• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Main
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 Back Matter
 Spine






Title: Guide to the Saviour, or, The lambs of the flock led to their great shepherd
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002070/00001
 Material Information
Title: Guide to the Saviour, or, The lambs of the flock led to their great shepherd
Alternate Title: Lambs of the flock led to their great shepherd
Physical Description: 128, <4> p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wise, Daniel, 1813-1898
Kidder, Daniel P ( Daniel Parish ), 1815-1891 ( Editor )
Longking, Joseph ( Printer )
Lane & Scott ( Publisher )
Methodist Episcopal Church -- Sunday School Union ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lane & Scott, for the Sunday-Schoool Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Place of Publication: New-York
Manufacturer: Joseph Longking
Publication Date: 1852, c1847
Copyright Date: 1847
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Rev. Daniel Wise ; edited by D.P. Kidder.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002070
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239888
oclc - 45892402
notis - ALJ0426
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Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Copyright
        Page v
    Preface
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main
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    Back Matter
        Page 125
        Page 126
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        Page 129
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    Spine
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Full Text






































AVOID THE EVIL, SEEK THE GOOD.


'04i tA A








GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR:

OR,


Ut)e Lambs of tl)je lock

LED TO


THEIR GREAT SHEPHERD.




BY REV. DANIEL WISE,
AUTHOR OF THE INFANT TEACHER'S MANUAL, ETC.




EDITED BY D. P. KIDDER.







Ne-Lfork :
PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,
FOR TUE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.
JOSEPH LONGING, PRINTER.
1852.

































Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1847, by
LANE & TIPPETT, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of
the Southern District of New-York.








PREFACE.


THIS unpretending book is de-
signed for children between the ages
of eight and fourteen. It aims to
point out "the way to the kingdom"
in the most simple language. Great
truths are here taught in words of
simplicity. Drops from the well of
salvation are offered to the lambs of
the flock in a simple vessel. That
the Shepherd and Bishop of souls
would sanctify my feeble labor to
the salvation of his "little ones" has
been my prayer as I have penned
each growing line. With the hope
that my prayer will be answered, I
send it forth to aid the parent and
the teacher in guiding their beloved
flocks to Him whose life was freely
laid down for his sheep.
D.W.












CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

ABOUT HEAVEN AND JESUS.
A world beyond the sky-Jesus-What Jesus wishes
-A kind-hearted lady-Jesus feeding the hungry-
Jesus blessing little children-Jesus giving a charge
to Peter--Jesus unchangeable-The sail-boat upset
-Christ a deliverer-Desiring to see Jesus-Little
William's wish-A pretty prayer Page 13


CHAPTER II.

A BAD HEART.
The streams in the mountain-The hidden spring-
The bad heart may be known-Eliza and her sick mo-
ther-A bad heart is deceitful-The girl and her new
clothes-Alfred and his book-A bad heart dislikes
prayer-Elizabeth and her praying place-A bad heart
has wicked thoughts-An illustration-Christ's descrip-
tion of a wicked heart-Address to the reader-The
good Physician 24






CONTENTS.


CHAPTER III.
A BAD HEART CANNOT DWELL WITH JESUS.
The whorteberyborry y-.Aad heart defended-Chil-
dren's hearts are vety Wicied-What Christ says about
the wicked-The curse-A shocking thought-Painful
to hear Jesus condemn-A prayer-Wicked hearts
think hard of GodC-ain-The dirty boy in a company
of clean children-A wicked heartin heaven-Wicked
hearts cannot go to heaven-Poetry Page 42

CHAPTER IV.
S T. DAD -HEART CHAN EDi
]lish it h the bitter Waters of Jerichlo-God changes
iME I1MW Wy the 8svittir is Waimted -erms- rs
taMsos--The pious gfetletba Ad 1 ir hildren--Gd
cannot lie-A new heart better than riches-A new
heart is happy--A anothi's kiss--The peace of Jesus-
The little chimney-sweep-A new heart loves Jesus-
It is a pure heart-A littlegifl another mother-Robert
and his sick mother-A question-A new heart is 4be-
dient-ZChilren should seek ^a new beart-A spitri4l


CHAPTER V. .
WAY TO OBWAIN E3! ART.
The jailer's question-Young sinne~ must feel like
e jailer-A boy lost in a forest-Why some who want






CONTENTS.


a new heart fail to find it-George Whitefield-God
changes the heart-Repentance commanded-What is
repentance ?-Peter and Lucy's peach-Children urged
to repent Page 71


CHAPTER VI.

MORE ABOUT THE WAY TO OBTAIN A NEW
HEART.
A child must have faith-A mistake corrected-
Why a child is not afraid of being starved-Faith ex-
plained-John Bunyan's Pilgrim at the cross-A child
led to Calvary-The guilty son-His brother's offer-
The father's promise-A sinner is saved for Christ's
sake-George Whitefield's faith-A prayer for a peni-
tent child-Effect of faith 85


CHAPTER VII.

HOW TO KEEP A NEW HEART.
The jewel and the iron safe-A new heart may be
lost-God's word says it may be lost-A new heart may
be kept-A promise-A new heart is kept by look-
ing unto Jesus-The fisherman's boy-Watching-The
apple orchard-Avoiding the wicked-The widow's
son ruined by a bad companion-A good resolution-
Advice to do other things 99






lU CONTENTS.


CHAPTER VIII.

WHEN LITTLE CHILDREN SHOULD SEEK NEW
HEARTS.

God's question-r-God's requiremeut-"-Children die-
Death of young sinners-Mary's happy death-A new
heart, necessary to die a happy death-William Young
-Now the accepted time-Danger of delay-An old
man's death described-Concluding appeal to the
reader .Page 111


ILLUSTRATIONS.
Page
fPRONTt1SIE-AVott Txa EVIL, SEE rXTHZ GOsD.
CHRIST BLESSING THe LOAVES AND FIBRES 1
THE VAIN GIRL 5
WHOBRLESERRY BOY 43
ELISHA HEALING THE WATERS .54
THE JAILER AND THE APOSTLES .. 70
PILGRIM AT THE CROSS .. 84
FISHERMAN'S BOY . 98
DEATH OF AN OLD MAN ...... 110









































CHRIST BLESSING THE LOAVES AND FISHES.








GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.



CHAPTER I.
ABOUT HEAVEN AND JESUS.
A world beyond the sky-Jesus-What Jesus wishes
-A kind-hearted lady-Jesus feeding the hungry-
Jesus blessing little children-Jesus giving a charge
to Peter-Jesus unchangeable-The sail-boat upset
-Christ a deliverer-Desiring to see Jesus--Little
William's wish-A pretty prayer.
COULD little children see beyond
the sky, they would discover a most
beautiful world. It is described in
the Holy Bible by the sweet name
of Heaven. Angels dwell there; and
the spirits of all the holy people and
all the good children who have lived
in this world are there too. They
are so many in number that you
could not count them, if you were
permitted to see them.





14 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


SAll these angels and redeemed
sout-s .ie~ krery happy. They -are
never sick; they never cry. They
never feel tired, or sorry; they never
suffer the least unpleasant feeling.
But they ,sing sweet songs; they
make joyful music on their golden
harps, and fed a constant delight in
serving the God of glory.
There is one Being in that glorious
world who is loved better than all
the rest. He is seated on a dazzling
throae with a royal crown upon his
head. %All the angels of God and the
hosts of the redeemed worship him.
The souls of little children love him
too, and cast their.crowns at his feet.
Would you like to knoaw his name?
It is the Loxd Jesus Christ. He is
their King and Saviour, and to him
they sing everlasting praises.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


This blessed Jesus wishes all little
children to live with him in that
happy land. He knows if they are
not brought into that bright world
when they die, they must be sent
down to a dark, gloomy, miserable
place, where they will dwell in
everlasting torments. He is so good,
and loves children so well, he is not
willing that one of them should be
sent to that awful world of pain.
He would rather see them all in
heaven.
Perhaps you would like to know
what sort of a being the blessed
Jesus is ;-whether a little child
would feel afraid of him, or whether
he is so lovely that his presence
would make you feel happy and
pleasant.
I will tell you something about


15







hinm, and then :yod can jadge for
yourselves in this matter. You know
that J-sus once lived on the e'aih,
fir mote than thirty years. He fas
knowlv by vast aiumbers of people,
-whosamtd hi'm preach, and saw how
he lived, and what he did.j No if
you are -told some of the actions of
his life, you can-easily tell whether a
child would feel happy o afraid in
his presence.
If you were a poor little orphan
girl, and were obliged to beg froit
door to door, should you hot think
that lady had a kind. heart, who
should take you into her honse;' ad
wash. your feet, and give you plenty
of food and clothing ? You answer,
( 0 yes, that would be kind indeed "
Well, Jesus had just such a heart.
For, once, thousands of people fol-


16 GUIDDIP. .'TO -TIRE 'SA;IP'IOUR.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


lowed him far away from their
homes into a desert place. They
were so pleased with his preaching,
they forgot everything else. Toward
evening they began to feel faint and
hungry, and they could not buy any
food, because there were no stores
in the desert. The dear Saviour felt
sad to see them so faint and weary.
So he made them sit down on the
grass, and wrought a great miracle
on five barley loaves and two small
fishes, by which he made food suffi-
cient to feed them all. Had he not
possessed a kind heart, he would not
have fed these hungry people.
He also showed that he had a very
tender love for little children. He
was teaching the people one day,
and some pious mothers brought
their little boys and girls into his
2


17





18 GUIDE TO T-E SAVIOUR.


pesenee, that he might lay his hands
.on their heads and bless them.
His-disciples th.eght these mother
asked too much. They imagined
that so great a teacher as Jesus could
not condescend, so much as to lay
his hands on children. So they told
these:mothers to go away.
But these disciples did not -know
all 1e love and humility of their
adorable Saviour. To their, surprise,
he was displeased. at them for refus-
ing to permit those niwters to bring
their children. And then he even
stooped 4down and took those happy
children into his aris a~d blessed
them; Saying, as he did it, "Suffer
little qbildren, axd. forbid .them not,
to, conc ugto xne; for of such is the
kingdom of heaven."
Au4. wkla h1?ad risen out of the





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


grave, after the wicked Jews had put
him to death, he said to his disciple,
Peter: Simon, son of Jonas, lovest
thou me ?" And when Peter replied,
" Yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love
thee," this kind Saviour said to him,
"Feed my lambs !"
By his lambs, he meant those chil-
dren and youth who should become
his disciples. He wished Peter to
care for them, and do all he could to
lead them to glory. Had he not
been very kind of heart, do you think
he would have given this order to
Peter?
You see, then, that the blessed
Jesus was very lovely in his man-
ners and kind in his feelings when
he lived in our world. He is not
changed, now that he is in heaven.
For "Jesus Christ is the same yester-






20 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.
day, to-day, and for ever." He is kind
now, therefore. He loves children
now as much as ever. When little
children go to heaven, they find him
just as lovely as those little ones
found him who were taken into his
arms.
Suppose, my little reader, that your
father is sailing in a pleasure-boat
A sudden puff of wind overturns the
boat. She sinks, and your father is
seen struggling for his life upon the
wave. Just as he is about to sink,
a man from another boat plunges
into the water, and, at the risk of his
own life, saves your father.
When your father comes home,
he tells you how nearly he was
drowned. You look at his pale face
and his dripping clothes, and feel
that your father has indeed had a





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


very narrow escape. Your heart
feels glad that he did not drown.
But what question would you ask?
Ah! you would inquire, "Father!
where is the man that saved your
life ?" You would want to see that
man very much indeed. You would
feel bad if you could not see him.
Do you never wish to see a Friend
who not only risked his life, but who
actually died a cruel death to save
your father, your mother, and your-
self, from sinking into the dark sea
of death ? You have such a Friend.
That kind-hearted Saviour, the
blessed Jesus, who is so beloved in
heaven, and who was so kind to
children on the earth, is that Friend.
He shed his blood to save your soul
from the anger of God. Do you
never desire to see him?





22 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Let me tell you what a sweet little
boy, named William, once said about
seeing Jesus. This pious boy was
sitting by the fireplace one night,
when a large kettle, filled with boil-
ing water, slipped from a hook, and
he was dreadfully scalded. While
the doctor was dressing his wounds,
he tried to encourage him, and talked
about his recovery. But little William
looked up and said, 0, sir, I am not
afraid to die. I want to go to heaven,
and see God there, and the blessed
Jesus at his right hand."
Now William wanted to see Jesus
because he loved him. I hope you
will love him too, and that you will
desire to see him in that happy
country, where he is King and
Saviour. If you do, you will read
the rest of this book. You see it is






GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR. 23

called a Guide to the Saviour. It
will tell you what you must do in
order to join those crowds of glorious
children, who, in white robes, stand
round the throne of Jesus, and sing
hosannas to his everlasting praise.
Now, that this book may do you
good, I want you to pray to God for
his blessing. Say these beautiful
words in your heart:-
Gentle Jesus, meek and mild,
Look upon a little child:
Pity my simplicity,
And suffer me to come to thee."






24 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER II.
THE BAD HEART.
The streams in the mountain-The hidden spring-
The bad heart may be known-Eliza and her sick mo-
ther-A bad heart is deceitful-The girl and her new
clothes-Alfred and his book-A bad heart dislikes
prayer-Elizabeth and her praying-place-A bad heart
has wicked thoughts-An illustration-Christ's descrip-
tion of a wicked heart-Address to the reader-The
good Physician.
A TRAVELER once visited a moun-
tainous country.: he found a great
many little springs bursting forth in
his path. These springs sent out
little streams, which trickled down
the sides of the mountains. He met
one of these little streams, and de-
sired to know what sort of a spring
it came from. To find out, he fol-
lowed the stream back to its com-
mencement. After a long search, he
found that the spring was behind











































THE VAIN GIRL.




r





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


some huge rocks, and its streams
came winding through a very small
fissure, so that he could not possibly
get a glance at the spring itself.
Now although he could not see
this spring, yet he could easily tell
what sort of water it contained. By
tasting the stream, he knew whether
the spring was good or bad, just as
well as if he had seen it.
It is so with your heart. You
cannot see it, and yet you can tell
whether it is good or bad. If it is
good, you act right and feel right.
But if you do wrong or feel wrong,
you may be sure your heart is bad.
The heart is as a spring, and the
feelings and actions are as the
streams. If these are bad, the spring
must be bad too. If you do not obey
God, and love Jesus, and all his


27





28 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


friends, then is your heart certainly
a bad one.
Let me tell you about a girl named
Eliza. She was taken sick one day,
and obliged to go to bed. Her
mother watched over her with a
great deal of care. When she was
hot and feverish, she fanned her;,
when the sweat-drops stood on her
forehead, she wiped them off with
the utmost gentleness. So attentive
was she to Eliza, that she made her-
self sick, and from that time became
a very feeble and delicate lady.
But Eliza, through her mother's
care and God's blessing, recovered
her health, and was as rosy and gay
as any girl in the place.
It happened, one Monday morn-
ing, that Eliza's little brother was
not very well. Her mother kept no





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


servant, and, as it was washing-day,
she wanted Eliza to stay at home
and take care of the baby. So she
said to her, "Eliza! I want you to
stay out of school this morning, and
wait on your little brother."
Eliza was just putting her books
into a bag, and preparing to go to
school, when her mother spoke. She
loved her school, and was called a
good scholar. It was therefore a
trial for her to stop at home: still, it
was her duty, and she ought to have
done it cheerfully, especially after
what her mother had suffered on
her account. Instead of this, she
frowned and replied,-
"I don't want to stay at home,
mother."
"But your brother is unwell, and
I have more work than I am able


29





30 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.
to do. I am afraid I shall be sick
if I do not keep you at home."
"It 's always so. You don't
care whether I get along in my
studies or not," said Eliza, very
pettishly.
"Eliza!" replied the afflicted mo-
ther, "you must stay at home, and I
am very sorry to see you display
such a wicked disposition."
Upon this Eliza angrily threw
down her books; and as the child
cried at the moment, she took her
seat by the cradle, and rocked it so
violently as to frighten the babe,
and even almost throw it out on the
floor.
Her mother, seeing that Eliza was
resolved to be troublesome, and
would only increase her labors, said
to her, while the tears ran down her





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


cheeks, "Eliza, you may go to
school."
Now what do you think of Eliza's
heart? She was not what people
called a bad child in her general
conduct. But in this instance she
was guilty of ingratitude, disobedi-
ence, and a passionate temper. Was
Eliza's heart good ?
I am sure you will say it was a bad
heart. A good heart never makes
children act as Eliza did.
If, therefore, you are ever ungrate-
ful or unkind, or display a bad tem-
per, you show that the spring or
heart inside is wicked; because, if it
were good, it could not send forth
such foul streams.
A bad heart is deceitful. God told
Jeremiah to describe it in these
words: The heart is deceitful above


31





82 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


all things, and desperately wicked."
Children, then, who have bad hearts,
often fancy themselves quite good.
Their hearts are blind, and persuade
them to believe themselves truly
good children, while, in reality, they
are very wicked.
I knew such a girl once. She
went to sabbath school; could always
recite her lessons well; said her
prayers night and morning; and al-
most always appeared well in the
presence of others.
One day her sabbath school met
for a sort of festival or celebration.
She, of course, went with the rest.
I happened to be at my window as
she passed the house. Her mother
had given her a nice white dress, a
new scarf, and a pair of gaiter boots,
which made her look quite pretty.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


I saw this girl look round to see if
any persons saw her, and, supposing
herself unnoticed, she walked very
haughtily, and looked at the dress,
the boots, and the handsome scarf,
witth a glance which said, "Don't I
look handsome to-day?"
I said this child thought herself to
be very good; yet she was proud.
Her deceitful heart made her think
she might be proud and good too.
It is so with many other sins. A
child with an ungrateful, or passion-
ate, or selfish disposition, will still
think himself very good This, you
see, is a great mistake.
The deceitful heart makes children
act deceitfully. There was once a
boy who went to school with me. I
will call him Alfred. He was a very
bright scholar, and fond of reading.





34 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


He had the use of a library, and
would bring books to school to read.
He wished his teacher to think well
of him, and yet he was not willing
to do well. He would place these
books under his grammar, upon his
lap, and then, leaning his head upon
the desk, raise up the grammar and
read the other book.
One day his teacher said to him,
"Alfred, what are you doing ?"
"Studying, sir."
"What are you studying, Alfred?"
"My grammar, sir."
"Let me see it."
Upon this, Alfred, whose seat was
next to the wall, slipped the prohi-
bited book between his knees, and
placed the grammar on the desk
before his teacher. The latter, not
knowing the boy's true character,





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


was satisfied, and resumed his own
seat.
This, you see, was very deceit-
ful conduct; and boys and girls
whose hearts are wicked, frequent-
ly deceive each other and their
friends.
The wicked heart is also a prayer-
less heart. It does not love Jesus
Christ, and therefore does not love
to pray to him. If you know a
schoolmate who is disagreeable to
you, you avoid his company; while
that classmate whom you love with
great affection is your companion.
You delight to talk with him, and to
hear him talk to you.
It is thus with a good heart. It
loves Jesus, and therefore delights in
prayer. There was a girl whose
heart Jesus had made good, who


35





36 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


one day asked her mother to give
her a piece of cotton cloth.
SWhat for, Elizabeth ?"
"To make a screen, mother."
"Where do you wish to make a
screen, my child "
"In my bedroom, mother."
"For what purpose, Elizabeth?"
The dear child embraced her mo-
ther and whispered, I want a place
to pray in."
So her mother gave her the cloth,
and Elizabeth chose a corner of her
little chamber and hung up the cloth
for a screen. Then she put a chair
inside. Upon the chair she placed
her beautiful Bible and her Hymn-
book. And there she used to go,
three times every day, and pray to
Jesus for his blessing.
Elizabeth's heart was good. The





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Holy Spirit had changed it, and that
was why she loved prayer. Before
it was changed she did not pray.
Wicked hearts dislike to pray. Chil-
dren who have them may say their
prayers over without thinking, they
may kneel down while others pray,
but their thoughts are somewhere
else. They do not and cannot love
prayer.
There is one more mark of a bad
heart which I must not omit to
describe. It has wicked thoughts. It
loves to think of wickedness. Let
me explain.
Suppose that you are at the head
of your class in school. You love to
keep that honorable place. But one
day you fail to answer some hard
question, and another boy takes
your place. As soon as he is there






38 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


he looks proudly at you. After school
is out he laughs at you and teases
you by saying, "I've got above you
at last! I told you you wouldn't stay
there always."
This would be wrong on his part;
but you give way to angry feelings,
and, when you get by yourself, say
in your mind a great many ill-tem-
pered things about that boy. You
study how to hurt him in some way,
and take pleasure in fancying him
in all sorts of trouble. These would
be wicked thoughts.
There are a great many wicked
thoughts in the bad heart. They are
not all alike. But all wicked hearts
love to think on wicked things.
I have now told you of many
marks by which you may judge
your heart. You must look outside






GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


at the actions, and inside at the feel-
ings. You must ask God to teach
you about yourself.
He doth show the young beginner
That in him there's nothing good:
He can lead the vilest sinner
To the Saviour's precious blood.

You must also learn the account
of the wicked heart given by the
blessed Saviour. He says: Out of
the heart proceed evil thoughts, mur-
ders, adulteries, fornications, thefts,
false witness, blasphemies." Matthew
xv, 19.
Dear little friend, what do you
think of your heart? Is it not a
wicked one ? Does it not send out
streams of disobedience, ingratitude,
unkindness, selfishness, deceit, evil
tempers, and the like ? Does it not
feel proud, wicked, and envious,


39





40 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


within? Does it not dislike prayer
and the worship of the Saviour?
O! I am afraid it does. If you are
not converted I am sure it does,
because it was bad when you were
born. All hearts are wicked from
the birth, and nothing but the Holy
Spirit ever makes them better.
Yours, then, is bad. It must be
hateful in the sight of God, for he
has said that "every one that is
PROUD (or WICKED) IN HEART IS AN
ABOMINATION TO THE LORD." Prov.
xvi, 5.
Think of this, dear child, until you
are troubled about it. Don't be afraid
to know the worst of your state. If
you were sick, it would not do for
you to resist your feelings, and per-
suade yourself you were well. It
would be best to tell how you felt,





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR. 41

and let the physician come and cure
you. So in this case. You must
find out how-very wicked and lost
you are, and then you will know
how good and precious a physician
Jesus is, and how powerful the balm
of Gilead is to cure a sinful heart.
Deeply are our hearts polluted;
He can cleanse and keep them clean;
To his holy nature suited,
While his witness dwells within.





42 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER III.
A BAD HEART CANNOT DWELL WITH JESUS.
The whortleberry boy-A bad heart defended-Chil-
dren's hearts are very wicked-What Christ says about
the wicked-The curse-A shocking thought-Painful
to hear Jesus condemn-A prayer-Wicked hearts
think hard of God-Cain-The dirty boy in a company
of clean children-A wicked heart in heaven-Wicked
hearts cannot go to heaven-Poetry.
YONDER is a boy going home, with
a basket full of fine whortleberries.
Berries are scarce; the boy has had
to labor very hard to get them. He
is going to present them to his mo-
ther, who has been desiring to get a
quantity for several days past.
What do you think of this boy?
You pronounce him a good lad at
once. But stop! let me tell you
something else about him. He wat
sent to school this morning, and has
been playing truant all day.









































WHORTLEBERRY BOY.








































































































































. -





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


What do you think of him now?
Your mind is changed. He is a bad
boy. Gathering berries, and giving
them to his mother, will not now
prove him to be good. He was even
guilty for gathering them. He had
no business in the fields. He was
sent to school, and, being a truant,
all he did that day was wrong. He
ought to have been doing something
else. The running away from school
made all else wrong.
I have drawn you this picture of
the berry boy, because I fancy you
may be saying to yourself, "My
heart is not so very wicked, after all.
It has never made me swear, steal,
or break the sabbath, as thousands
of bad boys do."
Perhaps you have not done these
things. Your parents and teachers


45





46 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.
have taught you better habits. But
you are still a great sinner, and your
heart is very wicked in God's sight.
You are like the truant boy. He
did wrong all day, because he was a
truant. He was living in disobedi-
ence. So have you been disobedient
to God. His command to you, as
soon as you knew anything, was, to
"believe in the Lord Jesus Christ,"
and to "love God with all your
heart." Now, you have paid no at-
tention to this commandment. You
have been a poor, wayward child,
doing your own will, and living in
disobedience to God all the time.
This, you must confess, is a sad
proof that your heart is very wicked.
If it has made you disobey God all
your lifetime, it must be a bad heart
indeed; and if you had been brought





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


up with liars and swearers your heart
would have surely led you to do as
they do.
Dear child, will you think of this ?
Your heart is bad. It must be made
new. Jesus says, VERILY, VERILY, I
SAY UNTO THEE, EXCEPT A MAN BE BORN
AGAIN, HE CANNOT SEE THE KINGDOM OF
GOD." John iii, 3.
What Christ says of every man is
true of every child. By being born
again, he means having a new heart.
Without this new heart, he says, you
cannot see his blessed kingdom.
The Holy Bible is full of texts that
teach the same truth. It everywhere
says that the wicked cannot go to
heaven. Here is one more text:
"THE WICKED SHALL BE TURNED INTO
HELL;" and here is another which
tells what Jesus will say, in the day


47




48 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


of judgment, to those children who
will keep their wicked hearts and
love their sins. When they appear
on his left hand, he will say: DE-
PART FROM ME, YE CURSED, INTO EVER-
LASTING FIRE, PREPARED FOR THE DEVIL
AND HIS ANGELS."
What a shocking thought! Your
soul and body will be cast into fire
and brimstone, to live in torment for
ever. You will see terrible sights;
you will hear awful sounds; you
will feel racking pains; you will
weep, wail, and gnash your teeth for
ever, if you keep your wicked heart.
Then only think, dear little one,
how dreadful to have the mild and
lovely Jesus speak that terrible curse
to you. If a wicked man should
speak unkindly to you in the street,
you would not mind it much; but





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


if your dear mother, who is so kind
to you, speaks severely, you feel bad
and weep. How much worse will
you feel to have the dear Saviour,
who has died for you, who has loved
you so much better than your mo-
ther, say the awful word, DEPART!
Can you bear it? Will you tempt
him to say it? Will you keep your
bad heart? 0! I beseech you to
make your mind up to get a new
heart, and thus escape the awful
doom of guilty sinners. Say,-
Great God! I tremble at thy power,
And at thy feet for mercy bend:
That when to judgment I am brought,
The Judge himself may be my friend.

You may think sometimes, it is a
very hard thing for a child to go to
such a horrible place as hell. A bad
heart will find fault with God.


49





50 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Guilty criminals censure their coun-
try for putting them in prison; and
a wicked heart will complain of the
just punishment of its sins. Cain
did so, after he had murdered his
pious brother. "My punishment,"
he cried, is greater than I can bear."
But he had to bear it, and so will sin-
ners, if they will not seek new hearts.
Suppose you had a company of
girls and boys at your father's house,
all very nicely dressed, all well be-
haved and well instructed. While
you are engaged in reading or sing-
ing, a little ragged, dirty boy, who
cannot read, is brought into the
room. He has never been in such
company before. His companions
have been dirty, swearing, idle chil-
dren, like himself. Do you think he
would be happy among you?





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR. 01
In addition to this, suppose he had
the leprosy, or some infectious dis-
ease. When you see it upon him,
you all get as far from him as pos-
sible. Would he feel happy in that
parlor, as he saw himself avoided by
you all? You know he would not.
You would be somewhat like that
boy, if God should let you enter
heaven with your wicked heart.
When you saw the saints shining in
their white robes, and heard them
singing a song which you could not
sing, and then saw yourself so mise-
rably sinful, without a robe, without
a crown, without a song to sing, you
would feel very unhappy.
But when you saw the saints fly-
ing away from your society, and
regarding you as a poor, spotted
creature, from whom they feared to





52 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.

catch the infection of sin, you would
weep scalding tears, and wish to go
anywhere rather than stay in heaven
with a wicked heart.
So, you see, if you wish to live in
glory with Christ and his holy an-
gels, you must have a new heart.
You must pray,-
Lord, look upon a little child,
By nature sinful, rude, and wild;
0 let thy grace descend on me,
And make me all I ought to be!
Make me thy child-a child of God-
Wash'd in the Saviour's precious blood;
And my whole heart from sin set free,
A little vessel full of thee.

















































r(






j~ i
i ;
1,...
~
-. -. r- -..
d,









































ELISHA HEALING THE WATERS.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER IV.
THE BAD HEART CHANGED.
Elisha and the bitter waters of Jericho-God changes
bad hearts-Why the Saviour is named Jesus-God's
promise-The pious gentleman and his children-God
cannot lie-A new heart better than riches-A new
heart is happy-A mother's kiss-The peace of Jesus-
The little chimney-sweep-A new heart loves Jesus-
It is a pure heart-A little girl and her mother-Robert
and his sick mother-A question-A new heart is obe-
dient-Children should seek a new heart-A spiritual
song.
I WANT yOU to read very attentively
the following story about Elisha the
prophet:-
Elisha was at Jericho, with several
young prophets, shortly after Elijah
went up to heaven, in a chariot of
fire.
The people of Jericho told him
that the waters of the place were
brackish, and unfit to drink. The
ground also, they said, was barren.





56 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


They prayed the good man to heal
the waters and make the ground
fruitful.
Elisha said, "Bring me a new
cruse, and put salt therein." 2 Kings
ii, 20.
He then took the salt and cast it
into the springs, from which the
waters flowed, with these words:
"Thus saith the Lord, I have healed
these waters."
And the water immediately be-
came sweet and good, and the
ground became fruitful.
That was a wonderful act. No-
thing but the power of God could
have so changed those bitter waters.
All the men in the world could not
have done it. The God of glory did
it by the hands of Elisha.
Now, your wicked heart may be





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


changed as well as those waters. It
now sends forth bitter streams; it
may send forth sweet ones. It is now
full of sin; it may become full of
holiness.
What a blessed truth this is! If
you had lost a leg or an arm, you
could not get a new one. But you
may get a new heart. God is able
to give you a heart so good and pure,
that he himself will take pleasure in
looking upon it.
Did you ever think why the blessed
Saviour is named JESUS ?It is be-
cause Jesus means Saviour; and he
saves all who desire it from their
sins. That sweet name of Jesus is
therefore a proof that you inay have
a new heart. And here is a promise
from God to all penitent men, wo-
men, and children. He has said to





58 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


them: "A NEW HEART ALSO WILL I
GIVE YOU, AND A NEW SPIRIT WILL I PUT
WITHIN YOU; AND I WILL TAKE AWAY
THE STONY HEART OUT OF YOUR FLESH,
AND I WILL GIVE YOU A HEART OF
FLESH !" Ezek. xxxvi, 26.
There was once a pious gentle-
man who had some little girls and
boys. He went from home some-
times, and at his departure often
promised to bring them some little
presents on his return. One day, as
he left for a long journey, he kissed
his little ones, and said he would
bring each of them a new book from
the city.
After he was gone his children
talked about these books: they pro-
mised to loan them to one another;
they tried to guess what they would
be about; but in all their talk they





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


never uttered a doubt about receiving
them. Their father had promised to
bring them, and they felt quite sure
the books would come when he
returned.
Now if the God of truth has pro-
mised to give you a new heart, there
can be no doubt but that you may
have it. He cannot lie. He is also
able to change it. And, as the waters
became sweet when Elisha threw
the salt into the spring, so will your
heart become new when it is sprin-
kled with the blood of Jesus; be-
cause it is written, The blood of
Jesus Christ cleanseth us from all sin."
1 John i, 7.
If God should offer you all the
gold, and diamonds, and other riches,
which are in the world, or a new
heart, without any riches on earth,


59





60 GUIDE TO THE AAVIOUR


which would you choose? I hope
you would prefer the new heart.
You would be happier, even if clothed
in rags, with such a heart, than if
dressed in a purple robe, with all the
world in your power, and your heart
full of sin.
A new heart is a happy heart. You
do not know what sweet peace fills
the breast of a converted child. You
do know how you feel when, after
being disobedient to your mother, you
repent and she forgives you. You
are happy when she imprints a kiss
of pardon on your cheek; but that
joy is nothing to the joy of a child
who feels that his Father in heaven
has pardoned him, and has become
his Friend. He hears the voice of
Jesus, saying, "Let not your heart be
troubled." That voice fills him with





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


a "peace which passeth all understand-
ing." He suffers no fear to torment
him. His soul is full of glory. There
is no heart so happy as one that is
converted to Jesus.
It makes no difference, to a child
with a new heart, whether he is
poor or rich. He can be happy
in rags or in robes. There was
once a little chimney-sweep, in the
city of London, who went to a Sun-
day school. He there heard that
Jesus gave new hearts to praying
children. He asked for one, and
obtained it.
One day he went up a chimney,
to sweep it clean with a brush. It
was a frightful place to be in. He
had a dirty cap drawn over his face,
for fear the soot should smother him.
But he went about his work cheer-


61





62 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


fully, and climbed to the top of the
chimney.
Presently, the people in the room
below heard his voice. A sound
came down the chimney. They
looked pale, for sometimes boys are
smothered while at work in the
narrow, sooty chimneys of ancient
houses. They listened. What could
it mean?
Ah! the boy was singing! What
could he sing in that dark chimney ?
They catch the words of his song.
Here they are:-
"The sorrows of the mind
Be banish'd from this place:
Religion never was designed
To make our pleasures less."

Thus did his new heart make him
happy in the most disgusting of all situ-
ations. A new heart is a happy heart.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


A new heart loves Jesus. "He is
the altogether lovely, and the fairest
among ten thousand." Sol. Song v, 10.
A converted child loves mother,
father, brothers, sisters, and friends;
but he loves Jesus better than all.
" Christ is very precious" to such a
child. He thinks about the dear
Saviour, and feels so tender that he
weeps tears of love. He longs to see
him, and rejoices that one day he
will go up to heaven and dwell with
him for ever.
The new heart is also a pure
heart. Jesus takes away its sins,
and the child who is converted
desires to be as pure as the Sa-
viour himself He desires this, be-
cause it pleases Jesus to see children
pure. Blessed are the pure in heart,
for they shall see God," was one


63




64 GUIDE TO THE BAVIOUR.


of the sayings of the ever-blessed
Saviour.
A pious mother was telling her
little girl, one day, how much Jesus
loved pure-hearted children. "Mo-
ther," asked the child, "how does
Jesus make us pure ?"
The mother answered, "By loving
us, and sending his Holy Spirit to
dwell in our hearts."
When she heard this, she went
away to her.chamber, and, falling on
her knees, clasped her little hands to-
gether, and said: Jesus, make my
heart pure! Love me, and send thy
Holy Spirit to make me like thyself."
This is the way with all children
who have new hearts. They desire
Christ to dwell with themn-they
pray to him-they feel happy at the
thought of his love for them.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Let me tell you about a boy
named Robert. He had a kind mo-
ther, who was very feeble in health.
One day, when she was left in the
house alone with Robert, she felt
very faint, and said to her son,-
"Robert!"
"Yes, mother."
"I am not well: don't leave the
room."
"I want to go out."
"You will not leave your mother,
will you?"
"I want to play with Edward."
"You shall play with him when
pa comes home. Don't go out yet,
my son."
Robert now began to cry. He
muttered and pouted, and threw his
playthings on the floor: he worked
himself into quite a passion.
5


65





66 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Do you think Robert loved his
mother ?
He certainly did not, or he would
have tried to please her. We always
try to please those whom we love
earnestly.
From this, then, you may learn,
that a new heart keeps the com-
mands of Christ. It loves Christ,
and so must desire to please him.
Jesus expects this, for he said: Ye
are my friends, if ye do whatsoever 1
command you."
A new heart is obedient. It does
not, therefore, lead a child into the
common sins of boys and girls. Self-
ishness, quarreling, disobedience to
parents, lying, profanity, sabbath-
breaking, deceit, and other fruits of
the carnal mind, are not visible in a
converted child. He is able, through





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ,
to overcome them all.
Do you not desire such a heart,
my dear little friend? Is it not a
lovely thing for a child to love Jesus,
and keep his holy laws? I have told
you that you may have a new heart.
Jesus waits to give it to you, with-
out money and without price." Will
you bid him go away? Will you
still keep that heart which makes
you so miserable, and which will
surely lead you down the broad road
to destruction, and to everlasting
pains in hell fire? Surely you will
not keep it. You will say, "Jesus,
make me a new heart !" You will
join in the song of the poet, and
say,-
Gracious Spirit, heavenly Dove,
Grant to me the gift of love:


67






68 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.

Love can make a little child
Patient, teachable, and mild.

"To my Maker, God above,
Let me have the warmest Iove:
And to Jesus let me feel
Love to do his holy will.

"Bless me with a lowly mind-
Love to God and all mankind:
Let my life and conduct prove
That I do religion love."











































THE JAILER AND THE APOSTLES.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER V.
THE WAY TO OBTAIN A NEW HEART.
The jailer's question-Young sinners must feel like
the jailer-A boy lost in a forest-Why some who want
a new heart fail to find it-George Whitefield-God
changes the heart-Repentance commanded-What is
repentance ?-Peter and Lucy's peach-Children urged
to repent.
MANY years ago, there was a great
earthquake at Philippi. Paul the
apostle lay a prisoner in one of its
dungeons at the time. Such was
the violence of the earthquake, that
the massive doors of the dungeon
were thrown open The jailer was
so fearful his prisoners had escaped,
that he was on the point of killing
himself
Paul kept him from that wicked
deed. When the jailer recollected
himself, he saw how nearly he had


71




72 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


ruined himself in soul and body.
The Holy Spirit suddenly awakened
him, and he was brought under deep
concern for his soul. He trembled
-he fell at the feet of the apostle:
he cried aloud in his distress, and
eagerly inquired, What must I do
to be saved?" Acts xvi, 30.
When the Philippian jailer asked
this question, his mind was in great
distress. He saw himself to be a
poor, lost sinner, sinking down to
hell. He was afraid, and wished to
know how to escape his terrible
doom.
If God has touched the heart of
my dear young reader, he feels some-
thing like this. He wants to know,
very much, what he must do to be
saved. He feels as a child would
feel, who should miss his road in a





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


great forest. Bewildered, without a
path to guide him, with the howling
of wild beasts ringing in his ears, he
would say, O that I knew how to
get out of this forest!" So, if you
feel the plague and danger of your
wicked heart, you are ready to say,
" that I knew how to get a new
heart!" or, in the language used by
the jailer, "What must I do to be
saved?"
This is a great question. It is also
a very pleasant fact to know, that
you feel enough to ask it: it proves
that you are not far from the king-
dom of God.
Yet many, who get thus far in the
road to heaven, never advance any
further. They want new hearts;
they pray for new hearts; they do
many things to procure them; and,


73





74 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.
after all, keep their wicked hearts
still. Why is this ? I will tell you.
They try to make new hearts for
themselves. Instead of letting the
Holy Spirit change them, they want
to do the work by their own efforts.
This is so impossible, that God com-
pares it to a man trying to change
his color: Can the Ethiopian change
his skin, or the leopard his spots?
Then may ye also do good, who are
accustomed to do evil." Jer. xiii, 23.
Which means, that a man can no
more make his bad heart good, than
a leopard can change his spots, or a
man the color of his skin.
I mention this truth, because you
are in danger of trying to make your
own heart new. Many people, who
have at last found the good way,
have been hindered and made very





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


wretched by this useless labor. I
will tell you about one of them.
George Whitefield, the eloquent
preacher who visited America a hun-
dred years ago, was a great sufferer
by this mistake. When he first felt
the plague of a wicked heart, he set
out to make it good. He fasted two
days in a week; he ate the coarsest
food; he wore mean clothes; he
walked out in cold weather, until
his hands were black with the cold;
once he lay down on his face in a
graveyard to pray, during a violent
storm, for nearly two hours. He
went so far in these painful efforts
that he lost his health, and was un-
fitted for his regular duties. And
the more he persisted in them, the
more wretched he grew.
Why was this? The reason is


75





76 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


very simple. He was not seeking a
new heart in God's way. He had
chosen a way of his own. When
he found out that it is "not by works
of righteousness which we have done,
but according to his mercy, by the
washing of regeneration, and renewing
of the Holy Ghost," (Titus iii, 5,) that
a man is saved, he found a new and
a happy heart.
Be sure, then, dear young sinner,
that you can never make your heart
new by your own efforts.
Do you still inquire, "What must
I do to be saved?"
You must repent. "Repent ye, and
believe the gospel," is the command of
God. The times of this ignorance
God winked at, but now commandeth
all men everywhere to repent."
Repentance is not a difficult sub-





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


ject for a child to understand. Here
is a verse which describes it very
beautifully:-
"Repentance is to leave
The sins we loved before:
And show that we in earnest grieve,
By doing so no more."

I will make it still plainer, by de-
scribing a little incident, which, in
substance, I am afraid too often oc-
curs among unconverted children.
A pious woman is visiting a beau-
tiful little girl, who is going to die.
As she stands beside the bed, and
looks on her little pale face, with
red spots in the cheeks, and her eyes
sparkling with unearthly light, she
feels sad, because she knows that
lovely little girl must soon die.
On her'return home, this good
woman goes to her closet, and places


77





78 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


some nice little dainties in a basket.
She thinks they may be pleasant to
the dying child. Among these dain-
ties is a large, luscious peach.
Calling in her little boy, she sends
him to the cottage of the consump-
tive with the basket, giving him strict
orders not to touch anything it con-
tains.
Peter sets out, quite pleased with
his task, for Lucy has been his favor-.
ite playmate. On the way he peeps
into the basket. The peach, with
its delicate tints and plump look,
meets his eye. How nice! What
a delicious peach! How luscious
it would taste!" are the tempting
thoughts which pass rapidly through
his mind.
Peter takes the peach into his
hand. His desire to taste it grows





GUIDE TO THE SAVPOUR.


strong. The tempter suggests-
"Mother will not know it."
"Suppose she does not; yet it is
wrong for all that, and it is cruel to
take it from poor little Lucy," says
his conscience.
No," replies the tempter; Lucy
won't care for it. Besides, here are
jellies, and jams, and a nice custard
for her."
Peter yields, and hastily eats the
peach. You may imagine how he
feels, as he stands by Lucy's bed-
side; and also how ashamed he
looks, when his mother asks him
how Lucy enjoyed her gifts.
But this is not the worst of his
punishment. He cannot get that
peach out of his mind. The thought
of it haunts him all day. "How
wicked to disobey your mother! how


79





80 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


cruel and mean to rob little Lucy, and
she a poor dying child!" Such are
the thoughts which sting his heart.
Night arrives. Peter tries to pray.
The prayer chokes him. He dares
not utter it. He goes to his bed, but
not to sleep. He thinks of the
peach. The more he thinks, the
worse he feels. His heart is full of
bitterness. At last, his feelings vent
themselves in sobs and tears.
His mother, sitting in the next
room, hears him sob. What is the
matter, Peter ?" she inquires, bending
over his bed.
O mother, I am a wicked boy!
I ate Lucy's peach to-day. It was
wicked, very wicked! Can you for-
give me, mother? I will tell Lucy
to-morrow, and buy her the best
peach in the market."





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


Peter's sorrow was true repent-
ance. He was sorry for doing wrong,
and willing to do right in future.
Now, when you feel'sorry for all
your sins against God; when you
are ashamed of yourself, because you
are a sinner, and are willing and de-
sirous to break off all your sins; then
you will be a penitent. Then, if, with
that heart of sorrow, you "believe on
the Lord Jesus Christ," your sins shall
be forgiven, and your heart made
new.
And are you not sorry for sin?
Can you think of all your wicked
thoughts, your sinful actions, and
not be sorry? Can you think how
Jesus Christ left his bright throne in
heaven, to be born in Bethlehem,
and to die a cruel death on Calvary
for you; and that you have been
6


81





82 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.

offending him ever since you were
old enough to sin, and not be sorry?
O, no; you must feel! You are
sorry! You will go to God, and cry
to the gentle Saviour,-
Fain I would to Thee be brought:
Gracious Lord, forbid it not:
Give a little child a place
In the kingdom of thy grace."







~~ ~"s






















































.r
























:



















































PILGRIM AT THE CROSS.


~I~Sb~cI, r:
.L ..
-';1- "E





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER VI.
MORE ABOUT THE WAY TO OBTAIN A NEW
HEART.
A child must have ftith-A mistake corrected-
Why a child is not afraid of being starved-Faith ex-
plained-John Bunyan's Pilgrim at the cross-A child
led to Calvary-The guilty son-His brother's offer-
The father's promise-A sinner is saved for Christ's
sake-George Whitefield's faith-A prayer for a peni-
tent child-Effect of faith.

WHEN a little child is sorry for sin,
and is willing to forsake it, and
confesses it in humble prayer to
God, he only needs to have faith in
the blessed Jesus, and his heart is
instantly made good. The Bible
teaches this truth, and millions of
people have found it true. Vast
numbers of children, too, who are
now in glory, and many who are
still in this world, have known this


85





86 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


by experience; and, if you believe,
you will know it also.
Perhaps you will say, "I am very
young. I cannot understand the
meaning of believing in Christ. I
cannot have faith, so early in life."
This is a mistake. Jesus said,
"Sufer little children to come unto
me." Coming to Christ, is having
faith in his blood. Jesus would not
have said that, if it had been impos-
sible for you to believe. You can
have faith if you desire it. I will try
to explain it to you.
You are a little boy or girl. You
cannot do any work so as to earn
money. Yet, you are not afraid of
going hungry or ragged.
Why is this? If a man cannot
work, and has no property, he is
afraid of hunger and nakedness. He





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


is in distress, because he must either
beg or starve.
You have nothing, and yet you
cannot work. Why have you no
fear of hunger and nakedness?
I will tell you. You have faith in
your father and mother. You be-
lieve they will feed you and clothe
you. You have so much faith in
their love and ability to keep you,
that it gives you no concern at all.
Faith in God is like this. The
same confidence which you place in
your father and mother concerning
your food and clothes, you must
place in God concerning your new
heart. Your parents tell you, they
will feed and clothe you until you
can provide for yourself. You be-
lieve them, and feel sure they will
do so. God tells you, if you ask him


87





88 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


to forgive your sins and change your
heart, he will do it for the sake of his
dear Son, who died for your sins.
You must ask him, and believe that
he does just as he has promised, and
your heart will, in that very moment,
be made new. For this is a faith-
ful saying, and worthy of all accepta-
tion, that Christ Jesus came into the
world to save sinners." 1 Tim. i, 15.
John Bunyan, in that beautiful
book called "The Pilgrim's Progress,"
describes a saving faith in a very
simple manner. His Pilgrim carries
a burden on his back, to represent
the grief and sorrow of a heart in its
penitent state. With this burden,.
poor Pilgrim comes to a place where
he sees three crosses and a sepul-
chre. One of these crosses he knows
to be the cross of Christ-the wood





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


to which his Lord was nailed. He
stops and thinks of Christ crucified
-of God's love in giving his Son
Jesus to die for the world-of Christ's
love in bearing all that pain to atone
for his sins. And, as he thought of
these things, his heart melted; he
felt love to Christ; he ran to the foot
of the cross, to kneel and praise his
Saviour; when, lo! as he runs his
burden rolls from his shoulders; he
feels rest and ease; he exclaims,
"He hath given me rest by his sor-
row, and life by his death!"
This is a beautiful description of
faith. It is the way in which you
must behold the Lamb of God, who
taketh away the sins of the world."
Bring the dying Jesus before your
mind! See him kneeling in the
garden at night, praying so earnestly


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90 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


that great drops of bloody sweat fall
from his body to the ground. See
him a prisoner in Pilate's hall: the
soldiers mock him, smite him, whip
him, spit upon him! See him driven
out of the city to Calvary! There
they lay his sacred body on the
cross; they drive large nails through
his hands and feet. They lift him
up on high, and mock his agonies
with insulting words. Behold this,
dear child, and tell your heart that
it was all suffered for you; and that
it was endured that "God might be
just, and yet the justifier" of your
guilty soul, when you "believe in
Jesus."
If you had offended your father,
and he thought it necessary to expel
you from your home, and you had
been ordered to leave it for ever, you





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


would consider yourself a ruined
child. Suppose, when thus about to
become a poor outcast, your brother
should go to your father, and say to
him, "Dear father, forgive my bro-
ther !"
He replies, "I would, my son, did
I not know that his offense must not
go unpunished. I should forfeit your
respect, and the respect of all the
family, if I did not punish him; and
even your brother would be likely to
repeat his sin."
"But, father, punish me in his
stead. You promised to let me visit
uncle Henry this winter, and to give
me a new cloak. I will go without
the cloak, and give up my visit to
uncle, if you will forgive my bro-
ther." .
Be it so, my son. When your





92 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.
brother sees you without a cloak,
and without the pleasure you ex-
pected to enjoy, he will certainly
feel his offense to be grievous. Go!
tell him what you have promised to
do, and that, if he will come and
confess his sins, I will forgive him
for your sake."
Now would you have any fear of
not gaining your father's smile, and
his permission for you still to be a
member of his family, after this
message? No. You would go to
your father, not doubting in your
heart but that he would kindly re-
ceive you. You would expect to be
restored to his love.
That feeling would be faith. God
has promised for Christ's sake to for-
give a penitent child. If you ask
God to forgive you, and do not doubt





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUr.


in your heart, but expect him to par-
don you in that moment, you will
have faith. God will directly change
your heart by his Holy Spirit.
I have told you how George
Whitefield tried to make his heart
new by his own efforts. I told you
also how he failed. Now let me tell
you about him when he had faith in
Jesus.
He was one day in great distress
and agony of heart. Then he thought
of Jesus Christ, when he cried out,
"I thirst! I thirst!" Upon this, he
cried out, "I thirst for salvation; I
want pardon through Jesus Christ!"
He then looked up, and believed
Jesus to be indeed the Saviour of
sinners; and in that moment, he
says, "I perceived my load go off; a
spirit of mourning was taken from





94 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


me, and I knew what it was to re-
joice in the Lord."
Come, then, young sinner, and
try to have faith in the blessed
Jesus! Kneel down before the Lord.
Don't think of your being a peni-
tent, nor of your intention to be a
good child. Think only that Jesus
Christ is the Saviour of sinners;
with this thought offer a PRAYER like
this:-
0 God, look upon a sinful child.
My heart is wicked. It does not love
thee. It has always loved wicked-
ness. I have not cared for thy dear
Son. I have done many sinful things
in thy sight. I have been a selfish,
disobedient, quarrelsome, prayerless
child. I have been so wicked, I de-
serve to be cut down and sent to
hell, to dwell in everlasting pains





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


with Satan and his angels. I am a
poor little straying lamb, lost and
perishing in this wilderness world.
O Lord, have mercy upon me! The
blessed Jesus died to save poor sin-
ners like me. He said, Come unto
me, all ye that labor and are heavy
laden, and I will give you rest.' 0
Lord, I repent. I am sorry for my
sins! Give me rest. I will not of-
fend thee any more. 0, forgive me
now. I believe Jesus died for me.
Save me, O Lord, and make my
heart new, just now, and I will love
thee for ever."
If you do not doubt in your heart
when you offer this, or a similar
prayer, God will forgive you. His
Holy Spirit will change your wicked
heart. You will feel happy, and be
able hereafter to be a good and


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96 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.

pious child. You will be able to
sing,-
"My God is reconciled--
His pard'ning voice I hear:
He owns me for his child,
I can no longer fear:
With confidence I now draw nigh,
And Father! Abba, Father! cry 1"











































































































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i








































FISHERMAN'S BOY.





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


CHAPTER VII.
HOW TO KEEP A NEW HEART.
The jewel and the iron safe-A new heart may be
lost-God's word says it may be lost-A new heart may
be kept-A promise-A new heart is kept by look-
ing unto Jesus-The fisherman's boy-Watching-The
apple orchard-Avoiding the wicked-The widow's
son mined by a bad companion-A good resolution-
Advice to do other things.
IF some prince or princess should
send you a precious jewel, which
cost thousands of dollars, you would
not keep it in an open drawer with-
out care. No, you would keep it
locked up; and most likely you
would want a strong iron safe to put
it in, for fear that thieves should
come to steal it. The more it was
worth, the more care you would take
'o keep it. You would rather lose
all your clothes, books, and play-
things, than that jewel.


99





100 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


But a new heart is worth more
than all the jewels in the world.
When yours is made new, you must
therefore take the greatest possible
care to keep it.
A new heart may be lost; that is,
it may grow wicked again. It may
become so wicked that God may
refuse to cleanse it any more, and so
send it down to hell. This is a
dreadful thought; because a child
who has had Jesus dwell in his
heart, would be more miserable in
hell than one who never was con-
verted. Just as a child, who was
brought up by wealthy parents,
would suffer more to be made very
poor, than if he had always been
poor. The remembrance of riches
makes poverty more painful. So the
recollection of the love of Christ





GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


would make his anger more ter-
rible.
The Bible teaches you that you
may lose a good heart, and perish
after being made a child of God.
The Lord says, When I shall say to
the righteous that he shall surely live;
if he trust to his own righteousness,
and commit iniquity, ALL HIS RIGHT-
EOUSNESS SHALL NOT BE REMEMBERED:
BUT FOR HIS INIQUITY THAT HE HATH
COMMITTED, HE SHALL DIE FOR IT."
Ezek. xxxiii, 13.
Still, you may keep your new
heart. God has promised to help
you, if you try. He says, "I will
never leave thee nor forsake thee." So
that while there is danger, it may be
escaped.
To keep your new heart, you
must "look unto Jesus." Every day


101





102 GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


and every hour you must look to
Jesus.
When you rise in the morning, be
sure to kneel down and "look to
Jesus" in prayer. So at noon find
a praying-place, and at night again
you must be found on your knees,
"looking unto Jesus."
I knew a little boy once, whose
father was a fisherman. This boy's
name was Thomas. He was very
wicked when he first came to my
Sunday school: but he obtained a
new heart and was very happy.
Thomas went with his father,
early in the morning, to catch fish.
After his conversion, he kept his fa-
ther waiting a few moments in the
mornings, before he came down from
his chamber. So, one morning, his
father crept softly to his room, and,




GUIDE TO THE SAVIOUR.


peeping through a crevice in the
door, saw his son upon his knees at
prayer. Thus he found that Thomas
was praying boy. This pious child
kept his new heart and died happy.
If you will keep yours, you must
pray too.
To keep a new heart, you must
watch. If your father had an orchard
full of fine rosy apples, and the boys
came to steal them, he might set you
to look out for the thieves, that he
might come and drive them away.
You would then take your station.
You would listen to every sound;
you would look all round the fences,
and up into the trees--in every spot
where the boys might come you
would look out. That would be
watching.
In the same manner you must


103




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