• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The blackberries
 The wax doll
 The falcon family
 The window pane at night
 Back Cover






Title: Rose Tremaine, or, The Blackberries, and other stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002216/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rose Tremaine, or, The Blackberries, and other stories
Alternate Title: Rose Tremaine
Blackberries
Physical Description: 48 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crosby and Nichols ( Publisher )
Publisher: Crosby & Nichols
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1852
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1852   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1852   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002216
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236771
oclc - 45758722
notis - ALH7249
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The blackberries
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The wax doll
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The falcon family
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The window pane at night
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




ROSE TREMAINE

OR, THE


BLACKBERRIES,

AND


OTHER STORIES.







BOSTONW
CROSBY & NICHOLS.
1852.


1~ V








STORIES.


THE BLACKBERRIES.
IN Cumberland there are, as everybody
jnows, a number of beautiful lakes;
some are large, and others small, but
most of them have pretty little woody
islands dotted over their surface, andi
fairy bays and headlands on their sh~es.
In the numerous peaceful valleys which
slope from the lofty hills to the water's
edge, are built pretty villages and ham-
lets, and many handsome houses ae
(5).





THE BLACKBERRIES.


scattered about in the woods, and on the
promontories above them.
In one of these vales was a village more
secluded than ordinary from the world's
notice. Its inhabitants were chiefly com-
posed of farmers, and the laborers whom
they employed. Among the latter, there
S was nowhere to be found a more indus-
trious and clever, or more cheerful man,
than -tdward Trevaine; he was always
in request wherever work requiring more
than usual talent and knowledge was
to be done, an4 consequently he gained
more money than most of his companions;
this might have thade them jealous, had
he iot been ever ready to help them in
sorrow or want to the best of his ability.
Trevaine was also blessed by the pos-




THE BLACKBERRIES.


session of a good wife, and one sweet
little daughter, who was the pride and
delight, not only of her parents, but of
the whole village. Mothers told their
children to follow the example of little
Rose, and fathers said how happy the
Tremaines must he in her gqpd conduct
At school her lessons were ready first,
and repeated the mot perfectly; .at play
she was always kiXn and obliift ag4
never quarrelsome; and at home she
was obedient and affectionate; never '
giving trouble, but wag ing for oppor-
tunities to assist her kintr pother in her
household, work; but still Rose was not
perfectly good; she used sometfnes,
though very seldom, to do what she was





THE BLACKBERRIES.


not told to do; and I will give you an
account of one of these sad occasions.
Rose returned from school one bright
morning, in the beginning of autumn,
with her neat little book-bag on her arm,
and her sweet face beaming with happi-
ness. Shei ran across the well-stocked
garden, and entering the cottage threw
her anns round her mother's neck, and
kissed her.
"Have you been good this morning,
darling?" was the kind question with
which she was greeted.
"Yes, mother and now I want you
to grant me a favor I Will yqa?"
"What is it dear?"
"May I go into the field above the
sand bay, to see if the blackberries are




THE BLACKBERRIES.


ripe? I won't eat many, but will bring
them home to you, my own dear mother;
and if I get a great quantity you will
make a pudding for Sunday, and father
will be so pleased!"
"Yes," replied her mother, "you may
go dear; but mind you ao not go beyond
the first field, or I shall not know where
to find you for dinner."
So Rose put her books in the cup-
board, and, after promising obedience,
took her little basket and bounded from
the house. She soon reached the desired
spot, and hunted all over the hedges and
brambles she could find, but there was
no ripe fruit on them; and she picked a
few flowers, wandered on towards the
stile that led into the next field; this





THE BLACKBERRIES.


was quickly reached, and Rose looked
over it. She stretched out her head to
see if any blackberries were ripe there,
and perceived, not within reach of where
she stood, but yet so near, that if she
only just got over the gate she could ob-
tain them, a large bunch of the finest|
had seen that day.
"Oh," thought Rose, "I must have
these; I will only cross the stile and-
come back again. Mother's reason for.*
telling me not to go, was in case she
should notbeable to find me." And in
one moment she had disobeyed, and was
standing on the other side of the hedge,
eagerly plucking the berries. When
they were gathered, Rose looked itrther,
and at about half a dozen yards' distance

4 l. ,
a. t 4




THE BLACKBERRIES.


were a great many more, so she said to
herself,-" Well, just these, and I will
go back;" but when these were also de-
posited in her basket, she was tempted
afresh, and I am sorry to say, strayed
from bramble to bramble, till she had
rwched the opposite stile that led into a
third field; here she again peeped, and a
'hunch of nuts tempted her to transgress
still further, and the little girl yielded,
and went after them. She picked the
nuts from the tree, and looked around
her; the hedge was formed of nut trees
and brambles, and she thought, that as
she had gone into the enclosure, she
might as well get all she could; and she
Swalk~e on, pulling every nut or berry
that she saw. By and by she reached a





THE BLACKBERRIES.


part of a fence which joined a wild wood,
that covered the sides and summit of one
of the highest hills on the borders of the
lake; just before her was a gap that had
been made by the village children, when
on nutting excursions, and inside the
edge of the forest was a beautiful bed of
wild strawberries.
Oh !" exclaimed the little girl, "how
beautiful they look I will pick them,
and then I must run back as fast as I
can." So she scrambled through the
hedge, and.began to gather the fruit in
great haste; but the bank was a long
one, and led some way into the wood;
:besides, the nuts hung in clusters around,
and Rose was tempted on, till at let she
lost the path.





THE BLACKBERRIES.


There were a great many little roads
through the wood, and she ran about
looking and longing for the one that led
to the village, but she could not find it.
Then she called to her mother as loud as
she could, but her mother could neither
hear nor answer her; so at last she sat
down on the mossy-root of a large oak
tree, and cried very bitterly. "Oh dear 1"
she said, "how unhappy am II What
will become of me? I shall never find
my way out of the wood, and the gipsies
will take me away." And her tears
flowed afresh. But soon Rose felt hun-
gry; she had not eaten since her break-
fast, and it was now far advanced in the
afternua; so she took the wild fruits
that had seduced her into the wood and
*





THE BLACKBERRIES.


made an unsubstantial meal of them.
After resting a little she again set out on
her wanderings; but turn where she
would the paths only led further into the
forest. Poor Rose now began to be very
frightened and very sad, and she wished
she had staid in the first field and done
as her mother had bidden her.
She walked a long way further, and
saw that the sun was getting very low,
and then she stood still by the side of a
little spring of water that welled up from
beneath a bit of gray rock, thickly cover-
ed with yellow lichen, and over which
the bare and knotty roots of the trees
were hanging. Rose waited and watched
till the sun was gone, and darkness had
spread its mantle over the quiet earth.




THE BLACKBERRIES.


She did not heed the little birds that
were twittering Good night" to one an-
other in the branches, or the merry chirp
of the grasshoppers come out for their
evening stroll; but she thought of her
dear mother, and her little heart was
bursting with its load of grief and guilt.
It was useless to go further, and Rose's
feet were swollen already with walking;
so she sat down by the gray stone and
gazed on the tiny pool formed by the
crystal spring. As she watched it she
saw the reflected image of a star trem-
bling on its mirror-like surface, and Rose
raised her weeping eyes to the blue hea-
ven above. There she saw the countless
lamps of light burning in their glory;
and as her thoughts reverted to the God





THE BLACKBERRIES.


who had created them, she bent her
knees and fervently supplicated mercy
and protection. She rose calm and com-
forted, and then laid herself down on the
green moss and grass to rest before she
again attempted to reach the village.
Meantime all was grief and sorrow in
the hamlet. Mrs. Trevaine went to call
Rose, and found she was not in the first
field; she searched for her in those ad-
joining, but in vain. She then flew back
to the village, and asked her neighbors
if they had seen her lost child. But all
said "No:" and the terrified mother be-
came frantic with anxiety. Her husband
now returned from his work with the
other men, and on hearing the sorrowful





THE BLACKBERRIES.


tale, they all agreed to go in quest of the
the little truant.
Accordingly, they formed into nume-
rous parties, and took different routes,
agreeing to return to the village by an
appointed hour, so that if none of them
had found Rose they might consult about
further plans of search. The time so
anxiously looked for by the agonised
mother at length arrived, and the men
were discovered approaching on their re-
turn. The children ran towards them to
learn news of their lost companion, but
did not hasten back to their mothers, for
they had no joyful tidings to communi-
cate. In a few minutes the various par-
ties had met on the village green, under
the branches of the aged lime tree; and,
2





THE BLACKBERRIES.


after comparing their adventures, and
echoing the tale of disappointment from
mouth to mouth, Edward and a few of
the kindest of his neighbors arranged to
make one more trial that night in the
wood, and armed with stout sticks and
lanterns they set out, accompanied by
the prayers of all who remained behind.
After wandering and searching for some
time, without obtaining so much even as
a trace of the lost child, one of the men,
who was separated some distance from
the rest, hailed them with the cry of
"Found, found!" All hurried to the
sound of the voice, and there, lying on
the green moss, was little Rose in a
troubled sleep. Her father caught ber
in his arms, and, with a loud scream, the





