• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Introduction
 The poppy
 The fir-tree
 The wood-streamlet
 The pebble
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Was sich der Wald erzahlt.
Title: What was said in the woods
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002108/00001
 Material Information
Title: What was said in the woods
Uniform Title: Was sich der Wald erzählt
Physical Description: 163 p. : col. ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Putlitz, Gustav Heinrich Gans, 1821-1890
Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans ( Publisher )
J. Wertheimer and Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: J. Wertheimer and Co.
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Nature -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Westleys & Co -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1851   ( local )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: translated from the German of Gustav zu Putlitz.
General Note: Hand-colored illustrations and letters.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002108
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236361
oclc - 45443093
notis - ALH6832
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Half Title 1
        Half Title 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The poppy
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The fir-tree
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The wood-streamlet
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    The pebble
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Page 159
Full Text








WHAT WAS AID IN
TMF WOODS.







































LONDON:
PRINTED BY J. WERTHEIMER AND CO.,
CIRCUS PLACE, FINSBURY CIRCUS.









W'V T Wl sS) P4


ranslat fom te man of Dustab utli.
Ev~anslatel fromt the G~erman~ of Sustab~ 2t p3futlit2.


LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN & LONGMANS,
1851.












WHAT WAS SAID IN
THE WOODS.


INTRODUCTION.
L E are mistaken if we
think flowers can do
nothing but bud, blos-
som, exhale perfumes,
and wither. This notion, however
widely it may be spread, is the result

B







2 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

of our own selfishness, which would
willingly persuade us that everything
in nature is made for us alone; and
that, since we only perceive the outer
life of flowers, they really have no inner
one. But, as I have said already, that is
not so; and, as every flower has its own
character,-one is modest, another proud
and vain, this one cheerful and brilliant,
that dull and almost invisible; or, as
each is distinguished from the rest by
its peculiar colours and habits,-so every
one has its own wishes, struggles, plea-
sures, sorrows, and loves; but they all







INTRODUCTION.


1


U-- -


I


3


i


agree in possessing a remarkable amount
of patriotism, which does not merely
signify an attachment to their own
country, but to the very spot on which
they were born, so that they cannot
exist elsewhere. This is a sentiment
that is rarely to be found among the
men of modern times. Flowers have,
also, the means of conversation; and if
any one did but understand their lan-
guage, they would whisper many a
pretty poem or story in his ear; and
he would willingly lie whole nights
(for the night is the chief time for







4 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

their conversations, as we shall soon
see) listening on the flowery ground;
and the many-coloured images that
passed before him would easily seem
like a beautiful poetic dream. Now it
so happened, that the relater of the
following stories lay one fragrant moon-
shiny night on the flowery carpet of
the wood and listened-or dreamed, as
many people will more readily believe;
and, all on a sudden, he heard many
thousand tiny voices issue from the
flowers. Probably a kind little fairy,
to whom he had once unconsciously
.-..~.---- ..-.-~-. ^







INTRODUCTION. 5

rendered some service, had lent him
his hearing for the night.
The Rush, in a melancholy tone,
whispered a long lyrical poem into its
neighbour's ear, and its neighbour lis-
tened attentively. During the pauses,
the Scarlet Corn-flower babbled, which
is a sad scandal-bearer among flowers,
and a great gossip. Not far off, the
Red Moss-flowers tittered; they had
certainly been saying something very
funny to one another. The Blue-bells,
it is true, were silent, but they always
confirmed the speeches of their neigh-


---







6 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

bours, by bowing their heads to the
right hand and to the left. It was
very different with the Quaking-grass,
which constantly shook its head, and
would believe nothing of all it heard.
Now whether they were aware of the
listener's presence, and determined, ac-
Scording to the old proverb, to punish
him for his rudeness, or whether it is
a favourite subject among the flowers,
I cannot say, but this time their con-
versation turned chiefly on the injustice
and the unloving ways of men towards
them.






INTRODUCTION.


"Alas alas !" said grievingly a
group of Thyme-blossoms, "there again
the great foot of a man has crushed
our darling sisters."
Yes," said a Catch-fly, which is
so fond of being seen, and therefore
stretches itself up as high as it can on
its slender stem; "they care nothing
about us, however tenderly we attach
ourselves to them and endeavour to
detain them. I would as soon be des-
troyed at once for being hurtful, like
the Hemlock; for nothing is harder
to bear than that contempt, which


U --







8 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

makes them not think it worth while
to turn away their foot from us."
But yet," whispered a Forget-me-
not soothingly, you do not mean that
men are altogether cruel and unjust to
us? I cannot quite refute your accu-
sations; but are we not their most
favourite ornament on festive occasions;
and do not they always choose us as
the bearers of their holiest sentiments,
-of their love?"
Those times are long past," said
the Sorrel, very much out of humour.
Do not men, in their inflated pride,.
&?--- ... ...... .. .






INTRODUCTION.


think themselves justified in copying,
-yes, in improving the works of the
Creator, by attempting to imitate and
beautify us, forsooth, in miserable
painted paper things? And with which
is it that they now adorn themselves,
-with us, or with those wretched imi-
tations? And they only make us into
love-tokens when they have nothing
better; and, for that matter, the lan-
guage of flowers is long since gone out
of fashion,-they call it sentimentality,
and make it ridiculous."
"I would submit to all that," ob-






10 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

served the Lily; "for how can men
estimate our feelings when they do not
know them; but they ought not to
deny them when they appear visibly
before them. Only remember, when
night is passed, and we look around us
in the morning light, we always miss
one or other of our playfellows, which
either laid down its head in the even-
ing twilight, or was blown away by
a rough night wind: then we grieve,
and tears hang in our eyes. Men see
this; but without troubling themselves
to understand it, they deny that these
S. ..- -- ..--





F'
I







i


11


drops are a sign of our feelings and of
our sorrow, and declare, that they are
the dew which the morning mist has
scattered over us."
This proof of the injustice of men
must have been very convincing; for,
for a moment, no one had anything to
reply or to add to it. Then not far
from me, I saw a group collected round
a shining tall Poppy. I had already
observed, that her neighbours laid their
heads together, and took no part in
the dispute which had been so little
flattering to me. Now when this pause


.---.. .


INTRODUCTION.


f






12 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

ensued, the Cowslip rang its little bells
loudly, and called out: Hush! hush!
sisters all, the Poppy will tell us a tale.
The Poppy will tell us a tale; hush!
hush!" and everybody listened; for
even the Rush had finished its long
poem.












THE POPPY.





B---------


.-


THE POPPY.


HE Poppy raised herself
S on her tall straight stem,
looked around, and bowed
a few times. I had expected,
that she would have required to be asked
frequently,-would have complained of
hoarseness, or, at least, would have
made many excuses; but that does not
seem to be the custom among flowers,
for the Poppy began at once to tell
.. .. .. ... .. ......






16 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

her tale. Do you wish to listen to
me? Well, then, I will tell you how,
according to a time-honoured tradi-
tion which has been handed down in
our family from generation to gene-
ration, we Poppies owe our existence
to a very remarkable accident; for you
must not imagine that at the creation
of the world we flowers were all scat-
tered over the earth at once. O no!
one came up after another, very much
in the same way as happens now in
the Spring."
"Well, but what does happen in


i






THE POPPY. 17

Spring?" interrupted the Corn-flower
impetuously.
"That you may inquire from the
Daisy," replied the Poppy, "who is
always there early to see; and then do
not interrupt me again in my story."
The Daisy, who, for the most part, is
little regarded, and is even thought by
many to be foolish, whereas its cousin,
the Aster, is much more highly valued,
Because it has enjoyed somewhat more
education, was at once pleased and
abashed to be thus called upon to speak,
and a slight blush passed over its white

C





D------- --- .-E. g
18 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

petals, as may often have been remarked
in this flower. Then it raised its head
thankfully to its tall patroness, and
told its tale without waiting a further
request.
"What harm we have done Winter
that he should be so hard upon us poor
flowers, I cannot say; and indeed there
are many different opinions about it.
This, however, is certain, that he can-
not endure us; and never rests till he
has quite driven us all from the earth.
But his government does not last for
ever; and after him comes our best


___ .. g







THE POPPY. 19

friend, Spring. He looks around him
quite sadly when he sees none of all
the pretty children he so earnestly
entrusted at his departure to Summer;
and he is obliged to envelop his locks
in a long grey veil, because there is yet
neither flower nor leaf out of which he
can weave himself a garland. Then he
strokes the earth with his soft warm
hand, and looks down and calls his
favourites, none of which dare yet raise
up their heads; for they are still quite
.frightened, so much has harsh Winter
Soverawed them. And, indeed, this fear
^ .-- .. .. .. .
I~~ii-:







20 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.


is not groundless, for there have been
examples of Winter, after he had once
gone away, coming back again, and
knocking the flowers upon the head.
There are some flowers which are of a
peculiarly friendly disposition, and will
not let Spring wait long, but come
quickly out to meet him. Such a one
is the good Violet. But when it peeps
round, and sees the earth still so very
bare, and so few of its sisters yet
awakened, it is afraid, and timidly
hides its little head under the green
leaves. Men call that modesty, but it is
a^.. ~-- ...- .. ---N .




"'

;F;
''i

;;
:
;I


i i



$
j


much more truly fear; and then there

rises in the Violet the greatest longing

for companions, which it expresses in

its sweet breath. Poor little Violet!

This longing remains ungratified; and

when the other flowers come, its season

is long since passed. But, because it

always feels itself so much attached to

other flowers, it sometimes peeps out

again in Autumn for a few days, when

its wish is granted. And that, too,

is the reason why it never smells

so sweetly then as when it first

blooms."


THE POPPY.







22 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

"Now you understand what happens
in spring," said the Poppy, resuming
her story. So it was at the creation:
one flower sprung up after another.
But at that period to which my story
refers, most of them had already ap-
peared, and the earth was very beauti-
ful; for goodness and happiness reigned
everywhere. Beasts and men dwelt
peaceably with one another; and there
was nothing but joy from morning to
evening. One being alone-only one
in the wide, wide world -did not share
the general happiness, but wandered





-m


THE POPPY. 23

sorrowfully over the young earth. It
was Night. I will tell you why she
was sorrowful. It was because she
was alone in the world when every
other being had a companion; and
what happiness is there if we cannot
share it? In addition to this, Night
felt more and more, what she would
have so willingly hidden even from
herself, that she was the only being
whom the rest did not love to come
near. However generously she kindled
her starry lamps, she yet could not but
hide the beauties of the earth from men
| l.: ... ..







24 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

and beasts, and that turned all hearts
from her. Not that they had made
any complaints to her, but the joy with
which they greeted the morning sun,
showed clearly enough how little they
loved Night. That naturally grieved
her, for she was kind and loving; and
she hid her head in a thick veil, so that
she might weep over her bitter sorrow.
Now that greatly touched the hearts of
us pitiful flowers; and, when every-
thing else turned away from her, we
endeavoured, as much as our feeble
powers permitted, to make her happi-


3 -_




7-


THE POPPY.


25


31Li:

i I
f~::
pl


Sness, though we could not remove her
grief. But we have nothing to offer
save colours and perfumes; and Night
never took much pleasure in colours.
So we treasured for her our richest
odours; and some of us even did as the
Night-violet, who emitted no perfumes
during the day, so that it might bestow
all its sweets on Night; and this custom,
as you know, it has since retained. But
all that could not console the mourner,
and she cast herself down in grief
before the throne of the Creator.
And she raised her voice and said,


-ZSB


I;;: :






26 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

'Almighty Father! thou seest how
everything is happy in thy creation,
while I alone wander joyless, lonely,
and unloved over the earth; and have
no one to whom I can turn in my
sorrow. Day flies away before me,
however lovingly I hasten after him;
and all other creatures, like him, turn
away from me. Wherefore, O Al-
mighty Father! have compassion on
my sorrow, and give me a companion!'
Then the Creator smiled compas-
sionately, and granted the prayer of
Night; and he created Sleep, and gave





8 ~"-- U
THE POPPY. 27

him to Night as a companion. Do
we not feel that he was created with
smiles, for he is always loved and
blessed, and gives nothing but happi-
ness and comfort? Night received her
friend in her arms; and now she enter-
ed on a new life. It was not only
because she was no longer lonely, but
all hearts were now open to her because
Sleep, the darling of all living creatures,
came with her when she frightened Day
from the earth. Soon other friendly
beings were found in her train-Dreams,
the children of Night and of Sleep.






28 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

These wandered with their parents over
the earth, and soon made friendship
with men, who then were still like chil-
dren in heart. But alas! that soon
changed. Passions rose up in men,
and their souls became more and more
troubled. Children are easily spoiled
by bad company; and so it happened
that, in their intercourse with men,
some Dreams became fickle, deceitful,
and unfriendly. Sleep marked this
change among his children, and thought
to drive the naughty ones out of his
company; but their brothers and sisters







THE POPPY.


begged for them, and said, Leave our
brothers with us, they are not so bad
as they seem, and we will promise to
do our very best to repair any mischief
they are guilty of !' The father granted
the request of his good children, and so
the had Dreams remained in his com-
pany; but, as experience has taught,
they for the most part feel themselves
attracted in a wonderful manner to-
wards bad men.
Meanwhile men grew worse and
worse. Once on a glorious night, a
man lay upon the odorous turf, and


n_..


29






30 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

Sleep and Dreams came towards him,
but Sin would not suffer them to take
possession of him. A fearful thought
rose up in his mind; the thought of
murder. Vainly Sleep shook the tran-
quillising drops from his magic wand;
vainly did Dreams spread their many-
coloured pictures before him; he always
withdrew himself from their gentle con-
trol. Then Sleep called his children
to him, and said, Let us fly away, this
man is not worthy of our gifts!' and
they flew away. When they had gone
some distance, Sleep, half in anger, took







THE POPPY.


.the magic wand, which on this occasion
had so ill proved its power, and put it
in the ground. Round its summit the
sportive Dreams hung the light, airy,
many-coloured pictures they had in-
tended as presents for the man. Night
saw it, and breathed life into the wand,
so that it sent roots into the earth. It
grew, and pushed forth leaves; and
still, as before, concealed within it the
drops which summon Sleep. And the
gifts of the dreams formed themselves
into delicate, fluttering, coloured petals.
"Thus we Poppies had our origin! "


31


-fc_.._


I
___~~~_~~~ -_--..-_ _-__ ~s


tI

I







32 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

The tale was ended, and the flowers
gratefully bowed from all sides to the
narrator. Then morning began to
dawn. As it grew brighter, the scat-
tered petals of a rose fluttered through
the wood, and lingered by every flower
they came near, to whisper a sad fare-
well. And tears hung in the eyes of
all the flowers.















THE FIR-TfREE











D













THE FIR-TREE.

HY did the Fir-tree groan
When the Daisy told us
how cruel Winter is to
the flowers ?" inquired
the Lime-tree.
Because he was angry," replied the
Oak; and when he is angry he groans.
Have you never heard how when the
wind rushes through the wood, and





-- ---- --.- gg~
36 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

calls to us trees to bend before him,
the Fir-tree says, 'Stand upright!' and
when the other trees are afraid, and
pay their respects to the wind, the Fir-
tree stands stiffly up, bends as ungra-
ciously as he can, and groans because
he is angry?"
"But then, what can that have to
do with Winter and the Daisy?" said
the Lime-tree.
Ask him! ask him !" murmured the
Poplar; at least you will hear what
he says, for he often gives sharp an-
swers." Moreover, the Lime-tree him-







THE FIR-TREE.


self was curious; and who can blame
him? If one had to stand year after
year on the same spot, one would not
willingly miss a tale for fear of a sharp
answer. If it is too sharp, we do not
apply it to ourselves; nor do the trees
do so either. But the Lime-tree was
prudent, and considered how he might
make a suitable beginning.
"Fir-tree," said he, "how does it
happen that you always wear the same
dress, summer and winter, hot weather
and cold?"
Because I am not vain, and am not


37






38 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

always wanting something new like
you," replied the Fir-tree.
There you have it, take that to
yourself!" said the Poplar.
But the Fir-tree was wrong; that
was not the reason, for he could do
nothing contrary to his nature any
more than the others could. Even men
are no wiser, but always pride them-
selves upon what forms part of their
natural disposition, as if it were a
virtue. Those who have no taste for
ornament, laugh at those who are vain;
and there are even people who despise







THE FIR-TREE. 39

poetry, because they are insensible to
its beauties; and these are more in the
wrong than the Fir-tree. The Lime
had almost taken the answer in evil
part, and ceased to question the Fir
from vexation; but he was too curious,
and that was fortunate; first, because
it is of no use to be sulky; and then,
because if he had been, neither he nor
we should have heard the story about
Winter. So the Lime muttered some-
thing to himself, and then turned again
to his unfriendly neighbour and said:
You might tell us something about
m ___- .- u ...... _____






40 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

Winter, because you know him, and
even, it is said, love him. We other
trees know nothing about him, for we
are asleep when he comes; but you are
awake, and spend the long, long time
in talking with him."
The Fir-tree was silent for a while,
and all the trees listened, curious to
know what would come of it; only the
Willow said:
Lime-tree, you are brave, speak to
him again."
But at last the Fir-tree answered:--
Let me alone! and if you want to







THE FIR-TREE.


hear something about Winter, keep
awake. He who wants to know any-
thing must not sleep away his time."
The conversation would probably
have dropped here, had not the Oak
interposed. He was held in great re-
spect among the trees of the wood,
because he was the oldest and the
strongest ; who knows whether he
would have been treated with so much
deference if the latter qualification had
not been added to the former?
Fir-tree," said the Oak, You seem
like an ill-natured fellow, and yet you
_ _ ._ _. ... . .. . . .


41







42 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.


are not so bad, only you always turn
your rough side out. I know you better
than that, for I saw you when you were
scarcely a year old, and had made your
first green shoot. Why are you so
cross-grained to your companions? Has
not the same earth nourished us; and
are not our roots interlaced in her bo-
som, as our branches are in the air?
Are not we altogether able to brave
dangers which singly we could not
withstand? It is not well to quarrel,
especially about such trifling things.
Will you shut yourself up from your
-------N--~







THE FIR-TREE.


companions, and seem ill-natured, which
you really are not, because those trees
have soft rounded leaves, and yours are
sharp and pointed; or because your
bark is not so smooth as that of the
Beech? No, no: tell your friends the
tale; be happy with them now in the
good time, since you must hold together
when the evil times come!"
These were serious words, and the
Fir-tree took them to heart; many
others might do the same. The Fir-
tree thought a little, and then began
his story.
/


43






44 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

You want to hear something about
Winter? Well, then, lay aside your
prejudices against him, for I know you
do not like him. Do not think that I
am partial, because I am his friend; I
am only just because I know him. But
to the point. When the Lord God had
created the world; when the flowers
grew in the fields, and the trees in the
woods, He called the Seasons and said:
'Behold how beautiful my world is, I
give it into your charge; share the
flowers and the trees among you, only
take care of them and love them.'






THE FIR-TREE.


Then the Seasons were very happy
and sported with the children of na-
ture. That went on for a short time;
but then, here and there, one little dif-
ference after another began to rise up
among them. Bold, unsteady Spring
could not accommodate himself to slow,
contemplative Winter: hot Summer
thought Autumn phlegmatic: Autumn
accused Spring of delaying the flowers;
in sh6rt their quarrels grew more and
more vehement, and we poor flowers
and trees suffered most in the dispute.
Then Autumn said: This cannot


45


....,______9f






46 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

go on any longer; since we cannot agree
to have things in common, let us meet
together and divide them!' And so it
happened. The Seasons divided the
earth. Winter built his house at the
two poles; Summer took possession of
the centre of the earth; and Spring and
Autumn fixed their kingdoms between
the two. You will afterwards learn that
this division was not strictly adhered
to; but it is still much the same; and
Winter still lives in his old house."
"How is it you know that?" asked
the Lime-tree."






THE FIR-TREE.


"My cousin told me so, who once
paid him a visit there."
Take care," whispered the Poplar
to his neighbour; "he is inventing some
lies."
How could your cousin visit him?"
inquired the Lime; "must not he stand
still like us?"
It happened thus;" replied the Fir-
tree. "Once, some bold, adventurous
men came to seek wood in order to
build a ship. My cousin, a tall straight
Pine-tree, stood proudly up among the
other trees of the forest. Scarcely had






48 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

they set eyes upon him before they
felled him, and converted him into a
mast.
"Then he went on to the sea. The
sailors folded a great cloth round my
cousin, and told him to hold it fast;
and they fixed on his head a gay, broad,
floating flag. My cousin was quite
pleased with his journey, and performed
his duty well; and when the wind
came and tried to steal away the cloth,
he stood firm and held it fast, so the
sailors honoured him more than all the
other wood in the ship. Their route


--1 -----g--- g







THE FIR-TREE. 49

always lay towards the north; and,
behold! all at once, they came to the
dwelling of Winter. His house looked
very plain, but very strong; and when
the ship knocked, Winter himself came
out, astonished by so rare a visit. But,
it occurred to him that when he comes
he is often received in a very unfriendly
manner, so he did not feel inclined to
show hospitality, but shook his head
and let his white locks fall round them.
Then he spied out my cousin, and, as
he is particularly attached to us Fir-
trees, he at once became quite friendly,
a . .,-- ........ ...... .. . .. .. ... .... .- &






50 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

and entered into conversation. He
wished to know what had become of
every one of his brothers, and when
the mast had told him all about them,
he, in his turn, began to tell the most
wonderful stories. What I am relating
to you is one of them.
The stories were never done; and
the old gentleman was so happy in
having some one to listen to them all,
that he would not let the ship go, but
held it tightly in his arms. My cousin
can never find words to express how
beautiful everything was there; but the


I
---- B~B








THE FIR-TREE.


happier he felt the more wretched be-
came the ship's crew. One morning
he heard them holding a consultation
together: Our wood,' said the helms-
man, 'is almost consumed, our provisions
are nearly done, and if the ice does not
soon break, we shall perish miserably.
Let us hew down the mast and burn
it, that will at least preserve us for a
short time.'
When my cousin heard that, he
besought Winter to let go his hold of
the ship; and Winter heard him, and
did that to save his darling which he


~ --


51
1-~- ----- ~--






52 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

would not have done to please men.
He allowed the ice to break up, and the
ship with its crew reached home again
in safety."
That was right!" exclaimed the
trees, unanimously.
"But now," pursued the Fir-tree,
' let me come back to my story. So
the earth was divided, and the Seasons
had each his own kingdom. And now
all would have continued right if Spring,
in his unsteady way, had not again cried
out for a change. He did not like
always to remain in the same place;






THE FIR-TREE.


so he called the Seasons together and
made the following proposal:
"'Let us divide things differently,' said
he, 'and since the earth belongs to us
all in common, do not let us remain
perpetually in the same spot. Let each
of us have a fixed time in which he
shall possess the whole earth, and in
which he alone shall rule.' I am con-
tent,' said Summer, 'If only I may
retain the girdle of the earth':-'and I
my pole,' observed Winter. Giddy
Spring was satisfied with anything to
obtain his end, and Autumn hoped to


53







54 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

indemnify himself in other ways. So
the proposal was agreed to; and Spring
wanted to enter upon his reign imme-
diately. Then thoughtful Winter said:
'In order that one of us shall not usurp
all the beauty of the earth, let us also
share that among us.'
Very well!' exclaimed Spring. 'I
will have the buds.'
'And I the flowers;' said Summer.
'The fruits are mine,' said greedy
Autumn; 'and Winter shall have the
leaves of the trees.'
S "Winter made no objections; so the


. _---- --


r

i
-----rnr






THE FIR-TREE.


55


proposal was agreed to, and Spring
began his reign. His kisses drew forth
buds on trees and plants, and every
thing smiled upon him. Now, when
the buds opened, and a thousand dif-
ferent colours glittered on leaves and
flowers, Summer assumed the throne of
the earth. But then the order began
to fail; for Autumn, always intent on
his own interest, made a special treaty
with Summer. Summer was to leave
him some flowers, and he would give
him some fruits in exchange; it is said,
Autumn made the best of the bargain,


U -- --,.


U


K


1






56 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

for he kept the finest fruits for himself.
Now he alone obtained sovereign rule,
and collected all the fruits with busy
hand, for he had a right to do so.
But, in the meantime, something else
had happened by which poor Winter
was cheated. You remember that, ac-
cording to the agreement, the leaves of
the trees fell to Winter's share. But, in
the warm spring-time, when leaf upon
leaf hung above, and the flowers down
in the grass glittered and coquettishly
displayed their thousand colours, love
had grown up between the leaves and
y __ .... _.. .. ..... _..... ___ ________ ;





8 ------ -----~- ~-~~--- ... ---- ~~ -.~- -~ "- .-.--.-. ,-_..

THE FIR-TREE. 57

the flowers. As is often the case, this
love began with all kinds of little
sportive tricks. When the hot dazzling
sun wanted to shine upon the flowers,
the leaves of the trees interposed; then,
before the flowers were aware of it,
they turned away, so that the sunshine
suddenly struck the little ones below
and almost blinded them. The flowers
shut their eyes, and the leaves tittered
up above in the branches. Or when a
refreshing shower came, the leaves col-
lected the drops, and then when the
flowers thought it was all over, they






58 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

let them fall down all at once, so that
the flowers were frightened and shook
their little heads. What at first was
only done for fun was soon done for
love; for the sun became hotter and
hotter, and the poor little delicate
flowers would have quite withered away,
if the leaves had not made a shield to
receive the fiery arrows of its rays
So their love became an earnest
matter, to which fun was not a sufficient
gratification, and they sought some
means of union. But the leaves hung
there up above, and the flowers shone


-K


--- --- ^






THE FIR-TREE. 59

in the grass. But love can always find
means: and leaves and flowers soon
chose a messenger to bear their sighs
and protestations up and down-it was
the Ivy.
It shot forth below among the
flowers, and wound itself-a green gar-
land-up to the leaves of the trees, form-
ing a ladder of sweet vows, a silent bond
of love.
Who does not perceive this, its
tender mission, at the first glance? To
whom does it not breathe forth, as it
were, from its evergreen branches, the


I .-






60 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

silent sighs of young, enthusiastic
devotion? And the flowers and the
leaves were content with this corre-
spondence.
Then the empire of Autumn came
to an end, and he plucked off the last
flowers and threw them on the ground.
The leaves looked down in sorrow, and
laid before Autumn their earnest request
to be permitted for once to go down to
their dying friends. And Autumn
granted their request, although he
had no right to do so, and in doing
it encroached on the province of







THE FIR-TREE. 61

Winter, who alone had power over
the leaves.
Autumn shook the trees, and the
free leaves fluttered down to the earth.
And now began a right mad love-chase;
and Autumn, who found amusement in
it, sported with them in a wild way.
The leaves flew around the flowers in
circling dances, until these, weak and
weary, laid down their heads; and,
when Autumn moaned forth his last
song, the leaves, too, sank down in
everlasting slumber.
Then Winter came. Field and


- -





-- --------


62 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

forest received him naked and bare.
No green thing caine to meet him, but
we poor Fir-trees, with whose sharp-
pointed leaves no flowers had fallen in
love; and the Ivy spread itself from
tree to tree, as if to deck triumphal
arches for Winter, and from branch to
branch, as if to hide the treason of the
leaves, and to lend the trees an orna-
ment in place of their lost foliage.
Winter was touched when he saw it; -
and, while he angrily struck down from
the branches the last leaves which lin-
gered here and there, unwillingly and





S-----


--3
63


THE FIR-TREE.


alone, and drove them along over the
ice and snow, he spoke solemnly to the
leaves of the Ivy: You will I protect,
you will I preserve for the friendly
office you chose; continue to be the
messengers of love, bear silent greetings
from flower to leaf, from Autumn to
Spring; form an everlasting bridge
from Season to Season! Your mission
is to embrace and unite; you, the ever-
green memorials of fields and woods,
you shall even break the severity of
Winter!'
So spake Winter to the Ivy; but,

. ---- -___







64 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

to us Fir-trees, he extended his warmest
regards, and prepared for us honours
in which you other trees have no
share."
And what may they be?" asked
the other trees, somewhat aggrieved.
"Winter is the season of friendship;
it was that which he at once recognized
and honoured in the Ivy. Men know
that; for at no season do they unite
themselves so closely to one another as
in Winter. It is he who brings with
him the affectionate, holy, and myste-
rious festival of Christmas; for in his


-----NIQ


~-~~--~-Win


--- I


1-. .. 1. .







THE FIR-TREE. 65

company is always found the friendly
Spirit of Christmas-time. Men say
this spirit is only the love of parents
and friends; but that is not true, and
if he ceased to put forth his enchant-
ments, it would be all up with men.
In the early Winter-season, the
mother thinks day and night what she
shall give to her dear children; but she
only does so because the Spirit of
Christmas is always whispering in her
ear. Whoever goes out to purchase
Christmas-presents, always brings home
more than he intended, and lightens


F







66 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

his purse more than he thought for. It
is not because the beautiful things he
sees tempt him. O no! it is the Spirit
of Christmas which is at work every-
where, and whispers in his ear, and
touches his heart, and opens his hand,
till he has provided the most beautiful
Christmas-gifts.
We Fir-trees know all about these
things, because we are always present;
we are the Christmas-trees, and the
good Spirit of Christmas always places
us in the midst of the greatest Christ-
mas rejoicings. We are never absent


_-- ------- 3_ _







THE FIR-TREE.


from castle or hovel. However poor
the parents may be, they contrive to put
a candle or two in our green branches,
to delight their merry children.
Gold and silver hang upon us;
we bear shining fruits, and the children
clap their little hands around us; for,
however beautiful other things are, the
Christmas-tree is the most beautiful,
for the Spirit of Christmas has sur-
rounded it with his choicest enchant-
ments.
Perhaps children love the Christ-
mas-tree so much, because it resembles


67







68 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

a generous child's heart. All manner
of brilliant images hide themselves
among the green branches of hope,
and there the tree stands, rich and
golden, mysterious and inexplicable.
But, one by one, the brilliant images
fall off; the gold proves tinsel; the hopes
wither; the secret is revealed; and, with
the last ornament that is removed, the
whole wonder disappears, and there is
nothing left but a withered Fir-tree.
In the heart of the child, one golden
dream after another vanishes, the mys-
teries which surrounded him clear off,


L.*-..---_.-___.







THE FIR-TREE. 69

one by one; and in what does life differ
from the image the child formed in
his heart?"
"When all the ornaments have fallen,
is your glory quite departed?" asked
the Aspen.
"The tree is then put into the fire,"
replied the Fir-tree, and there it often
hears many pretty stories which men
tell one another while they watch
it burn. The Christmas-tree listens
attentively, and, when it hears any-
thing it does not like, it crackles so that
the sparks fly out among the people






70 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

collected round the hearth. And when
the golden apples are all eaten, the
children look out from their corner,
and are sorry to see the Christmas-tree
quite burning away.
That is the Fir-tree's tale about
Winter. Another time I will tell you
a tale that a Christmas-tree on the fire
once heard, for men know many pretty
stories.-Yes, another time."










THE WOODSTEALET

THE WOOD-STREAMLET.














THE WOOD-STREAMLET.

?HE Fir-tree had concluded
his tale with the melan-
choly prospect of an un-
certain continuation; his
last words had gently died away, and
a profound silence reigned over the
whole wood. One only sound broke
the universal stillness: the babbling of







74 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

the Wood-Streamlet, which, with in-
terrupted stroke, beat against stones
and tree-roots --- the ever-going Clock
of the Woods. And as it murmured
on, now glittering brightly in the
sunshine, now dark with the shadows
of trees and clouds which broke the
pictures mirrored on its surface, its
monotonous voice formed into com-
prehensible words, and unasked, but
listened to by flowers and trees, the
Streamlet began a tale.
Trees and flowers hearkened atten-
tively. Solemn silence rested on the






THE WOOD-STREAMLET.


wood, only the Streamlet murmured
on, the solitary sound audible far and
wide. That is the stillness of the
woods. Who does not know it; to
whom has it not sometime seemed like
the sabbath festival of the plants of the
wood? All is so still, so solemn every-
where. The Wind itself breathes more
gently and scarcely seems to move. It
affects even the hunter with a holy,
loving awe, and he forgets his bloody
errand, and sinks down upon the grass
to the general peace of the wood. That
is the time when the Streamlet tells the


U-


75







76 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

trees and the flowers tales; that is the
silence of the woods.
And the Streamlet spoke:
Do you know whence I come?
Do you know my descent? You know
that of the Meadow-Stream; for it
flows openly on, over stone or round
hillock, always growing larger and
larger, till the short clothing of grass
no longer suffices (though from dear
love to the Streamlet it stretches its
stems to the fullest height), and it puts
on a stiff bodice of reeds, with loose-
growing water-lilies, or dark rushes.







THE WOOD-STREAMLET.


You also know whence the Moun-
tain-Stream comes. On their tops lies
the snow, the everlasting cap of the
mountains, which the sun only colours
when it rises and sets, which the clouds
adorn with mysterious veils when they
pass by, and near which the ice of the
glacier sparkles hard and darkly blue
in its crevices. On the surface it
seems unchangeable; but down below
it leads a merry life, and through
chinks and round corners the water-
drops play a never-ending game of'
hide-and-seek; for the Sun-god always

n ~ _.~._ _.... .. . .. .............~. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~_~~ .


77






I
FI


78 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

kisses the top of the mountain, and
this enduring love touches and softens
even the hard heart of the ice, and these
little streams are the children of his
kisses, which play at hide-and-seek till
they become too many for the narrow
space, and then they soon find a
way out.
But when they come into the light
they are astonished, and at first they
fall down on the wide world which lies
before them. Other curious streams
soon join them; and so by degrees they
venture forth, very slowly at first, then







THE WOOD-STREAMLET.


quicker and quicker, till at last, a
merry Mountain-Stream, they leap
together impetuously from rock to
rock, like the Chamois which was
born near them.
Sometimes it foams up like the
snow of the mountain; sometimes it
shines brightly, an unbroken mirror,
like the ice of the glacier, until at last
it reaches the valley and then it grows
quiet amid the unbroken peace of the
plains.
But whence do I come, the Wood-
Streamlet? You cannot find the spring

.. ... ... . .. ..... ... ... .. ....... .. ....... -- 'il


79





---
80 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

which gave me birth; nor the ice and
snow whose child I am.
"Follow my course. There, think
you, I have my origin behind a pebble or
a mossy hillock; but no, I am further off,
and laugh at you from behind the knotty
root of a tree. Sometimes I hide myself
under a thousand leaves and flowers;
sometimes I lose myself in a heap of
stones, which, jealous of the greenness
of the wood, have also placed a green
mossy cap on their grey heads, but
then I run on further, and here I
trickle forth again. You cannot find
. ... .- . ... . .





I-


THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 81

my source; it is the riddle of the
woods. Listen then, and I will tell
you how I arose.
Up above, on a light cloud, which
moved softly over the fields, sat a gentle
little Fairy, the favourite attendant of
the Fairy Queen, arranging the orna-
ments of her mistress. Then she drew
from a casket a long, long string of pre-
cious pearls, the present of the ocean.
SKeep them most carefully,' had Titania
said, 'the tears of the ocean are my
favourite ornament.'
"And pearls are the tears of the

G







82 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

ocean; not those that it weeps, but
those that it hides in its depths, until
the diver, at the risk of his life, brings
them to light. They have become hard
and stiff; but,in their dull radiance, they
still resemble eyes dim with weeping.
The Fairy was delighted with the
pearls, and held up the string, to see
if they would not sparkle in the sun-
shine; but the pearl is not like the
precious stone, which borrows its bril-
liance from without: the tears of the
sea enclose their heart within them, and
shine from within outwards.


a? ____ __ __ V


------------ ~bTi


I







THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 83

"Behind the Fairy sat Puck, the
rogue who teases men and fairies; and,
while she admired the necklace, unseen
he cut the string, and down rolled the
pearls, first over the cloud and then
down on to the earth.
At first the Fairy sat stiff with dis-
may; then she jumped up and flew
down from the cloud after the falling
pearls. While she fluttered in the
vast space between the cloud and the
earth, she saw how the little round
balls fell on all sides and rolled away;
and she was about to return hopeless,







84 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

when she saw beneath her, on the green
ground, glimmering among the leaves
and flowers, a thousand pearls, which
she took to be the lost ones.
"The Fairy still held in her hand the
casket, in which the string of pearls
had been; and she began busily to col-
lect them.
The casket was almost full, when
Titania's favourite attendant perceived
that they were not pearls-the tears of
the ocean-which she was collecting, but
dew-the tears of the flowers, and griev-
ingly she went away to seek the lost.







THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 85

And lo! she saw pearls hanging
in the eyes of a mother bending over
her dying child, and she gathered them
-they were the tears of love; and as
she went further on she found other
weeping eyes, so many tears that they
overflowed her casket. Ah! how many
tears are wept upon the earth; for
from human eyes there often flows a
wondrous stream.
"I can tell you its source: its
source is the heart; and there sorrow,
and anguish, and repentance, and some-
times, also, joy, must knock before the





S .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. ... .

86 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

stream issues forth. And this stream
can perform wonderful miracles, for
that heart must be very hard which is
not moved by the tears of others. Men
often try to silence it, and say, 'I have
no pity for these tears; they are well
deserved.'
"But that is false; for they still
continue to be tears, and still come
from the heart, which, perhaps, was
struck all the more severely to call them
forth.
Our Fairy thought all these were
the lost pearls, held the casket firmly

N -.. ......- -... ..







THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 87

in her arms, and flew up with it to the
cloud. But alas! the casket felt heavier
and heavier, for tears do not weigh
lightly; and when she opened it, she
found all the tears had run together.
Disconsolately she flew from cloud
to cloud; for they all loved her and
pitied her affliction. And the clouds
sent their rain down upon the earth,
to seek for the lost pearls. It flowed
everywhere; the trees and plants bowed
to it, and it washed the dew from
them; but nowhere could it find the
pearls.
..__ _- --.-.. ...- .- N---- s





3S -- -- -- ----%~

88 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

Puck, the rogue, saw it, and saw
the grief of the poor little Fairy,
whom he had exposed to blame, and he
was sorry; for he only wanted to tease,
not to injure. So down he dipped into
the bosom of the earth, and begged
from his friends, the Kobolds, and the
Gnomes, various coloured shining ores
and glittering metals, and carried them
up to the Fairy. 'There,' said he,
'you have all your trash back again,
and brighter and better than before.'
The Fairy rejoiced, and the clouds
ceased raining. But when she came to







THE WOOD-STREAMLET.


inspect the gifts more closely, she found
they were nothing but vain show and
worthless counterfeit; so she angrily
seized the vase, in which they lay, and
hurled it from her, so that the glittering
bits flew in a wide arch over the whole
horizon. That was the first rainbow;
and since then, whenever the clouds
weep, Puck brings forth his glittering
stores, and the play is acted over
again.
The rainbow is beautiful, and we
all delight in it: so do men; but it is
deceitful, for it is only the gift of the


W..--


89







90 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

Gnomes, a piece of that rogue Puck's
handiwork. Men know that, too; for
whenever they hasten to find it, it runs
out of their reach, and all at once dis-
appears. What becomes of it? It
falls into the sea, say the children; and
the sea-fairies make out of it their
manv-coloured dresses.
What accident once formed, Puck
now makes for his own amusement.
He wanders with his treasures over
the heaven; and when he has some
left, he flies back again and makes a
smaller and less brilliant bow out of





U- -- -- -- --
THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 91

the remnants. That is why you so
often see on the horizon two of these
brilliant spectacles; and that is also the
reason why you never see it but when
the clouds have wept from compassion
for the grief of the Fairies, whom Puck
has teased and then tried to console.
Our Fairy still sat sorrowfully on the
cloud, and found no pleasure in the first
rainbow which she herself had made.
Then Titania came to her. The capri-
cious queen happened this time to be
in good 1lmour, and when her servant
related the cause of her grief, she smiled







92 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

and readily forgave her. Perhaps she
consoled herself all the more easily for
her loss, because a sea-fairy, whose heart
she had won, had already promised her
another pearl necklace; for great folks
are liberal even of the tears which are
entrusted to them. But now what shall
she do with the heavy contents of the
casket, which the Fairy still held in her
arms?
"' Hasten down,' said Titania, 'to the
most secret and confidential spot in my
wood, and pour forth these drops among
the most odorous plants; let these tears







THE WOOD-STREAMLET. 93

continue what they are, but they shall
flow together a tear-drop of the
wood.'
"The servant obeyed the command of
the queen; and thus the first wood-
streamlet flowed, thus the wood also
had its tears. Now do you know
whence I come? As it is with the
tears of men, so also is it with me;
my source is the heart, the hidden
heart of the wood. When sorrow,
anguish and pain knock at the heart
then tears flow.
"In summer, when so many children
--_ ,.. -- ... .__ .- .....-.- .- _. .. ._. ___ ._ ';--- -- --- -- --







94 WHAT WAS SAID IN THE WOODS.

of the wood are bent and broken, I
flow on quietly but ceaselessly.
"In autumn, when all depart, I weep
in silent sorrow the flowers and leaves
which the wind often strews in my
bed, so that the grief for them becomes
their grave.
In the deserted loneliness of winter
I freeze, and the tears become pearls,
like the hidden sorrow of the sea. So
I hang on roots and stones with the
dim radiance of weeping eyes.
"But in spring, when love arises in all
hearts, the tears of the wood flow both


. ^11




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