• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Castle-building
 Castle-builders
 Flower of the Family
 Fall of the Air-castles
 Hopes and disappointments
 Glimmerings of Sunshine
 Strawberry Patch
 A Secret Discovered
 An Unexpected Visitor
 Changes at Rose Cottage
 Amy, as a Governess
 An Unlooked-for Answer
 A Nut for Mrs. Simpkins
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Uncle Frank's home stories
Title: The strawberry girl, or, How to rise in the world
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002188/00001
 Material Information
Title: The strawberry girl, or, How to rise in the world
Series Title: Uncle Frank's home stories
Alternate Title: How to rise in the world
Physical Description: 174 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Scribner, Charles, 1821-1871 ( Publisher )
Benedict, Charles W ( Printer )
Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Howland, William ( Engraver )
Publisher: Charles Scribner
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: C.W. Benedict, Stereotyper and Printer
Publication Date: 1852, c1851
Copyright Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Girls -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Uncle Frank.
General Note: Added title page, engraved.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by W. Roberts and Howland.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002188
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240035
oclc - 08837115
notis - ALJ0574

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Front Matter 3
    Half Title
        Front Matter 6
    Title Page
        Page i
    Copyright
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Castle-building
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Castle-builders
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Plate 1
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Flower of the Family
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Fall of the Air-castles
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Plate 2
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Hopes and disappointments
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Plate 3
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Glimmerings of Sunshine
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Plate 4
    Strawberry Patch
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    A Secret Discovered
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    An Unexpected Visitor
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Changes at Rose Cottage
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    Amy, as a Governess
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Plate 5
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    An Unlooked-for Answer
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    A Nut for Mrs. Simpkins
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Plate 6
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Back Cover
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Spine
        Page 178
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THE


STRAWBERRY


GIRL;


HOW TO RISE IN THE WORLD.


With Sll1tratinws.

BY UNCLE FRANK,
AUTHOR OF THE "WILLOW LANE ITORIEl," 1TO.




NEW YORK:
CHARLES SCRIBNER, 145 NASSAU STREET.
1852.



















Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 18S1, by
CHARLES SCRIBNER,
In the Clerk's Omce of the District Court of the United State for
the Southern District of New York.


C. W. BENKDICT.
STEREOTnPER AND PRINaTU,
201 William at., N. Y.


















CONTENTS.





INTRODUCTION, 7

CASTLE-BUILDING 14

THE CASTLE-BUILDERS, 19

THE FLOWER OF THE FAMILY, 30

THE FALL OF THE AIR-CASTLES, 45

HOPES AND DISAPPOINTMENS, 59

GLIMMERING OF SUNSHINE, 79

THAT STRAWBERRY PATCH, 101

A SECRET DISCOVERED, 110






CONTENTS.


AN UNEXPECTED VISITOR,

CHANGES AT ROSE COTTAGE,

AMT, AS A GOVERNESS,

AN UNLOOKED-FOR ANSWER,

A NUT FOR MRS. SIMPKINS, .


.

* .

*

.


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONL


AMY ROSE AND HER BROTHER, Frontispiece

VIGNETTE TITLE-PAGE, 1

THE EVENING PRAYER, 26

WATCHING FOR THE SHIP, 54

" WHAT MONSTROUS STITCHES 74

THE SERENADERS, 99

THE PROFESSOR AND THE GOVERNESS, 156

THE CLASS IN BOTANT, 169











THE STRAWBERRY GIRL


CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTION.

You will find in this book, little friend,
a tale of every-day life-nothing more
and nothing less. The incidents in it
may some of them be rather remarkable;
yet I must inform you at the outset, that
they are not generally such as to startle,
and astonish, and bewilder you. I give





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


them to you in their native simplicity-
almost in their unpretending homespun
costume.
If you should take a fancy, however,
that the book is dull, because it has to
do, for the most part, with people, and
facts, and scenes, such as we all fre-
quently meet with, you would be some-
what mistaken, I think. If you find the
book dull-and I can't undertake to pro-
mise you that you will not, though I cer-
tainly hope you will find it quite the re-
verse-its dullness will not be owing to
a want of interest in the persons and
things I talk about. They are interest-
ing enough. You can't find better tim





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


ber from which to frame a story, or a
series of stories, that will entertain and
please everybody, than you can right
around you, in the very neighborhood
where you live. I have often thought,
that the farther one goes away from
home to gather his stories, the more dry
the stories seem to children; and I sup-
pose that is the reason why all the boys
and girls like better to get hold of a book
that was written in their own country,
than one that was written by somebody
on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean.
So that, if you should take a fancy that
my book is a little dull-which, as I said
befoi e, I hope will not be the case-you





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


must charge the dullness not to the rank
and condition of the persons I write
about, nor to the commonness of the inci-
dents which are related, but to another
cause, less creditable, perhaps, to the
author.
You cannot read the history of any in-
dividual-no matter whether he is rich
or poor, whether he moves in high cir-
cles or in low circles, whether he drives
his carriage or gets his scanty living by
hard labor with his hands, whether he
has had the benefit of schools and col-
leges or has been obliged to pick up his
education by the wayside-you cannot
carefully read the history of any one,





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


without getting some hints from it that
will be useful to you in some way or
other; and this sketch of the Strawberry
Girl would be a very poor one indeed,
if it did not furnish such hints. I think
you will discover some as you pass along,
that may prove of service to you.
Let me point out two or three truths
which the history itself seems to bring
out, and which you will do well to note
down in the memorandum book of your
mind. I think you will find here these
valuable lessons, if you don't discover
any others:
That happiness is not confined to any
station in life.





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


That it is not the result of outward cir-
cumstances, so much as of the disposition
of one's own mind.
That honesty, principle, faithfulness,
industry, virtue, religion, bring with them
their own rewards; and that if one de-
sires to rise in the world, he cannot find
so sure a ladder as one made of such
rounds as these.
That it is a useless waste of time to
fret and find fault with our condition.
That a contented spirit is a gem more
to be coveted than gold or diamonds.
That kindness, and gentleness, and
love, can win their way to almost any
heart.





TIE STRAWBERRY GIRL. 13

That it is no disgrace to anybody to be
poor.
That it is both foolish and wicked to
be ashamed of the lot in which God has
placed us.
That wealth does not always secure a
well-cultivated mind; and that the ab-
sence of wealth does not always imply a
want either of education or refinement.












CHAPTER II.

CASTLE-BUILDING.

"OH, Eddy!" said little Bessie Rose,
running into the room where her brother
and sister were playing, "father is
coming home next week. How glad I
shall be to see him."
"Who said so, sister?" asked Amy,
who was older than Bessie, and not quite
so extravagant in her hopes and expecta-
tions; "who told you so, dear ?"






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"Grandfather told me," said Bessie.
"But how does he know, I wonder ?"
"Oh, I don't know that. But he said
he was almost sure papa would come
home next week."
"Is he here now ?"
"No, he has gone down to the sea-
shore."
How light-hearted children are; and
how easily their bosoms are filled with
hope. Both these girls clapped their
hands, and danced about the room, with
almost as much joy as they would have
felt if their father had actually stepped
into the room where they were. Chil-
dren, who have seen but little of the





16 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


world, and have not often been painfully
disappointed, do not allow their happi-
ness to be marred by doubts and fears,
like those who are older.
I wonder what papa will bring me ?"
said Bessie. "A string of coral beads, I
guess."
And I guess he will bring me ever
so many shells-all sorts of pretty
shells," said Amy, "and some East In-
dia flower seeds."
And a monkey, and a music box, and
a doll that winks with its eyes, like Kate
Merrill's," little Bessie rattled on, evi-
dently without having heard her sister,
and meaning to join the string containing





THE STRAWBERRY CIRL.


the three last mentioned articles to the
one with the coral beads."
Amy laughed heartily at the expense
of the poor monkey, recommending her
sister to teach him how to dance and
keep time to the tunes played by the
music box.
Edwin-the gentle one, the pet of the
sisters-was not so wild in his notions.
Eddy was a sickly boy. He had been a
delicate child from his birth. There was
always more seriousness about him than
about either of the other children. Be-
sides, he never thought much of his own
happiness. It was enough for him, if he
could see others happy, and especially





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


his sisters. It made him happy, to see.
them enjoy themselves. As for him, he
said, he was very rich, and if his father
did not buy anything for him, he should
not feel bad about it.
"You rich!" exclaimed both of the
girls, laughing.
"Yes," said Eddy.
"But how is that ?" asked Amy.
"I've got two of the best sisters in the
world," said Eddy. "I'm rich enough.
When papa comes home, I don't know
but I shall be too rich."
And so they went on; building castles
in the air.













CHAPTER III.

THE CASTLE-BUILDERS.

I MUST give you a more definite ac-
count of these three children and their
parents. As you have no doubt guessed,
Mr. Rose, their father, is a sailor. He
followed the sea, for most of the time,
ever since he was twelve years old. It
was a sad day, to be sure, when, for the
first time after his marriage and the birth
of his daughter Amy, he tore himself
2






TIE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


away from his humble dwelling, and
went on board the ship that was to take
him thousands of miles from his native
land. It was a sad day, and the tears
flowed freely down his weather-beaten
cheeks, as he uttered his farewell bless-
ing. But he was brought up to follow
the sea. His father was a sailor. So
were all his brothers. They knew very
little about work on land; and painful as
it was to be so long separated from his
family, he saw no other way of getting a
living than to go to sea.
Matthew Rose was a poor man. But
he managed to support his family com-
fortably. Their wants were not so great






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


as those of some families I know of. If
they had expected a thousand dollars a
year, they would have been greatly dis-
appointed. If they had regarded that
sum as necessary to a comfortable living,
they would have had a miserable time of
it. But Mrs. Rose had learned two
valuable arts: that of living within her
means, and that of being tolerably con-
tented with the temporal things that fell
to her share. She was a Christian. So
was her husband. They were Christians
in the highest sense of the te:m. Their.
religion had soul in it. It was some-
thing more than a bundle of dry bones.
They carried their religion into every






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


department of life; and they taught its
principles carefully to their children.
The result was that the sailor's cottage
was always a happy spot. Mr. Rose
himself, though so often and so long
separated from those he loved most
fondly, was a happy man; for

"He is the happy man, whose life e'en now
Shows somewhat of the happier life to come."

Mr. Rose's cottage was situated within
a mile or two of the sea-shore, in the
State of New Jersey. There was not
much of a village where he lived. Peo-
ple were rather scarce in that region.
To tell the truth, the land in that part of





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


the country is not the best in the world.
It is poor enough, to tell the whole truth.
Still, it is a pleasant spot. It is pleasant
to have a fine beach of white sand near
you; to be able to wander for miles
along that beach, picking up shells; to
play with the saucy waves, as they dash
against the shore; to gaze upon the vast
ocean, when it is lashed into foam, and
the surf is high; to listen to the sound
of the waves, always in motion, always
uttering its strange murmurs, even when
its bosom seems at rest.
The government and early training of
the children fell almost entirely to the
lot of the mother; and she seems to have





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


possessed no small share of tact in their
management. As soon as they could
speak, they were taught the language of
prayer and praise. Before they could
speak plain, this well-known hymn was
repeated by each one of them, as they
retired fur the night:

"Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul to keep;
If I should die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take."

At the time when the conversation re-
lated in the preceding chapter took place,
there were two children-Amy and Bes-
sie. Eddy-the gentle little Eddy, had
gone to his rest. These children, with
















I!I.j
\.III Dv d


jilt
//









-- THE EVENING PRAYER. SI





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


the mother and grandfather Rose, com-
prised the whole family, when Mr. Rose
was away at sea. Some of you will
wonder how they got along without any
servant. But they did get along without
any, in some way or another. Mrs. Rose
had a habit of helping herself a good
deal; and the children, at the time I am
speaking of, did not need much helping.
They, too, had learned to help them-
selves.
You will inquire, perhaps, what sort
of education the children had. There
was a school about a mile from Mr.
Rose's, and the two eldest, Amy and
Bessie, had for some years been accus-





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


tomed to walk there and back, during
the time when the school was kept, al-
most every day. And they had been
good scholars, too. There were none in
the school who were more faithful in
their studies than they. There were
none of their age, more frequently at the
head of the spelling class than they were.
None more readily did the hard sums or
answered more correctly the questions
that were put to them out of Morse's
Geography. I may go farther, and say
that Amy was generally, if not always
reckoned among the very best scholars
in school.
As it is about Amy that my story






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.. 29

principally relates, you will not think I
slight Bessie, if I have less to do with
her than with her sister; though I do
not mean to neglect her altogether, by
any means.












CHAPTER IV.

THE FLOWER OF THE FAMILY.

AMY ROSE was the flower of the family.
No one could help seeing that. It was
astonishing how readily she learned, and
it was almost equally astonishing, to some
people, where she got hold of sundry rare
morsels of knowledge, not in very com-
mon use in the vicinity of Rose cottage.
The school which she attended, in com-
mon with her sister, was certainly not






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


among the best. It was, indeed, only
tolerable. The very commonest branches
merely were all that any of the instruc-
tors attempted to teach; and some of
them made bungling work with even
these branches.
But with all these disadvantages, Amy
managed, first and last, by hook or by
crook, to learn more than many girls
who are sent to the best schools in the
country.
I will give you one specimen of the
way in which she gleaned sheaves of
valuable knowledge, here and there.
Botany was not taught at the school
which she attended. It was quite as






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


much as those teachers could do to carry
their pupils safely through the somewhat
perilous seas of grammar, geography, and
arithmetic. Well, Amy was exceedingly
fond of flowers. She always wanted to
become acquainted with every flower she
saw. The woods, and swamps, and
meadows, in the vicinity of her home,
abounded with flowers, many of which
were lovely in the extreme. It is a great
mistake, little girl, to suppose that ill
the beautiful flowers grow in the gardens,
and have been adopted from some far-
off country. It is a great mistake.
Some of the loveliest flowers I ever saw
in my life-some of the loveliest, I do






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


believe, that the sun ever shone upon-
are natives of our northern and middle
states. The hills and vales, the woods
and meadows of New Jersey, the state in
which Amy lived, can boast of flowers as
fair as most of those which grace our gar-
dens and green-houses.
Our young friend, unlike many others
who live in the country, and who have
the same opportunities of becoming ac-
quainted with the beauties of the coun-
try, became, quite early in life, an ad-
mirer of the wild flowers. She loved to
look in their beautiful faces, and got to
be very intimate with them, long before
she knew many of their names, or the






THE STRAWBERRY GIAL.


different families to which they be-
longed.
In the spring of the year, as soon as
the snow left the ground, Amy might
have been seen in the woods, carefully
removing the dry leaves, to see if she
could find the trailing arbutus; and when
she did find it, she was as much delighted,
I am sure, as if she had discovered a
small mine of gold. Some will wonder
at this. But I do not wonder at all.
The trailing arbutus is one of the love-
liest little creatures that ever grew. It
used to make the blood course a great
deal more swiftly in my veins, in the
days of my boyhood, when, quite as soon






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


as the warm sun had taken off the earth's
white mantle, and sometimes even before
that, I found a cluster of these flowers,
with an almost crimson blush on their
cheeks.
The trailing arbutus, and many of its
companions, Amy was in the habit of in-
troducing from their wild haunts into the
garden, where she contrived to make
them quite at home. Among these
flowers were the wind anemone, sev-
eral species of the violet, the liverleaf,
(not liverwort, as many people call the
plant, confounding it with a very differ-
ent thing growing on the damp stones of
old wells) the spring beauty, the ladies'






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


slipper, the adder's tongue, the twin
flower, the honeysuckle, the cardinal
flower, the arethusa, and a good many
more besides.
One day, during the summer, she was
walking in the pine woods, with her
brother, when she discovered a rare
flower, of great beauty. I don't know
whether you have ever seen it or not.
Its haunts are dense woods, in rather
sandy soils. It is sometimes called the
grass pink, I believe; though that name
does not distinguish it from a common
exotic flower in the garden. The botani-
cal name of the plant in the Cymbidium
Pulchellum. I have heard Amy say that







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


she never had been more delighted with
any discovery in her life than she was
when she first found, each in its native
haunt, the grass pink and the purple
wake robin.
From the discovery of the grass pink
dates a new era in the history of Amy
Rose. She transplanted it to her garden,
and it bloomed there, by the side of the
blue violet and the anemone.
It was not many days after the dis-
covery of that flower, that a stranger,
who happened to be travelling that way,
called at Mr. Rose's house, to rest him-
self a little while-for it was a very hot
day-and to refresh himself with a glass






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


of water. This gentleman proved to be
a professor in one of the most celebrated
colleges in the country, and was as much
at home in botany as if he had made it
his study for a lifetime. The door lead-
ing to the garden standing open, his at-
tention was at once directed to Amy's
wild flowers, and he went out to see
them.
Whose work is this ?" he inquired,
with astonishment.
Amy modestly informed him that she
had taken a fancy to the flowers, as she
had seen them in their native haunts,
and so had invited them to come and
live with her.


.38






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


But where did you find this flower,
my dear ?" he asked, pointing to the
grass pink.
"In the pine woods, yonder," Amy
said.
Are there any more in those woods ?"
Amy did not know. This one was all
she had found.
My dear," said the professor, will
you walk over to the pine woods with
me, and show me where you found it ?"
"Yes, sir," Amy said, "if my mother
is willing."
Her mother, being appealed to, was
willing, and Amy and the professor went
off in pursuit of the rare flower. Amy






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


readily led the way to the spot where she
discovered her specimen; but it was a
long time before they found another.
They did find one, however, and I think
several, before they left the woods.
The professor told Amy the name of
the flower, and said that, in the part of
the country where he resided, it was not
found at all. On their way to the cot-
tage of Mr. Rose (which I have a good
mind to call the Rose Cottage, though
it was known by no such poetical name
in those days) and after their return, the
kind-hearted man taught Amy a great
deal about her friends, the flowers.
Some girls would have been ashamed to






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


confess their ignorance about the whole
subject of botany. But Amy did not be-
long to that class. She was always glad
of any opportunity to add to her stock of
knowledge, and she had no desire to have
any one regard her in any other than her
true light. Truth was one of the fea-
tures most strongly marked in her char-
acter. I never knew a person whose
whole soul shone out more clearly and
artlessly in her every-day life.
That conversation with Mr. White-
for that was the name of the professor-
was the foundation of Amy's knowledge
of botany. When the professor took his
leave, he thanked her politely for her






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


kindness in consenting to be his pilot to
the pine woods. And he did more than
that, too. He had not adopted the
notion which some people, strangely
enough, seem to have stumbled upon,
that civility and politeness are thrown
away, when bestowed upon those in the
humbler ranks of life. He expressed
himself as highly pleased to find Amy so
fond of the wild flowers, and hoped she
would be able to become better acquaint-
ed with them. To aid her in extending
this acquaintance, he presented her with
a book on botany, which she afterward
pored over, as if it contained directions
for finding the philosopher's stone which






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


people used foolishly to hunt after in
former times--a stone which it was
thought would change everything it
touched into the purest gold. By the
aid of this book, and with the very little
help she obtained, once in a great while,
from a minister who lived some twelve
or fifteen miles from her father's, she
succeeded in becoming, before she was
eighteen years of age, one of the best
botanists in that section of the state.
Botany became, from the date of her
first interview with the professor, one of
her pleasantest amusements during the
summer months. She spent hours and
hours rambling through all the forests






44 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.

and meadows for miles around Rose Cot-
tage, seeking the wild flowers.
I have mentioned only one of the
sheaves of knowledge she gathered as
she went along through the field of early
youth, not because she did not glean
others-for she did-but because the
gleaning of this one had a very close
connection, as you will see, by and by,
with some of the most important inci-
dents in her life.













CHAPTER V.

THE FALL OF THE AIR-CASTLES.

I AM getting along too fast with my
story. I must go back a little. You re-
collect the conversation of the children
in Rose Cottage about the expected re-
turn of their father. That was in the
early autumn, I think. What reason
Grandfather Rose had for hoping that
the ship in which his son sailed would
return so soon, I do not know. But I






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


know that such was his hope, and I know,
too, that the time came and passed, with-
out any tidings of the arrival of the ship.
She was what is called an East India
ship, that is, she was engaged in trading
with the East Indies. Days, weeks, and
even months passed, and still there were
no tidings of the vessel.
In the meantime, sorrow came into
the little cottage in another form, and no
one of the family felt it so keenly as our
friend. Amy. In all the rambles that
Amy took after flowers-and she took a
great many after the professor's visit-
she was always accompanied by her
brother Edwin, who loved his sister as he






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


did his own soul, and who would do any-
thing to add to her happiness. But the
time came, when that brother and sister
were called to separate until the judg-
ment day. Poor Eddy! He had always
a frail, delicate frame. The seeds of
disease early sprang up in his system;
and he faded away, from year to year,
until it became evident that this cherished
flower must perish.
One day, in autumn, Amy and her
brother rambled into the meadow, to see
if they could find the beautiful fringed
gentian, which grew by the side of the
little brook. The meadow was but a
short distance from the cottage. But






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


Eddy was tired with the walk, and they
both sat down under the shade of a ven-
erable oak, where they talked for a long
time.
"Dear sister," said Eddy, do you see
how the leaves on this tree are withering
and falling off?"
"Yes, dear," said Amy, "and how
beautiful they are when they are ready
to fall."
They are beautiful," said Eddy. I
love the fall of the year. How pretty
the woods are now. I think I never saw
them so fine before."
And they were both silent for a while.
Edwin, who had seated himself close to






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


his sister, and had twined his slender arm
around her neck, spoke first, and said,
Amy, dear, what will you do when
Eddy leaves you ?"
I hope you will not leave me," said
Amy.
But I must go," said Eddy.
"Why must you go ?"
"Because my heavenly Father has
sent for me."
"Oh, don't say so, dear brother. I
cannot bear to hear you talk so. I hope
you will stay with us a long time yet."
"No, no, Amy. I shall die before
these leaves have all fallen from the
trees. I shall never go with you to the






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


pine woods again. I shall die. I know
I am going to die. Don't cry so. I am
willing to die. I hope my sins are for-
given. I believe I shall go to heaven."
Amy could say no more. Something
told her that Edwin was right. That
truth, when it burst upon her, caused her
the heaviest sorrow she had ever felt.
Edwin was right. That was the last
visit he ever made with his sister to the
haunts of the wild flowers. He died in
a few brief weeks, and his gentle spirit
went to the God who gave it.
But to return to the East India ship.
No tidings were heard from her; and, at
length, hope began to give place to anx-






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


iety, and anxiety to fear. At length,
everybody, almost, gave up the East
India ship as lost. I say almost every-
body. The wife and father had not
given her up. They hoped against
hope. So did the children. How hard
it is to give up, as utterly lost, those
whom we love. How carefully and
breathlessly we watch over a sick child,
even after the doctor has pronounced
those cruel words, "He must die."
How we notice every change in his coun-
tenance, every variation in the ebbing
tide of life, every symptom of the dis-
ease which is gradually consuming the
form of our darling child. We see not






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


the stealthy approach of the messenger
of death. We hear not the sound of his
footsteps. What brings only despair to
others, brings hope to us. He cannot
die-so it seems to our loving hearts.
My mother died when I was quite
young, and she took my heart with her
to heaven. She was the victim of a
wasting disease, which did its work
slowly and almost imperceptibly. For
months-for years, I might say, per-
haps-her frame, strong at the first, was
steadily yielding to the attack of that de-
ceitful malady. I loved her with all the
strength of my young heart. They told
me, at length, that she must die. But I






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


could not credit them. Her death did
not seem possible. She could not die, I
thought. I loved her too well for that.
She could not leave me for her long
home. She could not go away, and
never return again to my embrace.
Even during that long, long night, after
I had kissed those pale lips for the last
time, and had heard the last blessing that
was to fall from them, I could not be-
lieve that she would die, and that we
should see her dear face no more.
So watched, and waited, and hoped,
the Rose family for the ship which con-
tained the object of their fondest love.
Often would the old gentleman, some-
4






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


times with Amy for his companion, but
oftener alone, wend his way to the sea-
shore, and sit there for hours, gazing out
into the wide ocean, watching the in-
ward bound vessels that happened to
come near the coast, in the hope, the
vain hope, that one of them would prove
to be the East India ship. But her fair
form was never seen on that coast again.
She was a proud ship, and many a good
sailor had been heard to say that there
was not a safer vessel afloat than the old
N- But she was not a match for
the waves, when the wind had driven
them to madness. Though no tidings
of her ever reached the ears of those who














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THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


were most interested in her safety, there
is no doubt that she was dashed to pieces,
and that all on board of her were lost.
The truth, the whole truth, when it
came home to the minds of the humble
family that occupied the Rose Cottage,
struck a terrible blow there. It seemed
to them, for a while, as if all their hopes
were wrecked with the vessel. They
saw, they could not help seeing, that the
loss they had sustained could not easily
be made up. It gave a keener pang to
their grief, when they reflected that they
were left, apparently, with very scanty
means of living. They knew, however,
which way to turn for support. They






58 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.

went to God in their distress. They
went to him, as children to a father, told
him all their griefs and all their fears,
and humbly and earnestly implored his
blessing.















CHAPTER VI.

HOPES AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.

THERE is, perhaps-certainly there
often sees to be-some ground for the
remark that

-" Misfortunes come not single spies,
But in battalions."

The Rose family, after their sad be-
reavement, had some evidence that there
was quite as much truth as poetry in the






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


remark. They were sorely afflicted.
But they made up their minds, at the
outset, that they would do what they
could to obtain an honest, and if possi-
ble a comfortable living; and with them
it was a question of far less importance
whether the labor that fell to their
lot was respectable and genteel, than
whether it was honorable in the sight of
God, and afforded them the comforts of
life.
The plan which was finally adopted
was this: The mother was to take in
plain sewing. She was a good seam-
stress, and there seemed to be no doubt
that she could earn a great deal with her






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


needle. The old gentleman, who loved
to work in the garden as well as he loved
to eat, almost, was to raise vegetables
for the New York market. Amy-there
seemed to be nothing quite so definite
marked out for her. She was to assist
in the garden, and to do the best she
could in every other branch of profitable
labor that might turn up. Bessie was to
be the housekeeper.
How easy it is to plan; but how often
the Lord disappoints us, after our plans
are all matured. When the spring came,
the old gentleman set about his garden-
ing in earnest, and Amy helped him in
his task. But before they had reaped






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


any of the rewards of their toil, the
broken-hearted old sailor was bidden to
his last account, and a new fountain of
grief was opened in that poor family.
Mrs. Rose did not succeed so well as
she expected with her sewing. True,
she did not find much trouble in getting
work to do. Her greatest difficulties
were to suit her customers, and to get
pay for her work, after they were suited.
The result of the lrst trial she made in
her new line of business was not calcu-
lated to encourage her much. Some one
had told her that Mrs. Simpkins had a
great deal of plain sewing to do, and to
Mrs. Simpkins she applied at once.






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL


This lady was the wife of aet.like a
who had formerly been. c~cerne~ and
large factory; but who had failed, and
who, since his failure, had been livinrter,
great style, without doing any busidoes
in a fine house about three miles the
the Rose Cottage. that
My readers will perhaps wonder kins'
it comes to pass that a man fails in leme
ness, alld still lives like a rich man. est
tell you. He does it by cheating hx
creditors. That is the way it is done,
and that is the only way it can be done.
When Mr. Simpkins failed, he owed
thousands of dollars. Among his credi-
tors were poor men, who had to work






TH.THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


any oforhe their daily bread. But they
broker got ed_-nt from Mrs. Simpkins,
his laSis sham failure. "w
griehat pleasure should you thin'Pl"',here
M, in living on money obtained in this
she '? Would you not rather dine on a
she d; of bread-aye, would you not
worker go without a dinner, than to be
wereged to think, while sitting at your
pay)le, although it were loaded with lux-
Tjies, that you were eating food bought
with the money you had got by cheating
those whom you owed ? I should, I'm
sure. I don't see how such men can
eat their splendid dinners with any relish.
I don't see how they can sleep nights.







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


I should think their dishonesty, like a
fiend, would dog them about, all day and
all night, and stare them in the face, and
keep up such a saucy clamor and clatter,
that they would go crazy. But it does
not seem to be so always. I suppose the
conscience gets so hard and tough, that
there is no feeling in it. Mr. Simpkins'
conscience-if he had any, which some
of those people who knew him best
doubted-must have been as tough as
a piece of sole leather, and as hard as
cast iron.
Mrs. Simpkins, too, I should judge,
had tried the hardening and toughen-
ing process pretty successfully. So it






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


appeared in the matter of the plain
sewing.
"Amy, my dear," said Mrs. Rose,
one night, after she had taken the last
stitches in the piece of work which Mrs.
Simpkins, "purely out of charity," as
that lady said, had given her to do,
" Amy, can you go and carry this work
home to-morrow ?"
"Oh, yes, ma'am," said she, "it is
only a little way. I shall feel all the
better for the walk."
"But you will have to carry a basket
on your arm."
"A light one, a very light one, dear
mother."







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


You are so kind and good, Amy, and
so anxious to please your mother, that I'm
afraid you sometimes go beyond your
strength."
Oh, no, mother," said Amy, laugh-
ing, I'm as strong as a young elephant,
you know."
"Well, you may go to-morrow, if you
please. I hope Mrs. Simpkins will give
you the money for the work. You need
some shoes, Amy, and so does Bessie."
The next morning Amy, with a heart
unusually light and cheerful, posted off to
the rich bankrupt's, with the basket of
linen for the lady of the house.
"Is Mrs. Simpkins at home ?" asked






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


Amy, when the servant answered her
faint knock at the door.
"I'll see," said the servant, shutting
the door in the poor girl's face, and leav-
ing her standing outside, with the basket
on her arm.
Some minutes elapsed-the time seem-
ed an hour to Amy-before the messen-
ger returned. "Mrs. Simpkins is at
home, little hussy," was his insulting
message. "She'll wait on you by and
by. Step round to the back door with
your trumpery. The lady don't allow
such folks as you are to bolt into the
front door."
Amy made no reply, but, silently and






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


sadly, walked round to the back door.
She wanted to say a word to the man.
If she had mustered courage enough,
after the harsh treatment she had re-
ceived, she would have asked him what
he meant by "such folks as you are."
Those words puzzled her. She could
not make out their meaning. She tried
to be very brave, and to ask the man,
kindly; but her courage failed her be-
fore the first word of the question escaped
her lips.
After sitting in the kitchen a long
time, Amy was informed that Mrs. Simp-
kins would see her in the parlor. So to
the parlor she went, basket in hand.







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"You unmannerly thing," said Mrs.
Simpkins, when the girl presented her-
self. what on earth do you bring that
basket into the parlor for ? Don't you
know any better than that? My pa-
tience, child! was you brought up in the
woods ?"
Amy, who turned as red as the lining
in her cottage bonnet, and who could
hardly keep from crying, started to go
back again with her load, to the kitchen.
But Mrs. Simpkins, in a tone of voice
which the girl thought the opposite of
kind and courteous, to say the least,
called after her, and bade her to come
back. "The stupid girl!" said she,







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"you might as well stay, now you're
here, I suppose." Her voice sounded to
Amy-so she told her fun-loving sister
long after that, when her wound had be-
come healed over-her voice sounded
like the music made by striking a crack-
ed tea-kettle. -
Mrs. Simpkins, after this last speech,
seemed to feel better, and, with some-
thing about as near a smile as she ever
used in her intercourse with "such folks
as Amy," proceeded to examine Mrs.
Rose's work, with the aid of her specta-
cles. She kept muttering something be-
tween her teeth, at intervals, all the time
the long examination lasted. But Amy,
5







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


as she stood, with her eyes fixed on thL
carpet, could catch only here and there a
word. Once she was sure she heard the
old lady say, What monstrous stitches!"
and at another time she thought she
heard the words perfect botch." Those
words did not tend to assure her much,
as you may imagine.
The scrutiny was over at last. The
spectacles were discharged from their
important mission, and the decision was
declared:
"Your mother has sent me a real
shabby piece of work, I must say."
Will it not answer, ma'am ?" Amy
modestly inquired.
















































14 "WHAT MONSTROUS STITCHES I







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"Answer!" exclaimed the lady, "why,
it isn't fit for my servants to wear !"
Amy was very sorry, she said. She
had no doubt but her mother would alter
it so as to suit, if Mrs. Simpkins would
send her word how she wished to have it
done.
Mrs. Rose ought to know how to do
her work, if she undertakes to do it. I
can't tell her how to alter it. I might
as well do it myself, and have done with
it. But it serves me right. I had no
business to give people work, just be-
cause they are poor. People fancy
we're made of money here, I should
think. I can't help everybody. 'It







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


would be a charity,' Mrs. Morton said.
Charity! Suppose it is charity ? It's a
pretty story if I must have Pmy work
spoiled for the sake of charity."
Amy asked again what instructions she
would send back to her mother about the
work.
Tell her she can't suit me," said Mrs.
Simpkins.
And the work ?" inquired Amy, ob-
serving that the lady had folded it up,
and laid it away on the sofa.
"I'll keep it," said Mrs. Simpkins,
rather impatiently.
And she did keep it. She conde-
scended to keep it, and told Amy she






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


had no farther use for her mother's ser
vices.
The poor girl went home with light
pockets and a heavy heart. She felt
wounded by the treatment she had re-
ceived-treatment which any member of
the Rose family would have considered
too harsh and unkind for them to employ
toward a dog-but she had a heavier
burden at her heart than that. It was
the thought of the pain that her mother
would feel, when she learned that she
had entirely failed to please Mrs. Simp-
kins, and that all hope of obtaining any
money in that quarter was cut off.
She told her mother all that she







THE STRAWBERRY GIBL.


thought it necessary for her to know-
that the work did not suit the lady, and
that she had said she should have no
farther need for her services. It was
not until Mrs. Rose read it in the tears
which stood in her daughter's eyes, that
she learned how harshly and unfeelingly
the poor girl had been treated. When
Amy told her all, they wept together for
a long time. Then they went to their
heavenly Father with their sorrow, and
were comforted.













CHAPTER VII.

GLIMMERINGS OF SUNSHINE.

THERE is a proverb which says, "The
darkest time is just before day." Like
most proverbs in common use, this one
has enough in it to keep it from being
driven out of good society, though possi-
bly not much more. It is a pretty good
crutch to lean upon, however, especially
where a poor fellow cannot get anything
better to lean upon, and is obliged to





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


take that or nothing. I don't know
whether it was quoted in the Rose family
or not, at the period when Amy returned
from the rich bankrupt's. Very likely
it never came into their minds, and that
they went elsewhere for comfort and
hope. If the truth were known, indeed,
I presume it would appear, that such
words as these, from the pages of Scrip-
ture, were worth more to them, at that
dark and desolate period, than all the
proverbs that ever fell from human lips:
"Trust in the Lord, and do good; so
shalt thou dwell in the land, and verily
thou shalt be fed. Delight thyself, also,
in the Lord; trust, also, in him; and he






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


shall bring it to pass; and he shall bring
forth thy righteousness as the light, and
thy judgment as the noon-day. The
steps of a good man are ordered by the
Lord; and he delighteth in his way.
Though he fall, he shall not be utterly
cast down; for the Lord upholdeth him
with his hand."
I say very likely the family at Rose
Cottage found something in the Bible a
great deal more consoling to them in
their distress, than the old proverb I have
quoted, and that, possibly, they did not
call for any aid from that quarter. Still,
it must be confessed that the truth of the
old saw was rather confirmed than other-.






TIE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


wise in their case. At any rate, it is
certain that the night was pitch dark, at
about the period when Amy brought
home the sad budget of news from Mrs.
Simpkins, and it is equally certain that
some faint signs of daylight made their
appearance in the sky pretty soon after-
ward.
Mrs. Rose concluded, after three or
four unsuccessful attempts, to give up the
plain sewing business, for a time, at least,
and to turn her attention to the little gar-
den. Amy needed help there, it was
clear. She was chief gardener, after the
death of her grandfather.
There was one of the finest strawberry






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


beds in that enclosure, that could be
found in all that section of the country.
And how do you think they managed to
make that profitable ? Guess.
They hired one man to keep it in
order and to pick the strawberries, and
another to sell them," some little boy
says.
No, not a bit of it.
"I guess they hired girls to do it,"
says another.
No. Nothing of the kind.
How did they manage, then, Uncle
Frank ?"
I'll tell you. But first let me tell you
why they did not get somebody to do the






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


work, or a part of the work, for them.
If they had done so, they would have
been obliged to pay so much for doing
the work, that they would have made
but little money from their strawberries.
They saw that. Amy saw it, as plainly
as her mother did. And so she took the
entire care of the bed herself until the
berries were ripe.
But the time came when it was neces-
sary to contrive some way for selling the
strawberries.
"Amy, dear," said Mrs. Rose, one
day in the early part of June," how shall
we manage to turn these strawberries
into money ?"






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"Oh, I conjured up a plan for that,
long ago," said Amy.
Pray, what is it, Amy I" asked Mrs.
Rose. I've teased my brains about the
matter for a whole fortnight, and I can't
hit upon any plan."
"Well, mother," said Amy, "please
don't worry those brains of yours any
more about it. I've got a plan which
will work to a charm, I know it will.
You'll say so, when I tell you what it is.
And it is a simple thing, a very simple
thing. You can't think how little ma-
chinery there is about it. It is one of
the simplest things in the world."
"But will it work? I've known a






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


great many of the simplest things in the
world that did well enough in other re-
spects, but they wouldn't work. Amy,
there is poetry in that head of yours."
Yes, mother-and prose, too."
Not enough of it, I fear-not enough
for every day use."
A great deal more than you suppose,
mother. You did not send me to school
to Mrs. Simpkins for nothing."
Mrs. Rose's countenance fell at the
mention of that name-a name she had
tried to forget, and which brought none
but the saddest thoughts with it-and
tears soon found their way down her
cheeks.






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


"Now, dear mamma," said Amy,
laughing, and kissing away the tears,
"I'm ashamed of you. I thought you
had done crying over that affair long
ago. I have."
But," said Mrs. Rose, "how can I
help feeling sadly, when I remember
how my dear Amy's heart was wrung by
that cruel"-
There, mother," said Amy, "let us
drop Mrs. Simpkins. I'm almost sorry I
took her up. But, mother, I'm serious
when I say that I never learned a lesson
in my life which I am more thankful for
than the one which Mrs. Simpkins taught
me, while I was trembling there, like a






TIHE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


scared rabbit, with my eyes running over
the figures in that Brussels carpet."
What did you learn, Amy ?" "Any-
thing about carpet-weaving ?"
"No, ma'am; something better than
that."
"Well, what was it?"
That I was a little simpleton." And
the merry-hearted girl laughed so heartily
that her mother had to laugh too.
Amy went on: "The night after I
came home from that errand, I thought
the matter all over and over; and I
finally said to myself, "Well, simple-
ton-for I saw that I was a simpleton-
you are as poor as a church mouse. But






THE STRAWBERRY OIRL.


my dear little simple-hearted gosling,
you can't help that. You didn't make
yourself poor; and if you* had done it,
you couldn't help it now. Now what is
the use in crying over spilled milk
The Lord has had a hand in making you
so poor. Suppose you are down pretty
near the foot of the hill, then ? It is all
right. It is not very pleasant to be quite
so poor as you are. But you must make
the best of it. God has put you where
you are. You must do as well as you
can now. If you do, perhaps you will
not always be as poor. Perhaps you will.
But see that you do the best you can, at
any rate. If you don't play your part






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


well now, what reason have you to think
you would do so, if you should happen to
rise a little in the world? I'll do my
best, and ask God to help me. Mrs.
Simpkins beat all this into my head, and
more too. I hardly know how she did
it. But she did it. I suppose that is the
way she paid for the stitches you took for
her ladyship; and I think she paid a
good price enough, after all, don't you,
mother ?"
Then followed one of Amy's heartiest
laughs. She laughed, when she really
set herself about the business, from the
very lightest and merriest corner of her
heart. And this time her mother laugh-





THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


ed too. "But, Amy," said Mrs. Rose,
"you haven't told me about the plan for
changing strawberries into gold ?"
"No, ma'am," Amy replied, "that's
my secret. I am not quite sure but I
shall get a patent for it, if it works well;
and I don't intend to make any noise
about it, until the time comes for setting
my machinery goingg"
And she didn't say anything about it
until the strawberries began to get ripe
in the garden. One afternoon, she and
Bessie picked several quarts. It was
early for strawberries, and they brought
a very high price in market. BuItthe
difficulty was to get them to market.






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


The city was a long way off-long for
the occupants of the Rose Cottage, who
did not travel much.
"Well," said Mrs. Rose in the eve-
ning, "now for the wonderful plan."
"Wait till to-morrow, mother," said
Amy. "I'm going to try it then, and
we'll see whether it will work or not."
To-morrow came. Very early in the
morning, Amy called her mother, to see,
as she said, "the starting of the ma-
chine." Mrs. Rose was not a little sur-
prised, when she got up, to find one of
the,neighbors at the door with a market
wagon; and she was still more surprised
when she found Amy all ready to take a






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


seat in the wagon, with her large basket
of strawberries.
It turned out that Amy had made
arrangements with this farmer to take
her with him to the steamboat, and that
she was going to the city to sell the
strawberries.
Mrs. Rose urged scores of objections
to the plan. But Amy had an answer to
them all; and off she started, as soon as
it appeared that the last objection had
been stated, leaving her mother wonder-
ing whether the girl was really in her
right mind or not. "She is a crazy-
headed creature," said that matron,
partly to herself, and partly to Bessie.







THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


" A strawberry girl! my Amy a straw-
berry girl! What will folks say ? And
what does she know about selling straw-
berries ? They'll cheat her eye-teeth
out of her in New York. Well, well,
we shall see. She's a dear good-hearted
girl, isn't she, Bessie ?"
The truth is, Mrs. Rose-on account
of her not having been to school to Mrs.
Simpkins, or for some other reason-was
not by any means so well prepared to
act her part as Amy was to act hers.
The result of the strawberry specula-
tion was even more favorable than Amy
herself, with all the poetry which her
mother gave her credit for, had dreamed






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


of. The proceeds of the sale amounted
to upwards of five dollars, over and above
all the expenses. When the strawberry
girl got home that afternoon, and showed
her mother the proceeds of the day's
sales, the good woman was even more
astonished than she was when she saw
her set out in the morning.
Doesn't my plan work well so far,
mother?" asked Amy; "and isn't it
one of the simplest things in the world ?"
Mrs. Rose was obliged to confess that
it did work well so far, and that it was a
very simple thing, too. "But, Amy,"
said she, "don't you think it is rather
beneath you to sell strawberries ?"






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


Beneath me, mother !" Amy replied,
" why, a few hours ago, you seemed to
think I was beneath that. A sorry figure
you thought I was sure to make selling
strawberries. I was going to get cheat-
ed, you know, and abused in every way.
I was to have perils by land and perils
by sea, perils by my own countrymen
and"-
"No, no, Amy," Mrs. Rose broke in,
"you don't seem to get my meaning,
when I speak of its being beneath you.
Isn't it beneath you, now, to stand in the
market to sell strawberries, like a market
woman ?"
"I don't see how," replied Amy,






THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


laughing, "if I get along as well selling
my berries as the market woman does."
But, dear Amy," said her mother,
"should you like to be called a straw-
berry girl?"
La, yes, ma'am," said Amy. "Why
not ? I rather like the name, now you
mention it. 'The Strawberry Girl!' it
sounds well, mamma. There's poetry in
it, I'm sure. Why, you make me more
and more in love with my new trade.
But has Bessie picked another basketful ?
because I have engaged several quarts
for to-morrow, and I wouldn't disappoint
my customers for a small gold mine. I
must run out to the strawberry patch







98 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.

now." And away she ran, singing an
air almost as merry as that of the birds
who had built their nests so confidingly
in the door yard, and who were now giv-
ing their evening serenade.




















-n?


THE SERENADERS.













CHAPTER VIII.

THAT STRAWBERRY PATCH.

"WELL, mother," said Amy, one eve-
ning, after her return from the city, "that
strawberry patch is doing wonders, isn't
it?"
Mrs. Rose could not help nodding as-
sent. And, indeed, "that strawberry
patch" was the theme of wonder all over
the neighborhood. For some reason or
other, it was a most extraordinary bed






102 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL.


of strawberries. Amy, too, was a good
deal talked of, in connection with the
strawberry affair.
"And what did the people say about
her ?" you inquire.
Well, some said one thing, and some
another. Some thought, as Mrs. Rose
was inclined to think, at first, that it was
beneath Amy to- sell strawberries, like a
market woman.
Mrs. Simpkins, as soon as she heard of
it, went into a kind of horrific fit, hold-
ing up both hands very high, opening her
mouth very wide, and drawing in a very
long breath, the greater portion of which
was expended in exclamations. These




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