• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The ox and the cow
 The elephant
 The antelope
 The dog
 The zebra
 The giraffe
 The nyl-ghau
 The leopard
 The lion
 The bear
 The mouse
 The rabbit and the hare
 The tiger
 The rhinoceros
 The cat
 The squirrel
 The jackal
 The deer
 The hippopotamus
 The weasel
 Conclusion
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: A peep at the beasts : with twenty engravings
Title: A peep at the beasts
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002073/00001
 Material Information
Title: A peep at the beasts with twenty engravings
Alternate Title: Uncle Frank's peep at the beasts
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Phillips, Sampson & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Phillips, Sampson & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1852, c1851
Copyright Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal behavior -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Genre: Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Uncle Frank.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002073
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240021
notis - ALJ0560
oclc - 45839926
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    The ox and the cow
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The elephant
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The antelope
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The dog
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The zebra
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The giraffe
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The nyl-ghau
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The leopard
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The lion
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The bear
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The mouse
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The rabbit and the hare
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The tiger
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The rhinoceros
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The cat
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The squirrel
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The jackal
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The deer
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The hippopotamus
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The weasel
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Conclusion
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text























































TO,,







4-


























































TAKING CARE OF THE LAMBR.












PEEP AT


THE BEASTS.


WITH TWENTY ENGRAVINGS.




BY UNCLE FRANK.





BOSTON:
PHIILIPS, SAMPSON & CO.
1852.

























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, by
FRANCIS C. WOODWORTH,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the
Southern District of New York.




























PAGE
TRE OX AND THE COW........................................ 9

THE ELEPHANT .............. ..............................13

TIE ANTELOPE ........................................... ......17

THE DOG...... ...................................... ... ....... 21

THE ZEBRA .......................................................25

THE GIRAFFE..................... ................... ......29

THE NYL-GHAU..............................................

THE LEOPARD....................... ..............................

THE LION ...... ........... ....... ................. ... ......41

THE BEAR.......................................................49

THE MOUSE.......................... ........... ........ ...... ...53

THE RABBIT...................................................57

THE TIGER......................... .............................. 65

THE RHINOCEROS .................................................69

THE CAT................... ..............................73










vl CO]Nii4 rZ.


PAGE
THE SQUIRREL............... .......... .. .. ... 77

THE JACKAL.............. ..... ..........................81
THE DEER ......................... .....8... ..................85
THE HIPPOPOTAMUS ........................................89

THE WEASEL ............... ............... ............ .... 93

CONCLUSION......................... ....... ............5






.









































THE OX.






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


WHAT should we do if it was not for
the oxen and the cows? The ox is
worth a good deal to the farmer. How,
strong he is-how gentle-how patient.,
I used to wonder, when I was a little
boy, that he would hold down his head
so kindly, when 1Je farmer wanted to put
the yoke on his neck. "If I was the
ox," I thought, I would run away, and
tell them to catch me if they could. I
would not have the heavy yoke on my
neck." Well, the ox did not think as I


9







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


did. He knew he should have to work;
and he thought he might just as well go
to work cheerfully as to be cross about
it. And that was the best way, no doubt.
There is a fable about a frog who tried
to be as large as an ox. So he puffed
himself up, until he burst. Some proud
children make me think of the poor frog.
I am almost afraid they will burst, they
are so proud.
The cow is as useful as the ox, too,
and I don't know but more useful. It
would be hard for us to get along with-
out milk, wouldn't it ? And then the
butter and cheese which the farmer makes
from milk of the cow-how should we
do without them ?


10













































Att ELEPHANT.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE elephant is a very large animal.
Have you ever seen one, little friend ?
Children are apt to be afraid of an ele-
phant, when they see one for the first
time. But there is not much danger that
the tame elephant will hurt anybody.
When he is wild, it is dangerous to come
anywhere near him. But if he is caught
when he is young, and tamed, he is as
gentle as a horse or a cow. You will
see something in the picture, hanging
Jown, and turning up at the end, as if it


13








14 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.

was a part of his nose. This is called
his trunk. With his trunk, the elephant
does a great many funny things. He
picks up food, and puts it into his mouth,
with his trunk; and I have seen a large
elephant pick a piece of gingerbread out
of a boy's pocket in the same way.
When he had got the gingerbread, he
threw it into his mouth, and ate it, and
gave a knowing wink with his eyes, as if
he thought he had done something pretty
cunning. And so the people all thought,
I guess; for they laughed a good deal at
the elephant's trick.
















I


THE ANTELOPE.


4S


-'. .







PEEP AT THE BEASTS,


THE antelope can run faster than the
swiftest dogs. If people want to catch
an antelope, they cannot tire him out,
by sending dogs to chase him. The way
they do sometimes is to send a falcon, a
bird something like a hawk, after the
antelope, and the falcon worries him so
that the men can get near enough to
shoot him.
It does seem a pity to kill such a beau-
tiful creature, and one so timid and inno-
cent, too. I should hate to shoot one, I


17







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


know. I would a great deal rather see
him bounding along over the ground,
than to shoot at him, and see him fall
down, and bleed, and die.
In some parts of the world a sort of
leopard is made use of, in capturing the
antelope. The leopard cannot run any
faster than the antelope, to be sure. He
cannot run so fast, I think. But the way
he catches him, is by springing suddenly
at him. The antelope does not run in
the same way that a horse or a dog does.
He leaps forward, a great distance at
once, like a deer. The leopard can leap
a great ways, too; and so he sometimes
catches the poor antelope.


18












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-- LJk~
$
L' ( L;~~


N J'


EXPLOIT OF THE NEW ENGLAND DO%.


^-c-






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


SOME dogs that I have co,
really seem to know almost as much as
some men. There was Rover, I remem-
ber-my father's dog-who used to be
with me a great deal when I was a boy.
My father sometimes gave him a basket,
and said, Rover, here, Rover! take
this basket, and go over to the store,
Sand get some crackers and some sugar."
I don't know how much the dog under-
stood of what was told him. But I know
i-f that when the basket was handed to him,


21






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


he would start off to the store, just as fast
as he could run. Some bright little boy
is ready to ask, "But Uncle Frank, did
the dog get what he was sent after, and
come home with it I'll tell you how
that was. My father would follow on
after Rover, and when he got to the store,
he would tell the man that kept the store
what he wanted. Then he would have
it put into the basket, and the dog would
take hold of the handle of the basket with
his teeth and run home with the load.
He often got to the house a good while
before my father did. Once, I know,
my father staid to talk with somebody,
and Rover got to the house an hour be-
fore his master got home.


22












































THE ZEBRA






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


WHAT a gay looking fellow the zebra
is. You see how much he looks like the
horse. He is something like the horse
in many things, but he is not so useful.
The zebra lives in Africa. There a great
many of them are found wild. It is diffi-
cult to catch them; and when they are
caught, they are not easily tamed. Only
a few of them have ever been brought to
this country; and they have been kept
for a show-not because they could carry
people on their backs or draw carts, and


25






26 PEEP AT TIE BEASTS.

wagons, and carriages, like the horse.
They do not seem to love to be tamed at
all. I heard of one once, who became
so tame that he would let the man who
kept him get on to his back, and ride a
little way. But when he got as far as
he thought best to go, he would stop, and
look around at the man, as much as to
say, "There, I guess that will do. I
guess you have rode far enough for this
time." After that, no matter how hard
the man tried to make him go, he would
not stir an inch farther.

















A -


THE GIRAFFE


~
L~ I'
~E;
~\







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE giraffe is a great, tall creature.
His neck and legs are so long, that he
can stand on the ground, and eat leaves
off from quite a high tree. There is one
in the American Museum, in the city of
New York. It is not alive. It is dead,
and the skin is stuffid so that it looks
very much as if it were alive. It is worth
going to the Museum to see.
The giraffe is a very harmless animal.
His rule seems to be to keep good-na-
tured, and not harm any one, unless he


29







30 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.

is in danger of being hurt himself, and
then he does the best he can to get out
of danger. He kicks with his hind feet,
so hard that his enemies are very glad to
let him alone.
A giraffe became very tame, so that
his keeper could lead him about the
streets. This man would frequently take
his giraffe about town with him, when he
went out to walk. The saucy fellow
would sometimes stop and reach his head
up to the chamber windows, after some-
thing to eat.














ii


THE NYL-GHAU.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


HERE is a hard name for you. I wish
I had one shorter and easier. But I
have not; and so you must take what I
have. This animal is something like an
antelope. He has a strange way of
fighting. When he is angry with an-
other animal, he gets down on his fore
knees, and makes a spring upon the one
who has vexed him. A nyl-ghau has
been known to run against a strong fence
in this way, with such force as to break
it down. I should not think there would


33







34 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.

be much fun in that, should you? It
might be funny enough to any person
who was looking on; but I should think
the animal himself would soon get sick
of fighting fences. Some children act
just as foolishly as he does, though, when
they get very angry. They hurt them-
selves a great deal more than they do
anybody else.



















N/


THE LEOPARD AND TIIE SERPENT.






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


I THINK I should not want to fall into
the hands of the leopard. I have seen
men play with the tame leopard, when
he was kept in a cage. But I would
much rather have something else for a
pet. It is strange, though, what a great
difference there is between a wild leo-
pard and a tame one. The wild leopard
is one of the fiercest beasts in the world.
But when he is tame, he will play with
his keeper like a cat.
In some parts of the world, there are


37






38 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


very large serpents, or snakes. They
are so large that they can swallow a
ieopard at once. These serpents climb
a tree, fasten their tail around one of the
limbs of the tree, and then wait for some
animal to come along. When any one
comes near enough, they spring upon
him, still keeping hold of the limb with
their tail, and wind themselves so tightly
around the animal's body, as to crush
him, after which they swallow him.
The leopard is sometimes killed in this
way. The serpent springs upon him,
before he has time to get away, and in a
very few minutes he is crushed to death.















































THE LION.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE lion is called the king of the
beasts; and if half the stories that are
told about him are true, he deserves the
name. I cannot think of any other beast
that would make so good a king. He
has a great deal of strength and courage,
and he knows more than most of the four-
footed race. The strength of the lion is
wonderful. He has been known to drag
a heavy ox a long distance. A traveler
tells us, that he saw a lion kill a horse,
and drag him a mile from the spot where


41







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


he killed him. Another man says he
saw a lion take up a horse on his back,
and carry him off. I guess it was not a
very large horse, or else I guess it was
a pretty large lion-one or the other.
Another story is told of the great strength
of this beast. A party of men were out
hunting. They got on the track of a
lion, who had killed a heifer, and was
carrying it off. The men followed him
thirty miles, before they could come up
with him. All that time the lion held
the heifer in his jaws, and was running
faster than the party could go on horse-
back. The man who tells the story says,
too, that the lion, for most of the time
held the heifer so that it did not touch


42

















I/


THE LIONESS AND HER CUBS.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


the ground. This was wonderful, was it
not, little friend ?
The lion never chases after his prey.
When he is hungry, and wants a good
dinner for himself and his family, he goes
to some place where he can easily see all
the animals that go that way, and where
he cannot very well be seen himself.
Very often he chooses a spot where there
is a spring of water, and where he knows
the animals will come to drink. He
takes good care to get behind some
bushes, if there are any close bj the
spring, so that no one will be likely to
see him at first. By and by, he sees
some beast or other-perhaps a deer-
come trotting along towards the spring.


45







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


The lion keeps still. The deer comes to
the spring, and begins to drink. That is
the time for the lion to make sure of his
dinner. Before the poor deer lifts up his
head, and while he is drinking, the lion
leaps from the spot where he has been ly-
ing, and seizes the deer, before he has time
to think. It is all over with the deer
then. He need not try to get away from
the king of the beasts. He has to die.
The lion often has a family waiting not
far off; and when he has killed the ani-
mal, he drags it away, and calls the
lioness and the young lions to dinner.
They do not think, I suppose, when they
are eating their dinner, how sad the
deer's family must be.


46











































THE BROWN BEAR.,







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THERE are several different kinds of
bears. But they are all alike in one
thing. They are all fond of picking the
bones of other animals. There are some
bears in this country now. But they do
not live very near any village, or where
there are many people. I saw a bear in
the state of Pennsylvania, a year or two
ago, which was caught in the woods near
where I saw him. He was not very
tame, and did not seem to like it at all
that he had been taken away from his
3


49







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


home in the wild woods. He was
chained up near the house; and when
I came up to him, he tried to bite me.
But it is the nature of bears to bite; and
we ought not to blame them. That
makes me think of some verses in the
Primer, that I used to read when a child.
Here they are:

"Let dogs delight to bark and bite,
For God hath made them so;
Let bears and lions growl and fight,
For 'tis their nature too.
But children, you should never let
Such 'angry passions rise;
Your little hands were never made
To tear each other's eyes."


50










I N\J l\1\


/i


FIELD MICE.






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE mouse is about as cunning a fel-
low, for one no larger than he is, that I
know of. A family of field mice will eat
a great deal of corn, if they get a chance.
The mouse will get through a very small
hole, into the cupboard, and eat cheese
until he has got enough, and then he will
creep slyly back to his home under the
floor, or in the cellar, and tell his broth-
ers and sisters what a good meal he has
had, and that they had better go and
help themselves to the cheese. Just as


53






PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


likely as not they will make a dozen din-
ners out of the same cheese. But they
must look out. Mrs. Somebody, who
keeps the house where Mousey lives, one
of these days, when she goes to the cup-
board, will say, "There, you little rogue !
you have eaten enough of my cheese.
I'll put a stop to it; and I'll put a stop
to your breath, you little thief, at the
same time." Mousey is pretty cunning,
as I said; but he is not quite cunning
enough always, to keep out of the way
of danger. Mrs. Somebody takes away
the cheese, and she puts a nice little trap
in its place. Mousey crowds himself
into the hole, and eats the cheese. He
can't get out, though. He is caught.


54













N >\ 9
pYil i


THE HA"U







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE rabbit and the hare are very
much alike. You could hardly tell them
apart, I guess. I always loved the rab-
bit. I loved to see him in the woods,
hopping along, looking after berries or
green leaves. It is true I did, when I
lived on a farm, once in a while set a
trap for rabbits, in the winter; and I
caught some, too, to tell the whole truth.
But I am rather sorry for it now, and I
am sure I shall never do so any more. I
said I always loved the rabbit. You


57







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


may wonder how that could be, when I
set the traps to catch him. I don't
hardly know how it was myself, but I
know it was so. I wanted to catch the
rabbit in my snare, so as to show the
boys how wise I was, and how nicely I
could get a noose around the poor rab-
bit's neck; but when the rabbit was
caught-when I saw him hanging by
the string, dead, I always felt half sorry
I had caught him, I pitied him so. Once,
I remember, when I went to my snares
during the winter season, and the ground
was covered with snow, I found a rabbit
hanging by his foot. The noose had not
caught him by the neck this time, and he
was alive. He could not have been


58
















































ait; "&ARES,







PEEP AT TrIE BEASTS.


caught long; or he would have gnawed
off the cord. Poor fellow! how he did
try to get away, when he saw me coming.
And he cried like a child. I could not
bear to hear him make that mournful
noise. I let him go, and told him to
keep clear of my snare after that. As
he bounded along over the ground, and
stopped once in a while to look back at
me, I thought he thanked me for letting
him go. I never set any snares after
that. I was afraid I should calch an-
other rabbit by his foot, if I did, and that
I should hear him cry, and plead with
me to let him go.
The rabbit is easily tamed, if he is
caught when he is young. I was at Ja-


61







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


maica Plains, a beautiful place near Bos-
ton, a little while ago, and I saw two
very tame ones there, which belonged to
my young friend Augustus, and which
were given to him. These rabbits were
very'tame. My cousin, the little boy's
mother, would sometimes let them come
into the parlor, and stay a little while.
They liked that. They would sit in my
lap, just like kittens, and they would let
me take them up by the ears. Then we
got them some lettuce, and a piece of an
apple; and it was funny to see them eat.
There was a great dog belonging to the
family; and he looked at the rabbits, as
if he would like to taste of them. But
he did not dare to touch one of them.


62






































THE TIGER.


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5 .~ii~~
c)


P,~-~;4Ef;"~'~?~?~?~?~?~~







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE tiger, like the lion and the leo-
pard, and the cat, when he is looking out
for something to eat, lies still in a sly
place, and springs upon the animal he
wants to catch. They do not try to
catch men, when they can get other ani-
mals; but they will kill men if they are
hungry, and do not see any other way to
get a dinner. How thankful we ought
to be that there are so few wild beasts to
be afraid of, in this country. In some
parts of the world, it would not be safe


65







66 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


for you to go into the woods, unless you
had some man with you; and even if you
had a man with you, it might not be safe,
unless he had a loaded gun in his hand.
There are so many lions, and tigers, and
animals of that sort, that you might be
killed, if you were alone. But there are
but very few places in our country, where
children are in danger of being killed by
wild beasts. There are some parts of
Texas, and some parts of California,
where I should not love to have children
go out alone in the woods to play. A
boy who lives in Texas tells me that he
has seen wild beasts in the woods there,
and that he did not dare to go to the
woods alone.











AA<~


THE RHINOCEROS.


ALA1


: It,


y,-







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


I CANNOT tell all about the animals
that I show you pictures of in this book.
The most I can do, is to give you a
"peep" at them. That is all I try to do.
When you get to be a little older, you
may, if your parents are willing, have
another book, called WOODWORTH'S
STORIES ABOUT ANIMALS," which is a
great deal larger than this book, and
tells much more about the beasts. In
Mr. Woodworth's book, there are some
stories about the rhinoceros, which are


69







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


worth reading, I think, though I cannot
print them here, they are so long.
The rhinoceros eats green leaves, and
fruit, and such things. In the country
where he lives, some of the trees are not
quite as hard as most of the trees in our
woods; and after the rhinoceros has
eaten up all the leaves which he can
reach on a tree, he puts his tusks into the
trunk of the tree, and rips it all to pieces.
Then he gets all the leaves there are on
the tree. And he is not always satisfied
with the leaves. He will sometimes
chew up the branches and even the trunk
of the tree.
There are two kinds of the rhinoceros.
One has two horns-the other has but one.


70





























































THE CAT.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


WELL, Puss, you look as though some-
thing was the matter. What has hap-
pened ? Has that great saucy dog, Lion,
been showing his teeth to you ? Lion
will not hurt you, I am sure. He loves
to frighten cats. But he would not harm
a hair on your neck for a dozen fat
chickens. So don't act as if you were
half scared out of your wits.
Do you think Lion would hurt Pussy,
little girl ? Let us go up to Pussy, and
stroke his fur a little, and see if we


73







74 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


couldn't make him feel better. He is
not in very good humor now, that is plain
enough.
He makes me think of a cat that used
to live in the family of Deacon Hopewell.
Her name was Polly. Once when Polly
was going up stairs, she saw a dog stand-
ing not far from the head of the stairs;
and she was so much frightened that she
jumped right out of the window, and fell
on the door steps. It is a wonder her
fall did not kill her. But she lived a
good many years after that. Her fall
hurt her, though. She did not get over
it for some time. I remember how she
used to limp about the house. She paid
pretty dear for being so careless.



































THE SQUIRREL.


^-^fc-







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


Is one of the most charming little crea-
tures that we have in our woods. There
are several kinds of squirrels. Those
which are most common among us are
the gray squirrel, the red squirrel, and
the striped squirrel. The striped squirrel
is much more tame than either of the
others. Many a time, when I have been
walking in the woods, I have seen him
sitting on a stump, or fence, or old log,
singing his favorite song of chip, chip,
chip;" and he has let me come up close


77







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


to him, before he jumped down and
scampered away to his hole. Some folks
call him the chipping squirrel, because he
sings such a song.
The red squirrel is not so tame. He
and the gray squirrel take more pains
to keep out of the way of their human
neighbors. The red squirrel, if you
catch him when he is quite young, will
grow very tame indeed-as tame as a
cat. He will run all about the house,
and play just like a kitten. But oh!
how full of mischief he is. If he can
only find a way to gnaw a hole into a
box of nuts, he will do it, and carry off
the nuts, and hide them, where nobody
can find them.


78












































THE JACKAL.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


JACKALS live in Asia and Africa.
Their home is in the thickest woods.
They feed on other animals; but they do
not show so much cunning in catching
their prey as the lion, and the tiger, and
the leopard do. Jackals always hunt in
the night. They do not steal carefully
after the animal they want; but they set
up a noise so loud that they can be heard
for miles. A great many jackals go to-
gether, when they are hunting; and they
make such a howling, that the animals


81







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


know they are coming, and a good many
of them get out of the way. Some of
them cannot run fast enough, though, and
they get caught. The lion keeps his
ears wide open, when he hears the yell
of the jackal. He likes that noise. I'll
tell you why. He knows that the very
animals he is looking out for will be so
scared by the jackals, that they will run
as fast as they can to get rid of the hun-
gry fellows; and he thinks some stray
goat or deer will be likely to pass near
him. So he keeps still, and looks out.
By and by, sure enough, a deer comes
along, all out of breath; and the lion
makes a spring at him, and catches him.


82














A','


A


THE DEER







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


I SAID, a moment ago, that a stray
deer who got scared by the jackals,
would, just as likely as not, run so near
where the lion was lying, that the poor
fellow would get killed. Yes, and the
lion is not the only enemy the deer has,
either. Some of his enemies have four
legs, and some have but two legs. The
hunter loves to come across a fine, large
deer, and shoot him. But I should not
love to shoot a deer, I think. I once
saw a deer in the woods. He raised up


85







PEEP AT THE DEASTS.


his head, and looked at me steadily for a
minute or two, thinking, I suppose, what
it was best to do-whether he had better
keep still or run. He was a fine looking
fellow. I would not have shot him, if I
could. He did not stay long where I
first saw him. He was afraid of me, and
started off as fast as he could run.
While I saw him running so fast, I
could not help thinking how kind God is
to all the creatures he has made. The
deer cannot hurt his enemies. He has
no sharp teeth and claws. But God 'has
made him so that he can run very swiftly,
and he often gets out of danger in this
way.


86











































THE HIPPOPOTAMUS







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THIS is a hard name, is it not ? Well,
I did not name the animal myself. If I
had done so, I should have used a shorter
word; for Uncle Frank does not like
hard words much better than you do.
But never mind. We will do the best
we can with the long name. The hip-
popotamus is very clumsy on land. He
looks as if he would be clumsy, don't you
think he does ? He is quite a different
animal, though, when he gets into the
water. He is a good swimmer; and he


89








90 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.

does a good deal of mischief to the ani-
mals that come in his way, when he is in
the river. In Woodworth's Stories
about .Jnimals," you can learn what the
hippopotamus does, when he gets angry.
One has been known to break a boat all
to pieces with his great paws. Another
has got under a boat, and lifted it up with
his head, so as to drown the men who
were in it.














































THE FERRET WEASEL.







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


THE weasel is called a very cunning
animal. He likes young chickens and
ducks. I do not mean that he likes
them as you do. He does not like to
feed them so well as he likes to eat them.
The ferret weasel catches mice and other
animals of that kind. No mice can live
long where there is a ferret weasel. I
once heard a funny story about a weasel
and a hawk. The hawk took it into his
head to catch the weasel, and carry him
off to his nest, for his young ones to eat.


93







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


So he flew down, and caught the weasel,
and began to fly away with him. Well,
the weasel did not love to ride in that
way. He thought he would rather walk
than ride. So he did something which
he knew would make the hawk want to
let go of him. He bit the bird on his
neck. The hawk did not like that at all.
But the weasel kept on biting. He did
not care what the hawk liked. "I'll let
the fellow go," thought the hawk. But
the weasel would not go. He kept hold
of the hawk, until, after a while, he was
so weak, that he could not fly. By and
by, the hawk dropped down dead, and
the weasel ate him.


94







PEEP AT THE BEASTS.


WE have got to the end of our book,
little boys and girls. I hope you have
been pleased with this peep at the beasts.
You have learned something about them,
I am sure. Do you want to know more ?
I can't tell you any more now. But if
you come across Woodworth's Stories
about animalss, you will find a good
deal more about them, and about other
beasts, too.
Before I say "good bye" to you, I
must tell you that, if you will be good


95







96 PEEP AT THE BEASTS.

children, I will make you a Peep at the
Birds, one of these days.
Good bye, little friends. Uncle Frank
hopes you will try to be good children.
God loves good children; and those who
mind their parents, and love Christ, and
try to do right, will be happy in this
world, and go to heaven when they die.



THE END.




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