• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Preface
 Main
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Leila in England
Title: Leila at home
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002146/00001
 Material Information
Title: Leila at home : a continuation of Leila in England
Physical Description: iv, 352, 36 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tytler, Ann Fraser ( Author, Primary )
Hatchard, Thomas, d. 1858 ( Publisher )
Palmer, George Josiah ( Printer )
Vizetelly, Henry, 1820-1894 ( Engraver )
Foster, B. ( Illustrator )
Publisher: T. Hatchard
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: G.J. Palmer
Publication Date: 1852
Edition: 2nd ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Wolff, R.L. 19th cent. fiction,
Statement of Responsibility: by Ann Fraser Tytler.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Illustration drawn by B. Foster and engraved by H. Vizetelly.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002146
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239045
oclc - 21212422
notis - ALH9570

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page i
        Front page ii
        Front page iii
    Frontispiece
        Front page iv
    Title Page
        Front page v
    Copyright
        Front page vi
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
    Advertising
        Advertising page 1
        Advertising page 2
        Advertising page 3
        Advertising page 4
        Advertising page 5
        Advertising page 6
        Advertising page 7
        Advertising page 8
        Advertising page 9
        Advertising page 10
        Advertising page 11
        Advertising page 12
        Advertising page 13
        Advertising page 14
        Advertising page 15
        Advertising page 16
        Advertising page 17
        Advertising page 18
        Advertising page 19
        Advertising page 20
        Advertising page 21
        Advertising page 22
        Advertising page 23
        Advertising page 24
        Advertising page 25
        Advertising page 26
        Advertising page 27
        Advertising page 28
        Advertising page 29
        Advertising page 30
        Advertising page 31
        Advertising page 32
        Advertising page 33
        Advertising page 34
        Advertising page 35
        Advertising page 36
        Advertising page 37
    Back Cover
        Back cover 1
    Spine
        Spine 1
Full Text
"' ,!-W' "U!' %, 04 ` --.f; ; *7 ..
.'- -," 7 .. 711- 4 77.71':47----" !T ----.- 'z! ;!!t:l ;---,-.-:i .,----!-.-;"--.:.-..,-.----..--:- ^ ,-* Fi _-
', ` .3 -M ...... .-;t;"!':j.l.
._ i :.A 4 .1; ..., ..
1)!;-e'.' -4_'-"_:._-"].' _'..._ '_ I : TRAY, T R A n 4 9" W "O G -"'' -, I ..
__ s M "' '.' ',!' A_- '- `:':: 7.:.' - ..; -.1 :-
0 -5- --. 4 ".....,
I I ...Z.. I I ... '. I ... .'... _" _._
-' 4;-"-- ;--"-z-'_ '. ,'.',: -_'...: "......z_ : ----..--. ,-.-;." --..-..;,..-,--,;-.,--,----,,;Io t A
e. -- ..' -: : -. -- --- -'-' -- 10 1 --,-
"" ", -.. '-.1f.-.1 '_ 1-
.. Po o "
'..:Ii' -ttion0hoov: .: 1 A -" ,,, - '.' -' -': I
q4l_... '!'-. I
!";z' _'.:. ,,, -,- ; :7" 7 .- - -;
.-!'-"'Z-'_% ""---.---.-' --'-''-.'.'.:" : 4--- _',,, _- ,..;;,.,.",,,,,,..-..r."".,-.z ", __ .. .:. -.- ,--.4, :.%,. 1": ... A ,
;7 .-'-'*-'-f- e .- ..' -.::_'7 lnz: .' :'...; '_.;.._- -: -;-. ..' _-' --'. .. ...: -, -
'... a ; .' _;'!. .. ... 1 .-.--:.'
,-, , .,.. I E." I --.:.- ---.--'. ",.I...
.. -, igicentl
.rC ila'. I I e ".._.. I -1 1 1 "' ---
".." 4w.'.' -'' ` :_ 11 -, ...-F _' '4-'V- ':.''_' I
"I I .... 11 ..' I : -1 I:, '.,.-- -,:- e: -. zi.- z.i.;' ". '. .
"- : 1 1 1 v '" __ ---' --7_ _' __ "'. "', ...Iiv..t'.' I _.; -...". ;'-" '-,
.' .., ; ...', e I ..... 1. ..'
.: "_' 1. .'; ... '
'," -J.- i: ..' .'..'.`_""" : 'v I r -'
X. -.4, - I.-.:
1. 4 ..-..,. _w ..- ": .,r:, I.: w --'.'.: I I '. ; iK. Z'.. --..; __1 ` -- '. M. I 'Y:'. --- __ '
.1'4.... ... ..' ;X" ... ..'
:-, .""i -'. :' ., '. -q '. -_ : ;f':" I le A N v : it Jw tliL'. "I' .; "', -" "J, -- -1
-5 ,,:-.-. ?'ii':" -'' .. 4v-. .. I %r. -,'--AEF._ -.. .-. _._.1 .. ", _' I '. "'_ -' t# -t 1 ,
-- '.' : _;r.'..
:' "7 ':' .. '. _z" ... : '.'_':_'_'.
-'.'- __ K 4" ; .-, '
.: : .... ." .r c' ': I.: ,-.
_._ I % --: 'e. '. ..: .:: : -;1z
''- -2 -, ..'. .' ': _. 1,
-T I 3- .
r _': -" ,,:-,. I '... :_ .. t e..4 4-. .,2.7, .': '. F. ' ""-" -..".: ..' :
... -, : - '
"' __ _'_z.'._. i :' .' '.... 1. ..'
.- "'v. .:'_ 'z' I I I I 'F ...i.... _'..... I
__ r ,.'.., -'. -- -,.,- ,
...7 : .i .. _:' !.. -, '.; .Z. .:. _n:__"_ --- .. '. 7
... I 1 "' _' "."'Z 3- 4 1 -. .-' .; ..
12 ..' _'; '. '.` ::: "'""i'..':..'- ...' .4.".""_ ".- '_.-- I _!*_.... '. , I --._.. .. ., .. -- '. -.
_.: ';7., , .. I 11... S...' .,:,. .;
..:. .. .. ''I 7'.- i e _..; L Lt', I .,- .."-.- _..' '.'.'i' _'.' -I, ,4;K'_':. -
q t 0. z I .: 11. _2 I.- _' -1 :_ 2i _,' ..-- I -7 .' 7', .' I ,
u. '. ..7 .1 .. 1. -i : --' .-.' i 4 '. "Y 1 .. .... I, .1 44 .. _4 I
; A 1 I :. : ., .;: -, .va'.
.. I .' .,.,* -- : --"- i, ; 4 :_ . ..... ,..' i- ,. _!" ... ,
':' A K I O a ,"J .. __ .,.' _z_-";_ r _-- .' ',' -;.-J ..,'7 '. ., _.'.__'_.'z. 11'.' I 1 "'!'
4- '.' .-' '.'-.'f.i- -- ., '_.!.-' _e'. M' 14 J. w ... in .-.
7 j-'. ._. _,. F ,.-- i' _'. '
?, .. .;
11 I ..' ,
..A 7'; :!"?' 7'..' '. T, ..---- -?.- ... _t IA I -.... ,
'.'- -t' - ': ..?.. __ _'5"!--,-..--.','-P w -t -, -..-- .-- ... --'- --'-' . 'I -- .. :.P::' ."... %....
-. -i_ .19" zp.. ., : '. '
.:':P` I '. ,;: .:,. _-...."- .
;.-r4t__ I .. '. 9. -,-,, .' ... .. _" '
5 r.. .... i .1 '_
Eyn : .: t '4--' -- -. _"--.'..1..'..4 x T ; --'.'-. .' _-.,._.4 _t ..'- I '..: '-t._-r",! A 4,
I.% -I.. I .. ; .. z.i '_ .J ---:-;-. 7__iw'.;'3_1-':'_ ":1
.. .. ., ; _.. .."'. .. .-_' ,:-.- -.`I'; ;' *" I ':t. '.,-,: .. ".V ...;,"...." i'..-s ,---' I -1k i I
4 41 h.' "F.. t'. .'. I .' n L....", _-;_ -;-._!- _'
- ` ^ -_ L': .*_;_: ''__.-_ .. : ..'.': _--'r -, :"': ; I I
- J:'4_ ..' .-: 'T' ."
... _* .. I I -11 11
..:" I '!* _'. -3- t.'t- '.:".:-'t; "'_ ;t-. .; -- -'.. r. .' _'.'S'_- I I
.. r. -:' '- _- .. I ... .E. ., I _!r_._
.. ; ..' .F I ,' I
.! i 7'4 '1_..to '7.1..M'.':._i,'r I I '.
4'..' '_."_ : .. .' ...'i -, -',--. ';:._- I :.
I, .. _; ,-- .-
.. W. Z 6- 11 I I re .' '.....''. %-. .... ., .r % - -, 7
.. I I i a- ,.'.-.;`._--. '.'-. -, -.- .- '.: -- .. .... _e .:. 0 = "& 1 ::,- 'K .'. _11 I.- I .7
.' T 110 ."t_ _" .1-p-, .'-"_'..-'---;z:; I ., _. .. "". I I .1 SN KIRM ; iT
.. .. '... '. ., '_" `- r- .. 4 I .
-.1 -4 7 i 'f .:' .. '
11 '. i ,.4 i,..---i.i--.--...,:..:,Z!.. v .! .. ';'." ';.' --',,'.' '.;.' 4 ., I I
7'..", k2.......I..'... __ I I
_.;i.:_ .. .-,-.-.-... ';_-r, -.-':--- ':i--i.'--.'_'... ;. 1!.
.... ... .;.. I
-_ '_ -. _. : .. ... ^49 -` i;__ __ f .. -_-. t' ` ' "' -
.;. -% I ,
r 1 .. V ,.:. ':''.. .. ,
t ; -- -.-'--.;-,'-.,'-.,.-,.,-..,'.,..'.-'-. _-,:, v' q,.? _"
_::_ .;.._.".'. -
'''
-w --';'T--t_t- -.='.. c7lr__-%. I-7." _:.. '. -11 I '1'.''*'17 '
::::' 7. :' .. . ^ ." I
z %- ,'
Q f 7 -., ... .....'... .. .
''''''''''''''._:
._: ,
._:
._: ,
._:
._: ,
._:
._: ,
._:
._:
._: :
._:
._: ,
._:.- %1 '."' ... V 4_-re: '' .'_ .-. '- ,
... i_ -'- "''- --i7 '."",-', '-----. ..' -, I I I
._: :- --' '-- "., -"'.'.--.' -' -, ,. --. .-- -Q w WW I _-
._: _. .:_.. ._ ,
1_,_. 'i I I,- ; : -. .: .. ". r ._ _. _".. .__.'T..._._:_7 _" ,_.. '..... ;.' _;' z "':- -- ,
:::::: -- ; 0 ; : A :
.- I ...-..-" I V .- __ : ,,, I '.
: _.- N'L: .. '_.
---,, __ M.- _'...'. : ... .. ..:.'i_.
'.. .. I 11 _- ;h.,,---.!",i.,.-.,4,.'.-.--,...-..', '.z..".i .. : ,
.. '%"__ 7.'. ..
.... 1..:::::::::::::: . 0' ._'_1'__4..'1?;f_--`; .. -.,. -", !'
..' :' -;'_ T-7, -` '-
:.. 11. e -, ; 1 1 ,
.... .. I, .-; .. 1. J. ..!..
_. __',_'. : 'zt., __" _'.'.'.4, _'t:_;- 2.7 ... .... I ... ,
I' ...." .. ..... -,.-.-, _. _'.. 1 -, ,
M... .;' "' ... ';' -
... .Y... '.4 I --- - -_'- : ,,- "_
'_-z .' ...'..' _'. .... 1 -I- 7 -!-:-.'-.T? t I' -.1- 11
....1 ... .- .1 .-'-"' '.' _. :1- -, -1
S'. 't:"' z i.". ..
.. L-7-'. I -, ;. 'r ''; '-r' - _" 6t.
... .,.,. -- "-,:--, ". '' - 1
;'.... r ------ I "4 ... .- .- -- __ "...".1. 7_ ...V_
.. '% -, "' z' ,,, "r ---., -- 'L:!:. ....::,. .'.. a, "-'*.-_.'-.-'.. ...'_."....- ;_.'_,;''.--- -_-"."-iwV 10 _Z -. 4' ,. -, 1
4'_ ; -'... _. _. .1i -'. _
'. -;_ _.... .' r n'Onn"! 't, !
N nn". .
.". I 1. I .. .. r, _. .. 1,
_. '."c w.-. r, ':;O- :.- -. '. _:. ,, O,.,XAOI!tt,,- 01211ozs.... ...- "2 _: 10 1 I I ..' :' "
r -'
I. -.-. ...-.'. _" "' ,,: -!z..-,'.-,;,-i,-,.---.."",.".... - --."' '' '--'_ - .r -' -_ -
'; ;r:1f:M"_- -,.,. .;."-.:--_; kz
-.;'- '"---. ...'!.2'..' --, -' .. ..' ". --' ,,, -: ":- ''
'. -':._''.----':.... 'i:::':
"" .. __ __ -;--;4a n.gkol""O4--, '. .; -, ,,, .' _''.
A. WAN-'.. '.7 "" "-'
._'-Z_-_LLn." '........_", & -. -... ._' I .
V_ __ ._ _-._. .;J:'_' _.: 7 ..
_!'&I".-.-:i'F" ? ..' ..:, ., -: ". . .;---- I
_. ""''l h; ... .- i4 _7.'_ .K ; ` 14':-'..-."-'--'....- '. -- -- '. __ ,
.VAc-.' z.' t .1 rilft _r... rr
'. I I ..;:':.; .' :.:., 11.1 '.-.,. L --z w.' ;
-, '.-- T : .. ''7 .... -7- -- '- .. .;.. ::,.,.',' :
Z-lw I.E. _.." 4 .-. e....t_ :_-.'...-_ v, _." ,
'. M.It-. _"'!.;- "'___.Q..'-.. -7i
:-; -_i_-.. .':...-';_ .,--T .. "--.'--.''.,'-,7,-,4. _Iz%'_''Igg-.;"-'.'' Z- i-t-_:-.-'_' ._-:!-; .
v'. v- .; "00 i ..-""- -'-:-",:'--;'._-.' ..; -, ,"
1:__171-'i37.1_1__;K_'.;.' ":: ._.l '-"-'`_ i-' '-:' 7 ..' ....' :_-'. .' .,., ---- '..
... _.-'__ -...2.-L '. e ... ....-._Z .:". A ':' '
.1 --. - '.';'".''7__'.;.'.f.'.. -_.."' 0 3 ..' '5 -".- !"-';'-. -
,-- '.-' A :'. : .:' -,.:' w : _'. Z': -t'- '.'-.- ;'.-'.".: Z-':j ...' --- ;z;.. .'. _..%..'.' .'; M- '' ,-7L I
' -'t._.; A M ov A Qyvnv ".'--.-_':'..-6.".: -''''
am Ewj -- X, '__.._____--' .- I
0 1y Ny T"-":.;- -T. -, 7' 1' ; "-;-, ". ':',- -" 0-04 A _L1'_"..'.-%' _:' ,
I I :', ---: .77,,.-,4.%--...:7-,.-.-7..-.. _. '_ :
.. .... ....... 4'.. 11 I I L ... ,. ,-..7!,..- -;;" -'- : ,-,.-"_, ---' A '-
.": z -, .. _.- _.,.'A.','_.!tl..'_ _":'i"' ..: -
"- -- I.:,; I '.-&.-_4-: _...' ; .. -_;:.%;"
.-..!. ..-'v.x ...'--'_.;.:- fze _'.'*'-!'--. _-J., __ '_ ... _' f. w w '"w W w w :"
.: .:... .. -.. '. __ -.." : I
.t.- 'L'. '_% ';.",' "- "..-''.'__ -- -- --- -7 -. :,-
-, __ _'.. ,-'42'-'.' .. ;'':'__
%".:-""M_' -''!;.."" I : '.,'j7.:_.'.'.';." '_..:;.; ';..-' -1.., -'11.:%_ _..,.' : I I I
-,..-r."l-.'.-"..,-.-:7:., .. --- I .;i .. i..,,l ,:,-,..-....--!.-,..;: _.',_
-.' _'.. I t. ..-. -..-- i, '
= '' ''.."" '" =": = _M ..'.. I
...... ., ".;!;''<';4i''*-'r' '+'N '. *4.w l. -;;k Z__.'_ .%_' :_ : ". ;"., z
7 ':6 '; A --z'-% -'.i47-:!%-.-..;":'.'.L,-.:;- '' '% -'-'
; .' 11- : .'_' .' '5 1 i'6'; 1"____w_&5= ?1
': .' nn A dom" "Aw .
44 ---_-'.-::?-n'_'. 'A -.kl :------.,,.r-,..'-,-,,--,.,- :,"" .. r --! 0 I I I
... : ..... .. .._ ..'_, -.-, _. -0 I I
------- _-'..--:_' -. .,.7j:;...._.-.'.'___' to A
.:4 .,,. t'-:.-;"Ajyvwsl Q .... .....W- 10 Q j I
I t _. n I I --:
--, .. -- --' -: .. -1 _..... I -
1 I -
i. '!..:"' _.. 1 "
i '-" '' ,_-- -:'-.'' :....,.-,;-,-,--'-,..-.--"-,...'--.,.-.,.;,:.. '..' .
...n w;;_'._" --.^: -"'." I ____':_--_-_ ..' .. -'- -..' : -
111 .. .M .'-1 I 1. 1. A':U l. __ __e' '. -_ -. : _-:;- .....z-, ..". I%-"..,. ;-, 1.1,1" --,,-- ;F;:- .
I 1 -- -: -F --';' -:. -.:*-'.`--r ...... ., .- _." .....
.."F, --, % ' 1_2011 ,11;lvn -.-.,.-...,...,."..",. .. ,z,.,--,-,-,;-:--i-.-,
-"11-- ":' ,:- :..--_.t'i:'-.- -.;"-'y. --,...;.'lt.::- ': 1 .
1. a '.1 11 M ..*'.;:: I __"_;"'L:- .. 7'-'.-'_ n.. .. ". ... -, .. .-I.". :- .. .'.. ': :';. '.''4;:' _.. i -'. ...-, '-- ,
An ee' .....,.,_r..;"..5,1-'-.,., '.1':'_._' ''--. +i;. I 4'1'41 _.'; -''"'.'J'.t"L'.-- :..- '

-.- -- 7:- .- 'Lr '_. __'_41'7 1'..'7- '' __ I

-, - ,',-,----. -... -. _'... -
'_Z "" __ -- ---
:4 ""- .; .;. v; -k .-. I 2. _. _. Z t 7 _"i: "'. ".. '...-q..:,':,-7 :'v;'F:x"71__ ,
., ....'.. 1 41 1_3- '.__z _7'. _... _- -
'.!---- -.---..---''_ --' _:.-'-A; %. .-, i' ,..-.
-: ;i' ...L... '._ '. -- -
_'...-.;'r.:.:'. .. ..' "....' ...., _. t* i I ... I., __.. !"'.;'-,-;.:i:;:-..-.,.i.-.,.-.. ... '._ ... :'L. ,. z -:F_' _"' __ -1:
'F ", -_ __ -',t- :-:" -- -'.-"-;.'.-.--- -: -. -' .:: '.."_-..., I :-- t : ". ,.-:-,-__..--4--i,,.-'.!.."-;"-".-.: 7 'A. ,
... C. .. I I 't c Z.. I
,--,---,, -1 .' N'- ''-'t '; -, ,.;:4
:" -' __ I- I + :' I I .- -'..:_': '.; v'_'.!._ '. -. :;' I 11
.' % ; : -" -%:' ... f'-'-::_..v :.',. "
;.;a '..'... ,_ ,.,. ', :: t--.4!;..-.
_'. "..'. -..."I i, ''I 71'...r.: ..:.. "n- -'%'7 `:"_^__ .'Pzl';- , '' '' -
,:..r,:..r,:..r I'' -- i f ; -.:."''. v -, -
:::::: .. ':-. j ,, !Q7 vn-- ... i 77':,: ..r. 1 1 W5 1 M = !M m ", ,11 .- -'' '.r. .7 ,.:: Aa 0 1- >Ityv 0A-_- :
;J .--.r.* "'. 7 z v' :- "V v Ry '5 I
;; I . i.- 1: 1 : -;- ----.,.. I
+ : -,., ,-:: '- -- .. _._ .'.'...z , .., ..' ......,:' ." --- '. .... T .1, 1. A ,
.... :.. :' '. "-' ` `- , --.-.. ., _,'..",_'..' If. -;--: '---'-' ':' -.....i.int.... !""7,':' ,-,- "

---'-','-"'-.- i.-"--'r '_ .. .. ,

.
. . ""7..-"- ." I `' -,"," -"
- ', .. '.
.. : "'
__' .... I .. -7 .; "." i -, A '' '-+ I-
.............. . . Q "'r-""-'"-"'." -- .'e- .: : _-, itv7` .' _' -
".. _- 4, -. ..-Z"' 'Ll.; L' -,
-.,.- '- --"" ;:_ .1 : 11 ,.,. I
.. w .' .': - '.......- .. I I
... __.!.'__'...._ ., '.. %';.....z" -....,w vom .1
.. I 5. .-,--,,.,,-,. -,."' -.--.-- .. '.. -_
..' ;. 0,..._ ,- : I
]:.:- : ': "
w lnao n 1. _11"> Q"T '.' i, '_ ..'i -"'. w -..r + I
M-0 qj,: "


















'a il/ce


S / //
.6 t/C /-I,-


/C(4% L3


/,



























--


II
II
It -
II~ -.


Page 40.


If-- T-- I,~~-~- -- -- -- "


-'---- -- ~J .-~---~a










LEILA AT HOME.



A CONTINUATION OF




LEILA IN ENGLAND.





BY

ANN FRASER TYTLER.

AUTHORESS OF MARY AND FLORENCE; OR, GRAVE AND
GAY," &C. &C.


etontr a iTtion.




LONDON:
T. HATCHARD, 187, PICCADILLY.
1852.







































(LONDON :

G. J. PALMER, SAVOY STREET, STRAND.

















PREFACE.


IT was the intention of the writer of the
following pages to have bid a last farewell
to Leila, but some of her young readers
have said No ;" and she feels too grateful
for the kindness they have shown her, not
to make an attempt to meet their wishes.
Circumstances have so long prevented her
fulfilling this intention, that it may be ne-
cessary to remind them that they took leave
of Leila when she had just set off for
Woodlands, (near Richmond,) a property
Mr. Howard had purchased near the resi-







iv PREFACE.

dence of her uncle, Mr. Sianley ;-that Leila
was in all the joy of her cousin, Selina
Stanley, having recovered her speech ;-
that Selina's sister, Matilda, was continuing
to make many good. resolutions, and too
often to break them again ;-and that their
brother, little Alfred, was little Alfred still,
and not over wise.

Ems, Sept. 12th, 1851.














LEILA AT HOME.





CHAPTER I.



THE wooded banks of Richmond were in
all the soft green of early spring, when
they were first seen by Leila. A few months
had passed; the trees were now half stripped
of their leaves, and the autumn tints were
fast fading into sombre gray as she a se-
cond time caught sight of its wooded
heights; but how different were now her
feelings, how much more beautiful did the
whole scene appear to her with Selina by
her side! Selina was spring, summer, sun-







LEILA AT HOME.


shine, and all to Leila, and she had not a
sigh to give to the falling leaves or the
moaning wind.
As the carriage drew up before the same
low, picturesque-looking house, which she
had before visited, Matilda and Alfred (who
with their papa and mamma had preceded
them but a few minutes) stood holding the
house-door open, ready to give them wel-
come. Little Alfred bustled out to assist in
letting down the steps, and Matilda, in her
eagerness to help them to alight, had well
nigh brought them to the ground.
"Softly, softly," Mr. Howard exclaimed,
as he endeavoured to catch hold of Leila's
frock; but Matilda had succeeded in extri-
cating both the little girls from the car-
riage.
"Oh, what a day of joy," she cried;
"Cousin Leila still to be with us for a
whole month, and Selina as able to talk to
her now as I am; Selina, do you remember
when you went away ?"
Selina did remember: she coloured, her
eyes filled with tears, and throwing her


29







LEILA AT HOME.


arms first round her sister's neck, and then
round Leila's, she darted from their side.
Why does she do that ? where has she
gone ?" Leila anxiously inquired.
"I think I know," Matilda answered; and
pointing to a door on the opposite side of
the passage, she flew back to the carriage to
assist in getting out the parcels.
Leila crossed the passage, and softly
opened the door; Selina was on her knees
by the side of her little bed; she timidly
advanced, and lifting the white muslin cur-
tain which partly concealed Selina's slight
figure, she knelt by her side. As the two
little girls rose from their knees, their eyes
met, eyes so full of gratitude to heaven, as
almost made Selina's half-whispered expla-
nation, Leila, I could not wait till night,"
unnecessary; and now," she continued,
" I must go to dear mamma."
When Selina returned soon after, she
found Leila and Matilda, assisted by Amy,
arranging the smaller parcels, and carrying
them to the different rooms. Matilda looked
eagerly in Selina's eyes.
B2







LEILA AT HOME.


"I see what you have been doing," she
said, reproachfully; but I think it is I
that should cry: when we were here before,
I had to speak both for you and myself.
Oh, it was so nice; no, no, Selina, I don't
mean that, I don't indeed; I am so glad
you can speak, oh, so very glad; I said it
only to make you laugh, and now I am near
crying myself, but I won't; this is not a day
to weep, the very happiest day of all our
lives. Come, let us go and visit the school-
room; not to say lessons, you know, but
just to enjoy ourselves."
"Yes, that will be an excellent plan,"
Leila answered; and perhaps in the bread-
basket we shall still find the head of the
doll, which would have been so pretty a
doll for my Sally, if it had not been so
hardly dealt with."
Matilda laughed: How funny you are,"
she said, turning to Leila, and passing her
arm round her waist; "you have put away
my sorrow in a minute."
The three little girls proceeded to the
school-room.








LEILA AT HOME.


"How very nice it looks," Leila ex-
claimed; "how bright, how cheerful-look-
ing; so different from what it was before."
"And were you very melancholy when
you were here before, and did not find us?"
Matilda inquired.
Oh, so melancholy when I saw the
flower-pots," Leila answered; and I cried
so when I saw the paper with 'Custom
commonly makes things easy.' Yes, 'Cus-
tom commonly' was the worst of all."
"But that is all over now," Matilda ob-
served; "so we need not speak about it,
for now we are all three as happy as can be;
don't you think so, Selina ?"
Indeed I do, Matilda; but it is such a
deep joy I cannot find words to utter it;
it does not make me merry, but do not
think it is because I am sad. If you are
happy and think it a joyful day, what must
it be to me? I had given up all hope of
ever being able to speak again ; I was tell-
ing Leila so that very day, and making her
promise not to pray for it any more. Then
so many changes have come upon me.







LEILA AT HOME.


When I saw Leila on the ground, when I
thought her dead,-oh, I must not think of
it; and when she opened her eyes again,
and said, 'Who spoke? what has hap-
pened?' and when she knew God had
opened my lips, what a moment that was !
Leila's joy, and my joy too, and to be able
to tell her how much I loved her. You do
not know how I used to struggle before,
and what it was for me not to be able to
speak."
"Indeed I do know very well," Matilda
answered; for when mamma often says to
me, 'Matilda, I must beg you to be silent,
you distract my head,' I am more anxious
to speak than ever; and so vexed, I would
rather she had given me a good slap."
"A good slap!" Leila exclaimed. "Oh,
Matilda, if my papa were ever to slap me,
I would-" she covered her face with her
hands and shuddered.
What would you do ?" Matilda anxiously
inquired, as she pulled down Leila's hands,
and tried to get a sight of her face.
"I would die," Leila answered, in a







LEILA AT HOME.


voice so low that the words were scarcely
audible.
But Matilda caught them. "Oh dear,"
she cried, how I have shocked you; what
a shocked face you have; well, I am always
saying something wrong, and I daresay I
shall never be better; for these kind of
things come out before I know what I am
saying. Selina, do you think it was so
very wrong, and was Leila right to say she
would ? You know what I mean. You
always tell me we should take trials pa-
tiently."
Selina coloured. "I think you were both
a little wrong," she said, timidly. "You
were wrong to talk in that way of dear
mamma, who is always so patient and gen-
tle with you; and very wrong to say you
would never be better, when you know God
will give you strength if you pray for it
with all your heart; but not if you say
wandering prayers, and do not really wish
it;" and she looked anxiously at Matilda;
"And cousin Leila ?" Matilda inquired.
Selina proceeded. Yes; Leila I thought







LEILA AT HOME.


was a little wrong to express herself so
strongly; you know Uncle Howard always
says she must try to command her feelings
more,-you are not angry with me, Leila,
for saying this ?"
"Angry? Oh! no, no. I love you even
more when you tell me I have not done
right; for I feel that you are so true, and
you say it so gently, just as my papa
does."
"Well to be sure !" Matilda said; "to
like to be told that one is not good, I can
never get up to that; I don't like at all to
be told I am not good; I would rather say
it of myself than that others should say it;
indeed, it comforts me sometimes to say it
all out. Selina, do you know that at this
very moment I am not good ?"
Yes, I do know,-you were glad when
I said Leila had been wrong too."
"And was that all ?" Matilda inquired.
"No, not quite all; you were disap-
pointed when you found it was so small a
fault."
Oh, Selina, it is too bad in you to say







LEILA AT HOME.


that; you are glad when you find people
are good, and like yourself, and I cannot
help being rather glad also, when I find
people a little like myself, though I am not
good; but you are getting into a way of
seeing me through and through!-you must
not do that, or you will see a great many
things to frighten you; at least, please
don't begin to-day, when we were to have
been so merry; but do you know what I
think is going to happen; something that
won't make us merry at all,-and yet I shall
be so curious to see her."
See whom ?" both the others ex-
claimed; "what do you mean, Matilda ?"
"I mean that we are going to get a
governess; that is, that I think, perhaps,
we are to get one."
"And why do you think so ?" Selina
asked.
Because when I went into the drawing-
room with one of the parcels, (mamma's
blotting-book, you know,) I heard Uncle
Howard say, 'Yes, I certainly do see the
advantage of having a governess; but '


9







LEILA AT HOME.


and then I put down the parcel very slowly,
that I might hear more; but mamma said,
'Matilda, don't linger in the room, for we
are engaged at present, and wish to be
alone.' So, you know, I was obliged to be
off very quick; do you think you will like it,
Selina ?-to be sure it won't be so bad for
you, but it will be bad enough for poor me,
with all my scrapes; and yet I should like
to see what sort of a face she has got, though
I am quite sure I shall not like it."
But perhaps the governess is for me,"
Leila said, in a sorrowful tone; then added,
" and I shall never be alone with my papa
any more."
"No, no," Matilda eagerly exclaimed;
"don't vex yourself, Leila. Don't put on
that sorrowful face; I am sure the gover-
ness is for us; for once before I head
mamma say something about it to papa,-
it was one day when she said I was un-
manageable, and you know you never are
unmanageable."
If you mean that I never am very bad,
you are mistaken; you don't know all the
things I do sometimes, and wish to do."


10








LEILA AT HOME. 11

"Well, well," Matilda answered, don't
tell me about them, for I don't want to
hear; it is too bad that to-day, when we
have no lessons, and are so happy to be
home again, we do nothing but speak about
faults, and make each other melancholy.
See, the sun is out-it is quite fair now-
let us go into the garden and have a nice
race."
Leila's face brightened. It will be de-
lightful," she said, as they all three ran off
together.







LEILA AT HOME.


CHAPTER II.



MATILDA'S faults, and Leila's fears, seemed
alike forgotten. They talked, and laughed,
and ran races, till fatigue at last made a
quieter mode of amusement desirable,
even to Matilda. The arbour, which was
in a sheltered spot at one end of the gar-
den, was still almost in summer beauty,-
the china-roses and many of the autumn
flowers were yet in rich luxuriance, and the
bright beams of the sun brought back the
feeling of summer with all its gladness. As
they seated themselves in the arbour, a
robin flew down from a neighboring tree,
and timidly advanced within the entrance,


12







LEILA AT HOME.


then paused, and seemed to fix its clear
bright eye on Leila; she softly raised her
hand, and pointed to her lips to enjoin
silence; but Matilda made a sudden move-
ment, and the next moment the robin was
gone. Leila sighed.
"Are you sorry I frightened it away ?"
Matilda inquired.
No," Leila answered, cheerfully; "it
was not that; you know the robin did not
know us, it would have flown away the
moment any of us had moved, and we could
not have sat all day quite still; so never
mind, Matilda, only it made me think "
she stopped and coloured.
"What did it make you think of? Do
tell me."
It made me think that in the island the
birds never were afraid of me; they never
flew away, at least a great many of them
did not; they knew me quite well there."
"And you are wishing to be back to the
island," Matilda exclaimed, reproachfully,
"because the birds know you there; and
you would leave Selina and me, who know


13







LEILA AT HOME.


you, I am sure, far better than the birds, and
love you better too; I am sure I wish that
-that island "
Selina placed her hands before Matilda's
mouth. Hush, hush, Matilda, don't say it.
You are working yourself up to be angry;
you will be sorry afterwards; indeed, you
will be sorry now;" and she pointed to
Leila, who stood covering her face with her
hands, while the tears trickled down be-
tween her fingers.
Matilda flew to her; she tried to remove
her hands, and kissed her repeatedly.
"There, you see, I am off again, and worse
than ever. Oh, this badness! will it never
leave me; and, Cousin Leila, perhaps you
will begin to hate me now !"
Leila removed her hands from her face,
and hastily brushed away her tears; then,
throwing her arms round Matilda's neck,
she said,-" Oh, Matilda! never, never say
that again, for 1 love you very much."
"You are so kind and good," Matilda
was beginning to say.
Leila stopped her. "No, Matilda, no; I


14







LEILA AT HOME.


atn not good. I was not crying now be-
cause I was sorry about the island, but be-
cause I was angry at you for speaking of it
in that way,-and now let me tell you all
that is in my heart. I am happy here, quite,
quite happy; I like living in the world
exceedingly, I think the world is delightful,
and the trials that papa spoke about I think
are not coming to me, at least, not the great
ones; for you know it is a little trial when
you are angry with me, and I should bear
it better, I know; but it is about the island
I wished to speak,-I do not wish to go
back to it to live. No, I could not leave-"
She fixed her eyes fondly on Selina.-" Nor
you either, Matilda," she added; "I could
not leave you, I do love you very much,
though sometimes you make me angry; but
I love the island very much also. God
placed me there when He snatched me from
the dashing waves. It was my home, my
happy home; I had my papa all to myself
then; he used to call me his little friend,
and he was such a friend to me, always
keeping me right. You know I was alone


15






LEILA AT HOME.


there with my papa, and with God; and it
was so much easier to be good there. I
thought more of God in the island, for
everything seemed so full of His love, and
all so beautiful. The island was God's
garden, the flowers always springing, so
bright and beautiful, the trees so green,
and nobody to take care of them but God;
the birds always singing to Him, the foun-
tain making that sweet sound, and the ever-
lasting hills.-Oh! Matilda, it was com-
forting to live amongst God's works, every-
thing to make me love Him, and nothing to
make me forget; here I am happy, too
happy sometimes, for it is a kind of happi-
ness which makes me forget, and then after-
wards comes the sorrow."
"And what do you do then ?" Matilda
anxiously inquired.
"I often try to put it off, and I dash
about, and try to be merry; but I am not
merry, I get more sorrowful; then I re-
member that it is conscience that is speak-
ing to me, and that papa says conscience is
the voice of God, and if I do not listen, He


16







LEILA AT HOME.


will turn away from me; then I get fright-
ened as well as sorrowful, and I go away by
myself, sometimes into my room, sometimes
into the garden, and there I think "
She hesitated, then continued,--" I think of
Jesus Christ, and of all He did for us,
and how He loved little children, and took
them in his arms, and blessed them: and I
pray to Him in my heart to love me and to
bless me also. Do you remember how he
raised the little daughter of twelve years
old from the dead? I always think how
good she must have been after that, and
how she must have loved Jesus Christ, and
yet it should be the same with us; He
keeps us alive every moment, and preserves
us from every danger, and I forget Him
often, though twice He has saved my life,
in the stormy sea, you know, and from the
frightful- She stopped and shuddered.
"Don't, don't think of it," Matilda ex-
claimed; "don't work yourself up in that
way, Leila."
But it does me good, Matilda, to think
of it, and besides it was such a day of hap-


17







LEILA AT HOME.


piness also,"-and she looked fondly at
Selina.
Yes, yes, I know what you mean," Ma-
tilda said, hastily; "and I am sure it was a
day of happiness to me too; but we won't
think any more about it now, for I do tire
a little if you speak too much about good-
ness; but what with you being so good,
and Selina being so good, I surely shall get
better in time; indeed, I am a little better
already, I assure you I am-I am almost
always sorry now when I do wrong."
Selina looked up and smiled. "Yes,
indeed, you are better, Matilda. I think
there has been a great improvement in you
since Leila came to stay with us, and now
I hope that you will not take to Lydia
Mildmay again so much, or allow her to
have such influence over you as she used to
have,-she did you no good."
"Why do you always say that?" Ma-
tilda exclaimed, colouring violently; "I
do wish, Selina, you would just tell me at
once why you don't like Lydia. I am sure
it is very ungrateful in you, and I think


18







LEILA AT HOME.


that you need not be so sorry that she
should praise me sometimes, she praises
you also a great deal."
Yes," Selina answered, "she does; but
I don't like her praise, and I would rather
she did not."
And why do you not like her praise ?"
"Because I cannot help thinking it is
not sincere."
"Now, Selina, that is too bad in you.
Mamma often says, 'Give me a proof of it,
Matilda;' so I say to you, give me a proof
of it, Selina."
"No, I cannot give you a proof of it
now; some other time we will talk of it
again. I wish to go to mamma now-I
dare say I can help her to arrange some-
thing-you know there must be a great deal
to arrange on our first coming home."
"And let me go with you also," Leila
eagerly said; "for I dare say I could do
some good. When we arrived in the cave,
I remember I assisted papa to arrange a
good deal. I unpacked the canteen, and
put out all the cups and saucers, and helped
c2


19







LEILA AT HOME.


