• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Back Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Spine






Group Title: The tales of Peter Parley about Africa : with engravings.
Title: The tales of Peter Parley about Africa
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002109/00001
 Material Information
Title: The tales of Peter Parley about Africa with engravings
Alternate Title: Parley's tales of Africa
Parley's Africa
Physical Description: 138 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Goodrich, Samuel G ( Samuel Griswold ), 1793-1860
H.S. & J. Applegate and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: H.S. & J. Applegate & Co.
Place of Publication: Cincinnati
Publication Date: 1851, c1830
Copyright Date: 1830
 Subjects
Subject: Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
 Notes
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002109
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235654
oclc - 45432799
notis - ALH6117
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Back Cover
        Front page i
        Front page ii
        Front page iii
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Spine
        Page 142
Full Text









































The Baldwin Library
University
TmBFIda








































































































r






I






















'1








THI


TALES





PETER PARLEY

ASOUT


AFRICA.




WITH ENGRAVING .



REVIBED EDITION.


CINCINNATI:
H. S. & J. APPLEGATE & 00.
1851.






















DISTRICT r' UMASSACHUS'TT1S, to vsi:
District Cler's Office.
Bx IT REMEMBERED, that on the seventh day of October, A. D. 1830
in the fifty-fourth year of the Independence of the United States of
America, Gray & Bowen, of the said district, have deposited in this office
the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the
words following, to wit:
The Tales of Petet Parley about Africa. With Engravings."
In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States entitled
a An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies o1
maps, ei and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies,
durin the times therein mentioned; and also to an act, entitled, 1" An
Act supplementary to an act, entitled, An Act for the encouragement of
by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors
uaaI prietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned; and
extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etclh
ing historical and other Drints. "
JNO. W. DAVIS.
Cleric of the District qf Massachusett.








PREFACE.


The following is the Preface to the revised edition of Parley's
America,' and will explain the nature and design of the present work.
It is now several years since this little work was given to the pub-
lic. It was my first adventure in authorship, and after passing through
several editions, has returned to receive my final revision. I have
bestowed upon it such care as an old worn out man may givo; and
as I must soon turn my back upon the world, I take my leave of my
little first-born, forever. The public-I mean the world of! IS..
dren-have bestowed upon it their favor, and I ask no more.
If my health is spared long enough, I intend to revise the hooks I
have written, and then I shall feel that the charter of mp7y
but I hope not useless existence, is at an end.
It is proper to say, that this book is the commencement of gerie,
designed to give the first ideas of Geography and History. The
second volume is about Europe; the third about Africa; the fourth
about Asia. To these are added three others, Tales of the Islands
in the Pacific Ocean; Tales of the Sea; and Tales of the Earth, the
Sun, Moon and Stars.











CONTENTS.


Chapter 1.--Parley goes to the
Mediterranean, and sees sa
Eruption of Mount Etna 5
Ch. 2.-Parley sets out to re-
turn to America, but is over-
taken by a storm, and seized
by Pirates .. .. 13
Ch. 3.-Parley is carried to
Tripoli, where he is impris-
oned, and meets with strange
adventures .. .... 17
Ch. 4.-A short description of
Afica . 28
Ch. 5.-Description of the city
of Tripoli 33
Ch. 6-Account of Algiers,
Morocco, and Tunis 37
Ch. 7.-Parley finds out his de-
liverer, and recognizes an old
acquaintance . 42
Ch. 8.-The story of a Robber 46
Ch. 9.-Leo's description of
Egypt ......51
Ch. 10.-Leo finishes his story 58
Ch. 11.-Parley tells about va-
rious matters, and how Deca-
tur and twentyy Americans,
burnt the tdelphia : 61
Ch. 12..-Parley -arrives in E-
gypt, and goes with General
Eto's Expedition, across
the desert .. .. 67


Ch. 13.-Arrival at Derne.
The Sirocco. A Battle,
and some other things 16
Ch. 14.-Parley sets out tor
Obina. Something about
Captain Riley, and great
stories .. ... .80
Ch. 15.-Capt. Riley's Ship-
wreck . .. 83
Ch. 16.-Captain Riley's ad-
ventures and sufferings 88
Ch. 17.- Parley continues
his voyage, and tells about
Mungo Tark, and other
Travellers into Central
Africa. ..... 96
Ch. 18.-Parley tells of his
voyage, and how they met
with a dreadful gale of
wind, off the Cape of Good
Hope ....... 107
Ch. 19.-Parley tells about
Cape Colony, the elottn-
tots, various wild animals,
and other things; .
Ch. 20.-Parley U4l about.
various matters t d. things 118
Ch. 21.-Parley tells Caille's
travels to Timbuctoo; Con-
clusion . .. 126








PETER PARLEY'S TALES


ABOUT AFRICA.



CHAPTER I.

PARLEY GOES TO THE MEDITERRANEAN, AND
SEES AN ERUPTION OF MOUNT ETNA.

IAM now going to tell yu of -whattppen-
ed near thirty years ago. After my returnto
A as I have told you in my tales about
Europe set outjn a ship for the Mediterra-
nean ago.
This sea lies far to the east. To go to i4
we must -ross the Atlantic ocean. -'It WiOiN%
tween Africa and Europe. Africa i i
it) and Europe north of it.
Which way from you is the Mediterranean sea? Between what tw
countries does it lie? Which way is Africa from the MediterrMuns
S"Whicb way as Europe 6lm the Mediterraeant ?
",,.





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


The name of the ship I sailed in was the
Swan. She was a fine vessel, and I was the
second mate. Every ship has one, or more
mates, whose duty it is, to assist the captain
in navigating the vessel.
I entered the ship at New York, and we
set sail. We had a fair wind, and in a few
days we came in sight .of the Bermudas, a
group of small islands, owned by the British
There are now am'pod many houses, and a
considdtble numit of inhabitants, on one
of these islands.
We shortly after saw some of the Canary
islands, where Canary birds first came from.
These islands are very beautiful indeed, and
very fruitful.
Qne of them called Tenerhfe, has a very
;1ofty peak. This peak is visible at a vat f
What was the name of the vessel in which Parley sailed to Me
iterraneant Which way did he ailT What group of small isb ids
he past? What ihand did he pass after the BermudasT? Desoibe tbh
Canary isles?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


tance. It is so high, that it is almost always
covered with snow. As I saw it from our
ship, it looked like a tall thunder cloud, piled
very high up in the air. Here you see a pic-
ture of it.












At length we came in sight of Gibraltar.
This is a town at which there is a rock, 0
feet high. In this rock there is a strong fb
tress. Gibraltar is in Spain, aM' forms the
mostuthern point of Europe. -The fortress

~r- ak e of Tnerif.et What ( Ctb town of

"* .-:: ^'7





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


has several thousand men in it, with a great
number of cannon.
At the present time the fortress is in the
possession of the British, and is occupied by
British soldiers. It is situated at the en-
trance of the Mediterranean sea.











Near the town of Gibraltar, are the straits
)f Gibraltar. These straits consist of a nar-
row channel where the sea flows from the
Atlantic o into the-Mediterranean., The
aits are ifteen miles acrosithe w-
Wi teli~f the. fortress? What or *ae tra tGibraltar?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


est part. As we sailed along through them,
I could see the.land on both sides of us. On
the left hand was Europe; on the right hand,
was Africa.
We now entered the Mediterranean sea.
This sea is 2000 miles in length. In some
places it is two or three hundred miles wide;
in other places it is much narrower.
This sea is surrounded with towns and vll-"
lages, and a multitudeof inhabitants. There
is a great amount of trade or commerce, car-
ried on upon this sea; here are vessels from
all the countries of Europe, and they are al-
ways crossing it in every direction.
At length we arrived at Sicily. This is a
large island, which produces oranges, grapes,
and many other fruits. It also produces wine,
which is made from grapes. The object ot
our voyage was, to get fruits ad wiine, to
:arry back to New York. T
What of the MediteafSean ea? What of Sicilyl,
4*.?


9




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


..Our voyage to Sicily had been a very pros-
perous one. It is very seldom that a vessel
crosses the Atlantic, without meeting some
very rough weather. We, however, had met
no storms; and in forty days after I left New
York, I was in the island of Sicily.
Very soon after our arrival, we unloaded our
ship, and began to take in our cargo. I wished
very much to go to the top of Mount Etna,
but we were so busy 1 could not be spared.
Mount Etna is situated in the island of Sicily,
and is one of the most celebrated volcanoes in
the w6rld.
A volcano, as you know, is a mountain that
throws out fire, smoke, ashes, and melted lava
at its top. The hole at the top through
which these things are thrown is called the
crater.
Though I could not go to the top of Mount
How long wa Parley in going from New York to Sicily? What of
Mount Etna What is a Volcano?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Etna, I lad an opportunity of witnessing one
of its eruptions. Itwas truly terrible. One
night, loud rumbling noises were heard in the
mountain, like distant thunder.
Very soon, a blaze issued from the crater,
which seemed to rise to the very clouds, and
stand on the mountain like a pillar of fire. At
the same time, clouds of black smoke rolled
from the mouth of the crater. The blaze shed.
its light all around, and made it like mid-day.
After a little while, the blaze suddenly dis-
appeared.' It seemed to fall back again into
the mouth of the crater. In an instant all
around was darkness.
But very soon, red hot stones were thrown
frdlt the mouth of the voldtno, which rose
high in the air, with a whizzing sound, and
then fell upon the sides of the mountain.
Then a mass of red hot lava swelled t~ the

Describe the eruption of Mount Etna, that Parlr saw. '


11






12 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFVdCA.
top of the crater, and gushing over it, ran
down the sides of the mountain.
It rolled along like a river, making a dread-
ful sound. It spread over the land, and des-
troyed several villages. Some of the inhab-
itants fled before it; some were overtaken,
and buried beneath the burning mass.
It was an awful sight, and made me shudder
to witness it. The mountain continued to
smoke for several days, but no more lava flow-
ed from it. These eruptions from Mount Etna,
have often taken place for thousands of years.
Within a few years, two towns in Italy
have been dug from beneath the lava, which
Issued from Mount Vesuvius and overwhelmed
them, nearly tiv thousand years ago. About
this, I have told you in my tales of Europe.




PAIRLEr' TALES OF AFRICA


CHAPTER II.

PARLYY SETS OUT TO RETURN TO AMERICA, BUT
IS OVERTAKEN BY A STORM, AND SEIZED
BY PIRATES.

OUR vessel was soon loaded, and, a few
weeks after our arrival, we set o A4oprw re-
turn to America. It was notinMt two
days after our departure, when we ere ited by a storm. *
The wind blew very powerfully, and the
agitation of the sea was dreadful. Our dip
rolled violently, and in a few hours, two of
our masts were broken off, and fell into the
sea. The vessel became ly unmanage-
able.,
She also sprang a leak, ad though we
made the greatest exertion at thewumps, still
the water increased very rapidly. Orders were
now given to lighten the vessel, and a great


18




PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


part of the cargo was immediately thrown
overboard.
Night now came on, and the gale increased.
Our large ship shuddered upon the waves, as
if terror had seized the very timbers. Our
captain, however, was a brave man, and he
steadily exerted himself to save the ship.
He spoke cheeringly to the men, and as-
sisted them with his own strength. But it
Was allin vain. The lightning struck the ship,


and set the sails on fire. The plashing of the
sea soon quenched it, but the waves broke




PALLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


over us, and swept away the greater part of
our men.
Out of twenty hands there were now but
five left in the ship. For myself, I never ex-
pected to see the light of another morning.
Yet another morning came; and hope, which
lingers till the last, revived.
The storm was over. The clouds rolled
away, and the sun shone out, bright and clear.
Our vessel however was a mere wreck. We
could scarcely keep her from sinking-J -
boring at the pumps. The waves a on-
tinued to roll very heavily, and th. ke
over the ship every few minutes. '
In this desperate situation, we saw a vessel
approaching us. Yet this vessel was more-.
dreadful to our sight than the troubled sea.
We knew it to be a corsaii.
A corsair is a ship sent out to rob and plun-
der other vessels. We had heard many in-
What is a corsair?


15




PAtLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


stances of vessels being taken, their cargoes
seized, and the crew sold as slaves, or shut
up in gloomy prisons.
As the vessel that approached us seemed to
be small, we determined to make an effort to
prevent ourselves from being taken. We
armed ourselves with pikes and swords, and
stood ready to meet the men from the corsair.
Their vessel came very close to us, but the
sea ran so high, that it was a long time before
they ventured to come along side of us. At
length they came close to us, and' the two
vessels lay side by side.
Five or six men armed with swords, imme-
diately jumped on board our ship. Three of
them were instantly killed by our pikes, and
two others were knocked down between the
vessels. But other men soon followed from
the corsair.
We struggled with them for a few moments,
What had Parley heard about these corealrs?


16





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


but our captain was shot with a pistol in the
breast. I was stunned with a blow upon my
head, and the remainder of the men, not able
to resist, yielded to their fate.
The most valuable part of our cargo was
iOow taken on board the corsair, and we were
taken there also. Holes were cut in our ves-
sel; she soon filled with water, and the waves
yawning widely, received her into the bosom
of the sea. The billows whirled and foamed
for a moment over the spot, and then we saw.
our ship no more.

CHAPTER III. .
PARLEY IS CARRIED TO TRIPOLI, WHERE 1 "
IMPRISONED, AND MEETS WITH STRANGE ADP
VENTURES.

WE soon found out that the corasir which
had taken us, belonged to Tripoli. i
0- ----------,. .~'
To what country did the corsair belong, that captured l'#ul
which Parley was?


17





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


a considerable country in the northern part of
Africa. The principal town is also called
Tripoli.
The people are a barbarous and cruel race,
and at the time I am speaking of, they were
engaged in plundering the ships of such other
nations as came in their way.
They had already taken several American
vessels, and we knew that some of our coun-
trymen were shut up in their prisons. We
of course had no other expectation, than to
share their fate.
In five days we arrived at the city of Tri-
poli. We were treated with the greatest cru-
elty, and our captain suffered exceedingly
from his wounds. We were taken ashore,
and attended by soldiers, with dark skins, and
strange dresses, to a large stone building.
This building was a castle. We were taken
What of Tripoli? What is the principal town in the country of Tr
poli? What of the people? In what were they engaged? Where were
Parley and his companions taken to?


18





PAARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


into a dark room in this castle, and here we
remained for four days, with no other food
than bread, and no drink but water. We
were then taken from our prison, and marched
through the town, guarded by soldiers.
I remarked as we went along, that every-
thing had a strange appearance. The inhab-
itants were as dark as our Indians, and their
dress appeared very singular. The streets
were also exceedingly narrow, and the roofs
of the houses very flat.
At length we arrived at another prison, and
here again we were shut up. I was myself
put into a separate room. I had no inter-
course with my companions.
My room was very dark; the light being
only admitted through a long narrow hole in
the wall. I had bread and wl brought to
me once a day, and these we~sny only sub-
sistence. E
How were they treated? What does Parley say of te inhabitants of
'lr pli? What of the -trrrts, and houses?


19





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Here I remained day after day, and week
after week. I knew nothing of the language
of the country; and the surly man who at-
tended the prison, seemed to have no more re-
gard for me than if I had been a brute.
How heavy were the hours as they slowly
passed away! I had no books to read, no one
to talk to. I knew nothing of what was to
be my fate, but I had reason to fear that I
should be put to death.
But so weary was I of confinement, that I
almost felt willing to die, if I could once more
Ssee the open sky, and breathe the free air,
were it only for a few moments.
But weeks passed away, and no change
happened in my situation. Day and night
came, but all went on in dull and dishearten-
ing uniformity. I tried to amuse myself by
devising means of escape. But the prison
was of stone, and forbade any attempt to force
a passage through the walls.


20




PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA*


At length a spider crept into the little win-
dow of my cell, and began to make a net. I
watched him carefully for a long time, and
found great amusement in observing him.
He soon went away, but the next day, he
came again; I caught several small flies, and
gave them to him. This encouraged him to
come, and very soon he took up his abode
there.
One night soon after this, I thought I heard
a noise at my window. I listened, and dia


81




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.
I


tinctly heard some one there. What this
meant I could not imagine.
As I had no reason to suppose that any one
would attempt to set me free, I fancied that it
was evil, rather than good, that was intended.
In the morning I found that my spider was
gone, and his web destroyed. tiept that
this only friend of my solitude was thus taken
away.
The next night I heard again a noise at my
window. But I could not conjecture the oc-
casion of it. Again the third night, I heard
it, and imagined that I heard some one whis-
pering to me, but of this I was not certain.
More than a fortnight now elapsed. The
noise at my window, which had excited some
little hope, was heard no more.
One night I dreamed that I was released
from my imprisonment; that I had crossed
the sea; that I had reached my native land
that I was at my home; that exclamations of


22




PARLEY TALES OF AFRICA.


joy at my return filled my ears; and while I
imagined that I was kneeling down, to thank
God for my deliverance, and a happy restora-
tion to my family, I suddenly awoke.
For a time I could hardly realize where I
was. But at length, fixing my eye upon the
dim light that entered my little window, I re-
collected that I was in prison, and in the pow-
er of a cruel and barbarous people.
At this moment I heard a noise at the door,
and distinctly heard the key put into the lock,
and the bolt slowly and cautiously turned.
The heavy iron door was then swung open
very silently. I heard no step, but a hand
was laid upo.. me, a&n some one said in a
whisper,' E~o'i me, and mane no noise!'
I was very much surprised, but I did not
hesitate instantly to follow. We passed out.
The door was locked behind us, and we
were on the point of leaving the spot, when
a man who had been sleeping upon the floor,


23




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


sprang suddenly up, and lifted his sword to
strike my conductor.
The latter, with the quickness of lightning,
struck the man over the head with a stick,
and he fell upon the floor. We then went
through several narrow passages, and at
length came to an open space, with high walls
around it.
My companion clambered up this wall by
means ot a rope-ladder, and I followed. We
then sprang into the street. We heard a noise
behind us as if my escape was discovered, and
an alarm given.
We heard several voices, and saw the glan-
cing of lights upon the buildings. My guide
quickened his steps, and turning and winding
through the narrow streets, we were soon at
a considerable distance from the prison.
At length we came to a house, which we
entered. I was taken to a remote part of it,
How was Parley rescued from prison?


24





PARLEY'S TAJES OF AFRICA.


and told by my guide to remain, until I receiv-
ed farther instructions.
He then left me. I was in total darkness.
Where I was, of course I knew not. Who
had delivered me, or for what object I had
been taken from the dungeon, I could not
guess.
For several hours I remained in total un.
certainty. At length a woman came to the
room where I was, with a light. She first
spoke to me in the language of the country,
but I did not understand her. She then spoke
to me in Italian.
Of this I knew very little, but I was able
to understand, that I must remain quiet,
and be assured that no harm was intended
me.
In the morning, this woman again came to
my room, and provided me with some food.
She told me that it was necessary for my own
safety and that .of my deli-frer, that I should
B


,5




PAII.FY 8 TALES OF AFRICA.


remain in my room, and by no means attempt
to leave it.
In a few days, she said, he would return
and explain all to me. In the mean time, she
would do all in her power to make my time
pass agreeably.
I thought it best. to comply with these di-
rections. My female attendant provided me
with food, and gave me a good deal of her
company. She behaved in a kind yet respect-
ful manner, and seemed to be anxious in every
way to make my situation agreeable.
I was soon able to understand a good deal
of her conversation, and I learned from her
many things respecting the country, and the
people where I was.


f2t6






PARLEYS8 TALES OF AFRICA,


Map of Africa.


27





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


CHAPTER IV.

A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF AFRICA.

I WILL now tell you something about the
country I was in. On the preceding page
there is a map of Africa. The shape of Afri-
ca is somewhat like that of a leg of mutton.
The southern point, which is called the Cape
of Good Hope, forms the small part towards
the knuckle. At the north end you will find,
on the map, the names of several places, as
Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco. These
countries pass under the general name of
Barbary.
Now Africa is an immense region, nearly
southeast of the United States. From the
nost northern, to the most southern ex-
What is the shape of Africa? Where is the Cape of Good Hope?
In what part of Africa are the four Barbary States? What countries
ire included in Barbary? In which direction is Africa from the United
States?


'28





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


tremity, it is five thousand miles; and it is
four thousand six hundred miles wide, at the
widest part.
It contains probably thirty-five millions of
inhabitants, about as many as exist in the
whole continent of America. These inhabit-
ants consist chiefly of two races of men, Arabs
and Negroes.
These races have mixed, and produced oth-
ers, partly Arab, and partly Negro. They
pass under different names, and are divided
into a multitude of different tribes, and na-
tions.
The inhabitants of Barbary are chiefly
Moors, who are nearly the same as Arabs.
Their skin is dark, like that of our Indians.
They have a great many negro slaves, who
are brought from the middle parts of Africa.
What is the length of Afrioa from north to south? What the width
from east to west 7 What the number of inhabitants? Of what two
races do the inhabitants of Africa principally consist? What are the in-
habitants of Barbary? Describe the Moors of Ba'.bry





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


Barbary is divided into four states or king-
doms; Tunis, Tripoli, Algiers, and Morocco.
Each of these States has a capital, or large
city of the same name as the country.
The people are Mahometans. They are
great enemies to the Christians, and at the
time I was there, it was a part of their regu-
lar business, to send out vessels upon the sea,
to capture the ships belonging to christian
countries.
South of Barbary, there is an immense des-
ert two thousand miles in length from east to
west, and eight hundred miles in width from
north to south. People can only cross it by
means of camels.
It is very dangerous to travel over this des-
ert; for sometimes the wind raises vast clouds
of sand, which bury unfortunate travellers be-
neath them. Beside this, there are many
What is the capital of Morocco? of Algiers? ofl unis? ot Trnpolit
What of the people? What was a part of the businow of the people of
Larhary when Parley was there? What of the great desert of Africa?


30





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


tribes of Arabs, who wander over the desert,
and attack and rob every body they meet
South of this great desert called Sahara,
there are several nations of negroes who in-
habit a fertile country.
On the western coast of Africa, from the
river Senegal, which you will find on the map,
to the Cape of Good Hope, there are many
tribes of negroes. Here is the coast of Guinea,
from which a great many slaves have been
brought to America.
Toward the Cape of Good Hope are the
Hottentots, a race of negroes, of which I shall
tell you by and by. At the Cape of Good
Hope, is a large town called Cape Towanin-
habitCdhby English people. There are also a

What tribes wander over the desert? What nations south of the great
desert? Where is the river Senegal? Into what ocean does it empty?
Which way does it run? What of the country between the Senegal and
the Cape of Good Hope? Where are the Hottentots? What of Cape
Town? In which direction is it from Tripoli Foint your finger toward
Cape Town Toward Trpol





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


number of small English villages, near Cape
Town.
On thel distern coast of Africa are several
tribes 6oneiroes, of which the Caffrees are
the most remarkable. They are said to be
the best formed people in the world. As you
proceed north from the land of the Caffrees
you will come to Abyssinia. This is a moun-
tainous country, inhabited by a very singular
race of people.
The Nile, one of the most celebrated rivers
in the world, flows through Abyssinia. It.
passes through Nubia and Egypt, and enters
the Mediterranean sea at the eastern ex-
tremity.
Thus I have told you a little about Africa,
so that you may better understand what I am

Where are the Caffrees? Describe the Caffrees? Where is Abyssinia?
In which direction from Morocco? From the Cape of Good Hope?
Describe Abyssinia. What of the Nile? Where is Nubia? Where is
Egypt? Which way is Egypt from Tripoli? From the mouth of the
Senegal? From the Cape of Good Hope




PARIJet'S TALES OF AFRICA.


going to relate. I hope you will study the
map very carefully, and see where every place
is, that I have mentioned.


CHAPTER V.

DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY OF TRIPOLI.

I MUST now tell you a little more particu-
larly about the city of Tripoli. It is a large
city, and contains as many inhabitants as Bos.
ton. The houses are square, and but one
story high. The roofs are so flat, that the
people frequently walk upon them.
The streets are narrow, crooked, and sandy.
Almost all heavy articles are carried from one
place to another on the backs of camels,
which raise a huge dust, as they go along the
streets.
How large is the city of Tripoli? Describe the hoes. The streets.
How are goods carried from one place to another


m




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


The city is surrounded by strong walls, with
ramparts fo? defending it against the attacks
of soldiers. It has two gates, by which peo-
ple go in, and out of the city. One is north,
toward the sea, the other south toward the
country.
At the east end of the city, is the castle,
in which the Bashaw lives. The Bashaw is
a sort of king, and rules over the people. His
dominions are quite extensive, and include
Fezzan, which is a country several hundred
miles to the south. It is situated in the mid-
dle of the great desert.
The Bashaw is generally a cruel man, and
does what he pleases to the people. His cas-
tle is surrounded by a strong wall, forty feet
high. He is very much afraid of being killed
by some of his people.
He has a great many wives, who live in a
Describe the walls round Tripoli. The gates. What of the castle
What of the Bashaw? What of Fezzan?


84





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRIICk.


8s


particular part of the castle. They are very
richly dressed with jewels, gold and silver or-
naments, and are covered with perfumes.
They are, however, shut up very close, and
are no better than prisoners.
I have told you before, that the principal
part of the people are Moors. These people
do not wear hats, but large turbans like the
Turks. They do not wear coats, but a large
loose garment fastened about the waist. They
also wear large trowsers, and yellow boots.
The. women wrap themselves up in a cloth
called a barracan, which covers the whole
person. This they hold so close over theji
heads, as to conceal their faces, which it
not thought modest4o expose to view. 7
The climate here is exceedingly hot in Sumz
mer. In Autumn there are powerful rains,
which continue for several days and nights.
What of the Bashaw's wives? Describe the drew of the men in Tri-
polh. The dress of the women. What of the climate?





3G ePAREY'S TALUS OF AMLCA.

These rains after a short period stop suddenly,
and not a drop of water then falls, for a num-
ber of months.
The people are Mahometans. As I have
said before, they hate Christians. Their re-
ligion teaches those who believe in it, to de-
spise all that do not hold to the same faith.
It teaches, that no Mahometan is bound to be
kind, just, or true, to those who believe in any
other religion.
In Tripoli there are a good many Jews. As
the Moors are very indolent, the Jews do a
great part of the business of the place. They
are however treated with the greatest con-
tempt by the Moors.
A Moor will often spit upon a Jew, and
pull his beard, and the poor Jew has only to
submit. The Christians are also sometimes
treated with the grossest cruelty.
What does the Mohametan religion teach? What of the Jews in Tri-
poli? How are Christians often treated?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRIJA


A Moor pulling a Jew's beard.


CHAPTER VI.

ACCOUNT OF ALGIERS, MOROCCO, AND TUNIS.

HAVING told you about Tripoli, I will now
tell you about Algiers. Algiers is an exten-
sive country, and contains many inhabitants,
It was under the government of "Dey, who
gy whom is Algiers governed? What can you tell :the Dey of Al
gierst


87





PARLEY'S TALKS OF AFRICA.


resided at the city of Algiers, which is the
largest town. But the French took the coun-
try in 1829, and the Dey fled away.
The city of Algiers is as large as New York.
The inhabitants and houses resemble those of
Tripoli. The former are however less barba-
rous, and the latter handsomer and more con
venient.
The roofs of the houses are flat, and com-
nunicate with each other, so that a person
may walk the whole length of the streets, on
the tops of the houses. Many of the people
have little gardens on their houses.
The houses are all whitewashed, and being
situated on the slope of a hill, the city at a
distance, looks like the sail of a great ship.
Morocco is a very populous country, govern-
ed by an Emperor, who lives at the city of
Morocco. This city has three hundred thou-
What of the city of Algiers? Of the inhabitants? Of the houses?
How is Morocco mo vcr iei Where does the Emperor live?





PARL Y'S TALES OF AFRICA.


sana inhabitants. It is situated in a fruitful
plain, and is surrounded by delightful groves.
The country produces oranges, figs, melons,
apricots, peaches, grapes, pears, dates, plums,
and pomegranates. There are a profusion of
the most fragrant and beautiful flowers here.
Morocco is encircled by very strong walls
for defence. The Emperor's palace is a
splendid edifice. The city abounds in mosques.
These are places, where the Mahometans wor-
ship.
Near the city is a range of lofty mountains
whose tops are always covered with snow.
'his range is called Atlas. From it we de-
rive the word Atlas, which is applied to a
book of maps.
There are several other towns in the king-
dom of Morocco. Of these, Fez is the most
considerable. The buildings of this city ar
How many people in the city of Morocco? What of the preoduetu
of Moroccot Describe the city of Morocco! What are MoequWt
What mountains near the city of Morocco? What of Fezt





4 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

the most splendid in Barbary. It has many
mosques, some of which are magnificent.
The gardens abound in all kinds of delicious
fruits. Roses and other fragrant flowers are
so abundant, as to perfume the air to a great
distance.
Tunis is the smallest of the four Barbary
States. The principal city is Tunis. The
country is governed by a Bey, who resides in
the city of Tunis.
Near this city, are the remains of ancient
Carthage. More than two thousand years
ago, Carthage was very powerful, and sent
an army against Rome, under the celebrated
Hannibal.
It was built on three hills, and it was
twenty-three miles aroitnd it. It contained
seven hundred thousand inhabitants, and was
defended by three strong walls, which en-
circled it.
What of Tunis? How is it governed? Where does the Bey residt
What of ancient Crthage?




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


This city, which flourished seven hundred
fears, was at last set on fire by the Romans,
Ind burnt to the ground. It continued to
burn incessantly for seventeen days. The
remains of this mighty city are now hardly
visible.
Thus I have told you of the four Barbary
States. The climate is, on the whole, delight-
ful, and the land is in general, very fertile.
The most delicious fruits, the most fragrant,
and beautiful flowers abound in this country.
Nature has done everything to male it one
of the most charming portions of the globe.
But the inhabitants are for the most part,
cruel, and vicious.
At the time I was in Tripoli, which is
almost thirty years ago, these Barbary states
were subject to the Sultan of Turkey; but
since that time, they have become indepen-
dent.
What of the climate of' Barbarvi





2 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA

They were then renowned all over the
world for their piracies. Their corsairs were
constantly cruising upon the Mediterranean
sea, and they took possession of every vessel
they could capture.
Since that time, these piracies have been
stopped, but the people remain nearly in the
same condition, though they have. somewhat
improved.




CHAPTER VII.

PARLEY FINDS OUT HIS DELIVERER, AND RE-
COGNISES AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

BY this time, I suppose my little reader may
wish to know the remainder of my own story.
I hope the preceding description of Barbary
will not be thought useless, for it is in some





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


degree necessary, in order to make the narra-
tive of my adventures in Africa understood.
I had now remained more than two months,
shut up in the house which I have before
mentioned. I had as yet seen nothing of the
man who rescued me from prison.
The woman who attended me would give
me no hint, which ~i' The least satisfied my
curiosity to kni i hed thuss interposed
in my behalf. 'Infn ftl, I ws totally at a
loss to conceive who it might be, or what
motive had led the individual, to engage in
an enterprise of so much hazard.
At length the time came when my doubts
were to be satisfied. I was one night waked
from my sleep by a man wrapped in a cloak,
who told me to dress myself immediately, and
prepare to accompany him.
This I did, and followed him into the
street. We wound through the narrow
crooked avenues, unt'l ve came to one of the


48





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


gates of the city. Here my conductor had
some conversation with the keeper of the
gate.











After awhile, we were allowed to pass
through a narrow door at the side of the
gate. We soon found ourselves upon a
wharf. My guide flashed some powder in a
pistol, and in a few moments a boat came
stealing towards us upon the water.
This we entered, and turning our backs
upon the city, rowed out into the harbour.





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


We had four oars-men, and we slid over the
water with great swiftness. We proceeded
in perfect silence for about three miles.
We then approached a small schooner
which seemed to be waiting for us. This we
entered. The sails were hoisted, and we put
to sea. The night was clear, but the wind
blew very fresh. The schooner was a 'fast
sailer, and she seemed to glance over the
waters, as a bird sails on the air.
At length the morning came. Nothing had
been said to me, which enabled me to conjec-
ture who my companions were I had laid
down on the deck of the vessel, and had fallen
asleep. I did not wake till sunrise*
As I opened my eyes, they fell Upon a man
of a very swarthy countenance, whom I in-
stantly recollected to have seen before. But'
where I had seen him I could not tell!
At length he spoke. When I heard his
voice, I knew him at once. It was Leo.


45





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


whose life I had saved on my voyage to
Europe!
The last time I had seen him, was in the
mountains of Switzerland, as related in my
tales about Europe. He was then at the head
of a troop of mountain-robbers. Knowing
his desperate character, I immediately con-
jectured he was now engaged in some bad
enterprise.
I had no fear, however, for myself. He
was evidently my deliverer, and I felt sure
that his gratitude for my having once saved
his life, was the cause of his generous con-
duct towards me now.



CHAPTER VIII.

THE STORY OF A ROBBER.

AFTER a few inquiries, Leo took me into
the little cabin of our schooner. It was




PAHILY'S TALE OF AFRICA.


about fifteen years since I had seen him. He
had altered very little. His complexion was
remarkably dark; his eyes very black and
piercing; his hair black, long, and curled over
his ears and forehead. His appearance was
altogether very striking.
He sat down, and began to speak of our
first meeting, many years before. After a
little while, I asked what had happened to
him since I had seen him. He then related
his history to me, as follows.
'After you saw me at the head of a band
of brave fellows in the mountains of Switzer-
land, I continued to follow the profession of a
freebooter. I always conducted my business
with humanity.
'We took away the people's goods and
money, who chanced to fall in our way, but
we never committed any unnecessary cruelty.
SOur success was very good for a consid-
erable time, but at length such loud con-





48 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.
plaints were made to the government, that a
body of more than a thousand soldiers were
sent to take us. Our band consisted of but
fifty men.
'We did not think it best therefore to meet
these troops in the open field, so we retired
to more secret places among the mountains,
and hid ourselves during the day, in caves
formed amid the rocks. At night we sallied
forth, and fell upon such travellers, as chance
threw in our way.
'But notwithstanding our utmost care, sev-
eral of our men were shot, and others taken.
A reward of a thousand dollars was offered
for my apprehension. One of my men, tempt-
ed by this offer, led the soldiers of the gov-
ernment to the cave, where I was concealed.
'At first I determined to resist, and endeav-
our to cut my way through them. But a mo-
ment's reflection satisfied me of the folly of at-
tempting it. I was taken, and carried to Venice.
)





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


,Jiere I was tried and sentenced to be shot.
I was confined in a prison on the edge of the
sea. I determined if possible to make my
escape. I made various attempts without
success.
'The day at length drew near, whi~rb4a .
fixed for my execution. It was now mid-
night, and at sunrise the next morning, I was
to be led out, and shot by a file of soldiers.
I sat in my dark cell reflecting upon my
coming fate.
'I determined to make oep effort more for
escape. I sprang up, and laying hold of
one of the iron bars that were placed before
the window of my dungeon, wrenched it with
all my strength. To my surprise it suddenly
broke, and I fell backward upon the floor,
holding the iron bar in my hands.'
'This. gave me fresh courage. I seized
another bar and strained it with the vigor of
a lion. This also yielded, and there was
4 C


49





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


now space for me to creep out through the
window.
'I looked down, and although the night was
dark, I could see the deep water rippling at
the foot of the prison. I was at least forty
feet above the water, but I did not hesitate a
moment. I let-myself fall from the window,
and plunged into the water.


Being a good swimmer, I soon rose, and
swam to a wharf, at a considerable distance.





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


Here I took aboat which I found there, and
stretched away upon the sea.
'I was afraid to show myself in Italy, so I
determined to quit my native country. After
various adventures, I took passage in a ship,
which I met with in the gulf Venice, and
ailed for Egypt. Here I entered the service
,f the Pt.cha, as a mameluke.



CHAPTER IX.

SEO'S DESCRIPTION bF EGYPT.

'ES t.T is-subject to the Sultan of Turkey.
TLe Pacha of Egypt governs in the name of
the Sultan. The mamelukes are his soloers.
'They are splendidly dressed, and moilted&
on fine horses. They are daring men, and des-
perate fighters. Most of them are from for-
To whom is Egypt subject? Who governs Egypt? What of the Mam-
elukes?


61





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


eign countries, and a large portion of them,
like myself, are adventurers.*
'In this service I remained for a number of
years, and was engaged in several battles with
Buonaparte. You have no doubt read an ac-
count of the invasion of Egypt by the French
some years ago.
'Buonaparte would no doubt have succeeded
in conquering-Egypt, had it not been for the
English. The French fleet being destroyed
by the English fleet, under Lord Nelson, Buo-
naparte left his army, which soon followed
him back to France. Thus Egypt was freed
from its invaders.
'I continued to remain in the service of the
Pacha. As you have never been to Egypt, I
will describe this remarkable country to you.
It is divided into Upper and Lower Egypt.
*My little reader should recollect that I am telling of things that hap-
pened almost thirty years ago. Since that time the Mamelukes have
been expelled from Egypt.
How is Egypt divided?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


'Along the Mediterranean sea, the country
spreads out into a level space of land, on
which, as far as the eye can reach, you see
nothing but a few date trees, a few palm trees,
and groups of huts, built of mud.
'Near the place where the Nile enters the
sea, it is called the Delta. This is overflowed
by the Nile every year, and is one of the most
fruitful spots on the globe.
'In Lower Egypt there are several great
cities. Alexandria was built, there more than
two thousand years ago, by, a celebrated con-
queror of ancient Greece, called Alexander.
'This place now abounds in the most astfth
fishing remains of its former greatness. F6r
the space of six miles, around the present
town, which is much smaller than the ancient
city, nothing is to be seen but fragments of
stone which belonged to the ancient edifices.
Describe that part of Egypt that lies along the Mediterranean sea?
What part of Fgypt is called the Delta? What of the Nile? What of
Alexandria?


53





PARLEY9s TALES OF AFRICA.


'There are heaps, sometimes piled as high
as a house, of pillars, columns, and obelisks.
Many of these are beatitifilly carved.
'Among them is one obelisk cut out of a
solid piece of stone, which measures seventy
feet in length. It is covered with sculptured
figures, called hieroglyphics.
'These hieroglyphics formed the ancient
written language of the Egyptians. This ob-
elisk now lies upon the ground. It once stod
erect, and was called Cleopatra's needle, af-
ter Cleopatra a very celebrated and beautiful
Queen of ancient Egypt.
'Near this city are several remarkable burying
places, called catacombs. In these catacombs
are found at this day, the bodies of persons who
were buried two or three thousand years ago.
'These bodies were embalmed, and they still
retain, the almost complete form and appear-
ance, of the persons when living.
What of Cleopatra's needle What of the Catacombs? What am
found in the Catacombs?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFWICA.


'Cairo is another very .remarkable city in
Lower Egypt. The streets are crooked, and
crowded with men, horses, camels, asses and
dogs.
'These are continually bustling through the
tow%, and raise an almost constant cloud of
dust. Cairo is the largest city in Africa, and
contains more inhabitants than Morocco.
'Upper Egypt lies to the south of Lower
Egypt. In the midst of a vast sandy plain
on. the western side of the Nile are some of
the most remarkable edifices in the world.


These are the Pyramids. There are a
Wht of Cairot What is the largest ciy it Afeat Where i Uppe
RaPt





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


number of them, but the largest is near five
hundred feet in height. It is built of large
pieces of stone. Its form is square, and one
of the sides, at the bottom, measures about
seven hundred feet.
'When, and for what object, these vast
structures were built, it is impossible to tell.
Ancient authors, who lived two thousand
years ago, speak of them as then the wonders
of the age.
'They were as ignorant as we are, of the
origin of these Pyramids. It is probable, that
they are the burial places of some of the an-
cient kings of Egypt, and perhaps were
erected even before the time of Pharaoh, who
is spoken of in the Bible.
'It has been supposed that the Israelites
during their bondage in Egypt, were occupied
in rearing some of these vast structures.
What can you tell of the Pyramids? How high is the largest Pyramidl
When were these Pyramids probably erected? For what object ar they
supposed to have been built?





I&ARLEY'S TAL E OF A2FRICA.


'Still farther south, in Upper Egypt, and
towards Nubia, the Nile flows through a nar-
row valley between two ranges of mountains.
In this valley, are many remarkable remains
of antiquity.
'The most wonderful of these, are those of
Thebes. This city must have been more
magnificent, by far, than any city now on the
earth. Its ruins are scattered on both sides
of the Nile, and cover a. surface of nearly
thirty miles in extent.
'The ground is covered with columns of im-
mense magnitude, statues, rows of obelisks,
and other works which fill the mind with
astonishment. It is impossible to convey any
idea of these magnificent ruins.
'This great city was of very ancient dat#.
It is mentioned by authors who wrote mose
than two thousand years ago, as exhibiting
the same spectacle then, as now. Still far-
What is evident from the splendid ruins that now exist in Egypt?





PARIIY S TALES OF AFRICA.


other south, towards Nubia, there are other
very remarkable remains of antiquity.
'It is evident that in the earliest ages,
Egypt has been filled with people, who lived
in splendid cities, who possessed a great deal
of learning, and had the knowledge of many
arts which are now lost.


CHAPTER X.
LEO FINISHES HIS STORY.
SBUT I am forgetting to tell you my own
adventures. Somewhat more than two years
since, there came to Egypt a man of the name
of Hamet Bashaw. He is the second son of
the late Bashaw of Tripoli.
'The present Bashaw, whose name is Joseph,
caused his father and eldest brother to be put
to death, and thus became Bashaw himself.
Hamet being older than Joseph, had a right
to succeed his father.





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


'To prevent his doing so, Joseph endeavored
to take his life. Hamet heard of his intentions,
and fled to Egypt. He was kindly received,
and some schemes have been set on foot, to
dethrone his brother Joseph and place Hamet
at the head of the government of Tripoli.
'About six months since, I came secretly
to Tripoli, as the agent of Hamet to promote
these schemes. Appearing to have come on
private business, I have had free access to all
parts of the city, and nobody has suspected
my motive.
When you were brought on shore from your
ship, I happened to be on the wharf, and saw
you. I knew you instantly, and determined
if possible to liberate you.
'I therefore took the greatest pains to find
out the place of your confinement, and ascer-
tain the means of setting you free.
'I at length contrived to get over the walls
of the prison, by a ladder of ropes, and three





PARLEY'S TALES OF Art Ci


nights in succession I went to your narrow
window, to contrive the means of your escape.
'Finding that nothing could be done in this
way, I one nigh' took advantage of the gaol-
er's being asleep, turned the key, and liberat-
ed you as you remember. I then placed you
under the care of a woman from my own
country, in whom I could place confidence.
'After this I was absent nearly two months,
engaged in pursuing the object which brought
me to Tripoli. My business being completed,
I took you from your place of concealment,
and brought you on board of this vessel, which
was waiting for me.
'I am now sailing for Egypt, and if this
fair wind continues, we shall be there in four
days. When you arrive there, you can take
passage in some vessel, and return to your
own country.'





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


CHAPTER XI.

PARLEY TELLS ABOUT VARIOUS MATTERS, AND
HOW DECATUR AND TWENTY AMERICANS,
BURNT THE PHILADELPHIA.

WE continued to sail on our voyage with a
fair wind. During the passage, Leo told me
of some things which interested me very much.
Before I tell them to you, I must go back, and
relate some facts, that it is necessary you
should first understand.
I have told you that the people of Barbary
sent out many vessels, to seize upon the ships
of other nations. Now, many of our American
vessels went to trade in the Mediterranean
sea, and several of these were taken by these
pirates.
The crews were seized, put in prison, and
treated with the greatest cruelty. Some of
them were reduced to slavery, and made to
labor very hard.





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


The sufferings of these unhappy Americans
induced our government to send out some ships
of war, under the command of Commodore
Preble, not only to protect our vessels, in the
Mediterranean sea, but to assist in effecting
the liberation of our countrymen, who were
in captivity. This took place in 1803.
One of the American vessels of war was
called the Philadelphia, and commanded by
Captain Bainbridge. One day, this vessel
was chasing a corsair into the harbor of
Tripoli, when unfortunately she struck the
-round, and could not move.
Unable to escape, the vessel fell a prey to
the Tripolitans. The crew were all taken,
and shut up in prison. The vessel remained
in the hands of its captors.
The Tripolitans soon got the Philadelphia
afloat, and intended to make use of her, to
Who was sent to the Mediterranean sea, near thirty years ago, with a
squadron of American ships of war under his command? For what was
Commodore Preble sent with these ships to the Mediterraneant





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


carry on the war against our ships. There
was a young man by the name of Decatur,
among the Americans, under the command of
Commodore Preble.
He commanded a small vessel called the
Enterprise, and was a very daring young
officer. He proposed to Commodore Preble,
to go and set the Philadelphia on fire, and
thus prevent her being useful to the Tripoli.
tans.
This plan was approved of by Commodore
Preble. So, Decatur waited till it was night,
and then took with him twenty men, and con-
cealed them in the bottom of a small vessel,
and sailed towards the Philadelphia.
The Tripolitans on board this ship, saw the
little vessel approaching, but supposing it be-
longed to their own people, and suspecting no
danger, they allowed it to come close up i
them. t
What happened to the Philadelphiat





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Suddenly, Decatur with his twenty men
leaped upon the deck. There were fifty Trip-
olitans on board the Philadelphia. The men
closed upon each other, and a deadly struggle
followed.
The astonished Tripolitans fought bravely
with their sabres. At the first onset, Decatur
was disarmed and thrown down. A Tripoli-
tan lifted his sword over him, and was about
to strike the fatal blow.
At this instant, one of Decatur's men saw
his danger, and springing between him, and
the Tripolitan, received the stroke of the
sword on his arm.
Decatur rose, and fought like a lion. He
was truly a brave man. His twenty Ameri-
cans were all brave men. The Tripolitans
fell before them, like grass before the scythe.
Decatur set the vessel on fire, and not one
of the fifty Tripolitans ever reached the shore.
Will you tell how Decatur caused the Philadelphia to be burnt?





PARLEYS TALES OF AFRICA.


The flames soon rose from the ship, and
lighted the harbor far and wide. The peo-
ple from the city looked on in fear and won.
der, and Decatur returned in triumph to his
vessel.












These were brave deeds, but many of the
poor Americans were still in slavery. The
Bashaw of Tripoli was so angry because the
Philadelphia was burnt, that he was still more
cruel to the American prisoners in his power.
The sufferings of these unhappy men, were
5





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


soon known in our country. The subject was
a matter of universal interest. Our govern-
ment was not idle.
They sent General Eaton to the Mediterra-
near., as an agent to assist in obtaining the
freedom of our imprisoned countrymen.
General Eaton at length heard of the situa-
tion of Hamet, whom I have mentioned be-
fore. He went to Egypt to see him.
He proposed to Hamet to assist him, in de-
throning his brother, provided Hamet, in com-
ing to the throne, would liberate the Ameri-
cans, and be at peace with America. To this
Hamet agreed, and General Eaton immedi-
ately set about making arrangements to carry
the project into effect.
For what purpose was General Eaton sent to the Mediterranean?
Where did General Eaton meet Hamet Bashaw? What agreement did
he make with Hamet Bashaw?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


CHAPTER XII.

PARLEY ARRIVES IN EGYPT, AND GOES WITH
GENERAL EATON'S EXPEDITION, ACROSS
THE DESERT.

IT was at this point of time, that Leo made
his communication to me. He told me that
General Eaton was at this moment in Egypt,
and that in a few days he would set out with
a number of soldiers, to make an attack on
the dominions of the Bashaw of Tripoli.
He left me at full liberty, either to return
directly to my country, or join General Eaton's
expedition. At the same time, he strongly
urged me to adopt the latter course.
He told me that the Bashaw of Tripoli
was a cruel man, that he had murdered his
own father; that Hamet was, by law, entitled
to the throne; and that above all, in joining
General Eaton's enterprise, I should assist in


In





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


liberating my suffering countrymen from cap-
tivity.
These considerations had some weight with
me, but I did not immediately determine to
follow Leo's advice. I chose rather to wait
till I arrived in Egypt, and then make up.my
mind what to do.
In a few days we arrived at Alexandria, in
Lower Egypt. On inquiry, I found that Gen-
eral Eaton was actually there, as Leo had
said.
I also found several American seamen there,
who, in the course of a few days, were to
start on the proposed expedition. I very soon
determined to accompany them. In less than
a week,, we were on our march westward,
towards the dominions of the Bashaw of Tri-
poli.
As we were going to travel across a desert,
General Eaton hired more than one hundred
camels to carry the baggage. There were


68






PARLEYPS TALES OF AFRICA.


very few Americans engaged in the expedi-
tion.


The whole number of persons was about
four hundred. Some of them were on horse-
back, but the greater part were on foot.
There were a good many Arabs and Moors,
headed by Hamet Bashaw.
We marched two hundred miles over an
uneven plain, consisting of barren hills of sand.
How many persons were engaged in General Eaton's eqpdition? Of
whom did these four hundred persons consist?


so






PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Over this whole distance we met with not
one human habitation. At length, we came
across some tribes of Arabs.
The people were living in tents, and had
some horses and cattle. We were the first
Christians they had ever seen. They laughed
heartily at our dress, which appeared to them
very ridiculous. These Arabs had very dark
complexions, and wore turbans like tle Turks.
They were all Mahometans, and like other
people, of this religion, thought Christians
very much worse than themselves.
They believe that Christians will all be
punished in another world, by being kept for
ages in a dreadful fire. They were very anx-
ious that I should become a Mahometan.
They seemed perfectly sincere, and no doubt
really believed, that if I remained a Christian,
I should suffer great torments in a future state.
Will you describe the people that Parley says they met with, after trpv-
elling two hundred miles?


70





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


I saw among these Arabs, several Ostriches,
which they had caught when young, and ren-
dered nearly tame. Ostriches are the largest
birds in the world. They are only found in
Africa, and a small part of Asia.
They lay their eggs in the sand, and the
heat of the sun is so great, that the bird is
only obliged to sit on them during the night,
to hatch them. These birds cannot fly, but
they will run as fast as a horse.
The Arabs had also beautiful Antelopes,
that resemble small Deer. These creatures
are very timid, and run with great swiftness.
Many of them are caught by the Panthers
and Lions, who lie concealed, and spring sud-
denly upon them, as cats do upon mice.
As we proceeded on our journey, we met
with almost constant difficulties. Sometimes
the weather was exceedingly hot, and we

What can you tell about the Ostrich? What can you tell about An-
telopes?


71





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


were all. drooping with fatigue and thirst.
Sometimes, quarrels took place among the
soldiers, and sometimes Hamet Bashaw and
his men became disheartened, and proposed
to return.
But General Eaton met these difficulties
with the greatest courage. He cheered the
troops, he inspired Hamet with confidence,
and triumphed over every obstacle.
But at length, we were short of provisions.
We were in a wide desert that produced al-
most nothing. We were surrounded by no
other people, than the wandering tribes of
Arabs, who kept out of sight during the day,
but stole into our camp at night, and robbed
us of our horses.
Our men were now dispersed in every di-
rection, to look for herbs and roots for food.
I went like the rest to find something to eat.
I had gone to a considerable distance from my
companions, when I happened to see between





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


the hills, a small low spot, where some shrubs
were growing.
They were in a little valley, in which:there
was a pond. The place was quite green, and
looked very beautiful all around it being
quite desolate, and barren. A spot like this
in a desert, is called an Oasis.


Well, I no sooner saw this spot, than I ran~
to it, expecting to find something there, that
would answer for food. What was my sur-
D





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


prise, to see four men start, with the sudden-
ness of beasts of prey, from the bushes, and
surround me! I saw at once that they were
Arabs, and being totally unarmed, I had no
means of defending myself. They instantly
fell upon me, and began to strip me of my
clothes, with surprising quickness.











They took off my hat and coat, and were
proceeding to rob me of my other garments,
when three or four of our horsemen acciden-
tally appeared in sight.


74






PARLEYS8 TALES OF AFRICA.


They were coming directly towards us.
The Arabs were alarmed, and throwing my
hat and coat upon the ground, they left me,
and sprang to their horses, which were at a
little distance among the shrubs.
They mounted them at a single leap, and
galloped away over the sand hills, disappear-
ing almost as quickly as birds of the air.
The swiftness of the horses, belonging to these
Arabs of the desert, is truly surprising.
Notwithstanding all our researches, we
were still short of food, and were obliged to.
kill one of our camels, which we found to be
excellent meat.
We continued our march, and in two
months, had proceeded six hundred miles
over the desert. We now arrived at a tolera-
bly fruitful country, ana soon reached the city
of Derne.
How long was General Eaton's expedition in crossing the desert? Hos
fhr across the desert?


76





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


CHAPTER XIII.
ARRIVAL AT DERNE. THE SIROCCO. A BATTLE,
AND SOME OTHER THINGS.

DERNE is situated on the sea, and is a large
place, nearly equal to Tripoli in size. It be-
longed to the Bashaw of Tripoli, and was gov-
erned by a Bey. Here General Eaton was
joined by several American vessels.
An attack upon the city was resolved upon.
The vessels were to fire upon the town, with
their cannon from the water, and General Ea-
ton with the soldiers, was to attack it by land.
While preparations were making to execute
these plans, we were visited by a dreadful hot
wind, called the Sirocco. This wind filled the
air with small sand. The whole sky was al-
meet the color of copper.
The animals were gasping for breath. The
In what direction is Derne from Alexandria? What can you tell of
Dernet





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


leaves, plants, and flowers, perished. It was
truly dreadful. I was parched with heat, and
my skin seemed on fire.
This lasted for three days, and then the Si-
rocco ceased. This dreadful wind is common
in the deserts of both Africa and Asia, and
often takes away the lives of men, and beasts.
The preparations being at length completed,
the attack on Derne was commenced. The
American vessels poured their cannon shot
upon the batteries of the enemy, and upon
the town.
The roar was loud and terrific. Our troops,
too, assailed the town on the land side. We
were opposed by a large number of Tripolitan
soldiers.
A fierce battle followed. General Eaton
was shot in the wrist, but he seemed to heed
it not. He led us on through the thicke(tff
the fight. It was a brave battle.
Describe the Sirocco. Describe the attack on Derne.


T7





PAULEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


We had some Greeks with us, who fought
by our sides, and they fought bravely. The
enemy at length gave way. They fled before
us, and we entered the town.
Derne was now captured. Joseph Bashaw
heard of this event with dread. He feared
that his brother Hamet would succeed in driv-
ing him from the throne.
He desired therefore to make peace as soon
as possible, with the Americans. He sent to
Mr. Lear, the American consul, and offered
immediately to release the American prison-
ers, if General Eaton would cease to assist
Hamet Bashaw.
Mr. Lear immediately agreed to this. Gen-
eral Eaton was consequently obliged to with-
draw his troops from Derne. Soon after this,
we all sailed for Malta, an island in the Med-
iterranean sea.
What effect had the capture of Derne on Joseph Bashaw? What did
Joseph Bashaw do? What was General Eaton obliged to do in ceue-
quence of the arrangement between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Poor Hamet Bashaw, thus deserted by his
American allies, had no farther hopes. He
left his cruel brother Joseph to reign, quitted
his country, and came to America.
General Eaton returned to America also,
and after some years he died. He deserves
to be remembered, as a man of extraordinary
courage, energy, and perseverance.
Immediately after the arrangement was
made, between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw,
all the American prisoners in Tripoli, were
set at liberty.
Among these were my companions, who
had been captured with me in the Mediterra-
nean. After we were imprisoned in Tripoli,
I had known nothing of their fate. How
great was my pleasure on arriving at Malta,
to meet them all there!
They had suffered a great deal during their

SWhat did Hamet Bashaw do? What became of General Eaton? For
4 dat does General Eaton deserve to be remembered?
A..


79





PARLEY'S TALES OF APRICA.


imprisonment, lbut were now very happy, in
the prospect of returning to their country.



CHAPTER XIV.
PARLEY BETS OUT FOR CHINA. SOMETHING
ABOUT CAPTAIN RILEY, AND GREAT STORIES.

A FEW days after I arrived at Malta, a large
American ship, called the Kien Long, came
to that island. She had been to Smyrna, a
town in Asia, on the Mediterranean sea, to
get opium. This opium, she was going to car-
ry to China, and exchange it for tea, silks and
other goods.
While she was at Smyrna, the plague was
raging there. The plague is a dreadful fever,
that is very common in all the large towns,
on the Mediterranean.
Sometimes, many thousands of people die
What can you tell of the Plague?
4t


80





PARLEY'S TALES OF, AFRIA.


of it, in a single city, in the course of a few
months. Several of the seamen on board the
Kien Long, took the disease at Smyrna, and
died there.
When she arrived at Malta, she was there-
fore short of men. I was offered the situation
of second mate on board of her.
This I accepted; and instead of setting out
for home as I intended, I started in a few
days, on a Voyage to China.
We passed through the straits of Gibraltar,
and stretched to the west along the northern
coast of Africa. We soon passed the Canary
isles, and at length came near Cape Blanco
on the western coast of Africa.
It was on the coast near this Cape, that
Captain Riley and his crew were wrecked,
about ten years afterwards, that is, in 1815.
In what direction did Parley sail after he left the Mediterranean?
What islands did he soon pass? Where was Captain Riley and his crew
wrecked? In that direction is Cape Blanco from Tripoli? The Cape
of Good Hope from you?





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


Captain Riley has written a book, giving an
account of his shipwreck, and his suffering in
Africa. This account is very interesting, but
it has one fault, he is too fond of telling large
stories.
He tells of a great many things, that are
perhaps nearly all true, but yet his descrip-
tions are so extravagant, that many people
disbelieve his whole book.
Nothing is more unfortunate, than to get a
habit of telling great stories. A person who
has this habit, is very soon laughed at, and
despised. Good people will place no confi
dence in, nor have any esteem for a person
who tells great stories.


82





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


CHAPTER XV.
CAPTAIN RILEY'S SHIPWRECK.
I WILL now give you an account of Captain
Riley's adventures; 'for, as I have said before,
they are very interesting.
Captain Riley was a native of Connecticut.
He sailed-in the brig Commerce from Hart-
ford, and went to Gibraltar. From thence he
set sail to go to the Canary islands.
When he came near these islands, the
weather was foggy, and he could not tell exact-
ly where he was. Being deceived by his reck-
onhig, he went beyond these islands, and ran
near to Cape Blanco, on the African coast.
A'strong wind was blowing the vessel along,
at a rapid rate, towards the shore. Suddenly
Captain Riley heard a great noise in the wa-
ters. He instantly knew it was the noise of
breakers.


8s






PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA


Breakers are hidden rocks in the sea, ovei
which the waves tumble with great violence
Scarcely had he heard the roar of the break
ers, before the vessel struck upon them.


Then the waves rose around the vessel, and
beat upon her with a noise like thunder. The
sea broke over her, and she was very soon al-
most full of water.
Expecting that she would be dashed to
pieces in a few minutes, Captain Riley and


b4





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


some of his men got into the boat, and set out
for the shore, which was visible at no great
distance.
The sea was very rough, and the boat was
tossed about like a feather. The billows
broke constantly over it, and almost drowned
the people who were in it.
It was rapidly driven towards the shore,
IAd soon it was thrown upon a sandy beach.
Several of the crew were yet on board the
ship, but by the greatest exertions, they were
all at length landed on the shore.,
Here then, on the desolate coast of Africa,
were Captain Riley and his crew. Their ves-
sel was on the rocks, and they knew she must
soon go to pieces. Their boat was. broken,
so that they could not sail in it.
They were indeed in a distressing situation.
But Captain Riley was a man of energy, and
he determined to escape from this dreary
coast, if possible. Accordingly, he and his


a




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


men first built a tent for shelter, and then be-
gan to repair their boat.
Their plan was to mend this, and when the
sea was calm, to sail out upon it, and en-
deavor to find some friendly vessel, or attempt
to reach some of the English settlements,
which they knew lay to the south, on the coast
of Africa.
The morning after they were wreckd
Captain Riley and his men were surprised to
discover some strange looking persons, coming
towards them.
These were an old man, with a hideous
face, and long hair standing out in all direc-
tions, two frightful old women, and several
children. These creatures were almost na-
ked, and had a wild and savage look.
The shore was strewed with a great vari-
ety of articles, which had floated from the
ship. The strange looking people fell to plun-
dering these articles. They ripped open the


86





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


feather beds, and were amazingly diverted to
see the air filled with feathers. They opened
some boxes of silk handkerchiefs, and lace
veils, and tied them about their heads, arms,
and legs.
At length they went away. Night came
on, and Captain Riley and his men slept in
tjeir tent, by the side of the restless ocean.
i the morning, they again began to repair
their boat.
But pretty soon, the Arabs came again.
The old man had a spear now, which he
threatened to throw at Captain Riley, and
his men.
There were also several other Arabs with
him, who had spears. They brought with
them a number of camels also, to carry off the
plunder.
Captain Riley and his men had no weapons
for defence, and could offer no resistance to
people thus armed. They therefore got into




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


their boat, which they had mended, and put
off to their vessel, which still remained on the
rocks.


CHAPTER XVI.

CAPTAIN RILEY'S ADVENTURES, AND SUFFERINGs
THE Arabs now loaded their camels with
the spoil, and destroyed whatever.they could
not carry away. They then beckoned to Cap-
tain Riley to come on shore to them, and at
length they persuaded him to come.
But pretty soon they seized him, struck at
him with their daggers, and threatened in-
stantly to kill him.
This was intended to frighten him. They
then told him, they must have the money that
was in the ship. Captain Riley made signs
to his men, and they brought about one thou-
sand dollars in a bucket, and gave to the





PARLEY 8 TALES OF AFRICA.


Arabs. But this did not satisfy them; they
wanted more.
Not being able to get more, they again
threatened to kill Captain Riley. Some of
his men seeing his danger, came ashore to as-
sist him.












But he found that his only chance of safety,
lay in an attempt to escape. So he waited
for a favorable moment. Then he sprang
away from his enemies, ran to the beach, and
plunged into the water.


89




PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


He was pursued by three of the Arabs.
They hurled a spear at him, but a wave at
that moment rolled over his head, and saved
him. He swam for his life. He reached the
ship, and escaped his pursuers.
But one of his men remained on the shore.
The disappointed savages now turned their
rage upon him. They plunged a spear
through his body, and he fell dead upon the
ground.
The situation of the poor seamen was now
dreadful. Their inhuman enermes were wait-
ing on the land, to take their lives if they
came ashore.
Their poor vessel had been so beat and
pounded on the rocks, by the rough billows,
that the water flowed through her, as if she
were a basket.
Nothing was left to them but to get into
their leaky boat, and push out upon the rough
sea, with the probable chance of soon sinking


90




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


in the waves. This they chose, rather than
venture among the cruel people, that occupied
the shore.
Having got their boat ready, Captain Ri-
ley and his ten companions put offto sea. At
first the ocean was tolerably calm, but by and
by the night came on, and with it, a dreadful
storm.
The peril of the poor seamen can hardly
be described. Their boat was very leaky,
and it took in so much water, that all of them
were occupied in bailing it out with their hats,
and whatever else they had, that would an-
swer the purpose.
With all their exertions they could scarcely
keep it from sinking. The night was very
dark, and they could see nothing around them,
save when the bright flashes of lightning,
showed them the tumbling billows.
The roar of the ocean in a storm, is terrific.
It has a fearful sound, even to one, who is


91




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


riding safely in a strong ship. But to the
ears of men in an open boat, that bends and
trembles at every shock of the sea, the uproar
of the waters must be terrible.
The poor men had indeed no expectation
that they should ever reach the land; yet a
faint hope still remained, and still they contin-
ued to exert themselves for their deliverance.
The storm continued for several days. At
Length, they were short of food and water.
Hunger and thirst soon pressed them very
hard. They had only water enough to wet
their lips. They devoured the remains of a
pig, without being cooked, which was all they
had, and gnawed the very bones.
Finally, reduced to the greatest extremity,
and having been a week at sea, they deter-
mined once more to land. They approached
the shore, and, borne along by the surf, were
carried high upon the beach.
The shore was formed of lofty, perpendic-


92





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.


ular rocks, at the bottom of which, was a nar-
row beach. Upon this, as night approached,
they laid themselves down to rest.
Weary with exertion, and wasted with anx-
iety, they slept soundly till morning. They
awoke very much refreshed. They then
clambered over the rocks, and travelled to-
wards the east.
The sufferings of the wanderers were now
very great. I cannot undertake to tell you
all that happened to them. Perhaps you wift
sometime read the whole story in Captain Ri-
ley's book. I can only tell you now, that af-
ter travelling awhile, they reached the bor-
ders of the great desert.
Here they met with one of those wandering
tribes of Arabs, who roam over the desert,
with their camels and flocks, living by pastur-
age, and plundering all who come in their way.
These Arabs seized Captain Riley and his
mea, stripped them of their clothes, and re-


s




PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


duced them to a state of slavery.
divided them among themselves.


They then


The Arabs soon moved to the eastward, and
proceeded to the interior of the desert. Cap-
tain Riley and his companions were placed
on camels, but being destitute of clothing, and
the heat being excessive, they suffered ex-
ceedingly.
Besides, they had no food but camels' milk,
and hardly enough of this to sustain life.
Their lips were also parched with thirst, and


94





PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.


such were their torments, that they wished to
die, to be relieved from their misery.
At length Captain Riley and four of his
men, were bought by two Arab merchants,
who were met with upon the desert. These
merchants set out for Morocco, intending to
sell them there.
In this journey, the poor captives endured
the greatest misery, from hunger, thirst, and
fatigue. They had a great variety of adven-
tures, and were once attacked by robbers.
But at length they reached Morocco. Here
they found an English gentleman, who paid
their ransom and treated them with great
kindness.
Emaciated with fatigue and privations, re-
duced to mere skeletons, by every species of
suffering, they now met with kindness and

Where was Captin Riley carried to by the Arabs? In what dire-
tion is Morocco from Cape Blanco? Will you relate some of Captaia
kilcy's adventures and sufferings, in crossing the desert?




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs