, either !"
Miss Mervyn remained many years


34:






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 35

in the family of Mr. Walton, beloved
and respected by all. I need hardly
say that her feelings were never again
pained, by any allusion to her deformi-
ty; and when she died, it was with all
her beloved pupils around her, and
many tears were shed over "Miss An-
na's grave," by those whom she had so
faithfully trained, for this life and the
next.


















TeH Spr gine has come, and the wild flowers
are blowing,
And the fields and the orchards are clothed all
in green,
The streams lately frozen now gaily are flowing,
And all nature contributes to gladden the scene.

And we too when come the bright holiday hours,
Delight in the spring-time, and welcome it too,
We roam to the green woods to gatheoild
flowers,
The blood-root so pure and the violet blue.













SPRING WILD RLOWMES.


. 1







38


THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


The anemone pale, and the wild virgin's bower,
A wreath for the hair of our sisters to twine,
In the marshes we find the strange side-saddle
flower,
On the rocky hillsides pluck the wild columbine.

Play on, happy boys, in your childhood's bright
hours,
For this is your spring, and with you all is gay;
But life cannot be spent, as you know, gathering
flowers,
And the days of your spring-time are passing
away.

Play on, for as spring is the season for flowers,
So childhood life's spring should with pleasures
abound:
But as blossoms all wither 'mid autumn'mid
showers,
So we too droop and die and are laid ini the ground.







THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 39

But the flowers thus withered are never forsaken,
For another spring smiles and more brightly they
bloom:
So the just from their sleep in the ground shall
awaken,
And in bright robes of glory arise from the tomb.















" T is almost finished, Emily I Now for
a double extra flourish, as I sign my
name; but I guess I will wait till
father comes in, and get a new pen, for
that."
"Oh, I am certain you will get the
prize, Fred! The composition is a first-
rate one, I am sure; and then you have.
copied it so beautifully. Not a single blot,
not a word scratched out, or spelt wrong."






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"I must thank you for that last, Em.
If it had not been for you, I should only
have put one m in imminent, and I
should have spelt' ascension, with a t.
Oh, dear! how many sheets of paper
we have spoiled, though, before it was
finally right; but I do believe now, I
shall get the gold pen. I am glad we
have not let father, or mother, or Rosa,
see it till it was all finished, and tied
up. Have you got the blue ribbon yet,
Em ?"
Yes, it is all ready; as soon as you
have signed your name, and got it
thoroughly dry, I will tie it together
for you, and then it will be ready for


41






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


exhibition. Take care! there comes
Rosa I cover it up quick I"
Rosa Weldon was a very strange child.
From her earliest years she had always
shown an uncommonly suspicious, and
prying disposition. If two persons were
whispering together, she always im-
agined that they could be talking about
nobody but herself. If significant glan-
ces passed between any of the school-
girls, she was sure that she was the
subject of them. Many a nice plan did
she spoil, by being determined to find
out every secret that was going on in
the family, and many a pleasant sur-
prise did she lose in the way of a pres-


42






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


ent, because she could not rest, when
she fancied anything was concealed
from her.
As you will understand, from the
conversation which passed between
Emily and Fred, there was to be a prize
given at the academy, for the English
composition which should be the best
in all respects; matter, spelling, and
penmanship. This prize was to be a
gold pen, and the compositions were to
be handed in for examination, the day
after the conversation with which our
story opens.
Fred had chosen "The Balloon" for
his subject, and had really made a very


43






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


good composition out of it, and as he
was the finest writer in the school, and
had taken especial pains on this occa-
sion, and Emily had assisted him in the
spelling department, he saw no reason
why the much wished for prize should
not be his.
Every day after school, he worked at
it, tearing up sheet after sheet of paper,
if the slightest mistake was made, and
patiently beginning it all over again.
But now he had got to the end; the
writing was all fair, and beautiful;
every comma, and period, was in its
place, and he only waited for a new
pen, to give the double extra flourish,"


44






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


as he said, at the end, when Rosa en-
tered the room.
Rosa had watched Emily and Fred,
"with their heads together," as she ex-
pressed it, for some days; and she re-
marked that as soon as she entered the
room, they ceased talking, and when
she passed very near the table, as she
generally happened to do, and cast her
eyes that way, they always contrived
to cover up the paper which was before
them.
"I know it is something about me,
they are writing," said she to herself;
"if not, why should they be so particu-
lar to hide the writing from me ? They


45





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


are writing something to make fun of
me. I know now I they are writing to
brother John, about my listening at the
door the other night, and opening that
letter of mother's."
When Rosa entered the room, and
heard Emily say, "There comes Rosa!
cover it up quick !" her suspicions were
confirmed. Quick as thought she darted
to the table, seized poor Fred's compo-
sition, and before either he or Emily
could prevent it, she had torn the sheet
into three or four pieces, and thrown
them on the floor.
"Oh, Rosa Rosa! what have you
done!" exclaimed Emily, angrily.


N
S


46















!ji


ROSA TEARNG THB COMPOSITION.





48 / THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


Fred was a kind, gentle boy; he did
not storm, or strike, when he had occa-
sion to be angry, but when he saw what
Rosa had done, he sat down and cov-
ered his face with his hands, and said,
"Farewell tohe prize, for me !"
"Oh, Fredi! Fred was that your
composition ?" exclaimed Rosa, who
already repented of her rashness.
Yes, Rosa," said Emily, you have
torn up poor Fred's prize composition,
on which he has worked for weeks, and
weeks. He had just got it completed,
and as soon as I had trimmed it, he
- was going to show it to you, and father,
and mother."




THE SILVER LAKE STORTIS.


"Oh, Fred my dear brother I what
can I do for you ?" asked Rosa.
"Nothing, Rosa, nothing; the com-
positions were to be given in to-morrow,
and there is no time to write another."
"I suppose you imagined, as you
generally do, that you were the subject
of this writing," said Emily.
"Well, it did look very much as if
you were writing about me," said Rosa;
"you always ceased talking, or covered
up the writing, when I came into the
room."
Oh, Rosa, I do wish you would con-
quer this selfish disposition of yours,"
said Emily, "for nothing but selfishness


49





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


is at the bottom of it, after all. You
always imagine that people have no-
thing more important to write about,
than your own little self. Poor Fred 1"
said she, as she saw the tears oozing
out from between his fingers.
Fred said nothing, but rose and left
the room. Now do not blame him, or
call him "a baby." Fred had set his
heart on this prize, and the loss of it,
and all his labor, was a most bitter dis-
appointment to him. Emily soon fol-
lowed Fred, and Rosa remained alone,
putting together the torn pieces of the
composition, and thinking how beauti-
ful it would have looked, but for her


50





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


impetuous burst of passion. After a
few moments, she went up to her own
room, with the torn pieces of paper in
her hand, and in about half an hour,
having obtained her mother's permis-
sion to go out, she put on her bonnet,
and shawl, and left the house.
Poor Fred said nothing more about
his composition, and tried to forget how
much he had wished for the prize. The
examination was over, a he day
came on which the composite were
to be read, and the prizes a)ied.
Mr. Weldon's family were all prl "tL
After several compositions had been
read, what was Fred's surprise, to hear


51 '





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


the title of the next one, which was
"The Balloon." "Surely," said he to
himself, "some one else has taken my
subject." But, no! the composition
was his: there could be no doubt about
it. He had reason to know it well,
having copied the beginning of it at
least twenty times, and it was his own
composition, word for word. Fred be-
gan to think he must be dreaming. At
length, the teacher arose, and said:
"The committee have determined to
award the first prize in composition,
and penmanship, to Master Frederic
Weldon. For though his composition
has been so injured (not by any fault


S52





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


of his own) that it cannot be handed
around among the audience, it is by far
the most beautifully written of any of
those which were handed in; and is in
every respect faultless. We, therefore,
award him the prize of a gold pen;
which he will please now to receive."
Fred was so completely overwhelmed
with astonishment, that he could scarce-
ly walk straight, as he went to the
teacher's desk, and as soon as he had
received the prize, he hurried from the
room, more agitated than he was when
Rosa tore up his composition.
Rosa had indeed neatly sewed to-
gether the torn pieces of the composi-





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


tion, and then taking it to Fred's teach-
er, had told him the story of her fault,
and Fred's disappointment, and he had
kindly consented to make known the
state of the case to the committee.
What a pity that a child of so many
fine generous traits, should have been
the subject of such contemptible weak-
nessesl I am sorry to say that even
this, did not cure Rosa. She was very,
very sorry for what she had done, but
sorrow is not reformation. She went
on, year after year, bringing trouble
upon herself, and others, and alienating
her best friends from her, by the foolish
fancies she took into her head; till at


54





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


length, when she was about fourteen
years old, a circumstance happened,
which involved more serious conse-
quences.
Entering her father's study hastily
one day, Rosa found him reading a let-
ter. He looked sad and troubled. "Ah,"
said she to herself, "I am afraid my
teacher has written to father, to tell him
how she caught me looking into a letter
of hers yesterday, which I thought might
be from father about me. I will just
step round, and look over his shoulder."
But as she came near her father, he
quietly laid the letter on his knee, with
the direction uppermost. This, to Rosa,


55





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


was sufficient to confirm her suspicions,
and she thought she would give the
world to know, what was in that letter.
"I know there must be something in
it about me," said she, "or he would
not be so careful to conceal it from me."
Just then Nancy, the chambermaid,
came in, and said:
"The man wishes to know if he is to
wait for an answer, sir ?"
"Tell him to say I will come down
immediately," said Mr. Weldon, at the
same time tearing up the letter, and
throwing it into the fire. He then left
the room, and Rosa sprang towards the
fire, and seized the papers which were


56





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


not yet consumed, and putting them
into her pocket with a quantity of
ashes, which she had caught up in her,
haste, she ran up to her own room.
Here she spread the papers out on the
table, and arranged, and re-arranged
over them for some time, as if they were
a Chinese puzzle. Having, at length,
arranged them as she supposed they
belonged, she found nothing there about
herself, but she did find what astonish-
ed, and shocked, her beyond measure.
Here is what she read, in the scraps of
paper, as she laid them together:
My dear sir:
regret informatima.-"


57






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


my son William taken money -
counting-house safe false keys -
Mr. Wallace's illness confessed -
in the habit small sums gam-
bling debts yet save him hush the
matter up off to California begin
anew disgrace public exposure
- ruin of the boy poor mother's
heart -
ob Daniels.
"Oh, dear I who would have thought
it l" exclaimed Rosa to herself, "Wil-
liam Daniels has always been thought
such a fine fellow; and I know Mr.
Wallace has trusted him with every-
thing, while he has been sick. Why I


58





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


it is dreadful! I would not say any-
thing about it for the world; it would
make so much mischief." And she put
on her hat, and shawl, and went to call
on Helen Nelson, with whom she had
struck up a sudden intimacy, and asked
her to take a walk with her. While
they were walking, they met William
Daniels, hurrying along with some pa-
pers in his hand. He waved his hand,
and smiled, and bowed, to the young
ladies, as he passed.
"What a handsome fellow William
Daniels is l" exclaimed Helen.
"Yes; he is handsome!" said Rosa,
and she sighed mysteriously.


59






THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


- Why, Rosa, you emphasize hand-
some,' as if that was all that could be
said of him. Father says he has won-
derful business talents for so young a
man, and Mr. Wallace trusts him with
all his business, now he is sick. He is
so strictly honest."
"Is he ?" said Rosa, in the same mys-
terious tone.
"Is he? why, of course, he is," an-
swered Helen. "What do you mean
by speaking so, Rosa, do you know any-
thing against him ?"
"Well-perhaps I do; but I ought
not to tell."
"Oh but you will tell me; you


60





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


know it will be as safe with me as with
yourself."
Well-but I am afraid you will tell,
Helen."
Why, of course not, Rosa."
Well, then, I happen to know-now
recollect you have promised-that Wil-
liam Daniels has taken a great deal of
money from Mr. Wallace's safe, since
he has been sick."
"Oh, Rosa! you don't say so."
"Yes, it is true, and the worst of it
is-(now you must not lisp a word
of this,) that it is to pay gambling
debts."
"Oh, horrible! who would have


61




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


thought it! how did you find it out,
Rosa ?"
"Oh II happened to see the letter,
which Mr. Daniels himself wrote to
father, about it. He wanted father to
help in some way, to get him off to
California, before it comes out; is n't
it dreadful? Now, Helen, remember
you will get me into trouble, if you tell
this to a single creature."
How often a person discloses to an-
other that which he cannot keep him-
self, (or I suppose a gentleman would
say, that which she cannot keep herself,)
imagining that his friend has much
more prudence and discretion than him-


62




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


self, and that the secret will go no
further. Helen had said to Rosa, "the
secret will be just as safe with me, as
with yourself," and it was just exactly
as safe.
The. friends parted at Rosa's door;
and Helen went immediately to see her
friend Laura Wallace; without any in-
tention, of course, of betraying Rosa's
confidence. She would not do such a
thing as that for the world; and yet
aching to rid herself of the secret, with
which she was burdened.
Laura greeted her joyfully. "Oh,
Helen I" she said, "you are just the
person I was wishing to see Do you


63




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


know papa is so much better, that he
says I shall have my birthday party
after all. You know my birthday comes
next Tuesday, and I want you to help
me think who to invite."
The two girls then sat down, with
pencil, and paper, and began to make
out a list. After getting through with
the female friends, they came to the
young gentlemen. Laura wrote the
names of three or four, and then said,
" And William Daniels, of course."
"Oh!" said Helen, gravely, "are you
going to invite him ?"
"William Daniels ? why, of course I
am! I know he is rather older than


64




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


our set, but then he does not mind that.
And he is always glad to come here, to
see my sister Clara. You know they
would be engaged, only papa thinks
they are too young yet. But why did
you speak so, Helen, I thought you
liked William Daniels so much."
"Well-I did /"
"Did ? Have you had any reason to
change your opinion of him ?"
"It may be that I have; but you
must not ask me, Laura. I have prom-
ised not to tell."
"Oh, but, Helen, you must just fell
me. Of course, I would not wish to in-
vite him to my party, if there is any-
5


65





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


thing against him. I really ought to
know, I think."
"Well, I suppose you ought, but I
was charged positively not to tell."
All this only stimulated Laura's cu-
riosity, who begged Helen just to tell
her the secret; it need go no further.
In short, without detailing the conver-
sation that happened, which the reader
has anticipated; with many injunctions
of secrecy, Helen told Laura the whole
story.
Laura opened her eyes very wide,
and held up her hands in astonishment;
and in fifteen minutes after Helen had
left the house, Laura who thought it


66




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


her duty to do so, had told the whole
story to her father. The old gentleman,
to the astonishment of his clerks, soon
appeared in his counting-room, and
began to look into his accounts, and
examine his safe. He soon became
convinced that there was a deficiency;
and though it was hard to believe such
a thing of the young man in whom he
had trusted, yet as he was assured that
his father had himself disclosed it to
Mr. Weldon, he could not doubt but it
was true. And if so," said he, I will
not be outwitted by Daniels and Wel-
don; the young man shall be brought
to justice." And the news soon spread


67





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


through the community, that William
Daniels had been arrested, for stealing
large sums of money from Mr. Wallace.
What does this mean, Mr. Wallace ?"
said old Mr. Daniels, rushing into the
office of that gentleman.
"Mean, sir ? how can you ask what
it means, when you yourself wrote the
account of it to Mr. Weldon, and asked
him to join with you in getting the boy
off to California."
"I did, sir, write about some boy, but
not about my boy; there is some terri-
ble mistake here, I wish you would send
for Mr. Weldon immediately. My poor
boy I Po upright, and honorable as he


68





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 69
is! So devoted to your interest You
have bees very hasty, Mr. Wallace, to
have him arrested without giving him
time for explanation."
"Perhaps, I have; perhaps, I have,"
answered the old gentleman; but the
story came very straight fiom Mr. Wel-
don's daughter Rosa, who said she had
seen the letter you wrote to her father."
"Ah! that is the young lady who is
always prying into other people's let-
ters; but she has got a strange under-
standing of a letter this time. Send
for her too, Mr. Wallace, and let us have
the whole affair cleared up."
In less than half an hour, Mr. Weldon,





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


and Rosa, Laura Wallace, old Mr. Dan-
iels, and Helen Nelson, who had also
been sent for, were collected in Mr.
Wallace's office. Rosa waw very much
frightened, for she saw by the grave
countenances of the gentlemen, and the
anxious looks of the girls, that they
were called together on some business
of importance.
"Rosa," said Mr. Weldon, sternly,
"how came you to see a letter, written
by Mr. Daniels to me yesterday ?"
It was a very humiliating thing to
do, but Rosa had to begin, and relate
the whole story of her suspicions, and
of her catching the bits of paper from


70





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


the fire, and putting them together, and
what she had made out of them.
"Oh, Rosa! my daughter exclaimed
her father, "where will this prying cu-
riosity of yours lead to! Mr. Daniels,
have you the original of your letter to
me ?"
"Yes, sir, at home among my papers;
I will bring it in a few moments."
He returned almost immediately, and
put a letter into the hand of Mr. Wel-
don, who looked it over, and said:
"Yes; this is an exact copy of the
letter Mr. Daniels sent me, and let me
tell you, Rosa, that in putting the
pieces of paper, which you snatched


71





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


from the fire, together, you had only a
part of them, and from these you drew
your own inferences; and your story
repeated by others, has been the means
of the arrest of an honorable, and high-
minded young man. For the sake of
clearing him, we must make known the
contents of this letter, though we would
have been glad, if possible, to screen
the young man, who is the subject of it.
Here is the letter I received from Mr.
p Daniels:
My dear sir:
I regret much, to be obliged to
give you a piece of information, com-
municated to me to-day, by my son


72





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


William; which is this. He has dis-
covered that the boy Michael, in whom
you and I have taken so much interest,
has taken a considerable amount of
money, from the counting-room safe,
(of which he has a false key,) during
Mr. Wallace's illness. On speaking to
him about it, Michael with many tears,
confessed to William, that he has been
in the habit of taking small sums at a
time; but that having contracted some
gambling debts, he was obliged to take
larger sums to pay them, or be arrested.
We may yet save him, if you will join
with me to hush the matter up, by
making up the deficiency, and then send


73





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


the boy off to California, where he prom-
ises to begin anew, and avoid the vices,
to which he has been addicted. I
would do anything in my power to save
him the disgrace of public exposure, as
I think that would be the ruin of the
boy, and would break his poor mother's
heart. When can I see you to talk the
matter over ? Yours,
JACOB DANIELS.
"Do you see what you have made of
this, Rosa?" asked her father of the
weeping girl. "I cannot feel sorry for
you, my daughter," said he, "but I re-
gret that you are not the only sufferer
by your folly."


74





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"Mr. Daniels, Mr. Daniels, let's have
that noble boy of yours here," said Mr.
Wallace. "I will have him released at
once, and will do all in my power, to
atone to him, for the suffering, and dis-
grace, which have been put upon him."
It was not long before William Dan-
iels, accompanied by his father, and a
few friends, entered the office. And
William was then, for the first time,
made acquainted with the causes,
which led to his arrest. He felt, at
first, as if he could hardly forgive Mr.
Wallace, for so readily believing evil
reports of him, but when the old gen-
tleman told him that in order to show


75





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


his entire confidence in him, he should
take him immediately into partnership;
and also gave him to understand, that
he would give his cordial consent, to
William's engagement to his daughter
Clara, William could hold out no longer.
And the day which had seemed so dark,
ended very happily for him.
Mr. Wallace also allowed the boy
Michael to leave the country privately,
and gave him every encouragement to
lead a life of honesty, in the new coun-
try to which he and his poor mother
were going.
This last lesson, I am happy to say,
was not lost upon Rosa. From this


76





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES. 77

time forth she ceased to fancy that the
thoughts of all others were taken up
with her exclusively; and she would
now as soon touch a viper, as a written
paper which was not directed to herself.

















VAcAnoI has come 1 and away we all hurry,
To leave thg dull city, its dust, and its heat,
Its noise, and its tumult, its bustle and flurry,
Which weary the brain, and which tire the
feet.

Vacation has come! and the wagon is ready,
The trunks are all in, the good-byes are all
said,
Hurrah! we are off, we are off at last, Neddy,
A smooth road underneath, and blue sky over-
head.









SUMMER















Orr,


7--





80


THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


How lovely, and fresh the broad fields are re-
posing,
]Ew pleasant the cottages shaded with green,
The flocks and the herds by the cool streams
are dozing,
All tell of tranquillity ealm an4 serene.

As it D fro& the rock the bright wat*r is

And t4o bro obr its pebly bed glides on
its way,
From the fall oft iJp l-4;sa the cool spray is
plashing,
And the hum of the mill never ceases all day.

On a rude raft we sail on the mill-stream so clear,
Or wade with bare feet in the pure running
brook,
With our torches at night we the slippery eels spear,
Or by day fish for trout with the fly-baited hook.










































XM31I-3 s95 iloj.s N.M.





82 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.

Then to search in the loft for the hen's hidden
treasures,
The rude ladder we mount plunging through
the sweet hay;
From the window we leap, and in search of new
pleasures,
We're off through the green fields and pastures
away.

Then away to the field, on the hay cart we rumble,
We toss the fresh grass, and we rake the dried
hay;
On the top of the hay-stack so fragrant we
tumble,
And ride home with the men at the close of the
day.

When the apples are gathered to make the sweet
cider,
We down to the cider-mill follow the team;





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


83


As the old horse plods round, Ned is driver, I
rider,
As I circle about with the turn of the beam.

When the rich juice has filled every vat, tub, and
barrel,
Each urchin appears duly armed with a straw,
No temperance man with such liquor will quarrel,
'Tis not even forbid by the famous Maine
law."

But, alas for the school-boy vacation is over,
Farewell to the fields, and the bright running
streams;
In the woods, o'er the hills, he 's no longer a
rover,
Save when books are all closed, and he wan-
ders in dreams."













OR THE EVILS OF 'XAGGERATION.

GOOD-TEMPERED, pleasant, and very
amusing girl was Kate Stanley.
Neither pride, affectation, nor ill-
nature marked her character; but still
she possessed one fault, and as it was
one which is not by any means uncom-
mon among young ladies of. the present
day, I cannot pass it by unnoticed.
Kate would have scorned to tell a




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


deliberate falsehood, where anything
which she thought of importance was
concerned, and yet, in her statements
of ordinary occurrences, and her de-
scriptions of every-day scenes, she
never related anything exactly as it
occurred. The habit of exaggeration,
had by long indulgence, and exercise,
grown so strong that she was not aware
of its power. With her, tens were
thousands, feet were miles, moments
were hours, a passing pain was intense
agony. Everything she saw or heard
was either "the very sweetest," "the
most delightful," "perfectly enchant-
U|," or "most horrible," "perfectly


85





86 THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.
awful," "the hatefullest thing in the
world."
So entirely were the other girls in
our school accustomed to hear her talk
in this manner, that they had ceased to
remark it, always taking Kate's asser-
tions with a considerable degree of al-
lowance, and as they said, "letting
them go for what they were worth."
There was one little girl, however,
a new comer in the school, who. could
not comprehend her at all. Little Mary
Grey was the daughter of a country
clergyman, and had always lived in a
retired village, having very little inter-
course with any persons out of her own








.I1 l


I I


OUR SCHOOL GIR~B.


~CLCI(C
l~e~~





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


family. Her father had always incul-
cated upon his family the importance
of the strictest truthfulness, and taught
them to regard the slightest deviation
from it as downright falsehood. And
so conscientious was little Mary, and
so careful to follow his precepts, that
she seemed to weigh every word she
uttered, and to select those which would
exactly express the meaning she wished
to convey.
It was after little Mary arrived at the
school that the scene occurred which I
have mentioned in the story of "Adelle
Sinclair," after Adelle and little Agnes
Stewart had been to Clarence Hill, and


88




T=E SILVER LAKE fOORIS.


the girls had drawn from Agnes fh*
account of their reception at that place.
Little Mary Grey sat in her room,
(which she occupied in common with
Kate Stanley and two other girls,) reCt-
ing her bible before going to bed, whl
Kate and two or three of her friK94
burst into the room,
"Oh, dear!" gasped .te, holding
her sides, and sinking down on the bq ,
oh, dear! I have laughed till I ctiew-
ly thought I should die."
S"Why-Miss--Stanley id Ii.
Mary, slowly, looking up from her bibt.
"What now, little one ?" asked t.
Whiy, I wet n theiaS g g atW 44l sfUl





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


thing it would be to die laughing ; how
did you feel when you thought you
were dying. ?"
"What a simpleton the child is !"
said Kate, feeling the absurdity of mak-
ing a common sense explanation of the
words she had used; then turning to
little Mary, she said:
"Don't alarm yourself, my dear; I
think I shall recover from this par-
oxysm." At this, the girls all laughed,
and little Mary looked from one to
another with a puzzled air, as if she
could not understand them at all, and
then went to reading again.
The next day Kate came running up


90




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


stairs, and said; "Girls, if any of you
want pins, needles, thread, or tape,
there is a little, old, dried up woman
down stairs with some to sell; she is
awfully old; I should think she was
two hundred and fifty, at least."
"Why-Miss--Stanley I" again ex-
claimed poor little Mary; "that cannot
be possible, you know, for people never
live to so great an age now. In the old
testament times"-
"For pity's sake, child, don't talk to
me about the old testament times; but
go and look for yourself, and see if she
is not very old." And off ran little
Mary Grey full of curiosity to see a per-


91




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


son who looked two hundred and ffty
years old; but she was very much
disappointed to see only an ordinary-
looking old woman, about as old as
grandmother at home, and she was only
eighty.
On another occasion Kate sat study-
ing her lesson, when, all at once, she
exclaimed, impatiently, "Well, here I
have sat poring over this lesson about
forty hours. I don't see the use of
giving a person a thousand pages to
learn I"
"Forty hours at one lesson, Miss
Stanley I" exclaimed the astonished lit.
t1 Mary, who could not becomeW aoM~




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


98


tomed to forms of expression so entirely
new to her; that is a long time in-
deed to be studying on one lesson, and
I should hardly think there could be a
thousand pages in that book."
"Well she is the oddest little creature
I ever met in this world," said Kate,
laughing; "I have not made a remark
since she came here, that has not caused
her the most unlimited surprise. As
for her, I do not believe she ever as-
serted anything positively in her life,
she is so afraid she shall say something
that is not strictly true. I positively
believe that if you were to meet her in
the hall, and ask her if she got up tis





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


morning, she would say, 'Why, really
I believe so-but, I will not be certain
of it-I rather think I did.' Yesterday,
do you believe, she came and told me
she had brought a pail full of water up
to my room for me; but soon after she
came running to me, with an expression
of contrition on her face, and exclaimed,
'Miss Stanley, I said I had carried a
pail full of water up to your room; but
I was mistaken, it was not quite full.'
Probably," added Kate, the pail would
have held two drops more."
At this, the girls all laughed again,
and little Mary, who was extremely sen-
sitive, stood looking at them as if the


94




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


"two drops" had got into her eyes.
But the other girls said to her, "Don't
cry, Mary, we all know Kate, and make
every allowance for all she says."
One fine summer afternoon the class
in botany, of which Kate was a mem-
ber, went out to gather flowers. In the
course of the afternoon, however, an
unexpected, but very slight shower
came up, and they did not return till
nearly tea-time. When they came in,
Kate Stanley threw herself into a chair,
exclaiming:
"Oh, dear 1 I am tired to death I I
never was so tired since I was bornm
I could not take another step to save


95




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


my life! It was perfectly ridiculous in
Miss Allen to take us round fifty miles;
and then that pouring rain came on,
and we had to wade through the mud.
Positively, 1 was mud to the knees I"
"Pouring rain, Miss Stanley!" ex-
claimed little Mary Grey, in astonish-
mnnt, "why there was only a slight
shower here, and your shoes do not look
as if you had been in such deep mud."
"Don't they, little Simpleton?" said
Kate, "well, just put away my hat and
scarf, and then come back with your
scales and weights, for I have not done
talking yet."
Then turning to the other girls, who


96





THI SILVER LAKE STORII.


had remained at home, she continued;
"Well, the rain drove us into a cottage,
and I never had such a time I never in
the world! the woman had at least
twenty brats, about that high, toddling
about"-
"Oh-Miss-Stanley 1 impossible I"
interrupted little Mary.
"I do really believe that child will
do me some good, after all," said Kate,
laughing good-naturedly; "her simple
'Why-Miss-Stanley!' and 'Oh-Miss
-Stanley-is it possible!' pin me down
to plain matter of fact, at once. Some-
times, I think she is deeper than she
seems, and does it on purpose to
7


97




THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


make me reflect, and sober down my
statements."
"The fact is-" began Olivia Harley.
"Ah!" interrupted Kate, "here comes
in explanatory notes by Miss Factotum."
"I think it would be well for you,
Kate, if explanatory notes could accom-
pany you wherever you go," answered
Olivia, "but the fact is, girls, we have
taken rather a long walk, of perhaps
two or three miles, and are pretty tired,
but I rather think that when the tea
bell rings, Miss Kate, as well as the
rest of us, will show that she can take
a few steps more, and pretty rapid ones
too, to save her life; for if she feels as


98





THE SILVER LAKE STORIES.


I do, her long walk has given her some-
thing of an appetite. As to the shower,
I suspect it was no more severe with us
than with you, but fearing it might rain
hard we stopped for a few moments at
the first cottage we saw; and here the
twenty brats, seen by the eye of sober
reality, dwindle down to two little chil-
dren, who were playing about the floor,
and two older ones, who were playing
out of doors." Just then the tea bell
rang, and the girls all hurried down to
the tea-table.
One day Cecilia Dale came into the
,room, where several of the girls were
assembled, and exclaimed:


99




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