Nurse to arrange the pans, and when papa
put up the shelves, I put the clothes upon
them, and his boots and shoes all in a row;
but in this country there is not so much to
be done; I sometimes think it is stupid to
have so many people making places for
everything, I used to like so much making
plans and contrivances."
Well," Matilda said, if you are both
going to be such busy bees, I will go to
Alfred for a little; I see him down the
middle walk, and we can romp together;
for you know this is to be a holiday,
mamma said so; so I need not work, un-
less I like it myself." She was off in a
moment.
"Why," inquired Leila, as they entered
the house together "would you not give
Matilda a proof of why you did not like
Lydia ?"
Better not," Selina answered; it does
not do with Matilda to talk to her too
much on subjects she does not like; if I
had gone on, in a few minutes more she
would have been angry. Did you not ob-
serve how her colour was rising ?"


o20







LEILA AT HOME.


"Yes, I did; and I am never very sure
when I am talking to Matilda how she is to
take it; she gets red very often,-but I
need not wonder at that, for it is just the
same with me-I am sure to get red very
often too."
"Yes," Selina answered, "you do; you
colour very often, but then it is not with
anger."
"You don't know, Selina; you think
that because you love me; but very often it
is with anger,-not so much when papa
tells me I am wrong, for he speaks so
gently to me, and always seems so sorry
himself, that it makes me very grieved, and
I always wish to be better, and say to my-
self, that I will try never to displease him
again; but it is quite another thing with Nurse.
I often feel my cheeks get as hot as fire
when she scolds me; but it is with anger
then; for she sometimes teases the very life
out of me. Not often though, for I know
she loves me; but then she is always say-
ing, 'Oh! Miss Leila, you are a heart-
break to me; if you would but sit to your


21







LEILA AT HOME.


work like a rational being,-you are not to
trust to Amy mending your things,-you
know your papa says you are not. You
are far too much taken up with your music
and your histories; and what sort of a
pocket-hole is that for a young lady to
have?' I am laughing now, Selina, while I
am telling it to you; but though sometimes
I can bear it pretty well, and try to please
her by beginning to mend my pocket-hole
as quick as possible, at other times I get
quite into a passion, and can't bear to put
in a single stitch; but we must make haste
now, or everything will be put in order, and
we shall have no work to do. I like that
kind of work very much, don't you, Selina ?"


22







LEILA AT HOME.


CHAPTER III.



MATILDA'S idea, that their having a go-
verness was a point determined on, proved
more correct than her hasty conclusions
generally did. Mr. Howard had been for
some time aware that the mode of life
which he must pursue in England would
prevent him giving that undivided attention
to Leila which his island home had af-
forded him, and which every day was be-
coming more necessary in the formation of
her inquiring mind and impetuous charac-
ter. He felt that Nurse, with all the fond
affection, in her attempts to rule, was only
fostering in his child a spirit of opposition


23







LEILA AT HOME.


and self-will; and that Leila was beginning
to think that in many things she knew bet-
ter than Nurse, and that she did right to re-
ject counsel, which, though always well in-
tended, was often not judiciously given.
Though resolved not to yield to the feeling,
he had been too long accustomed to the
exclusive society of his child, not to be
aware that there would be many occasions
in which the presence of a third person
would prove irksome to him, and it was
therefore with real gratitude that he listened
to Mrs. Stanley's proposal, that the in-
tended governess should reside under their
roof, yet still have the joint charge of the
cousins. "The distance was so short," she
observed, not two miles; it would only be
healthful exercise for Leila to walk when
the day was fine, and in bad weather she
could easily be sent to them in the car-
riage. She should take care that Leila was
always at home to dine with her papa when
he was alone, and to read and sing to him
in the evenings, as she had been accus-
tomed to do."


24







LEILA AT HOME.


When Mr. Howard sent for Leila next
day to communicate this intelligence, she
entered his room with an unusually grave
expression; the dreaded idea of a gover-
ness had been haunting her imagination the
whole morning, and gaining strength every
minute. She advanced slowly, and taking
her papa's hand in hers, she looked up
anxiously into his eyes:-" Is it a gover-
ness, papa ?" she said, "is it? Oh, tell me
quick."
My dear child," Mr. Howard answered,
as he stooped down and kissed her fore-
head, "my dear, dear child, what is all
this? Why do you look at me in this
piteous manner ? Indeed you must not agi-
tate yourself in this way; you must not let
your imagination get the better of you; it
certainly was on this subject I wished to
talk to you; but is the idea of a governess
so very frightful to you ?"
No, papa; perhaps she is not frightful,
but you know I never saw one; perhaps
she is like other ladies, but then you know
she will be always there, always sticking to


52







LEILA AT HOME.


me; Matilda said something which made
me know that; always sticking, papa; and
then I shall never be alone with you. No
more nice chats with your little friend."
Her voice failed, she could not continue.
Mr. Howard looked at her anxiously:
"Leila, my dear child, you distress me; if
you allow yourself to get into this way of
anticipating imaginary evils, you will ener-
Svate your mind, and unfit yourself to bear
as you ought to do the real trials of life;
remember who says, 'Sufficient unto the
day is the evil thereof.' Now listen to me;
I can see that Matilda has made you aware
that you are to have a governess, and all
the morning you have probably been work-
ing yourself up with the idea of suffering,
from what I trust may prove the greatest
blessing to you. I cannot now devote my
mornings to you as I did in the island;
I must frequently be absent, and you are
now of an age to require superior instruc-
tion to that of your faithful and affectionate
nurse; but you will still be my little friend;
in the evenings you will sing and read to


26







LEILA AT HOME.


me as you used to do, and we shall always
dine together."
Leila's face brightened. "Oh, what a com-
fort!" she exclaimed: then added, "but I
don't know that I shall be quite comfortable.
My governess won't like dining by herself;
she will be melancholy."
"Now, dear child, you are again running
on before the point, though I am glad that
now it is that you are anxious for your
governess's comfort: but she is not to be
exclusively your governess, Leila, and she
is not to reside at Woodlands. Your aunt
has most kindly proposed that you should
spend the mornings with your cousins, and
be educated with them. We are to breakfast
together early as we used to do; when fine
you are to walk here immediately after
breakfast, or to be sent in the carriage when
the weather is bad; and by five o'clock you
are to be home to dine with your papa. I
give you a general invitation to dinner, Miss
Leila Howard, and pray give me a favour-
able answer."
"Papa, papa, how delightful you are to


27








LEILA AT HOME.


me," Leila exclaimed; "all my fears, all
my sorrows, where are they? You are like
the sun to me, papa; the sun chasing away
the clouds, and now there is nothing but the
blue sky and my beautiful governess."
Mr. Howard smiled: "And who told you
she was to be beautiful ?" he inquired.
Nobody, papa; but I think she will be,
and I am sure I shall like her so much."
I hope indeed that you will like her,
my love; for if your aunt succeeds in the
application she is about to make, your
governess is likely to prove a very estima-
ble person; but I don't suppose she ever
was beautiful, and she can't be very young
now."
Leila's countenance fell. "As old as the
hills, I reckon," she ejaculated, in a very
low voice.
But her papa caught the words: "'As
old as the hills, I reckon,'" he repeated;
"Leila, from whom have you caught up that
phrase ?"
From Peggy Dobie," she replied.
From Peggy Dobie; but, my love, have I


28







LEILA AT HOME.


not told you that I do not wish you to acquire
Peggy Dobie's mode of expressing yourself?
I shall regret my promise of allowing Peggy
to remove to Woodlands, if you are to adopt
her phrases, and try to imnitate her mode of
speaking."
"But, papa, I promise you I will not, and
I dare say our governess would not like me
to speak in that way either. I hope she
will come to us very soon; how soon do
you think, papa? in a few days ?-our
governess I mean. I know Peggy Dobie
cannot be here so soon, or my pets either:
how delightful it will be when they all
arrive, what a world of happiness it will be
then !"
My dear Leila, I have already told you
that I hope this lady, if we succeed in en-
gaging her, may prove a real blessing and
advantage to you; but you must not allow
your imagination to run away with you in
this way, or suppose that you are imme-
diately to find her in every way delightful;
she is a person who has experienced severe
trials; her husband lost a large fortune by


29







LEILA AT HOME.


the failure of a bank with which he was
connected; he died soon after, leaving her
and one little girl, totally unprovided for.
Her sister has taken this girl to be educated
with her own children, and Mrs. Roberts
has for some time past been looking out for
a situation as governess. Your aunt has a
high idea of her principles, and was much
struck by the truly Christian way in which
she has borne up under her misfortunes;
and having resided several years abroad,
she speaks both French and Italian with
facility, and is besides an excellent musi-
cian. All this makes her a most desirable
person, but the sorrows she has gone through
may probably make her graver than you may
at first think agreeable; and you must re-
member, besides, that a governess has an
arduous task to perform, and many difficul-
ties to combat."
What difficulties, papa ?"
The difficulties, my love, of having three
little girls to correct, to control, and to in-
struct."
Leila repeated the word correct.


30







LEILA AT HOME.


Yes, my love," Mr. Howard continued,
" Mrs. Roberts would be unworthy of our
confidence, and neglectful of her duty, if
she did not correct your faults."
But, papa, she would only have two to
correct: Selina is quite perfect; don't you
think so, papa?"
"No, my love; I know no one in this
world who is perfect, and Selina, though
several years older than you are, is still
very young, and requires much care and
instruction to form her character; but she
has fewer faults than any other little girl I
know-she is indeed singularly amiable;
Mrs. Roberts, I have no doubt, will think
herself very fortunate in having such a
pupil."
And what will she think about me,
papa?" she anxiously inquired.
Why, she will probably think that she
has got rather an impetuous little woman to
manage, one who often allows her imagina-
tion to get the better of her." But seeing
Leila's downcast face, he added,-" yet I
feel sure also that she will not be long of


31








LEILA AT HOME.


loving my little girl, though she is not per-
fect ; and now, Leila," he continued, "have
you any idea of what is to be done to-
day ?"
No, papa, I have no idea. Are we to
begin our lessons again? Oh, no! I see
you have a plan-I see it in your face. Do
tell me: I am sure you have something
pleasant to tell."
Yes," Mr. Howard answered, I think
you will like the arrangements for this fore-
noon. I have just been proposing to your
aunt that we should visit Woodlands, that
you may see your future home, my child;
and we have settled that you young folks
are to walk there with Nurse and Amy, and
I have ordered the open carriage to drive
your uncle and aunt; we shall probably be
there first to receive you."
Papa, how delightful! May I run and
tell Selina and Matilda the good news ? and
Alfred, may he go too ?"
Certainly, my love."
Well then, I am off-how delightful to
have so much to tell; and I may speak


32







LEILA AT HOME.


33


about our governess also, papa, may I
not ?"
"Yes, my love, you may; but your aunt
has probably by this time mentioned the
subject to your cousins; I know she in-
tended doing so this morning."







LEILA AT HOME.


CHAPTER IV.



WHEN Leila entered the school-room
Selina was reading, but Matilda stood gaz-
ing out at the window with rather a dis-
turbed expression of countenance. Well,
Cousin Leila," she said," we have news for
you, and not very good news either. Now
all the day long it will be,-' Hold up your
head, Miss Leila,' 'Why do you walk in
that awkward way, Miss Matilda ?'' How
troublesome you are; I wish you would
take example by your elder sister-one
awkward trick after another-I really must
complain of you to Mrs. Stanley.' Yes,
Selina, you need not shake your head at


34







LEILA AT HOME.


me and look so grave; Leila will look
grave also when she knows the truth. Yes,
Leila, I was quite right, it is all settled, we
are to have a governess; so no more plea-
sant days for us. Botheration, botheration."
Leila had not been able to resist laughing
at first; but she checked herself, and re-
mained silent.
Selina spoke. "Oh, Matilda! how can
you speak in this way, and after all mamma
has been just saying? and you seemed to
feel it so."
"Yes, I know I am wrong; and when
mamma was speaking to me I felt very
sorry, and I resolved I would try to please
this Mrs. Roberts, or rather mamma, for I
would rather please mamma than any one
in the whole world ; but, Leila, you looked
when you came in as if you had something
joyful to say, if you have, please to say it,
for we need good news very much to-day."
But no sooner bad Leila communicated
the pleasant intelligence of the proposed
visit to Woodlands, than all traces of sor-
row were banished from Matilda's face; she
D2


35








LEILA AT HOME.


was in ecstacies, and, flying across the
room, she dashed the book from Selina's
hands, and throwing her arms round her
neck, she exclaimed,-" Now no more read-
ing to-day, if you please Mrs. Demure;
this is what I call the right kind of a holi-
day-how merry we shall be. Well, I do
think Uncle Howard makes most delightful
plans; how do you manage, Leila, to get
him to do so many nice things ?"
"I don't manage," Leila answered; "he
is always thinking of doing kind things to
me and everybody, and he has told me all
about our governess, and made me like
having one more than I did at first; I will
tell you about it as we go along, for we are
to walk, you know, and we must make
haste and get ready, that papa and uncle
and aunt may not be there long before us."
The walk proved every way delightful.
The sky so brightly blue, the sunshine
splendid, and the woods, now tinted with
the glowing hues of autumn, gave additional
beauty to the scene. Here and there a so-
litary unprotected tree, standing out from


36







LEILA AT HOME.


the others, might have given warning to
more contemplative minds that winter and
its storms were approaching; but there was
no winter in their young hearts-all was
fresh, gay, and green, and withered leaves
brought to them no memory of blighted
hopes, and of a world of many sorrows.
The distance could not be two miles, they
all agreed, though Matilda and Alfred did
their best to lengthen it, by continuing,
during every few yards of their progress, to
run up a little bank by the side of the road
and down again, assuring the others that it
was by far the quickest way of getting
on, but Leila greatly preferred walking
quietly straight forward with Selina; it
was always a particular pleasure to her to
have Selina entirely to herself. She now
related to her all her papa had told her of
Mrs. Roberts, and many were the good reso-
lutions made by both, that they would do all
they could to make her situation pleasant
to her. As they came in sight of a pretty-
looking house, standing in a small garden,
Leila stopped.


37








LEILA AT HOME.


"Look Selina," she said, "I think that
must be Woodlands, had we not better ask
some one if it is ?"
A countryman came up to them at that
moment, walking very quickly, and was
about to pass on before. Leila ran for-
ward.
Pray do stop," she said, "if you are
not very busy, and tell us if that is Wood-
lands."
The man turned back and looked at her
with astonishment.
"Dear heart, young lady, but you must
be a stranger in these parts-that Wood-
lands, that ? It would be but a humble post
indeed to open the park gates to them good
people, a very decent family too, I mean to
say nothing disrespectful, but Woodlands,
bless your heart, Woodlands is one of the
principalest houses in the whole country-
side. Do you see that beautiful great house
standing on the height there, with the broad
terrace and the pleasure-grounds sloping
down to the river, and them grand woods
on each side, shutting out the summer's sun


38






LEILA AT HOME.


and the winter's blasts ?-that's Woodlands,
and it's not every day you will see its like;
but you are pleasant-looking young ladies
to my mind, and if you have a fancy to see
Woodlands, though it's not to every one I
would say as much, I have no objections
to unlock the gates for you, for once and
away."
And are the gates always locked ?" Leila
timidly inquired; then added, papa told
us to go there."
No, no, my young lady; it's not papas
or mammas either that can give that per-
mission. As long as my head's above
ground, there shall no promiscuous com-
pany enter there; but never vex your sweet
heart," he continued, more mildly, (observ-
ing Leila's expression of blank dismay,)
"never vex your heart; you shall see the
place for all that;" then added with a sigh,
" but Woodlands has gotten a new master,
one Squire Howard, they tell me-a fine
man from the Indies. Heaven send he may
be a kind one; but they tell queer stories
about him too. It was I that showed the


39








LEILA AT HOME.


two gentlemen that came to settle about it
all over the place, and they said something
of his having lived in a desert island, a
Robinson Crusoe sort of an affair that I
could not make out at all; but if we are to
have a master from a desert island, I hope
he will keep more company about him than
his man Friday, or Woodlands will be a
changed place."
"My papa had no man Friday with him
in the island," Leila meekly answered;
" but we do not live there now. We came
into the world last May, and our man-ser-
vant's name is John; in the island we had
only Nurse-look, she is coming up to us
now, and she is to be my papa's house-
keeper at Woodlands."
The ruddy face of the countryman became
actually pale, as he pulled off his hat, and
stood immoveable before Leila.
My master's daughter; it's not possible.
Surely--"
Matilda, who from the moment she had
joined them, had continued walking with
the others, and had hitherto remained won-


40







LEILA AT HOME.


derfully silent, could now no longer restrain
herself.
"You may indeed look surprised," she
said, "for you have made a fine mistake.
Yes, it is quite true: you have all this time
been speaking to Miss Howard. She is the
young mistress of Woodlands. And now
will you open the gates ?"
"Don't, Matilda, pray don't," Leila ex-
claimed, in a voice of entreaty; "do you
not see how sorry he looks ?" then turning
with a smile to the poor man, who still re-
mained uncovered before them, "Do put on
your hat," she said; "the sun is hurting
your eyes, and you need not be the least
sorry for what you have said. I daresay
you were told to take care of Woodlands,
and you are quite right to take care of it;
that was just the way Nurse used to watch
over everything in the island, only there we
had no gates to lock."
In a few minutes longer they had reached
the lodge, a pretty small thatched house in
the cottage style, with a profusion of china
roses and honeysuckles on its white walls.


41







LEILA AT HOME.


Leila instantly thought how delightfully it
would have suited Peggy Dobie, but she
did not say so. The gates were no longer
shut, they stood most invitingly open; a
tidy, pleasant-looking young woman seemed
to have been watching for them at the door
of the cottage.
"Oh, Bill, Bill," she exclaimed, "you
have been long, and to have been away to-
day of all days in the year, and a fine lady
and gentleman away up the approach in
the carriage, and the squire himself, and
a kind, civil spoken gentleman he seems
to be."
But the young people were too impatient
to listen to further details; the moment they
entered the gates they bounded forward.
The windings of the approach, though cal-
culated to show the finest trees on the pro-
perty, they thought much too long, and by
the time they reached the house they were
breathless with impatience. Mr. Howard,
who had been watching them from the
window, was at the door to meet them.
"Welcome to all of you," he said, and he


42







LEILA AT HOME.


stooped down and kissed Leila repeatedly;
" welcome to your future home, my Leila;
may it be a happy home to you, my dearest
child."
Leila seemed at first quite bewildered;
the entrance hall seemed to be so large, the
drawing-room larger still. The windows of
the drawing-room opened on a trellised bal-
cony, festooned with creeping plants, and
filled with rare and beautiful flowers; a
broad flight of steps, with stone balustrades
on each side, and large vases, with the
scarlet pomegranate and pink oleander in
full bloom, led from this balcony to the
terrace below; and beyond this terrace the
velvet turf, interspersed with beds of gay
and fragrant flowers, sloped down to the
edge of the broad river, on which many
little boats were gliding up and down; hap-
pily no steamboat being in sight on this
first-favoured moment.
All were loud in their expressions of ad-
miration; they had never seen anything
more beautiful; but though Leila admired,


43








LEILA AT HOME.


she seemed still bewildered, and almost
more oppressed than pleased.
It is very beautiful," she said, "very
beautiful; but how shall I ever be able to
manage such a house as this ?"
Selina whispered, "Don't distress your-
self, Leila, it is not till you are grown up
that you will have to manage; your papa
will do it now, and my mamma will help
him."
Leila brightened a little, but still looked
anxiously round the room: Surely it is
very large," she said.
It was Matilda's observation, "Young
mistress of Woodlands," that had done all
this; poor Leila was weighed down to the
ground with a sudden sense of her respon-
sibilities; to common observers she was a
simple child, young, even for her years ; but
there was often a deep under-current of
thought about her, to be discovered only in
the changes of her expressive countenance,
and in the hesitating, varied tones of her
voice.


44







LEILA AT HOME.


Mr. Howard understood her: "We will
manage all for you very nicely," he said;
" so, my dear Leila, do not be afraid; and
this room will not look so large when it is
furnished, and we have sofas, and chairs,
and large tables, and little tables, and all
sorts of pretty things in it; and it certainly
will not be too large if we succeed in having
all the kind friends around us at Christmas
whom I hope we shall have. Your aunt,
uncle, and cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert,
and Maria, and perhaps the Selbys, with
Louisa, who knows ?"
Leila, from the moment of entering the
house, had been working herself up, and
struggling against comfort; but comfort, in
the shape of such a Christmas party as this,
who could resist? She quickly gave her-
self up to all its happy influences, and when
her papa led her into the adjoining break-
fast-room, which was small, and leading
into a spacious and beautiful conservatory,
she was in ecstacies.
"My birds, my birds," she exclaimed,
"my turtle-doves, my parrots, how they will


45







LEILA AT HOME.


enjoy it. They will think this more beau-
tiful than their green parlour."
All was sunshine to her again; it was a
moment of exquisite happiness, such happi-
ness as is only to be felt in very early life,
before the sad memories of the past, and
the shadows of coming evils, have dimmed
its brightness.
The young people returned home in high
spirits; Leila forgetting every care in the
remembrance of the beautiful conservatory,
and in anticipating the enjoyment of her
birds in taking possession of it; and Ma-
tilda far too much excited to allow any of
them to rest, even for a moment.
"Come," she said, we will act a play
now;" and flying into the passage, she seized
her papa's hat, placed it on one side on her
head, tied over her dress a green linen pin-
afore of Alfred's to imitate a blouse, and
returning into the room, Now," she said,
" I will be Bill; you, cousin Leila, are to
be talking very gravely with Selina, con-
sulting her how you are to order the dinner
at Woodlands when I come up to you; and


46







LEILA AT HOME.


you, Alfred, are to be the pit, and stamp
with your feet, and call out very loud."
But why," Leila exclaimed, "should
poor Alfred be in the pit? I don't like
that, it puts me in mind of such melancholy
things,-Joseph and his wicked brothers,
you know,-and he called out and they
would not listen; and the cruel thing we
did ourselves; we put the poor goats into
the pit; but papa said that was a necessary
evil."
Matilda laughed : "You are so odd," she
said; "it is not that sort of pit at all. I
never saw it myself, but Lydia told me
about it,-it is a place where all the gentle-
men sit in rows to see the play, and they
stamp very loud with their feet, and call out
encore; encore means-say it again; don't
forget that, Alfred."
Leila was quite relieved and satisfied,
and the play proceeded; and so admirably
did Matilda imitate Bill's voice and man-
ner, and so complete was the picture when
she drew off the hat, and stood with a face
of mute dismay before them, that Selina


47







LEILA AT HOME.


and Leila were convulsed with laughter; as
to little Alfred, he stamped so loud, and
called encore so often, that even Matilda,
with all her love of amusement, was fairly
exhausted.
"Now," she said, we have had enough
of this; let us play at Nurse's play now, let
us play at being rational beings, and sit
down quietly to our work: now there's a
proposal for you, Selina, what do you say
to that; I am going to turn over an en-
tirely new leaf, and I will begin with put-
ting back this hat into its right place, and
folding up this crumpled pinafore so very
nicely that Nurse will say it is fresh out of
the fold. Now it is all done, and I declare
you have got out your work already; well,
here is mine, and we can sit down comfort-
ably and converse about our future lives."
"Yes," Leila said, that will be a de-
lightful subject."
"I don't know that," Matilda replied;
" you are forgetting about the governess;
she is to be here very soon, if she can come.
Mamma wrote to her this morning; she bid


48







LEILA AT HOME.


me hold the taper when she was sealing the
letter, and I could not help thinking how
nice it would be if I could give a little push
and set the letter on fire."
"Oh, Matilda," Selina exclaimed, "how
sorry you make me; why do you talk in
this way, and why should your future life
not be happy, because we are to have a
governess to save mamma trouble; you
know she is not very strong, and she is not
able to manage us herself."
"To manage me, you should say, Selina;
but how can my future life be happy,
when she will be for ever finding fault with
me ?"
But why do you think so ? It is quite
in your own power to go on happily with
her; she will not find fault with you unless
you deserve it, and surely you would not
wish to grow up in your faults; you could
not have a happy future life if you are not
good, for you have a conscience, Matilda,
and after a little you are always sorry when
you do wrong."
"I am, Selina; you know me very well;


49







LEILA AT HOME.


but then I am so often bad, and so often
sorry, that there is no great happiness about
my life after all, even though I have not a
governess. Well, we shall see if she makes
this great change."
"She cannot make the change, Matilda,
she can only tell you what is right; and
you cannot do it, either, of yourself. You
must pray for the Spirit of God to come
into your heart, and to make you really
sorry for your faults, and really anxious to
do what is right."
But I am really anxious," Matilda an-
swered; and I am always wishing I could
be as good as you are."
I wish you would not say that so often;
I am not good."
Oh, if you are not good, and you expect
me to be better than you are, it is a bad
business! I need not try."
Why do you talk in that way? You do
not know all the foolish things I think of
and wish to do; but remember, Matilda
the lesson I have had, and the great bless-
ing God has given me. Before I had made







LEILA AT HOME.


up my mind to be always dumb, I used
often to pray to Him, and promise that if
He would open my lips, I would try to be
more and more His child, and praise Him
with my life as well as with my heart; and
when I read of Jesus Christ opening the
eyes of the blind, and making the dumb to
speak, I used to have such deep sorrow,
that sometimes I could scarcely bear it; I
used to shut myself up alone and say to
myself, Why did I not live then? Surely if
I had asked Him myself, and He had seen
my sorrow, He would have listened. Oh, it
was a sinful thought."
But why was it sinful ?" Matilda asked.
It was sinful, because it was doubting
His wisdom, for He knew what was best for
me; it was also doubting His power, for in
heaven He equally hears our prayers and
sees our sorrows; and the miracles He
worked on earth are not greater than those
which are everywhere around us. The
spring and summer coming again, and
bringing up the flowers, and making the
dead earth so green and beautiful, are mira-
E2


.51







LEILA AT HOME.


cles of His power; and the very miracle I
asked for was granted-granted in a mo-
ment-my lips were opened; from that time
I made my resolution- She stopped
and coloured.
"What resolution ?" Matilda eagerly
asked.
"The resolution that I would try to think
of Him more than I had ever done before;
that I would be part of every day alone, not
to ask for more worldly blessings, but to
thank Him for giving me more than I ever
can deserve."
And so this is the reason," Matilda said,
"why you go away in the forenoon and
lock your door. I never could find out what
you were doing; once I thought I would
look through the keyhole, and I went on
tip-toe, but then I remembered mamma
saying that was a mean, low habit, and I
did not. But you do another thing, Selina,
which you never used to do before; in the
morning, after you have read the Bible, you
turn over and over the pages, as if you were
looking for something. What are you doing
then, for you cannot be reading ?"


52







LEILA AT HOME.


"I am finding out texts. Every day I
search for a text, and an answer to it, and
I get them by heart; it helps to keep good
thoughts in my mind during the day."
And you never told me a word of all
this," Matilda said, reproachfully; "and if
you had, it might have made me better, and
I could have learned texts also. Why did
you not tell me ?"
Selina looked distressed, and coloured.
"I believe I was wrong, but I always feel
ashamed to talk on those subjects before
any one; I fear it is a false shame ?"
"No, Selina, no," Leila said quickly:
"my papa explained to me about that; to
be sure, to Matilda or to me you might have
said it, for he told me that with a very dear
friend it was a delightful subject, but that
in the world I must not talk about God as
I used to do in the island; I must try to
think of Him constantly just the same, and
always ask myself how He would wish me
to act, but I must not say so before indiffer-
ent people (that means worldly people).
He says before worldly people it may do


53








LEILA AT HOME.


harm, for their minds may not be in a good
frame at the moment, and it might make
them worse, and might make them turn
away; and even before good people I
should not talk in this way, for good people
may be shocked, and think it too sacred a
subject to be talked of before many; but,
Selina, I would like to do all that you have
been telling me you do; I would like to
find out texts also, and try to keep them in
my mind, for it is not so easy to be good
here as in the island, so many new things
come into my mind here. What was the
text you found out for to-day ?"
"It was from the Psalms : 'Blessed be
God which hath not turned away my prayer,
nor his mercy from me.'"
"And what answer did you find?" Leila
inquired.
"My answer was also from the Psalms:
'I sought the Lord and he heard me, and
delivered me from all my fears.'"
And it was an excellent answer," Leila
observed, and very comforting. I am so
glad, Selina, you have told me of this plan.


54








LEILA AT HOME.


I know a great many texts, for you know in
the island I had no other book to read but
the Bible, but I never thought of this plan ;
I wish I had."
Tears stood in Matilda's eyes: I do not
know the Bible by heart as Leila does,"
she said; "but you, Selina, will find out a
text to suit me, and I will learn it," and she
rose and left the room.
"(I must go to her," Selina said; "she is
a dear, kind sister to me, and always so
sorry when she does wrong."
Leila was left alone. "Such a happy
home preparing for me, and so many to
love," she whispered to herself; and clasp-
ing her hands together, she looked up for
a moment, then left the room to seek her
father.


55







LEILA AT HOME.


CHAPTER V.



NEARLY a month had passed rapidly
away : Mr. Howard had been much in Lon-
don during the mornings, selecting furni-
ture for Woodlands, and giving many ne-
cessary orders for their future comfort; and
Mrs. Stanley had been well pleased to find
that the joint example of Selina and Leila
appeared to have a beneficial effect on Ma-
tilda; the daily lessons went on smoothly
and well. Matilda now learned her texts
regularly, and after the first few days, had
always selected them for herself; and these
texts generally evinced, not only a know-
ledge of her own faults, but a sincere desire


56






LEILA AT HOME.


to get the better of them : the text for that
morning had been, "Remember not the
sins of my youth, nor my transgressions:
according to thy mercy remember thou me,
for thy goodness' sake, 0 Lord."
And the answer she had selected was, I
have blotted out as a thick cloud thy trans-
gressions, and as a cloud thy sins: return
unto me, for I have redeemed thee."
During this period Woodlands had been
frequently visited. Leila had become more
and more pleased with the grounds, and the
beautiful walks with which it abounded.
Mr. Howard had selected a pretty little
cottage near the poultry-yard for Peggy
Dobie, and Lelia had had much delight in
seeing the china roses, and several pretty
creepers, trained on its white walls, and the
little garden put in nice order, and well
stocked with useful winter vegetables. She
had asked the gardener to put up a green
turf seat in a warm corner of the garden;
he had humbly proposed that it should be
in the shade, but Leila said no-that Peggy
Dobie always sat in the sun when she







LEILA AT HOME.


watched her bees, and that she said, The
sun was gude baith for bees and bodies, and
gladdened her auld heart."
Peggy had been allowed time to visit her
friends before leaving her country, but the
period was now approaching for her arrival,
and Leila's gay spirits were in full flow.
Selina, the cat, and one solitary parrot, had
been poor substitutes for the loss of all the
other favourites; above all, the absence of
Dash had been particularly felt and mourned
over. "Now," she said, "I have but a few
days to wait, and I can scarce count up all
the pleasures that are coming upon me;-
Woodlands, and all the Christmas party,
with all the friends that I love; and
Dash, and Peggy Dobie, and all my birds
and turtle doves again,-joy, nothing but
joy."
The morning in which Peggy Dobie was
to embark with her precious cargo rose
calm and bright. The wind, which had
been threatening to rise the day before, was
completely lulled, and Leila had been re-
joicing in the brightness of the day, and


58







LEILA AT HOME.


had watched the sun go down in golden
splendour. Later in the evening, however,
the wind began to rise again, but not so as
at all to alarm her, and Leila's tranquil
sleep was unbroken by the coming storm,
the loud howling of the blast amidst the trees,
and the sound of distant thunder-it was a
fearful night. Mr. Howard had more than
once left his bed to look out upon the
scene of desolation, for the ground was
strewed with branches from the trees, and
the clouds were driving before the wind
with unceasing velocity. It recalled to his
mind that dreadful night when he seemed
about to part with all most dear to him, and
though deeply grateful for the present safety
of one so loved, he yet felt painfully anx-
ious for those that might now be in similar
circumstances. The good old woman too,
whom he had been the means of removing
from her quiet home! he thought what
Leila's grief would be, and his own regrets,
if aught of ill befel her. Of all this threat-
ened danger Leila was in ignorance till







LEILA AT HOME.


awakened next morning by Nurse; her face
of dismay Leila was too sleepy to observe,
but her words were startling.
Oh, Miss Leila !" she exclaimed, "poor,
poor Peggy Dobie, and our valuable Dash,
and all the poor dumb animals."
"What is it, Nurse," Leila cried, starting
up and rubbing her eyes; are they arrived ?
-but no; that is not possible ; they cannot
arrive for two days yet. What has hap-
pened ? why do you look so ? Oh, tell me ?"
"Calm yourself, my dear Miss Leila. It
was not like my usual prudence to frighten
you in this way; but did you not hear the
awful wind in the night ? listen to it now,
how it roars."
Leila was out of bed in a moment, and
gazing from the window. The lawn was
strewed with leaves and branches from the
trees; one branch lay across the doorway,
so very large, it seemed an entire tree. She
shuddered. Mr. Howard entered the room
at this moment, and lifting her in his arms,
he replaced her in bed, and sat down be-
side her.


60







LEILA AT HOME.


Leila's long dark eyelashes were wet
with tears; her cheeks were very pale, and
she trembled violently. Mr. Howard stooped
down and kissed her forehead.
You were wrong to leave your bed, my
child, you are very cold-and cold also, I
fear, from excessive agitation. Now, dear
Leila, give me a proof this day that you are
endeavouring to gain more command over
your feelings, and let me see that you do
not give way to what are, I trust, unneces-
sary fears."
"Unnecessary ?" she replied, in a low
voice. "Papa do you remember Clara ?"
Yes, my dear child, I do remember;
but I remember also that there is One
whose arm is mighty to save. He can say
to the angry waves, 'be still;' and without
His knowledge 'not a sparrow falls to the
ground.' He took Clara to Himself, and
He saved us from further trial. He willed
it so-let us trust to Him entirely. He
alone, who knows the end from the be-
ginning, can make all work together for
good."


61







LEILA AT HOME.


Leila hastily brushed the tears from her
eyes, and laid her little hand on her papa's.
Mr. Howard started, it was so very cold;
but she struggled for composure, and said
in a calm voice,-" Yes, papa, I will try to
think of all this, and my text for to-day
shall be, 'The waves of the sea are mighty
and rage horribly, but yet the Lord who
dwelleth on high is mightier: for he maketh
the storm to cease, so that the waves thereof
are still.' Now kiss me, papa, and please
send Amy to help me to dress, and when
I have been to your room to say my
prayers and to read to you, I am sure I
shall feel quite comforted again, and you
shall see that I am getting command, papa."
Leila kept her promise. Not a moment
did she give way to outward emotion, but
during that day many an anxious expres-
sion passed over her sweet face, for the
storm continued to rage fearfully, and the
party were constantly startled from their
seats by the crashing sound of some large
branch from the surrounding trees. These
creaking and crashing sounds constantly


62







LEILA AT HOME.


brought a frightful moment to Leila's imagi-
nation, and no one was without anxiety, for
it was impossible to believe but that such
a storm must bring disastrous consequences
to many an anxious heart. Selina seldom
left Leila's side for a moment, and made
constant efforts to draw her into conversa-
tion; and Matilda, as every fresh gust of wind
arose, exerted herself in every way she
could think of to divert her attention from
the scene without. Later in the day it
began to rain heavily, and the wind fell,
and towards evening the sky cleared, and
the moon shone out so bright, so calm, its
mild rays shed instant peace and hope into
Leila's young heart, and she lay down to
sleep with many bright anticipations of the
morrow.
The morrow came, the lawn looked fresh
and green, all traces of the storm had been
removed, and every surrounding object
seemed rejoicing in the sunshine. Leila
proposed that after the lessons they should
walk with Nurse and Amy to Woodlands


63







LEILA AT HOME.


to see if all was in order in Peggy Dobie's
cottage for her reception in the evening.
"I am sorry," she said, that she is not
to arrive here at first with my pets, for we
cannot know the very moment, and it will
take some time for Bill to send us the mes-
sage. How nice it would be if we had a
carrier-pigeon, papa, then it could fly to
us in a moment; when we are staying at
Woodlands, perhaps you will allow me to
teach a carrier-pigeon, then I can send
letters to Selina and Matilda whenever I
wish to tell them anything. Eh, papa? is
not this a nice little plan ? But you have
not answered me yet if we may go to Wood-
lands."
"Why, my dear child, so many nice
little plans from you come popping out,
one after another, that it is not easy to an-
swer them all; but I have no objection to
your going to Woodlands, only remember,
Leila, that it is not at all certain that Peggy
will arrive this evening; the steam-boat
will probably have been detained by the
storm."


64







LEILA AT HOME.


"Well papa, I will try to be very pa-
tient; but I don't think it will be detained;
I think that perhaps the wind will have
blown it on much quicker; so we must be
quick also. You know, papa, you say we
must not anticipate evils, or give way to
imaginary fears, eh, papa ?"
"Get along, little woman," was all Mr.
Howard's answer, as he patted her head,
and the next moment she was gone.
As soon as the lessons were over, the
young party proceeded merrily on their way
to Woodlands. They soon reached the
lodge, and found Bill at his post, who
opened the gates, and gave them entrance
with the greatest alacrity; and when in-
formed of their intention to visit Peggy
Dobie's cottage, took down a large key that
hung behind his own door, and prepared to
lead the way. He would not hear of
Nurse's proposal to save him that trouble.
"What !" he said, "was he not proud to
do that small service for his master's daugh-
ter, or any of her friends-he hoped to do
F






LEILA AT HOME.


many a greater service than that for the
family ere long."
They were all much pleased with the
perfect order in which they found every-
thing around the cottage, and still more
delighted with all within. Mr. Howard had
indeed done his part; the little bed-room
looked so comfortable, with its nice tidy
bed in one corner, its chest of drawers, its
white deal table, with basin, ewer, &c., all,
in short, was complete. And then the kit-
chen-the kitchen was a picture indeed;
there stood the pretty chairs, and the small
round table of walnut-tree, looking so
bright, which Leila had entreated her papa
to procure for Peggy. In a corner next
the latticed window, was a small cupboard
with a glass door, showing such petty cups,
saucers, and glasses within, as could not
fail soon to become the pride of Peggy's
heart. Above the small dresser there were
shelves with plates, and dishes, and bowls,
and mugs innumerable, and close by the
door a cuckoo clock was ticking cheerily.


66








LEILA AT HOME.


They all looked round in perfect ecsta-
sies.
"It is most delightful," Leila exclaimed;
"there is just one thing that could be better ;
this arm-chair for Peggy should be turned
round to the hearth, a cat should be lying
before it, and a nice fire burning. Were
you able to find peats in this country ?" she
said, turning to Bill; you know I begged
you to try."
"Yes, yes," Matilda said, "he did find
them-I saw them in a box behind the
door." She was off in a moment, and re-
turned with a couple in her hand.
"Now, Nurse, dear Nurse," Leila said,
coaxingly, "do let me light Peggy's first
fire myself-you know how very kind she
was to me; now there's a good Nurse, I see
you are going to let me-you have your
good-natured face on, though you are shak-
ing your head; but I know what you mean
by shaking it-you think I shall dirty my
hands, and that it is not a young lady's
work; but peats don't dirty the hands-I
F2


67







LEILA AT HOME.


am only going to put on peats and wood,
you know."
"Oh, Miss Leila, Miss Leila, you have
such a way with me."
But, Nurse, you know you say your-
self that I should not have useless hands
and be a fine lady. There, now 1 see it is
yes by yu r eyes. Matilda, give me that
match-box from the chimney-piece." She
was on her knees on the hearth, and had
struck a light in a moment.
Now, Selina, take the bellows, and blow
very gently while I am crumpling down a
little of the peat; that's it. Oh, how nice !
See what a blaze already-now for the
wood; we must put the wood behind, and
more peats in the front-how it burns; is
not this charming ?"
Bill stood looking on in mute astonish-
ment. "Well," he said at last, "desert
island, or no desert island, you are a handy
little miss; see when a London young
lady would have kindled a fire in such a
fashion,-but you seem all of one stamp.
Heaven be praised for such a family !"


68







LEILA AT HOME.


"There is still one thing wanting,"
Leila said, still the cat. Peggy will not
think herself at home without a cat upon
the hearth. You are so good-natured," she
continued, looking up in Bill's face, per-
haps you would be so very kind as to give
us your cat, just for one day, till Peggy has
time to unpack her own."
Bill smiled. "There is nothing in my
house that I would not give," he replied,
"to pleasure my young mistress; but, bless
your heart, the cats in our country would
never abide on a strange hearth. Our cat
would be through the window in no time, I
am afeard."
"It was very foolish in me to propose
this," Leila answered, "for I dare say all
cats are the same, and our Selina almost
mewed her heart out when she was first put
into the ship -she can't bear strange places
either."
Once more she looked around the room
to see if all was perfect; the small latticed
window, with the China-roses clustering in
about it, she was sure would delight Peggy,


69







LEILA AT HOME.


for Peggy was so fond of flowers; might
they not gather a few, and make a nosegay
for the middle of the table. The next mo-
ment they were all in the little garden-the
flowers were quickly gathered and arranged,
and after giving Bill many injunctions to
be so very kind as to step up frequently
and put more wood on the fire, and also to
be quite sure to send off a quick messenger
the very moment Peggy and the pets en-
tered the gates, they left the cottage.
They had not time to enter the house at
Woodlands, where all with regard to fur-
nishing had been going on prosperously,
but they had seen what had been done
there more than once. Leila had thought
it all beautiful, but she had a simple taste;
she really did not like fine things, and her
only request with regard to the furnishing
had been, Nothing fine in my room, papa
-please, nothing fine; just a nice little
bed with white dimity curtains, and a large
sea-grass mat under my little washhand-
stand, for I don't like to wash, and dash,
and splash on a Brussels carpet."


70







LEILA AT HOME.


The rest of the day passed in pleasant
expectation, but towards evening the young
people got very restless indeed, and little
Alfred was perpetually popping out at the
door and running a little way down the
gravel walk, in the hope of meeting
some one from Woodlands, and bring-
ing the first intelligence; but no carrier-
pigeon or swift messenger of any kind ar-
rived; and at a later hour than usual the
young people retired to rest, disappointed,
but not alarmed. To-morrow was a new
day, and to-morrow would bring all they
wished. But to-morrow came; it was a
long trying day of expectation, and still no
tidings were received. It was with great
difficulty that they could attend at all to
their lessons; but Mrs. Stanley was very
indulgent, and repeated most of them her-
self; and the moment they were over, she
despatched them all to count over their
clothes, and to put their drawers in order;
to be busy and active was what she parti-
cularly required of them on that long, long
day. It came to an end at last, and they


71







LEILA AT HOME.


went early to bed; but Mr. Howard had
now become seriously uneasy, and next
morning, as soon as breakfast was over,
went to London to inquire at the steam-
boat office if they had received any intelli-
gence with regard to the Victoria."
Leila's face brightened as she saw him
depart; the very idea that he would bring
back intelligence quite raised her spirits;
she never for a moment dreaded that this
intelligence might not be favourable.
Mr. Howard returned sooner than was
expected, but he had learned nothing.
Neither the Victoria, nor the other steam-
boat which had sailed on the same day, had
come in, and the owners were in much
anxiety, as there were reports of several
wrecks on the coast. This last part of the
intelligence received, Mr. Howard did not
communicate to Leila, but he looked anx-
ious, and she knew his face too well not to
feel considerable alarm. Next day he again
went to London. Mrs. Stanley saw it would
be too much to ask any of them to attend
to their lessons; Leila was beginning to


72







LEILA AT HOME.


have a pale, exhausted look; she therefore
gave Selina a book of natural history to
read to them aloud, while the other two
worked by the window. Poor Leila; she
did not listen much. She worked very
little, and looked out a great deal; after
some hours horse's hoofs were heard on the
gravel walk; she saw her papa alight at the
door; her heart beat violently; she felt un.
able to move; he looked up and smiled;
she could not read that smile; it was sweet
as usual, for was his smile ever otherwise
when it rested on her? But it was a
melancholy smile. He entered the room;
they all clustered round him.
"The Victoria has come in," he said.
Leila clapped her hands. My pets, my
pets," she cried; "and Dash, and Peggy
Dobie--all-ALL safe !"
Dear child," Mr. Howard continued,
looking anxiously at her, dear child, your
pets are safe, but Dash and Peggy-" he
stopped.
What of them, papa? Oh tell me, tell
me quick-why do you look so grieved ?"


73







LEILA AT HOME.


Mr. Howard drew her towards him. Try
to calm yourself, my beloved child, for you
have much to bear. Peggy and Dash are
not in the Victoria; they have not been seen
since the night of the storm."
"But how is that possible, papa? It
cannot be, they were in the ship-oh, yes
they were. I cannot understand what you
mean. I am not very frightened; say it all
out quick."
Mr. Howard then went on to say that he
had not been able to see the captain, and
had got but a confused account from two of
the sailors, but that both agreed in the same
story. The storm had been most fearful;
they had anchored that dreadful night off
Scarborough, but with little hope of being
able to keep their anchor. They expected
every moment to be driven on the shore.
The passengers in the fore cabin were too
much frightened to keep below as they were
advised and entreated to do. A heavy sea
had swept the deck, and several of them
were washed overboard. Peggy, with Dash
by her side, had been seen on deck the


74






LEILA AT HOME.


moment before by both these sailors. The
night was frightfully dark, the sea running
mountains high; to save any of them was
impossible. Next morning both Peggy and
Dash were amongst those missing.
Leila for a moment did not utter a word,
she grew deadly pale, then throwing her
arms round her papa's neck, she cried,
" Lost to me, lost to me for ever! Oh, poor
Peggy, and my dear, dear Dash-my dear-
est friend-" but seeing her papa's look of
distress, she stopped, then continued, "I
am wrong, very, very wrong; I am vexing
you. Peggy herself said, if the dearest was
left, if she had him to love and him to listen
to-and have 1 not you, papa, and are you
not my dearest one, and so many besides
to love ?" and she drew Selina towards her,
and with her pocket-handkerchief she wiped
Selina's eyes, then went on, and it is bad
in me to be so sorry for Dash-for Peggy
is a human being-but Dash, my own Dash,
and twice he saved my life." She covered
her face with her hands, and sobbed vio-
lently.


75-







LEILA AT HOME.


Mr. Howard did not attempt to console
her, or to stop her tears; he lifted her
gently in his arms, and laying her on the
sofa, sat down beside her, clasping her hand
in his.
After some time she became more calm;
she lifted his hand to her lips and kissed it,
then shutting her eyes she in a few minutes
dropped asleep; it was but a troubled sleep,
but all were thankful that it had brought
forgetfulness for the present. After some
time she awoke with a sudden start; slowly
she remembered all. Sad memories they
were which clouded her sweet face, and
tears again filled her eyes, but brushing
them hastily away, she said, in a low voice,
"The great trial has come to me at last,
and I must bear it, but God will help me."
Then rising from the sofa she slowly left
the room.
Matilda sprang up to follow her, but
Selina held her back, and whispered in her
ear, "You had better not, Matilda: I am
sure Leila has gone to her own room to
pray."


76







LEILA AT HOME.


Anxious to see the captain of the Vic-
toria, and if possible to obtain more intelli-
gence, Mr. Howard on the following morn-
ing again went to London, but to his dis-
appointment found that the vessel had
sailed on her downward passage a few
hours before. A gentleman came into the
office while he was there to inquire for one
of his trunks which was missing, and Mr.
Howard found he had been a passenger in
the Victoria. He said he had been much
at sea, but had only once before been out
in a similar storm; that their escape had
been most providential, as several vessels
near them had been driven on shore. The
frightful accident which had taken place,
had thrown a heavy gloom on all; their
being unable to render any assistance had
been heart-rending; it was a moment, he
said, he never could forget, but the dark-
ness of the night, and the violence of the
storm, had rendered all attempts impossi-
ble. Not half an hour after the wind had
fallen in some degree for a short time, and
a boat had put off from the shore; some of


77







LEILA AT HOME.


the passengers had taken advantage of this,
and had left the vessel; but it seemed to
him as if no boat could live in such a sea,
and he had, after some hesitation, resolved
to abide by the ship.
Leila listened in breathless agitation.
"And Peggy, papa, and Dash ? did he say
nothing of them ?"
He spoke of Dash, my love, with much
regret; he said he was a most noble animal.
He seemed not to have been aware to whom
he belonged."
Leila sighed heavily. "A most noble
animal ; yes, he was noble, everybody loved
Dash." Then taking her papa's hand, she
looked anxiously up in his face and said,
"Dash could swim so well; do you think,
papa, there is any- She stopped.
"Any hope, you would say, my love; I
fear, Leila, we must not trust to it, but the
same idea struck me, and before I left town
I wrote an advertisement, fully describing
Dash, and giving our address; and this I
sent to the 'Times' newspaper office."
Oh, thank you, thank you, dear papa,"


78







LEILA AT HOME.


and she hastily walked to the window and
looked out. She was determined not again
to give way.
Leila's naturally buoyant spirits did not
long remain much depressed; still the sud-
den shock, after all her bright anticipations,
had been so great, that it left evident traces
in her appearance, and when any accidental
circumstance recalled the late events, a pang
of such acute sorrow shot through her frame
as it greatly pained Mr. Howard to witness,
and he was not sorry that neither Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert, nor the Selbys, had accepted
his invitation for Christmas; the Selbys had
a family party that day, and the Herberts
were on a tour of visits; both parties, how-
ever, promised to be at Woodlands soon
after Christmas, and Mr. Herbert added,
that if Mr. Howard would allow him, he
would then be glad to introduce to him his
son, who would be at home for the holidays.
Christmas-day, therefore, would be spent in
a manner more congenial to the tone of
their present feelings; and Mr. Howard
arranged that they should not remove to


79






LEILA AT HOME.


Woodlands till a few days before, when
Leila could have the comfort of having her
uncle and aunt and her cousins with her.
The meeting with her pets again had
been very trying to Leila, and still more so
was her first visit to Peggy Dobie's cottage;
Susan, Bill's wife, had been employed to
take charge of her pets for the present, till
some one could be found to fill the situa-
tion, and the cottage had continued locked
up. Matilda had in vain tried to dissuade
Leila from making this visit, but she said
she felt sure she would feel better when it
was over, for she thought of it so much;
and Selina seemed of the same opinion.
It appeared but as yesterday when she had
been there before, and with what different
feelings! there stood the glass with the
withered flowers, on the little table, and the
wood ashes lay cold upon the hearth. Leila
gazed earnestly on every object which be-
fore had given her such delight; the tears
ran silently down her cheeks, there was no
violent emotion. She turned Peggy's own
chair from the hearth, and placed it against


80







LEILA AT HOME.


the wall, then left the cottage followed by
Selina and Matilda. She was certainly
better after all this was over, yet there were
feelings which did not soon leave her; she
could not help remembering, with self-accu-
sation, that her papa had only yielded to
Peggy's removal to England in consequence
of her entreaties ; he had at first represented
to her that at Peggy's time of life it would
be wiser to leave her in her own country,
and probably more for her happiness to do
so; but Leila had been too much carried
away by her own wishes in this instance to
practise the lessons of self-sacrifice which
her papa so often inculcated; she now felt
this deeply, and it was a lesson not lost
upon her.


81






LEILA AT HOME.


CHAPTER VI.



THE day had now arrived when Mrs.
Roberts was expected; the young people
were all assembled in the school-room busy
with their different tasks; Selina and Leila
were seated silently at their writing-desks,
translating English into French; Alfred
quietly in a corer, drawing birds and ani-
mals on a slate, his favourite employment.
Matilda alone was restless and unquiet;
she kept constantly running from the table
to the window, holding a book of French
dialogues in her hand, and looking out on
the approach, while she rhymed the same
phrase over and over again : "II faudra


8o







LEILA AT HOME.


faire comme nous pourrons, il faudra faire
comme nous pourrons, il faudra faire comme
nous pourrons; now surely this is knocked
into my brains."
Selina shook her head.
Well, Selina," she continued, "you
need not shake your head; il faudra faire
comme nous pourrons, and I am sure I am
doing the best I can."
Are you ?" Selina quickly said, and went
on with her writing.
"How provoking you are, Selina; there
do you two sit as quietly as if nothing were
going to happen, and as if Mrs. Roberts
might not arrive every moment."
But will running to the window, and
shaking the whole room, make her come
any sooner ?" Selina inquired.
"To be sure it will, that is, I shall see
her sooner. Alfred, do run down and listen
if you hear a carriage," and she snatched
the slate from his hand; there's a good
boy, run down and do like Fine-ear, you
know; stoop down and put your ear to the
G2


83







LEILA AT HOME.


ground there's a man," and she pushed him
out at the door.
Alfred returned again almost immediately.
" I could not play at fine-ear, Matilda," he
said, "for I saw the carriage at a little dis-
tance the moment I went out; listen, it is
stopping at the door now."
All the three young girls jumped up and
ran instantly to the window. The steps of
the carriage were let down, a ladylike per-
son, rather slender, and rather above the
middle height, stepped out, her bonnet en-
tirely concealing her face. Mr. Stanley
came forward, he seemed to welcome her
kindly; they entered the house together.
The next moment they heard the drawing-
room door close. Matilda glided from the
room.
Selina looked anxiously after her; in a
few minutes she returned.
"I have seen her trunks," she said; "I
don't like them."
Selina looked distressed.
"Well, Selina, why do you put on that


84







LEILA AT HOME.


sorrowful face ? I did not say I did not
like her. Come, cheer up, Ivill do the best
I can."
The drawing-room bell rang; in a few
minutes Amy tapped at the school-room
door to say the young ladies were wanted
in the drawing-room. They all went down.
Mrs. Roberts seemed talking earnestly to
their mamma when they entered; but she
stopped, and as Mrs. Stanley introduced
them, said a few kind words to each. Her
face was not pretty till she smiled; her
smile was very pleasing, and her voice was
low and sweet. Leila felt she should like
her; both she and Selina, when addressed,
said something in return, and probably just
what they ought to say, though no one
heard it; Matilda said nothing. Almost
immediately after Mrs. Stanley told them
they might return to the school-room, that
Mrs. Roberts was probably a little tired with
her journey, but if she felt inclined by-and-
by for a walk, they might join them in the
garden.
It was all over in a moment. "Well,"


85







LEILA AT HOME.


Matilda eagerly exclaimed, as they entered
the school-room again, "how do you like
her ?"
Both answered, "Very much, we like her
very much."
"Very much," Matilda repeated; "well,
I don't. I don't like her at all."
"And why, Matilda? why do you not
like her ?" Selina anxiously inquired.
I don't like her nose."
Don't like her nose !"
"No, I don't; she has a pinched nose,
and don't you see it droops ?"
Selina saw that at this moment it was a
hopeless case; she did not even attempt the
vindication of the nose.
Mrs. Stanley was not disappointed in her
expectations with regard to Mrs. Roberts;
she proved to be a highly principled, ami-
able, accomplished woman, and with a gentle
steadiness about her which peculiarly fitted
her for the task she had undertaken. With
Selina and Leila she had comparatively
little trouble, and they soon became fond of
her, and anxious to give her satisfaction,


86







LEILA AT HOME.


but with Matilda she had a far more diffi-
cult task; besides having strong prejudices
to combat, she had to struggle not only with
careless inattentive habits, but often with
an obstinate determination not to overcome
them, for Matilda's goodness as yet only
came by fits and starts; there was no very
steady improvement, and the arrival of Mrs.
Roberts seemed rather to have thrown her
back. She had fancied that she would not
like her, and she seemed too often to have
a wish to act up to the opinion she had
formed. Mrs. Roberts's patience with her
was wonderful; indifferent observers might
have fancied that Matilda was her favourite;
she spoke more to her than to the others,
often conversing cheerfully with her on in-
teresting subjects, and trying to draw out
her feelings and sentiments; and Matilda,
though she gave her much trouble, was not
quite insensible to this. There were times
when she acknowledged that Mrs. Roberts
was rather a kind person, though her nose
did droop.
The removal to Woodlands now took


87







LEILA AT HOME.


place, and the following morning Mrs. Ro-
berts granted a holiday to the young people,
that every room in the house might be
visited and properly admired, and also that
Leila might have time to settle with Susan
as to a convenient arrangement for several
of her pets, while, with the assistance of her
cousins, she hung the cages with the parrots
and the smaller birds up in the conserva-
tory. She had for some time been bringing
up a pair of turtle-doves as a gift to Mina,
and teaching a young parrot to speak, which
she intended for Louisa. The turtle-doves
were now at a very interesting age, just be-
ginning to be independent, and to coo to
each other in a most melodious manner,
and the parrot gave proof of fine abilities,
and could already say, I am Louisa's pretty
bird."
The house was most comfortably though
simply furnished; but the conservatory de-
lighted Leila more than any part of it: the
flowers so fragrant, so bright and beautiful,
and the birds so happy, they were already
singing in the branches. Once more


88






LEILA AT HOME.


she walked about amongst the birds and
flowers, and felt that but for one sad thought
she would not have had a wish ungratified.
She quite longed to give her papa an ac-
count of all her arrangements, and went in
search of him. She found Mr. Howard
reading in his library, but he answered her
little tap at his door with his usual kind
voice.
Come in, I think I know who is there;
what have you got to tell me, love ?" and
the book was thrown aside, and she, seated
on a low stool at his knee, kept looking up
in his face, and pouring out her little his-
tory, he entering into all her arrangements
with all the attention and satisfaction her
heart could desire. And now, papa," she
continued, you know I am of a great age
now, I am eleven, and I want to talk to you
a little about my responsibilities."
"Your responsibilities, my love !-that is
a very fine word for you; where did you
pick up that word, Leila ?"
I think it is a very nice word, papa, and
I understand it; and you must know I have


89







LEILA AT HOME.


responsibilities in my new home, for I heard
Aunt Stanley say to Mrs. Roberts the other
day, that Miss Palmer had gone now to keep
her father's house, and would have many
responsibilities; that besides the regulating
the house, and attending in every way to his
comfort, she would also have the school to
attend to, and the poor people to visit, and
it was a large parish. I could not find out
what a large parish meant, but I understood
all the rest; and don't you think, papa, I
should have a school, also, and visit the poor
people ?"
"No, dear Leila; I think you are too
young to have a school at present; but don't
look so disappointed, my love; let us talk
this matter over quietly. Miss Palmer is a
great many years older than you are, she is
a grown up young lady, and it is quite right
that she should in every way imitate her ex-
cellent mother's example, and endeavour to
make up as much as lies in her power for the
loss they have sustained in Mrs. Palmer's
death: but you, my love, are still a child,
and requiring too much instruction yourself


90







LEILA AT HOME.


to be able to instruct others; yet you, dear
Leila, also have your responsibilities."
I am so glad of that, papa,"-and her
countenance brightened again.
Yes," Mr. Howard continued, "you are
responsible for the talents God has entrusted
to you, for the employment of your time, for
the cultivation of the abilities He has given
you; for the use you make of the religious
instruction you receive in correcting your
faults; you are by nature ardent and impe-
tuous, you must struggle for the mastery
over yourself; for more self-denial, in re-
jecting the sudden impulses by which you
are governed; you must try to check that
excessive sensibility which, if indulged in,
must unfit you for the necessary exertion for
the welfare of others which is so high a duty,
and without which you would soon become
a useless, selfish being-turning away from
the misery of others, from the fear of what
you yourself must feel in witnessing it."
But, papa, if I am not to teach a school,
or visit the poor, and only to cultivate


91







LEILA AT HOME.


abilities, is not that turning away from
others, is not that being selfish ?"
But, my dear Leila, it is by no means
my wish that you should turn away from
others: though you are as yet too young to
teach a school yourself, you are not too
young to accompany your Aunt Stanley
when she goes to visit the school, in which
she takes so much interest. Selina often
accompanies her; I shall ask her to allow
you to do so also; and in this way you will
become acquainted with the duties you will,
I trust, one day fulfil yourself. You will,
also, accompany me in visiting the poor;
you have now a weekly allowance, which,
though not much, will still enable you, by
practising self-denial in some of your own
desires, to save a little each week for the
benefit of others: with this you can some-
times buy materials which may be useful to
poor children; and by employing some part
of your time in making them up, you can
bestow a double benefit; for remember,
Leila, it is not real charity to give of your
superfluity only."


92




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs