• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 The Balloon
 The Bad Boys
 The Good Children
 The Little Fish
 The Careless Boy
 Uncle Mike
 The Passion-Flower
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The balloon and other stories : with illustrations ; for children
Title: The balloon and other stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002122/00001
 Material Information
Title: The balloon and other stories with illustrations ; for children
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark, Austin & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Clark, Austin & Co.
Place of Publication: New York (205 Broadway)
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories -- 1851   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Theodore Thinker.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002122
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239995
oclc - 45501184
notis - ALJ0533
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
        Front page 2
        Front page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Copyright
        Page 4
    The Balloon
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The Bad Boys
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The Good Children
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The Little Fish
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The Careless Boy
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Uncle Mike
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The Passion-Flower
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Back Cover
        Page 98
    Spine
        Page 99
Full Text
















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The Balloon.








THB BALLOON,
AND

D ITL im i im ITS G IR u is so
f ws giLaiiR'a- fg@n o

FOR CHILDREN.


Tq C9nitnur jiuktu.

NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY CLARK, AUSTIN & 00.
205 BROADWAY.
1851.
^^ ^^-^ ^^> ^ ^^^^^ .^ ^>^.





















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850,
By CLARK, AUSTIN, & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.





THE BALLOON
AND

OTHER STORIES.


THE BALLOON.

Did you ever see a balloon?
and have you ever seen one go
up into the air, and watched it
until it was out of sight? The
balloon is made of silk, and is




6 THE BALLOON.
covered with a coat of some-
thing so tight that air cannot
get through it. Then people
put some kind of gas inside the
balloon. This gas is very much
like the air we breathe, only it
is much lighter. It is so much
lighter than the air, that the
balloon, when it is filled with
the gas, rises towards the sky.
They have a sort of basket
fastened to the balloon, on the




THE BALLOON. ?
under side. The man gets in-
to this basket, and the balloon
takes him up with it. Men have
gone up several miles in this
way. How it must seem, to go
up so high! At first they rise
above the tops of the houses.
Then they can see all the hou-
ses, and trees, and brooks, and
meadows, and hills, and they
all look like a picture. Soon
the houses seem like little




8 THE BALLOON.
specks, they are so far off. By
and by, they are out of sight.
The man in the balloon cannot
see them at all. He is like a
sailor on the broad ocean. He
is out of sight of land.
When he gets up very high,
he can hardly breathe, the air
is so different there. The wind
keeps blowing the balloon
along, so that when he comes
down, he is a great way off




THE BALLOON. 9
from the spot where he started.
It sometimes happens that the
balloon comes down in the wa-
ter. Then, unless the man can
swim, or unless somebody picks
him up in a boat, he is likely
to be drowned.
It is not very safe to travel
in balloons. Those who go up
in them cannot steer them, as
the sailor steers his boat; and
nobody can tell when he goes




10 THE BALLOON.

up where he will come down,
for the wind may drive his
balloon into the water, or it
may come down on the land.















































































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rr- "~ ---




THE BAD BOYS. 18


THE BAD BOYS.


Once there were two little
boys that went out into the
yard to play. .They were bro-
thers. One was Robert, and
one was Joseph. Robert was
older than Joseph. Robert
Shad a hoop. He was rolling it
all around the yard. Joseph




14 THE BAD BOYS.
had some sticks, and was trying
to make a house. He made
the sticks stand up straight;
then he laid two more sticks on
those that were standing up
straight; and he thought he
was going to have a nice little
house pretty soon.
"Look here, Robert," he
said; "look here. See what
a fine house I am building.
Take care, Robert. I am




THE BAD BOYS. 15
afraid you will run your hoop
against my house, and then
you will knock it down."
Robert heard what his bro-
ther said; but he did not say
any thing. He kept rolling his
hoop. That is the way little
boys often do. They are so
busy about their own play, that
they do not think about what
their little brothers are doing.
Joseph kept building his




16 THE BAD BOYS.
house. Such a nice house as
he was going to have! He
had got almost done. He had
been at work a good while
making it.
By and by, Robert's hoop
came running along close to
the little house. Joseph did
not see the hoop that time.
If he had seen it, I think he
could have stopped it. Poor
boy! The hoop struck against




THE BAD BOYS. 17
the little house, and down it
tumbled. No doubt he felt
very bad about it. You would
have felt bad. I do not know
how Robert felt. I guess he
felt sorry, though. He did not
riean to break down his bro-
ther's little house.
"0 you good for nothing
boy!" Joseph said. "What did
you break down my house for?"
Joseph spoke in such a way,




18 THE BAD BOYS.
that Robert got angry too. He
said some bad words, and then
Joseph was more angry than
he was before. At last one of
them struck the other on his
face. They quarrelled in this
way a long time.
"This was all very wrong,"
you say. I know it. How
much better it would have
been, if they had both acted as
little brothers ought to act.


























I

4.
8 :SS~ca




THE GOOD CHILDREN. 21

THE GOOD CHILDREN.

I have got a story to tell
you about some more children
-two brothers and one sister.
Their names were William,
and James, and Susan. They
used often to go out to play,
where the flowers grew. They
did not live in the city; but
their home was in the country.




22 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
They loved each other very
much. I think that if William
had any thing good-an apple,
or a peach, or a piece of cake
-he would as lief little Sue
had it as to eat it himself. And
so with James. When any-
body gave him good things, he
always ran to find his little sis-
ter, so as to give her some of
the good things.
How I like to see little bro-




THE GOOD CHILDREN. 28

others and sisters good and kind
to each other. When I see such
children as Willy, and James,
and Sue-when I look at them,
and see how good they are to
each other-I want to take
them by the hand, and kiss
them.
One day James and Sue
were in the garden, picking
currants. Their mother told
them they might do so. She




24 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
was a very kind mother. She
gave a basket to Willy, and a
basket to Sue. They were
going to pick a basket full of
currants, and then they were
going to carry them into the
house, and ask their mother to
bake them some little pies.
Their cousins, little Sarah and
Mary, were coming over to see
them the next day, and they
thought it would be nice to




THE GOOD CHILDREN. 25

have some pies, and some other
good things, to give their little
cousins.
Well, James and Sue went
out into the garden. Willy
did not go with them. He
was older than they were, and
he did not think so much about
making little currant pies for
his cousins.
I do not know where he was,
but I know he did not go into




26 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
the garden. I guess he was
leading his little pony down to
the brook to drink, or feeding
his chickens. He had a little
tame squirrel that he was very
fond of, and it may be he was
playing with that. I do not
know what he was doing, but
he did not go into the garden.
While Willy and his sister
were in the garden, picking
currants, and putting them in











I-
II


B







THE GOOD CHILDREN. 29

their baskets, they saw a robin
fly down upon the bushes.
Robins love currants as well as
boys and girls do, you know.
He was a pretty little fellow.
Willy did not throw a stone at
the bird, to drive him away.
Bad boys throw stones at robins,
but good boys do not.
"Dear little robin!" Sue said.
"Are you the robin that sings
so prettily under my window





80 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
every morning? I guess you
are the one. You have got a
nest there. I have seen it.
There are three little young
robins in your nest. Ah! you
dear creature! you shall have
just as many currants as you
want. There are enough for
us and you too. You will
carry some of them to your
little ones, will you not ?"
That is the way Sue talked




THE GOOD CHILDREN. 31

to the little robin. James said
that the bird was going to make
some currant pies for his chil-
dren, only he guessed they
would not be such nice pies as
their mother made. But Sue
thought the young robins would
like their pies as well as they
and their cousins would like
theirs.
By and by, after the robin
had eaten a few of the currants,





32 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
he flew away towards the house.
James and Sue watched him,
and, sure enough, he went
straight to the nest on the high
elm tree, close to the window.
"There!" said Sue, "I knew
that was our dear robin, that
sings all those pretty songs. I
know him. I can tell him from
all other robins. He can have
just as many currants as he
wants; can't he, brother?"



































































:.

Pi







THE GOOD CHILDREN. 85
"Yes," James said; "the
singing is worth a great deal
more than the currants. If he
will sing, we will pay him in
currants."
Sue got her basket full of cur-
rants before James got his full,
and then she picked some more
currants, and helped her brother
fill his basket.
When both the little chil-
dren had as many currants as




36 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
their baskets would hold, they
started to go into the house.
James said he would carry
both baskets, if his sister would
let him. Sue thanked him,
ahd let him take her basket.
But in a minute after that,
down went Sue's basket on the
ground, and all the currants
were spilled. Sue was sorry,
but she did not tell her brother
that he was a naughty boy,





THE GOOD CHILDREN. 87

because he let her basket fall
on the ground. She knew he
did not mean to let it fall, and
she said,
"Never mind, dear brother.
We can pick them up again.
I am glad they did not fall in
the dirt. See, they all fell on
the clean green grass."
When the children had pick-
ed up all the currants, they went
into the house. Their mother


_____ __





88 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
made some nice little pies for
them. When their cousins
came to see them, they played
tea. They had some little
cups and saucers, and knives
and forks, and spoons and plates.
Then the pies were brought on
the table, and they all liked
them very much.
One day the mother of these
children gave them each an
orange. Two of the oranges





THE GOOD CHILDREN. 89
were not very large, and one
of them was a large one. Some
boys and girls would have been
selfish, and each one would
have wanted the largest orange.
But Willy, and Sue, and James
did not act so. Willy did not
try to get the largest. Sue
did not try to get it. James
did not try to get it. Each
one of the children picked for
one of the small oranges. Wil-





40 THE GOOD CHILDREN.
ly and James got the small ones,
and then Sue was so good and
so kind, that she wanted one of
her brothers to take that orange,
and give her a small one. That
is right, dear Sue. That is
right. I love to see you so
kind to your brothers. But
they will not take the large
orange. They say the small
ones suit them very well. So
you can eat the large one.










SI
,j .,4




THE LITTLE FISIL 48


THE LITTLE FISH.


A fish cannot talk, as men
do. But he can feel, if he
cannot talk; and he can think
too, I suppose. Do you see
the man in the picture ? He
catches the fish out of the wa-
ter. See his basket. That is
the basket which he puts his





44 THE LITTLE FISH.
fish in, when he catches them.
There is a little pail close to
the basket. The pail has some
bait in it.
"Bait! what is that? I
never heard of such a thing
before."
I will tell you what it is.
The fish likes something good
to eat, you know. He likes
worms. Worms taste as good
to the fish as cake does to you.




THE LITTLE FISH. 45

This man has some worms in
the little pail, and these worms
he calls bait. He takes part
of a worm, and puts it on his
hook, and then he throws the
hook into the river. There is
a string tied to the hook, and
when the little fish bites the
worm, and tries to eat it, the
man knows it, because he feels
the fish pulling the string.
Take care, little fish! There,




46 THE LITTLE FISH. v
the man has got the poor
fellow. The hook is in his
mouth, and up he comes out of
the water.
How the man laughs! "Ha!
ha! ha!" Hark! let us hear
what he says:
"Well, my fine little fellow,
I am glad to see you. Why
did you not come up here be-
fore ? You have been biting
down there a long time. Let




THE LITTLE FISH. 47
me see. What shall I do with
you? How shall I cook you?
I guess I will put you in the
pan, and fry you for my break-
fast. Would you like to be
fried, little fish ? or would you
like to be put on the gridiron,
and broiled ? Which would
you like best ? You will taste
good whether you are fried or
broiled. Now I will take you
off from the hook. Take care




48 THE LITTLE FISH.
-softly-don't twist about so:
I shall hurt you, I am afraid.
I should not like to hurt you.
You are too fine a fellow to be
hurt. What did you get the
hook so far down in your throat
for? There, I have got the
hook out. You feel better now,
I know. You can lie still
there, till I go home, and then
my wife will see that you have
a nice warm place-as warm




THE LITTLE FISH. 49

as you like-and warmer too.
Ha! ha! ha!"
The man is not very kind, I
guess. I should think he would
pity the poor fish. But he
does not pity him. He laughs
at him, and jokes about him.
Splash! What is that?
What fell into the water then ?
Was it something that the man
threw in ? No, it was the fish
that he was taking off from his
4




50 THE LITTLE FISH.
hook a minute ago. The little
rogue got away from the man,
after all, and he has gone back
into the water. I wonder if
fishes can laugh. If they can,
I guess this little one will laugh
now. Only think of it. Just
now the man was talking about
frying him, and there he goes
into the water, as lively as ever
He will not bite at the hook
any more to-day. The man




THE LITTLE FISH. 51

will not catch him again. Ha!
ha! ha! It is the fish's turn
to laugh now. I wonder if the
fishes ever do such a thing as
to laugh. I wonder if they
ever talk to each other. If
they do talk, I think I know
what this little fish will say.
He will say,
"Good-bye, my dear sir. I
cannot stay any longer. My
folks want me at home. It is




52 THE LITTLE FISH.
quite warm enough down here.
When I want to be fried or
broiled, I will come up, and let
you know. Ha! ha! ha! You
need not throw your hook down
any more. I know all about
it now. You cannot cheat me
again. Good-bye, sir. Ha! ha!
ha! He was going to fry me
for his breakfast !"









































The Carlem Boy




THE CARELESS BOY. 55


THE CARELESS BOY.


Frank Styles was a very
careless boy. His mother tried
to teach him to be careful;
but what she said did not make
him much better. He forgot
what was taught him pretty
soon.
"Well, Frank was not a bad




56 THE CARELESS BOY.
boy, was he ?" So I hear one
of my little friends say. "He
was not a naughty boy, was
he ?" He was not a very bad
boy; but I do not think he
was a very good boy. Good.
boys and girls are not careless.
They mind what is said to
them. They do not forget all
about it in a minute or two.
Frank's great fault was care-
lessness. His mother told him




THE CARELESS BOY. 57

that he must be careful of the
wheels, when he was standing
near a wagon, or cart, or chaise,
or any thing of that kind. She
told him that sometimes the
horse would start before he
could get out of the way, and
then the wheels might run over
him. One day, Frank saw a
pedler's wagon in the street.
He was looking out of the
window, and he saw the wagon




58 THE CARELESS BOY.
stop right in front of the
house.
"Mamma," said he, "will you
please to let me go out into the
street, and see what the pedler
has got in his wagon ?"
"Yes, my dear," said his
mother, "you may go, if you
will take good care, and not
get under the wheels. Will
you be very careful, now ?"
Frank promised to be very




THE CARELESS BOY. 59
careful. Then he started, and
ran as fast as he could run into
the street, to see what the ped-
ler had got in his wagon. Did
you ever see the inside of one
of these wagons, little friend ?
I mean such pedler's wagons
as they have in Connecticut.
There is a little of almost every
thing in these wagons. I do
not much wonder that Frank
wanted to look at these things,




60 THE CARELESS BO
There were some nice pen-
knives and jews-harps in the
wagon-candies, tops, tin trum-
pets, little railroad-cars, china
dogs and cats, and a great
many other things, which any
of you boys would like to see.
Then there were toys that girls
would like, too. There were
dolls that were all dressed as
nicely as any of you. They
had pretty fingers, with gloves




THE CARELESS BOY. 61
on, and eyes that looked as if
they could see. There were
little thimbles, too; and china
cups and saucers, and sugar-
bowls, and plates, and every
thing little girls would like to
set their tables with. When
Frank got out into the street
where the pedler's wagon was,
he found two or three others
there, who had stopped to look
into the wagon. "Take care,




62 THE CARELESS BOY.
my little man," one lady said,
"take care you do not get under
the wheels. I am afraid you
would get hurt if you should
get under the wheels."
"Yes ma'am, I will take
care," Frank said.
But he did not take care.
Before he had been there five
minutes, he forgot what his mo-
ther had said to him, and he
forgot what the other lady had




THE CARELESS BOY. 63
said to him. He was so much
taken up with the whistles, and
trumpets, and penknives, which
he saw in the wagon, that he
could not think about any thing
else. By and by, when there
was no one looking at him, he
walked close to the wagon, and
stood looking into it, right be-
fore one of the wheels.
Poor boy! Just then the
horse moved. He had been




64 THE CARELESS BOY.
standing a long time, and was
uneasy. I think he must have
been hungry, and wanted to
walk along a little way, where
there was some nice green grass,
just such as he liked for his
dinner. I do not know how
that was. But I know that
the horse started before Frank
had time to get away from the
wheel, and the wheel went
right over his ankle.




THE CARELESS BOY. 65

Oh, how the poor child
cried! The wagon was very
heavy, and the wheel hurt his
ankle very much. He could
not walk into the house, he was
hurt so badly. Some one took
him up, and carried him into
the house. His father was
away at the time. His mother
came to see what was the mat-
ter, when she heard Frank
crying; and she soon found




66 THE CARELESS BOY.
that the wagon-wheel had run
over his ankle. She did not
punish him. She knew that
he was punished enough, and
she saw that there was some-
thing else to do. Frank's ankle
had by this time swelled, so
that it was almost twice as large
as it was before.
Bridget was sent after the
doctor. The doctor lived more
than a mile offl and it was a




THE CARELESS BOY. 67

long time before he came.
When he did come, he told
Frank's mother that there was
a bone broken in the ankle, and
that it would be a great while
before he would get well again.
The doctor was a very kind
man. He was a good doctor,
too, and knew what ought to
be done with Frank's ankle, so
as to cure it.
Frank thought the doctor




68 THE CARELESS BOY.
hurt him rather too. much,
when he was dressing his ankle.
But the doctor could not help
hurting the little fellow.
Well, Frank had to lie down
on his bed, and keep still all
that day. What a pity! How
he wanted to be out of doors!
But he could not go out of the
house. He could not get off his
bed. The next day it was just
so. He had to lie still on his bed.




THE CARELESS BOY. 69
It was just as the doctor said
it would be. It was a long
time before Frank could go out
and play again. It was in the
summer. Every thing was
pleasant. The birds were sing-
ing. Flowers were blooming.
Frank and his little sister had
been thinking, just before he
was hurt, of going out into the
woods, over the little brook, to
see if they could not find the




70 THE CARELESS BOY.
pretty lady's-slipper, and the
odd flower called Adam's cup.
But Frank could not walk.
It was six weeks before he could
get out of his room; and then,
for some days, he could only
walk with crutches.
"Well, I guess Frank was
more careful after that ?"
Yes, he was. He does not
forget what his mother tells
him now, as he did before.




THE CARELESS BOY. 71
Little boy! do you always
remember what your mother
tells you? I am afraid you
forget sometimes. Let me see.
The other day, did I not hear
her say you must be sure and
not touch something there was
on the table? and did you
not forget what she said pretty
soon after that ? Take care!
You may be almost as careless
as Frank was. Take care!





72 THE CARELESS BOY.
Children never know what
is best for them, so well as
their parents do. They some-
times think they do. But they
are mistaken; and if they live
to be men and women, they
will understand this.













ii~


)




UNCLE MIKE. 15


UNCLE MIKE.


There was a man that I used
to know when I was a boy, by
the name of Michael Marvin.
All the folks in the place called
him Uncle Mike, though. Nom
body ever thought of calling
him any thing else. He had
travelled a great deal. He was





76 UNCLE MIKE.
a soldier once. He was a little
lame when I knew him, and
used to walk with a staff, some-
times with a knapsack on his
back.
He was hobbling along one
day, near our house, and there
were two or three boys behind
him, who were making fun of
him. Poor man! it made him
feel bad to hear the boys talk
so. But he was a good man.




UNCLE MIKE. 77

He did not say any bad words
to them. He stopped at our
house and stayed to dinner.
He often stopped when he
went by. My father said he
was always glad to see Uncle
Mike, and to hear him tell his
stories.
After dinner, as Uncle Mike
was sitting in the hall, reading
a newspaper, one of the boys
who had made fun of him came





78 UNCLE MIKE.
in. His name was Richard.
Richard's mother had sent him
to our house on an errand.
"Well, Richard," said Uncle
Mike, "sit down here, and you
too, Theodore and Austin. Sit
down here by me, and I will tell
you a story."
That was just what we all
wanted. We loved to hear
Uncle Mike tell stories.




UNCLE MIKE. 19


UNCLE MIKE'S STORY.

Once there was a boy who
had a kind father and mother,
and two sisters. His father
was rich. He lived in a large
house, and had every thing he
wanted, almost, to make him
happy. He owned a factory
and a saw-mill, and a great
many acres of land. But he




80 UNCLE MIKE.
lost all his property, and be-
came poor. In a few years he
died. His wife, the mother of
the boy I told you of, soon fol-
lowed him. She died, too.
This boy was only twelve years
old when his mother died. He
was a poor boy, then. He
had no home. But he found
a home. Somebody was kind
to him, and told him he might
come to his house and live.




UNCLE MIKE. 81

By and by, this boy's two
sisters died, and then he was
left all alone. The boy be-
came a man. When the second
war with England began, he
went into the army. One day
he was badly wounded in a
battle. His leg was broken
by a musket ball. He was
carried home, and for a long
time he was kept in the house,
until, by and by, he was able
6


i




82 UNCLE MIKE.
to walk again. But he could
not walk as he did before. He
limped a little, and had to walk
first with a crutch, and then
with a staff.
A good many years after
this man was wounded, he was
walking one day near the house
where he once lived with his
father and mother and sisters.
He was sad. Tears fell from
his eyes. He was thinking of




UNCLE MIKE. 83

the days when he was a laugh-
ing, frolicking boy. He felt
very sad when he saw the old
house where he was born, and
where he lived for twelve of
the happiest years of his life.
Just then some boys came
up to him-for he was walking
very slowly, and thinking what
had taken place since he was a
child-some boys came up to
him, and began to make fun




84 UNCLE MIKE.
of him. "Go along, old cod-
ger!" they said. "Are you
going to the poor-house ?" "I
guess he is going to the gal-
lows, he goes so slowly."
The man then felt worse
than he did before. He want-
ed to speak to the boys, and to
tell them that they did wrong
to talk so, and to beg them not
to treat anybody else as they
treated him. He tried to speak




UNCLE MIKE. 85
to them. But he could not
speak: his heart was too full;
and he walked along silently
until he got away from the
boys, and then he wept for a
long time.

When Uncle Mike had got
through with his story, you may
be sure little Richard hung
down his head. The good sol-
dier had told the story about




86 UNCLE MIKE.
himself, and the boys under-
stood it all. Richard did not
know before that Uncle Mike
had been a soldier. He did
not know any thing about his
life. But that was no excuse
for him. It was wrong and
wicked to make fun of the man,
at any rate.
Will you forgive me, Uncle
Mike ?" said Richard. I am
sorry I spoke to you so. I





UNCLE MIKE. 87
will never do so any more."
And then he cried as if his
heart would break.
Uncle Mike promised to for-
give little Richard, and said he
hoped God would forgive him
too.





88 THE PASSION-FLOWER.


The Passion-Flowcr.


MOTHER WILL NOT SEE ME.
Sarah Jones was playing in
the garden one day in the sum-
mer. Her little brother Edwin





THE PASSION-FLOWER. 89

was with her. There were
some very pretty flowers in the
garden. Did you ever see the
passion-flower? If you have
seen it, you know how pretty
it is. Well, there were some
fine passion-flowers in the gar-
den where Sarah and her bro-
ther were playing, and both
the children thought they
would like to have one of these
flowers.




90 THE PASSION FLOWER.
"Come, let us pick one of
these passion-flowers," said Sa-
rah. "I want one very much."
"No, sister," said Edwin.
"Mother told us the other day
that we must not pick any of
the pretty flowers in the gar-
den, without asking her."
"I know it," said Sarah;
"but she would let us pick one
if we should ask her. I am
sure she would."




THE PASSION-FLOWER. 91
"Then we will go into the
house and ask her," said Edwin.
But Sarah did not want to
go into the house, to ask her
mother about picking the flow-
er She thought they might
just as well pick the flower
before they went into the house.
"No, my dear," said Edwin.
"I am very sure that mother
would not like it."
"Why, Edwin," said Sarah,




92 THE PASSION-FLOWER.
"mother would not see us pick
it. She would not know any
thing about it."
"Perhaps she would know
something about it," said Ed-
win; "but it would be wicked
to take the flowers, whether
she knew any thing about it
or not."
Sarah thought a moment.
Then she said she did not see
what harm could be done if




THE PASSION-FLOWER. 93
their mother did not know
they had picked the passion-
flower.
"Why, sister," said Edwin,
" when mother tells us we must
not do a thing, is it not wrong
to do it ?"
Sarah owned it was wrong.
"Well, then," said her bro-
ther, "we ought not to pick
the flower; and if we should
do so, we should be wicked."




94 THE PASSION-FLOWER.
But still little Sarah could
not see how it would be wicked.
"I think I can tell you,"
said Edwin, "what makes it
wicked to do a thing when mo-
ther tells us we must not do it."
"Well, I would like to know,"
said Sarah.
"The other day," Edwin
said, "when father was reading
in the Bible, he came to a
place where it said that chil-




THE PASSION-FLOWER. 95
dren must obey their parents.
That means, that we must do
just as father and mother tell
us."
"Who put that in the Bi-
ble?" little Sarah asked.
"The Bible is God's book,"
said Edwin. He gave it to us
to teach us how to be good,
and how to love him, and how
to get to heaven when we die.
God tells us that we must love




96 THE PASSION-FLOWER.
our parents, and do as they say.
God would see us, if we should
take one of these passion-flowers.
Mother is in the house, and she
could not see us. But God
would see us, and I am afraid
he would be angry with us."
Edwin was right; and I
hope all who read this little
book, if they had been in his
place, would have thought and
done as he did.




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