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Title: Choice poems for little children
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002161/00001
 Material Information
Title: Choice poems for little children
Physical Description: 161 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Sunday-School Union
Place of Publication: Philadelphia ;
New York
Publication Date: 1852
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1852   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002161
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224173
oclc - 20708351
notis - ALG4434
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
    Frontispiece
        Front page 2
        Front page 3
        Front page 4
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Copyright
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    Table of Contents
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Full Text












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PHILADELPHIA :
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 146 CHESTNUT STREET.
NEW YORK: No. 147 NASSAU ST......BOSTON: No. 9 CORNHILL.
LOUISVILLE: No. 103 FOURTH ST.

























Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1852, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAYI)A-SCIIOOL UNION,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.









4Z- No books are published by the AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of four-
tVen members, from the following denominations of Christians, viz. Bap-
tist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, Lutheran, and
Reformed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the same
denomination, and no book can be published to which any member of the
Committee shall object.

















CONTENTS.



PAGE
THE Two THIEVES................................... ...9. 9

THE PRETTY MOON....................... .... ......... 17

GOOD MORNING.. ................................... 19

GOOD N IGHT....................... ..... ... ......... 22

THE GLEANER ........................ ...... .......... 27

A CENT.............................................. 29

THE SONG OP1 THE GRASS.............................. 30

PRIVATE PRAYER ........ ........... ............... 33

THE PLEASANT EVENING............................... 35

WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST? ....................... 38

ALL CAN Do SOMETHING.............................. 43

RULES FOR MY MEALS................................ 45

THE LITTLE SOLDIER.................................... 49
1* 5






6 CONTENTS.
PAGE
LADY-BIRD .................................................. 50

SUNSHINE AND FLOWERS ............................... 51

THE SHADOWS ............................. ................ 52

PREPARING FOR SUNDAY ................................. 55

THE FLY.................... ................... ....... .... 57

SLOVENLY FLORA ................ .................... 58

No CHILDREN LIKE MINE............................... 61

THE LITTLE MATCH-SELLERS........................... 65

THE LAME HORSE..................... ................... 67

THE FLY IN THE ASTRAL LAMP ....................... 71

BESSIE BELL............................................... 73

THE MAN AND HIS COAT................................ 79

EMPLOYMENT............................................... 81

THE GOOD CHILDREN ..................................... 83

THE LITTLE LORD AND THE FARMER.................. 85

ANECDOTES OF JACK FROST, A FAMOUS LANDSCAPE
PAINTER................................................... 88

THE LAMB'S LULLABY................................... 96

THE PEACH BLOSSOMS..................................... 101

THE YOUNG PHILOSOPHER................................ 104






CONTENTS. 7
PAGE
EVERY LITTLE HELPS..................................... 109

THE BLIND BOY.......................................... 111

I WILL BE GOOD TO-DAY.............................. 115

FAIRY FROST-WORK...................................... 116

THE LITTLE BEGGARS.................................. 119

FATHER IS COMING..................................... 121

"LOVE ONE ANOTHER".................................... 123

USEFUL ELLEN............................................ 127

SELF-EXAMINATION ....................................... 131

A CHILD'S FAITH...................................... 132

THE USE OF SIGHT........................................ 135

THE HAPPY THOUGHT...................................... 139

THE BABBLING BROOK.............. ................ 141

THE SNOW BIRD.......................................... 143

THE PRIZE............................................. 147

THE LORD'S PRAYER............................ ........ 152

WE ARE SEVEN....................................... 153

"I NEVER LOOKED BEHIND"........................ 157














4irpct Voms

FOR


Little nilbrei



THE TWO THIEVES.

A LADY, (they called her Miss Mouse,)
In a slate-colour'd dress, like a Quaker,
Once lived in a snug little house,
Of which she herself was the maker.

There lived in another, close by,
A dame, whom they called Lady Kitty;
But that she was stationed so nigh
Miss Mouse often thought a great pity.
9






10 CHOICE POEMS

For she, though so soberly clad,
And never inclined to ill-speaking,
Had often a fancy to gad,
Or more than her own might be seek-
ing.

She then did not like to be scann'd,
Nor questioned respecting her duty,
When some little theft she had planned,
Or was seen coming home with her
booty.

So modest she was, and so shy,
Although an inveterate sinner,
She'd nip out her part of the pie
Before it was brought on for dinner.

She held that 'twas folly to ask
For what her own wits would allow
her;
And making her way through the cask,
She help'd herself well to the flour.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 11

The candles she scraped to their wicks;
And full of mischievous invention,
Would do many more naughty tricks,
Which I, as her friend, cannot mention.

Kit, too, had her living to make,
And yet, she was so above toiling,
She'd sooner attack the beef-steak
When the cook had prepared it for
broiling.

The puss, near a dish of warm toast,
Has often most patiently linger'd,
To seize her first chance-yet could boast
That none ever called her light-fin-
ger'd.

But mending, or minding herself
She thought would be quite too much
labour,
And so peep'd about on the shelf,
To smell out the faults of her neighbour.






1 CHOICE POEMS

For Mouse loved to meditate there!
While Kit would watch close to way-
lay her;
And once, in the midst of her fare,
Up bounded Miss Kitty to slay her.

But this was as luckless a jump
As ever Kit made-with the clatter
Of knife, skimmer, spoon, and a thump,
Which she got as she threw down the
platter.

While Mouse glided under a dish,
Escaping the mortal disaster,
Miss Kitty turn'd off to a fish,
The breakfast elect for her master.

Said she to herself, "'Tis clear gain,-
This rarity, fresh from the water,
Will save my white mittens the stain,
And me from the trouble of slaugh-
ter!"





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 13

But her racket, she found to her cost,
The plot had most fatally thicken'd,
And all hope of mercy was lost,
As Jack's coming footsteps were quick-
en'd.

He seized her, and binding her fast,
Declared he could never forgive her;
So Kitty was sentenced, and cast,
With a stone at her neck, in the river.

But Mouse still continued to thieve;
And often alone in her dwelling
Would silently laugh in her sleeve,
At the scene in the tale I've been
telling.

Till once, by a fatal mishap,
The little unfortunate rover,
Perceived herself close in a trap,
And felt that her race was now over.





14 CHOICE POEMS

She knew she must leave all behind;
And thus, in the midst of her terrors,
As every thing rush'd to her mind
Began her confession of errors.

"You'll find, on the word of a mouse,
Whom hope has for ever forsaken,
The following things in my house,
Which I have unlawfully taken.

A cork that was soak'd in the beer,
Which I nibbled until I was merry;
Some kernels of corn from the ear,
The skin and the stone of a cherry;

Some hemp-seed I took from the bird,
And found most deliciously tasted,
While safe in my covert, I heard
Its owner complain that 'twas wasted;

You'll find a few cucumber seeds,
Which I thought, if they could but be
hollow'd,





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 15

Would answer to string out for beads,-
So the inside of all I have swallow'd.

A few crumbs of biscuit and cheese,
Which I thought might a long time
supply me
With luncheons-some rice and split
peas,
Which seem'd well prepared to keep
by me;

A cluster of curls, which I stole
At night from a young lady's toilet,
And made me a bed of it, whole,
As tearing it open would spoil it;

And, as in a long summer day
I'd time both for reading and spelling,
I gnaw'd up the whole of a play
And carried it home to my dwelling.

I wish you'd set fire to my place,
And I pray you at once to despatch me;






16 CHOICE POEMS

That none of my enemy's race,
In the form of Miss Kitty, may catch
me!"

Disgrace thus will follow on vice,
Although for a while it be hidden;
When children, or kittens, or mice,
Will do what they know is forbidden.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 17





THE PRETTY MOON.

DEAR mother, how pretty the moon looks
to-night,
She was never so cunning before!
Her two little horns are so sharp and so
bright,
I wish she wouldn't grow any more!

If I were up there, with you and my
friends,
We'd have a nice rock, do you see;
We'd sit in the middle and hold at both
ends:
Oh, what a bright cradle wouldd be!

We'd call to the stars to get out of our
way,
Lest we should rock over their toes;
2*





18 CHOICE POEMS

And then we would stay till the dawn
of day,
And see where the pretty moon goes.

And then we would float through the
beautiful skies,
And then through bright clouds we
would roam,
And see the sun set, and see the sun
rise,
And on the next rainbow come home.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 19






GOOD-MORNING.

"OH, I am so happy !" a little girl said,
As she sprang, like a lark, from her low
trundle bed;
"'Tis morning-bright morning! Good-
morning, papa!
Oh, give me one kiss for good-morning,
mamma!
Only just look at my pretty canary!
Chirping his merry 'good-morning to
Mary!'
The sun, too, is peeping straight into my
eyes-
Good-morning to you, Mister Sun, for
you rise
Early to wake up my birdie and me,
And make us as happy as happy can be."






20 CHOICE POEMS

" Happy you may be, my dear little girl,"
And the mother stroked softly a cluster-
ing curl-
"Happy you can be-but think of the
One,
Who waken'd, this morning, both you
and the sun."
The little girl turn'd her bright eyes with
a nod-
"Ma, may I say then, 'Good-morning'
to God?"
"Yes, little darling one, surely you may;
Kneel, as you kneel every morning to
pray."
Mary knelt solemnly down, with her
eyes
Looking up-earnestly-into the skies.


Her two little hands, that were folded
together,
Softly she laid on the lap of her mother;





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 21

"Good-morning, dear Father in heaven,"
she said,
"I thank thee for watching my snug
little bed;
For taking good care of me all the dark
night,
And waking me up with the beautiful
light!
Ah, keep me from naughtiness all the
long day,
Dear Father, who taught little children
to pray!"

An angel look'd down in the sunshine
and smiled,
But she saw not the angel,-that beautiful
child!





22 CHOICE POEMS





GOOD-NIGHT.

"GOOD-NIGHT, dear mamma!" a little girl
said;
"I'm going to sleep in my nice trundle
bed;
Good-night, dear papa! little brother and
sis!"
And to each one the innocent gave a
sweet kiss.
"Good-night, little darling!" her fond
mother said-
" But remember, before you lie down in
your bed,
With a heart full of love, and a tone soft
and mild,
To breathe a short prayer to Heaven,
sweet child."





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 23

"0 yes, dear mamma!" said the child,
with a nod,
"I love, oh! I love to say 'Good-night'
to God!"
Kneeling down, "My dear Father in
heaven," she said,
"I thank thee for giving me such a nice
bed;
For though mamma told me she bought it
for me,
She tells me that every thing good comes
from thee;
I thank thee for keeping me safe through
the day;
I thank thee for teaching me, too, how
to pray;
Good-night! my dear Father, my Maker,
and God;
Should I never again on the earth ope
mine eyes,
I pray thee to give me a home in the skies!"





24 CHOICE POEMS

'Twas an exquisite sight as she meekly
knelt there,
With her eyes raised to heaven, her
hands clasp'd in prayer;
And I thought of the time when the
Saviour, in love,
Said Of such is the kingdom of heaven
above;"
And I inwardly pray'd that my own
heart, the while,
Might be cleansed of its bitterness, freed
from its guile.

Then she crept into bed, that beautiful
child,
And was soon lost in slumber, so calm
and so mild
That we listened in vain for the sound of
her breath,
As she lay in the arms of the emblem of
death.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 27






THE GLEANER.

BEFORE the bright sun rises over the hill,
In the wheatfield poor Mary is seen,
Impatient her arm or her apron to fill,
With the few scattered ears she can
glean.

She never leaves off, or runs out of her
place,
To play, or to idle, and chat;
Except now and then, just to wipe her
hot face,
And fan herself with her broad hat.

"Poor girl, hard at work in the heat of
the sun,
How tired and hot you must be:






28 CHOICE POEMS

Why don't you leave off, as the others
have done,
And sit with them under the tree ?"

"Oh no! for my mother lies ill in her bed,
Too feeble to spin or to knit;
And my poor little brothers are crying
for bread,
And yet we can't give them a bit!

"Then could I be merry, and idle, and
play,
While they are so hungry and ill ?"
Oh no! she had rather work hard all the
day,
Her arm or her apron to fill.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 29




A CENT,

A CENT, a cent! Yes, a bright new cent!
What shall I buy? It must not be mis-
spent.
Poor children there are, who to idols bow
down,
Worshipping blocks both of wood and
stone:
To them I will send a Bible or preacher,
A Sunday-school book, or a Sunday-school
teacher.
If I mean to do good, now's the time to
begin,
For the more we put off, the longer we
sin;
My cents shall now go to do what they
can,
And dollars I'll send when I am a man.





30 CHOICE POEMS







THE SONG OF THE GRASS.

HERE I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
By the dusty road-side,
On the sunny hill-side,
Close by the noisy brook,
In every shady nook,
I come creeping, creeping everywhere.

Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
All around the open door,
Where sit the aged poor,
There, where the children play
In the bright and merry May,
I come creeping, creeping everywhere.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 81

Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
In the noisy city street
My pleasant face you'll meet,
Cheering the sick at heart,
Toiling his busy part,
Silently creeping, creeping everywhere.


Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
You cannot see me coming,
Nor hear my low, sweet humming,
For in the starry night,
And the glad morning light,
I come quietly creeping everywhere.


Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
More welcome than the flowers,
In summer's pleasant hours.
3*





32 CHOICE POEMS

The gentle cow is glad,
And the merry bird not sad
To see me creeping, creeping everywhere.

Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where:
When you're number'd with the dead,
In your still and narrow bed,
In the happy Spring I'll come,
And deck your silent home,
Creeping, silently creeping everywhere.

Here I come, creeping, creeping every-
where :
My humble song of praise
Most gratefully I raise
To Him at whose command
I beautify the land,
Creeping, silently creeping everywhere.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 33







PRIVATE PRAYER.

NEVER, my child, forget to pray,
Whate'er the business of the day;
If happy dreams have bless'd thy sleep,
If startling dreams have made thee weep,
With holy thoughts begin the day,
And ne'er, my child, forget to pray.

Ask Him, by whom the birds are fed,
To give to thee thy daily bread;
If wealth her bounty should bestow,
Praise Him from whom all blessings flow;
If He who gave should take away,
Oh ne'er, my child, forget to pray.
The time will come when thou wilt miss
A father's and a mother's kiss;






34 CHOICE POEMS


And then, my child, perchance you'll see
Some who in prayer ne'er bend the knee;
From such examples turn away,
And ne'er, my child, forget to pray.


I,
I,


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j3 I I1 iit/ i ~I
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FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. U





THE PLEASANT EVENING.

'TWAS night, and o'er the desert moor
The wintry storm-gusts wildly blew,
And so we closed our cottage door
And round our cheerful wood-fire
drew:
Each join'd the hymn of evening praise,
Then told a tale of Bible days.

First Charley, in his little chair,
With sober face, his tale began,
And told us of the faith and prayer
Of Daniel in the lion's den;
And how the lions were afraid
To kill the righteous man who pray'd.

Then Henry spoke of Israel's guide,
The cloud by day, the fire by night,





86 CHOICE POEMS

And said, whatever might betide,
To trust in God is always right;
For he is still, to those who pray,
A fire by night, a cloud by day.

And little Freddy told of three,
Who once a fiery furnace trod,
Because they would not bow the knee
In worship to an idol-god;
And how, to save them from the flame,
The Son of God in glory came.

Then little Susan told of One
Who kindly all our sorrows bore-
Though rich in heaven, on earth became
For us, so very, very poor,
That, though the foxes had a bed,
He had not where to lay his head.

The tale was told-a crystal tear
Rose brightly to each sparkling eye,






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 37

And then in accents soft and clear
Our evening hymn again roll'd high;
Each little girl, each little boy
Join'd in the strains of solemn joy.

Then grandpa pray'd-that good old
man,
With wrinkled brow and hoary hair,
While all the little children ran
To kneel around his elbow chair.
And thus the Sabbath evening pass'd,
In peace and pleasure to the last.





88


CHOICE POEMS






WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?

TE whit! te whit! te whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole four eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?

Not I, said the cow, Moo-oo!
Such a thing I'd never do;
I gave you a wisp of hay,
But didn't take your nest away.
Not I, said the cow, Moo-oo!
Such a thing I'd never do.

Te whit! te whit! te whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole four eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Bob-a-link! bob-a-link!
Now what do you think?
Who stole a nest away
From the plum-tree to-day ?

Not I, said the dog, Bow-wow!
I wouldn't be so mean, I trow;
I gave hairs the nest to make,
But the nest I did not take.
Not I, said the dog, Bow-wow!
I wouldn't be so mean, I trow.

Te whit! te whit! te whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole four eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?

Bob-a-link! bob-a-link!
Now what do you think ?
Who stole a nest away
From the plum-tree to-day?
4


89





CHOICE POEMS

Coo coo! coo coo! coo coo!
Let me speak a word, too;
Who stole that pretty nest
From little yellow-breast?

Not I, said the sheep, Oh no!
I wouldn't treat a poor bird so;
I gave wool the nest to line,
But the nest was none of mine.
Baa, baa! said the sheep, Oh, no!
I wouldn't treat a poor bird so.

Te whit! te whit! te whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole four eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?

Bob-a-link! bob-a-link!
Now what do you think?
Who stole a nest away
From the plum-tree to-day?





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Coo coo! coo coo! coo coo!
Let me speak a word, too,
Who stole that pretty nest
From little yellow-breast?

Caw! caw! cried the crow,
I should like to know
What thief took away
A bird's nest to-day ?
Cluck, cluck! said the hen,
Don't ask me again;
Why, I hadn't a chick
Would do such a trick.
We all gave a feather,
And she wove them together;
I'd scorn to intrude
On her and her brood.
Cluck, cluck! said the hen,
Don't ask me again.
Chirr-a-whirr! chirr-a-whirr!
We will make a great stir;





42 CHOICE POEMS

Let us find out his name,
And all cry for shame!

I would not rob a bird,
Said little Mary Greene;
I think I never heard
Of any thing so mean.

'Tis very cruel, too,
Said little Alice Neal;
I wonder if he knew
How sad the bird would feel?

A little boy hung down his head,
And went and hid behind the bed;
For he stole that pretty nest
From poor little yellow-breast;
And he felt so full of shame,
He didn't like to tell his name.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 48





ALL CAN DO SOMETHING.

A LITTLE boy, brimful of fun,
Running as hard as he could run,
Plunged in a pond head over heels,
Among the fish and silver eels.
His elder brother caught his hand,
And brought him safely back to land;
The second fish'd his floating cap;
His sister cried at his mishap;
And all directly homeward came,
Dreading to hear their father's blame:
His kindness laid their fears at rest,
They told the truth-the truth is best.

He heard their talk; then, smiling said,
(Patting the first upon the head,)
"Your courage saved your drowning
brother;
4*





44 CHOICE POEMS

Receive this book: and now another
I give the second for his aid:
But what for you, my little maid?
You nothing did-you only cried:
And yet, your right is not denied:
You little did, but that was good-
Your little was just what you could;
To you an equal gift is shared-
Your kind desire I now reward."

Thus, Christians, help poor dying souls,
With all the means your power controls;
Stretch forth the hand, some burden bear,
Or raise your heart in fervent prayer;
The Lord of life, the God most high,
Approves you if you only cry.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 45





RULES FOR MY MEALS.

IN silence I must take my seat,
And give God thanks before I eat;
Must for my food in patience wait,
Till I am ask'd to hand my plate.
I must not scold, nor whine, nor pout,
Nor move my chair or plate about;
With knife, or fork, or napkin ring,
I must not play; nor must I sing.
I must not speak a useless word,
For children must be seen-not heard;
I must not talk about my food,
Nor fret if I don't think it good;
I must not say, "The bread is old !"
The tea is hot!" The coffee cold!"
I must not cry for this or that,
Nor murmur if my meat is fat;





46 CHOICE POEMS

My mouth with food I must not crowd,
Nor, while I'm eating, speak aloud;
Must turn my head to cough, or sneeze,
And when I ask, say, "If you please;"
The table cloth I must not spoil,
Nor with my food my fingers soil;
Must keep my seat when I have done,
Nor round the table sport or run;
When told to rise, then I must put
My chair away, with noiseless foot;
And lift my heart to God above,
In praise for all his wondrous love.















Ebo(ce 39oems.


4.


7 '


id.


1-


The broom across his shoulder flung,
'Twas twice as long as he.


2
-7-


p. 49.


i j!
; I~;
,,





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 49





THE LITTLE SOLDIER.

OH! mother, such a funny sight
I saw a while ago;
Our Johnny is a little sprite,
You've often said, you know;
Well, just now, in dear grandpa's room,
He stood on grandpa's table,
With Betty's heavy kitchen broom
And Betty's pewter ladle.

The broom across his shoulders hung,
'Twas twice as long as he,
The ladle from his rag-belt swung-
That was a sword, you see;
Grandpa's great boots, turn'd up at toes,
Spread wide beneath his gown,
And quite below his little nose,
Grandpa's old hat came down.






50 CHOICE POEMS

He's put around his neck, mamma,
Pa's tall, stiff, satin stock;
And Betty's made him many a star,
And pinn'd them on his frock.
Oh, never saw you such a sight!
Do come, if you are able,
And see that roguish little sprite
Parade on grandpa's table.





LADY-BIRD.

LADY-BIRD! lady-bird! fly away home,
The field-mouse has gone to her nest,
The daisies have shut up their sleepy
red eyes,
And the bees and the birds are at rest.

Lady-bird! lady-bird! fly away home,
The glow-worm is lighting her lamp,






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 51

The dew's falling fast, and your fine
speckled wings
Will be wet with the close-clinging
damp.

Lady-bird! lady-bird! fly away home,
The fairy bells tinkle afar,
Make haste, or they'll catch you, and
harness you fast,
With a cobweb, to Oberon's car.




SUNSHINE AND FLOWERS.
OH! humbly take what God bestows,
And, like his own fair flowers,
Look up in sunshine with a smile,
And gently bend in showers.






52 CHOICE POEMS








THE SHADOWS.

MOTHER.
TaE candles are lighted, the fire blazes
bright,
The curtains are drawn to keep out
the cold air;
What makes you so grave, little darling,
to-night,
And where is your smile, little quiet
one, where ?

CHILD.
Mother, I see something so dark on the
wall,
And it moves up and down, and it
looks very strange;






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 53

Sometimes it is large, and sometimes it is
small;
Pray, tell me what is it, and why does
it change?


MOTHER.
It is mother's shadow that puzzles you
so,
And there is your own close beside it,
my love;
Now, run round the room,-it will go
where you go;
When you sit 'twill be still, when you
rise it will move.


CHILD.
I don't like to see it, do please let me
ring
For Betsey to take all the shadows
away.
5






CHOICE POEMS


MOTHER.
No; Betsey oft carries a heavier thing,
But she could not lift this, should she
try a whole day.

These wonderful shadows are caused by
the light,
From fire and from candles, upon us
that falls:
Were we somewhere else, all that place
would be bright,
But the light can't shine through us,
you know, or the walls.

And when we are out, some fine day, in
the sun,
I'll take you where shadows of apple-
trees lie;
And houses and cottages too, every one
Casts a shade when the sun's shining
bright in the sky.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 55

Now hold up your mouth and give me a
sweet kiss;
Our shadows kiss too! don't you see it
quite plain ?
CHILD,
O yes! and I thank you for telling me
this;
I'll not be afraid of a shadow again.




PREPARING FOR SUNDAY.

HASTE! put your playthings all away,
To-morrow is the Sabbath-day;
Come! bring to me your Noah's ark,
Your pretty tinkling music-cart;
Because, my love, you must not play,
But holy keep the Sabbath-day.

Bring me your German village, please!
With all its houses, gates and trees;





00 CHOICE POEMS

Your waxen doll, with eyes of blue,
And all her tea-things, bright and new;
Because, you know, you must not play,
But love to keep the Sabbath-day.

Now take your Sunday pictures down,-
King David with his harp and crown,
Good little Samuel on his knees,
And many pleasant sights like these;
Because, you know, you must not play,
But learn God's word upon his day.

There is your hymn-book,-you shall
learn
A verse, and some sweet kisses earn;
Your book of Bible stories, too,
Which dear mamma will read to you.
I think, although you must not play,
We'll have a happy Sabbath-day.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 57




THE FLY.

MY merry little fly, play here,
And let me look at you;
I will not touch you, though you're near,
As naughty children do.

I see you spread your pretty wings,
That sparkle in the sun;
I see your legs,-what tiny things!
And yet how fast they run.

You walk along the ceiling now
And down the upright wall;
I'll ask mamma, to tell me how
You walk and do not fall.

'Twas God that taught you, little fly,
To walk along the ground,
And mount above my head so high,
And frolic round and round.
5*





b8 CHOICE POEMS.

I'll near you stand to see you play,
But do not be afraid;
I would not lift my little hand
To hurt the thing He made.






SLOVENLY FLORA.

LITTLE Flora, though really a beautiful
child,
Was always disgusting to see;
Her hands were so dirty, her apron so
soil'd,
Her pretty black curls so tangled and wild,
No scullion more filthy than she.

In vain her kind mother endeavour'd to
train
Her daughter to habits more nice;





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 59

She would listen and promise; but in half
a day,
From her heedless young mind, would
alike pass away
Remonstrance, reproof and advice.


One morning, her brother came running
up stairs-
"Oh! Mary, and Flora, and Sue;
Come quick to the parlour, for uncle is
there,
With beautiful pictures among us to
share;
But he says he has not many minutes to
spare,
And told me to hurry for you.


So Mary and Susan, who always looked
neat,
At once to the parlour ran down;






60 CHOICE POEMS

But Flora, as usual, in slovenly case,
Her hair all uncomb'd and all dirty her
face,
And scarcely a hook to her gown;
Must run to the nursery-beg to be
dress'd,
And hurry to scrub her hands clean;
But her combs were astray, and her shoe-
strings untied,
And her frock to be mended-in vain
Flora tried
To make herself fit to be seen.

At last she was ready, but long before that,
The pictures and uncle were gone;
And uncle had made to each little niece
A present of two little pictures apiece;
But slovenly Flora got none.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 61




NO CHILDREN LIKE MINE.

As I walk'd over the hills one day,
I listened, and heard a mother-sheep say,
"In all the green world there is nothing
so sweet
As my little lamb, with his nimble feet;
With his eyes so bright,
And his wool so white,
Oh! he is my darling, my heart's delight.
The robin, he
That sings in the tree,
Dearly may doat on his darlings four,
But I love my one little lambkin more."
And the mother-sheep and her little one
Side by side lay down in the sun,
As they went to sleep on the hill-side warm,
While my little lambkin lies here on my
arm.





0Z CHOICE POEMS

I went to the kitchen, and what did I
see,
But the old gray cat with her kittens
three.
I heard her whispering soft-said she,
"My kittens, with tails so cunningly
curl'd,
Are the prettiest things that can be in
the world;
The bird on the tree,
And the old ewe, she
May love her babies exceedingly;
But I love my kittens there,
All under the rocking chair.
I love my kittens, black, yellow and white,
I love them at morning, and noon, and
night.
Which is the prettiest I cannot tell-
Which of the three,
For the life of me-
I love them all so well;





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 63

Now I'll take up my kittens, the kittens
I love,
And we'll lie down together beneath the
warm stove."
Let the kittens sleep near the stove so
warm,
While my little darling lies here on my arm.

I went to the yard, and I saw the old hen
Go clucking about with her chickens ten.
She cluck'd, and she scratched, and she
bristled away,
And what do you think I heard the hen
say?
I heard her say, The sun never did shine
On any thing like to these chickens of
mine;
You may hunt through the moon and the
stars, if you please,
But you never will find ten such chickens
as these.





64 CHOICE POEMS

The cat loves her kitten, the ewe loves
her lamb,
But they do not know the proud mother
I am;
Not for lambs, nor for kittens, would I
part with these,
Though the sheep and the cat should get
down on their knees;
No! no! not though
The kittens could crow,
Or the lambkin on two yellow legs could go.
My own dear darlings! My sweet little
things!
Come nestle now cosily under my wings."
So the hen said,
And the chickens all sped,
As fast as they could, to their nice feather
bed.
And there let them sleep in their feathers
so warm,
While my little chick nestles here on my
arm.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 60







THE LITTLE MATCH SELLERS.

ARE all your matches sold, Tom?
Is all your selling done?
Then let us to the flowery fields,
To warm us in the sun.
To warm us in the sweet, sweet sun-
To feel his heavenly glow,
For his kind looks are the only looks
Of kindness that we know.

We'll call the sun our father, Tom!
We'll call the sun our mother!
We'll call each little charming beam
A sister or a brother!
He thinks no shame to kiss us,
Although we ragged go;
6






i CHOICE POEMS

For his kind looks are the only looks
Of kindness that we know.

We'll rest us on the grass, Tom!
We'll upward turn our face;
We'll lock his heat within our arms,
Our arms in fond embrace.
We'll give him a sweet parting tear
When he is sinking low;
For his kind looks are the only looks
Of kindness that we know.

We'll tell him all our sorrows, Tom!
We'll tell him all our care,-
We'll tell him where we sleep at night,
We'll tell him how we fare;
And then-oh then !-to cheer us,
How sweetly he will glow!-
For his kind looks are the only looks
Of kindness that we know.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 67





THE LAME HORSE.

OH! I cannot bring to mind
Where I've had a look so kind,
Gentle lady, as thine eye
Gives me as I'm limping by.
There, thy little girl appears
To regard me through her tears:
Dost thou think she'd like to know
What has brought my state so low?

When not half so old as she,
I was bounding, light and free,
By my happy mother's side,
Ere my mouth the bit had tried,
Or my head had felt the rein,
Drawn my spirits to restrain;
But I'm now so worn and old,
Half my sorrows can't be told.





68 CHOICE POEMS

When my services began,
How I loved my master, man!
I was pamper'd and caress'd,
Housed and fed upon the best;
Many look'd with hearts elate
At my graceful form and gait;
And my smooth and glossy hair,
Comb'd and brush'd with daily care.

Studded trappings then I wore,
And with pride my master bore,
Glad his kindness to repay
In my free, but silent way;
There was found no nimbler steed
That could equal me in speed,-
So untiring and so fleet
Were these poor, old, aching feet.

But my troubles soon drew nigh:
Less of kindness mark'd his eye
As my strength began to fail,
And he put me off at sale.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 69

Constant changes were my fate,
Far too grievous to relate;
But I've been, to say the least,
Mid them all, a patient beast.

Older, weaker still I grew-
Kind attendants all withdrew;
Little food and less repose,
Greater burdens, heavier blows.
These have been my hapless lot,
Till I fell upon the spot!
This maim'd limb beneath me bent,
With the pain it underwent.

Now I'm useless, old and poor,
They have made my sentence sure;
And to-morrow is the day
Set for me to limp away
To some far sequestered place,
There at once to end my race;
I stood by and heard their plot-
Soon my woes will be forgot!
6*





f CHOICE POEMS

Gentle lady, when I'm dead,
By the blow upon my head,
That the hungry dogs and crows
May not mar my last repose-
Only bid them dig a grave,
For the faithful, patient slave,
That will find his truest friend,
Him who brings him to his end!





A'/
(7 <^ ''





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.




THE FLY IN THE ASTRAL LAMP.

AH! thou lost, unwary thing,
Fluttering with a tortured wing-
Crying, with thy little feet
Scorch'd amid surrounding heat.
Poor, unhappy, suffering fly,
What a painful death to die!

Since so rashly thou hast stray'd
'Twixt the funnel and the shade,
In the fiery prison lost,
Now thy life must pay the cost
Of thy venturing near the glare,
Dazzling to allure thee there!

Oh! it fills my heart with pain,
Thus to see thee strive in vain
For escape; for I, alas!
Am too small to lift the glass.





CHOICE POEMS

Mother says I must not take
Things my little hands might break.
Here she comes! But, 'tis too late!
Thou, poor thing, hast met thy fate.
Motion ceases-life has fled
Dropping on the table, dead;
Now I see thee, thoughtless fly!
'Twas a foolish death to die.
"Yes, my child, in careless play,
Thus his life is thrown away-
For a thing that pleased the eye
He rush'd onward but to die!
Yet, remember, there was none
Warning him the blaze to shun.
"If thou think'st the untaught flies
For their errors so unwise,
Let this insect's fall be, hence,
From temptation thy defence!
On thy heart a picture stamp
Of the fly about the lamp."





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 73





BESSIE BELL.

DEAR mother, why do all the girls
Love little Bessie Bell ?
I've often thought it o'er and o'er,
And yet I cannot tell.
My favourite cousin, always was
Dear gentle cousin Bess;
But why the girls all love her so,
Indeed I cannot guess.

She's not so pretty half as Kate,
Her hair don't curl like mine;
Candies and cakes she never brings
To school, like Caroline.
She has no garden, large and fine,
Like Annie, Grace and Jane;
No coach, like Rose, to take her home
When there is snow or rain.





74 CHOICE POEMS

She's no piano like Christine,
No harp like Julia May;
Parties she never had but one,
That on her last birth-day.
Money she never seems to have,
She has but one silk dress.
Why is it, mother, all the girls
So love dear little Bess ?

They hear her gentle voice, my child,
And see her mild soft eye
Beaming around on every one
With love and sympathy.
They see her striving every hour
For others' happiness;
These are some reasons why the girls
So love sweet little Bess.

She never speaks an unkind word,
She's never passionate;
I never knew her to complain,
Or tease, or scold, or fret.














tbofce poems.

% ,, ,


She never speaks an unkind word.-p. 74.
She never speaks an unkind word.-p. 74.









FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 77

She's lowly in her own esteem,
She's gentle, kind and true;
The blessed Bible is her guide,
Its laws she keeps in view.

The widow'd mother's heart she cheers
By love and tenderness,
And by her daily walk with God,
And growth in holiness.
Sweet Bessie is a Christian child;
She loves the Saviour dear;
One of the lambs of his own flock,
She has no want nor fear.

Money, which other children spend
In candies, toys and cake,
She carries to the poor and sick-
She loves them for Christ's sake.
Poor, old black Dinah, down the lane,
She reads to every day,
And ne'er forgets it-though sweet Bess
Is very fond of play.






78 CHOICE POEMS

And now, my daughter dear, would you
Be loved like little Bess?
Go, ask of God to change your heart
From pride and sinfulness.
Better than beauty, rank, or gold,
To be, like little Bess,
Clothed in the pure and spotless robe
Of heavenly righteousness.


'd b. .. '






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.




THE MAN AND HIS COAT.

A MAN beat his coat
Now and then with a cane;
And, astonish'd, one morning
He heard it complain:

"Ungratefully treated,
My fortune is hard!
To beat me, dear master,
Is this my reward ?"

SI beat you !" he answer'd-
"The charge is unjust;
I but gently endeavour
To take out the dust.

"The means I make use of
To you may seem hard,
But it does not diminish
For you my regard.
7





80


CHOICE POEMS

"My boy, whom I dote on
More fondly than you,
I beat now and then,
For the same reason too.
" The faults that in childhood
'Tis right to repress,
Are like dust, or slight stains
On a beautiful dress:
" A little exertion
Will soon work a cure,
And will make both more lovely,
More worthy, more pure."
Though this fable is good,
Yet I never will blush,
To say I choose dusting
My coat with a brush.
To most of my readers
I need not explain,
Advice well observed
Saves the use of the cane.






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 81




EMPLOYMENT.

WHO'LL come and play with me, here,
under the tree,
Where my sisters have left me alone?
My sweet little sparrow, come hither to
me,
And play with me while they are gone.

"0 no, little lady, I can't come indeed;
I've no time to idle away;
I've got all my dear little children to feed,
And my nest to new cover with hay."

Pretty bee, do not buzz about over that
flower,
But come here and play with me, do;
The sparrow won't come and stay but an
hour,
But say, pretty bee-will not you?






82 CHOICE POEMS

"0 no, little lady, for do you not see
Those must work who would prosper
and thrive;
If I play, they would call me a sad idle bee,
And perhaps turn me out of the hive."
Stop! stop! little ant, do not run off so
fast,
Wait with me a little, and play:
I hope I shall find a companion at last,
You are not so busy as they.
"0 no, little lady, I can't stay with you,
We're not made to play, but to labour;
I always have something or other to do,-
If not for myself, for a neighbour."
What then! have they all some employ-
ment but me,
Who lay lounging here, like a dunce ?
0 then, like the ant, and the sparrow
and bee,
I'll go to my lesson at once.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 83





THE GOOD CHILDREN.

WEARY and faint, the blind man came
Up to the cottage door;
He'd walk'd so far, his feet were lame,
And his dog could run no more.
The sun was shining bright and clear,
But he could not see the sun;
The rich, ripe grapes were hanging near,
But he perceived not one.
Kind little Mary saw him come,
And so did John her brother;
And quick into the house they run
To tell their loving mother,
But soon the little girl appear'd--
With a bowl of milk and bread;
And Rover's ears were both uprear'd,
When he heard her gentle tread.
7*





84 CHOICE POEMS

He watch'd the bowl with wistful eye,
And, plain as looks could speak,
He said his tongue was very dry,
And he had nought to eat.
Then John brought out some wholesome
food-
He was a generous boy;
And in his heart it did him good
To see poor Rover's joy.
The blind old man was very glad
When his dog received a share;
Full fervently he bless'd the lad,
And thank'd kind Mary's care.
And as he rose up to depart,
He to the children said,
"May each preserve a loving heart,
When age has bleach'd the head!
And this shall be my daily prayer-
For I cannot, if I would,
Ask greater blessings for your share
Than the love of doing good."





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.


THE LITTLE LORD AND THE FARMER.

A LITTLE lord, engaged in play,
Carelessly threw his ball away;
So far beyond the brook it flew,
His lordship knew not what to do.

It chanced there pass'd a farmer's boy,
Whistling a tune in childish joy;
His frock was patch'd, and his hat was
old,
But the farmer's heart was very bold.

"Here, little chap! Pick up my ball!"
His saucy lordship loud did call-
He thought he need not be polite
To one with clothes in such a plight.

" Do it yourself, for want of me,"
The boy replied right manfully;


85






86 CHOICE POEMS

Then quietly he passed along,
Whistling aloud his favourite song.

His little lordship furious grew-
For he was proud, and hasty too;
"I'll break your bones !" he rudely cries,
While fire was flashing from his eyes.

And heedless quite what steps he took,
He tumbled plump into the brook;
And as he fell, he dropped his bat,
And next he lost his beaver hat.

"Come, help me out!" enraged he cried,
But the sturdy farmer thus denied:
"Alter your tone, my little man,
And then I'll help you all I can.

" There are few things I would not dare
For gentlemen who speak me fair;
But for rude words I do not choose
To tire my feet and wet my shoes."






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 87

" Please, help me," then his lordship said;
" I'm sorry that I was so ill-bred."
"'Tis all forgot," replied the boy,
And gave his hand with utmost joy.

The proffer'd aid his lordship took,
And soon came safely from the brook;
His looks were downcast and aside,
For he felt ashamed of his silly pride.

The farmer-boy brought his ball and bat,
And wiped the wet from his well-soak'd
hat;
And he mildly said, as he went away,
" Remember the lesson you've learned
to-day.

Be kind to all you chance to meet,
In field, or lane, or crowded street;
Anger and pride are both unwise-
Vinegar never catches flies."






88 CHOICE POEMS






ANECDOTES OF JACK FROST,-A FAMOUS
LANDSCAPE PAINTER.

A BRIGHT little rogue jump'd out of his
bed,
With his rose-flush'd cheek and his
golden hair
Curling and floating all over his head,
As if slumber had only been frolicking
there.
He sprung to the window, and clapp'd
his hands,
And a smile came up in his deep, blue
eyes,
For a vision of other and lovelier lands,
In still, dim beauty, before him lies!
The fairy garden-the glittering mosque,
The graceful bower and the gay kiosk.





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 89

The lake, that sparkles in light serene,
Might mark the picture a Persian seene:
That cataract foaming!-A drop of light!
Those cloud-capt mountains in miniature!
Why, a fly, in a twinkling, could climb
the height,
Where eastern idolaters knelt of yore!
But close to the temple,-how came it
there?-
Is something that looks like a great white
bear!
And gliding away, on the sunniest edge
Of the garden bright, is a Lapland
sledge!
The graceful reindeer is white as snow,-
And the reins and his antlers are silver,
I know!-
And see! on the seat of the gossamer
car,
A dear little Laplander shines like a
star,





90 CHOICE POEMS

With a cunning white boa, on her tiny
blue dress-
What! fur among roses! she'll melt, I
guess!
She is rather too brilliant for nature;-
no matter,-
We believe, 'tis the license of painters to
flatter.
Willy knew by the tracery, strange and
fair,
That a queer little artist, called Frost,
had been there;
He thought, too, he spied him, outside
of the pane-
That funny old man-when he look'd
again,
With his twinkling eyes, keen, cold and
bright,
His pallet of pearl and pencil of light,
His pinions of fleece, with moonbeams
inlaid,






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 91

And his three-corner'd cap, of a diamond
made.
He look'd hard at Willy, as much as to say,
"I would give the best gem in my casket,
to play
With your wild, bright curls, and your lip
of rose,
Or to bite off the end of your dear little
nose!"
"No! no! Mr. Frost, you may peep if
you please,
Over the mountains, and through the
trees!
You may float in the clouds, through the
deep midnight,
And play with your jewels of rainbow
light!
You may dance on the lake with your
twinkling feet,
Till it hardens beneath them, a silver
sheet!
8





92 CHOICE POEMS

You may wave your wings o'er the wood-
land bloom,
And sprinkle their sparkles amid the
gloom,
Till the whole wide forest, from towering
pine
To baby bush, with your snow-plumes
shine!
You may look on the rivulet, murmuring
by,
Till you charm it to sleep with your clear
cold eye,
And bid it forget its flowing!
You may do what you will, and I will
not fear-
No! no! Mr. Frost, you shall not come here.
Mother, how cold it is growing!
No! no! Mr. Frost, you may bite, if
you please,
The poor little shivering buds on the
trees;






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 93

You may dig with the point of your cap
in the earth,
Till you come to the place where the
flowers have birth,
And tell them they mustn't come up,-if
they do,
You'll pinch them all, till they're black
and blue!
You may frighten the lilies and roses;
You may bite the bush, the vine, the tree,
But, Mr. Jack Frost, you shall not bite me!
Mother, how cold my nose is!
No! no! Mr. Frost, you may eat the grass;
You may try your teeth upon window-
glass,
Since you must do some mischief or
other;
You may swallow the brooks,-and the
deep, full sea,
You thirsty ojd fellow! your drink may
be,






94 CHOICE POEMS

But, dear Mr. Jack Frost! please don't
eat me!
Oh! give me my breakfast, mother!"
The milk was lifted, for Willy to sip;
But he felt, just then, on his soft, warm
lip,
A tiny touch, from a hand of ice,
And he put it away from his mouth in a
trice.
What do you think he found in his cup?
The poor little iceman himself peep'd up.
Willy lifted the bowl-one draught he
drew;-
"And pray, Mr. Jack Frost, where are
you!
You needn't go diving and glancing about,
As if little Willy would let you come out."
Ah, Willy he drain'd the sweet cup with
delight,
But when he had finished, he stared in
affright,






FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 95

He thought he should find him all snugly
curled up,
The poor little painter, within the deep
cup.
Full sharply he look'd-but Jack was
not there,
And Willy cried out, "He's gone, I
declare!
While I drank, he jump'd from the bowl,
I know-
Mother, dear mother, did you see him
go?
You're a coward, Jack Frost; and next
time I meet you,
If you dare touch my lips, I will surely
eat you."


8*





vo CHOICE POEMS







THE LAMB'S LULLABY.

CHILD.
THE pretty little lambs that lie
And sleep upon the grass,
Have none to sing them lullaby
But the night winds as they pass.


While I, a happy little maid,
Bid dear papa good-night,
And in my crib so warm am laid,
And tuck'd up snug and tight.

There Annie sits and sings to me,
With gentle voice and soft,
The Highland song of Sweet Glenshee,
That I have heard so oft:

















cbofce voems.


The lambs sleep in the fields 'tis true,
Without a lullaby. p. 9





FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 97

Or else some pretty hymn she sings,
Until to sleep I go;
But the young helpless lambs, poor things,
Have none to lull them so.

Oh, if the lambs to me would come,
I'd try and sing Glenshee;
And here, in this warm quiet room,
How sound their sleep would be!

Haste, kind mamma! and call them here,
Where they'll be warm as I;
For in the chilly fields, I fear,
Before the morn they'll die.

AMAMA'S ANSWER.
The lambs sleep in the fields, 'tis true,
Without a lullaby;
And yet they are as warm as you,
Beneath the summer sky.

They choose some dry and grassy spot,
Below the shady trees;





98 CHOICE POEMS

To other songs they listen not,
Than the pleasant evening breeze.

The blankets soft that cover you
Are made of fleeces warm,
That kept the sheep from evening dew,
Or from the wintry storm.

And when the night is bitter cold,
The shepherd comes with care,
And leads them to his peaceful fold:
They're safe and sheltered there.

How happy are the lambs, my love!
How safe and calm they rest!
But you a Shepherd have above,
Of all kind shepherds best.

His lambs he gathers in his arms,
And in his bosom bears;
How blest-how safe from all alarms,
Each child his love who shares!




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