THE BLACKBERRIES.


little creature recognized him in the un-
certain light, and buried her burning
face on his shoulder. Questions were
rapidly put to the poor child, and an-
swered by her with shame and sorrow,
and the men prepared to carry her back
to the village in triumph. Rose, in the
meantime, told her father that she was
dreaming at the very moment he awoke
her that a wolf was eating her up, and
said she was trying to pray to God to
save her from it. In the course of an
hour they were described from the village
green, and this time the little folks who
flew to meet them vied with each other
in trying who should first reach the
anxious group of men and women, and
tell them that dear Rose was safe. The





THE BLACKBERRIES.


pastor, who was occupied in 'his study,
came out to meet them, and after the
first delirium of joy was over, he called
upon his flock to return thanks to God
for the preservation of the beloved child.
What words can picture the beauty of
the scene which followed? There, on
the soft grass under the old tree, knelt
many an aged man and woman, many a
hale, hearty laborer and his wife, and
many a light-hearted child. All were
hushed in solemn silence, while their
venerated minister, with Rose kneeling
beside him, implored the pardon of God
for her fault, and His blessing upon her,
and that His watchful eye might be over
every one then before Him, to protect
them from all evil and save them from


20





THE BLACKBERRIES. 21

sin. He then called on the assembly to
sing a hymn of praise, and afterwards
dismissed them with his blessing. The
benighted traveller started on his road
to hear the notes of thanksgiving swell-
ing on the moonlit air, and paused and
hung on the notes till they died away,
when, with a full heart and chastening
sigh, he resumed his way, wondering
whence those voices could have arisen,
so sweet, so full of meaning were the
souls who sung.









THE WAX DOLL.


SOFTEN when a little girl, have I
stood at shop-windows, gazing at
wax dolls. They seemed far be-
yond my reach, for I had no money to pur-
chase them. And yet they looked so
smiling, it was hard to leave them and
go home to my alabaster doll, Sally,
whose beauty had long since departed.
Sometimes carriages would before the
shop-doors where I was peeping in, bear-
ing richly dressed ladies, and little girls,
looking as fine as the wax dolls. Then
the steps were let down with a great
slam, and they tripping along entered
(22)





THE WAX DOLL.


the shop. They asked for wax dolls, and
I must needs look on to see which was
the chosen one. A little girl would hold
it forth so pleased, that I had to be
pleased too as, she rustled by me in her
silk dress and sprang into the carriage,
not even knowing that I was standing
near. But as she passed, I could hear
her mama say anxiously, sometimes,-
"Take care, my daughter, do not hurt
your new doll."
I went home and was soon consoled by
my alabaster baby, Sally, which I held
without fear.
Once I went to visit a little girl, who
had a splendid wax doll sent to her from
her uncle in London. But where do you
think it was? It was in a glass case. I





THE WAX DOLL.


was allowed to look at its red cheeks,
and curling hair, and satin slippers, and
gay sash, but not to touch her. A very
careful, big person, could take her out
of the case, and pull a wire that opened
and shut her eyes, but no child was al-
lowed to pull that mysterious wire. What
great wonder took hold of my mind when
I saw those eyes close and open! But I
went home to my plain doll Sally more
satisfied than ever. I kissed her and
tossed her in the air, and when she
came down head first, I laughed, and
said,
"It is better to have you, Sally,
though you are not so pretty, than a wax
doll in a case!
Since I became a woman I have seen





THE WAX DOLL.


many wax dolls,-gay, happy-looking
things. Some were new-year's gifts;
some, birth-day presents; and the little
children to whom they were presented
seemed gay and happy too: but once I
saw a wax doll in a coffin, and I will tell
you how it was.
I knew a little boy whom I shall call
Angel, because he is now an angel in
heaven. He was like a beautiful doll
when he was alive, for he had large blue
eyes, and light curling hair, and a round,
smooth face, and a dimpled smile.
This little boy had a friend about three
years old. I will call her Cherub, be-
cause she, too, is now a cherub in heaven.
She did not look like a doll; her features
were not so regular as the boy's, but





THE WAX DOLL.


there was something wonderfully sweet
in her darkly bright eyes, that made you
think of light and love; and then she
sang like one of Heaven's children before
her time.
Well, Angel was taken ill, and after a
few days of suffering he said,-
"Mama, I wish you to get my own
money, that is in my little purse, and
buy a wax doll for Cherub."
His mama said-" Yes, my child;"
but before she could keep her promise
he went to sleep in Christ, or as some
say, he died.
Then his mama, weeping that her
child was gone, yet glad that he was free
from pain and tears, remembered her
promise. So she went to Angel's own





THE WAX DOLL.


little purse, and took out the money and
bought a wax doll, and sent it to Cherub,
saying, that an angel had given it to
her.
Cherub took the doll in her arms, and
sang sweet songs to it, and talked about
Angel, and began to think of heaven.
Soon after Cherub became ill of the
same disease that took away Angel. She
often asked for her doll, and while she
had breath, sang, with her clear, rich
voice, until our hearts knew not which
most to feel, delight or dread.
When she was dying, she said, to one
who loved her,-
"Will you give me a beautiful blue
dress ?
And he said,-





THE WAX DOLL.


God is making a beautiful dress for
you, my child."
So the lovely creature's spirit went to
meet Angel's, and she was laid, meek
and peaceful, in her coffin, and knew
tears no more.
Then those who loved her, thought,
"What shall we do with Angel's doll?
no one should have it but Cherub."
So they took the doll, and laid it softly
in Cherub's arms, in the coffin, and its
red cheeks and bright eyes were pillowed
near the pale, calm face of the child.
They rest together in a tranquil grave-
yard, and evergreens grow around them.

































THE FALCON.









THE FALCON FAMILY.


HOSE diurnal birds of prey
which can be trained for
I hunting are termed Nobiles,
or Noble; and among them
j are almost all those which
form the falcon or hawk
tribe. They equal eagles in courage;
and although they are inferior in size
and strength, they are superior in docili-
ty, gentleness, and entire obedience to
the commands of those who train them
for use or amusement.
The beak of falcons is very strong, and
much more curved than that of any other
(31)





THE FALCON FAMILY.


bird of prey; it is also shorter, and has
a projection from each edge of the upper
part, like a sharply pointed tooth. The
wings are long, and end in a point on
one side; which shape obliges these
birds to fly in a slanting direction when
the weather is calm, and if they wish to
rise in a straight line, they are forced to
fly against the wind. They do not seek
dead prey, and pursue their game at full
speed, falling down upon it perpendicu-
larly with great swiftness. Old birds
differ much from the young in plumage,
and the colors are brown, white, black,
and gray, and occasionally a reddish tint;
the female is generally one-third larger
than the male; the eye-brows of both
project very much, which gives them a





THE FALCON FAMILY.


very peculiar appearance, and their eyes
are remarkably brilliant. The size va-
ries from that of a large cock to a pigeon;
the legs are blue or yellow, and there is
a great variety of shape in the spots and
bands formed by the feathers.
In consequence of falconry, or hawk-
ing, having been it former times a sport
among all classes in northern nations,
many curious laws were made about the
practice of it, as at this day we find for
shooting, fishing, or hunting with dogs;
and a great deal of money was spent in
keeping and training these birds. In
those days it was only thought necessary
for a nobleman to understand hawking,
hunting, and exercise of arms; and he
might, if he pleased, leave study and'





THE FALCON FAMILY.


learning to those who were of a rank be-
neath his own, without being remarkable
for his ignorance. There are many old
portraits of noblemen and gentlemen,
and even ladies, (for they used to join in
the sport on horseback,,) with falcons on
their wrists; and King Harold was re-
presented with a birdebn his hand and a
dog under his arm. The chief falconer
was the fourth officer in rank at court,
at the time when Wales had its own
kings; but he was only allowed to take
three draughts a day out of his drinking
horn, for fear he should get tipsy and
neglect his birds.
The expenses of falconry being so enor-
mous, those who infringed the laws re-
specting it were often severely punished.





























THE COMMON FALCON,






THE FALCON FAMILY.


From a very old book we learn, that to
steal a hawk, or even its eggs when found
by chance, in the time of Edward II.,
subjected a person to imprisonment, and
to pay a sum of money. It was the
same in the time of Queen Elizabeth,
with the additions that the offender was
obliged to find some one who would an-
swer for his good behaviour for seven
years; and if he could not procure any
one to do so, he was forced to remain in
prison for that period.
A thousand pounds are said to have
been given for a set of hawks, although
the birds were procured in England,
Wales, Scotland, and Ireland; these
large sums, therefore, must have been
paid for the trouble of training them.





THE FALCON FAMILY.


Occasionally they were brought from
Norway, and were then so much thought
of, that they were esteemed fit for a
sovereign. King John had two given to
him as a bribe for allowing a man to
trade in cheese.
Among the different kinds used in
sport, the Perigrine falcon was reckoned
the best, and is now the only one kept
for the purpose in England, and that
very rarely. Henry II. is said to have
sent for some of them every year into
Pembrokeshire. It however lives in most
of the northern parts of the earth, and
its flight is so rapid, that there are few
countries which it does not visit.
The Gyr falcon is one of the largest of
the tribe; its legs and beak are yellow,





THE FALCON FAMILY.


and it was formerly trained to catch
cranes, herons, and wild geese. The
Goshawk was also flown at the same
prey, but more especially at pheasants
and partridges. Among the smaller
trained species was the Kestril, which
nests in the holes of ruins, high towers,
or clefts of rocks; its chief food is field-
mice, and it is that hawk which we see
remaining a long time in the air in one
spot, fanning its wings and watching for
its prey. The Hobby, also a small species,
was taught to catch larks, and was thrown
from the hand near their haunts, when
the poor little creatures would crowd to-
gether and remain motionless from fear;
a net was then thrown over them, and
all were secured.




THE FALCON FAMILY.


The Kite, the Sparrowhawk, the Hen-
harrier, the Merlin, and the Buzzard, do
not appear to have been used for sport-
ing. The first builds its nests in large
forests, and has a forked tail. It may
be known in the air from all other birds
by its smooth flight, for its wings scarcely
seem to move, and it appears frequently
to remain motionless for a time. There
is an old saying, that when kites fly
high it will be fair weather; and the fa-
mous Pliny, who lived in the last times
of the ancient Romans, and wrote a great
deal about birds, says that the invention
of the rudder for steering boats and ships
was taken from the motion of a kite's
tail.
The Sparrowhawk is a great enemy to




4.f

'A
A


z


THE KITE.





THIE FALCON FAMILY.


pigeons and partridges; and it and the
Hen-harrier are very destructive to poul-
try. When we hear a hen cackle, and
see her cower down upon the ground,
and anxiously cover all her chickens
with her wings, we may be sure that
one of these destroyers is in the neigh-
borhood. The Merlin, although small,
is a very courageous bird, flies low, and
skims along the tops of the hedges in
search of its prey; it kills partridges by
one stroke upon the neck.
The Buzzards are much less active
than other hawks, they eat frogs, lizards,
mice, rabbits, birds, worms, and insects;
and one of them, which frequents moors
and marshy places, never soars into the
air. It is a very voracious bird, and





44 THE FALCON FAMILY.

kills many young ducks; its legs are
longer and more slender than those of
hawks in general, by which it is better
enabled to find its way through wet
places.












THE WINDOW PANE AT NIGHT.

" OH, what is the matter, my child I
Your looks are most awfully wild,-
Why leave off your usual play ?
Not noisy, for I heard not a sound,-
Now you throw down your doll on the
ground,-
Do listen, my Maud, and obey.

"Here's plenty of light-as you see,
though you'd play in the dark far from
me,
Behind the red curtain you ran,
(45)





THE WINDOW PANE AT NIGHT.


But now you run frightened about,
Of the reason you leave me in doubt;
Pray tell me the cause-if you can ?"

"Papa, at the window I saw!-"
"An owl, I suppose, or jackdaw."
Oh, no, but a robber, I'm sure!
She stared at me full in the face!"
"What, one of the poor gipsy race ?"-
"Why, no, I can't say she looked
poor.

"Her face is as rosy as mine;
Her eyes are bright blue-and they
shine,
But yet she began to look pale,
And opening her mouth as if crying,
I felt as if too, was dying!"
"Well, this is a wondrous tale!"





THE WINDOW PANE AT NIGHT.


"0 cruel papa, how you laugh!
As if 'twere a cow or a calf,
That really is your belief.
Papa might, I think, believe me-
Do go to the window and see,
Then send out and catch the young
thief !"
He took little Maud in his arms,
And said "These are foolish alarms,
The pretty young thief' I have caught I
Come now to the window with me,
And then you will speedily see
The wonder the window-glass wrought."
Quickly holding her up to the pane,
She saw the same face come again!
And there was papa's face also!





48 THE WINDOW PANE AT NIGHT.
Convinced now, she bashfully smiled,
The glass showed a sweet smiling child
"Then this is the case,
I saw my own face !"
Which truth little Maud was most
happy to know.




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Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs