• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 A
 B
 D
 C
 E
 F
 G
 Part the Second
 H
 I
 J
 K
 L
 M
 N
 O
 P
 Q
 Part the Third
 R
 S
 T
 U
 V
 W
 X
 Y
 Z
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The rhyming alphabet, or, Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
Title: The Rhyming alphabet or, Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00002069/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Rhyming alphabet or, Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
Alternate Title: Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
Physical Description: 136 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Sunday-school Union
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
New York
Publication Date: c1851
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1851   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1851   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's catalogue: 16 p. at end.
General Note: Baldwin library copy missing verses to accompany illustrated letters A and B.
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00002069
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236558
oclc - 20921014
notis - ALH7034
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
    Frontispiece
        Front cover 2
    Title Page
        Front cover 3
    Copyright
        Front cover 4
    A
        Page 13
        Page 14
    B
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    D
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    C
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    E
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    F
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    G
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Part the Second
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    H
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    I
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    J
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    K
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    L
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    M
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    N
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    O
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    P
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Q
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Part the Third
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    R
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    S
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    T
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    U
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    V
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    W
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    X
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Y
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Z
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Advertising
        Advertising page 1
        Advertising page 2
        Advertising page 3
        Advertising page 4
        Advertising page 5
        Advertising page 6
        Advertising page 7
        Advertising page 8
        Advertising page 9
        Advertising page 10
        Advertising page 11
        Advertising page 12
        Advertising page 13
        Advertising page 14
        Advertising page 15
        Advertising page 16
        Advertising page 17
    Back Cover
        Advertising page 18
    Spine
        Advertising page 19
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THE


RHYMING ALPHABET;


o.,


SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


PHILADELPHIA:
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 146 CHESTNUT STREET.
NuW YORK, No. 147 Nassau Street.....BosTON, No. 9 Cbmrnli.
LOUISVILLE, No. 103 Faurth Street.




















MIUred nmwrdk# to act of Cogreas i the year 1851, yp 0L
AMZRIOAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION
i 4W CIrwe O eim of tah Distric C crt of th Ea teu Dik*r qt
PmaqrIsyeia.







No books are published by the Axmyica SB rAT-mooMs gM
withaot the action of the Committee of Publication, comista of
tburteen members, from the following denominations of Chributans
vis. Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyteria, le-
tbhean and Reformed Dutch. Not moro than three of the mambes
ean be of the same denomination, and no book can be published t
vhloh any member of the Committee shall ojet.




























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My Alphabet ook.




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Weak and guilty as I am,
I wcgld be Christ's little lamb. p 15, 1. t6










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SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


Oh! may we bind it to our hearts,
And read it o'er and o'er.
With fervent prayer that we may sin
Against our God no more.
Whene'er I cast my roving eyes
Upon the letter B,
Thou blessed book of truth and grace,
I'll ever think of thee.





18 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

When Sarah first began to read,
Her face was light and gay;
But, as she longer read, her smile
To graver looks gave way.
The solemn words that she had read
Impressed her tender mind;
And all her little heart and soul
To serious thoughts inclined.
Yet anxious still in all to please,
She gave a pleasant look,
And kindly showed her cousin dear
The pictures in the book.
"Do, my dear girl, attend the while
I read the next," said she;
"I wonder what the verse will say
About the letter C ?"























































































































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However yo4i
Thy latter end


ii not to keep,
view. p. 26, 27.



















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SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 27

But whether joy be in thy heart,
Or grief-with all thy power
To him who gave thee life and hope
Devote thy every hour.

For he alone, when nature sinks,
And fails thy fleeting breath,
Can keep thee from the bitter pains
Of an eternal Death.
And he thy mortal hour can cheer,
And faith and grace supply;
And take thee to his dwelling-place,
Where thou shalt never die.




28 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


TERNITY is brought to mind,
By this next letter, E:
Oh, what a vast unbounded state
Eternity must be!
There's nothing seen by human eyes,
No thought to mortal lent,
That can enable him to know
Eternity's extent!
The blades of grass, the grains of sand
On ocean's brink that lie,
Ten thousand times ten thousand told,j
Are not eternity.


I





Cc








Little children love one another. p 19. 20.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


C ALWAYS is a pleasant sight;
It speaks of many a rhyme,
Of many a carol sweetly sung,
In happy Christmas time.
It tells of many a childish sport
That I remember well,
And scenes of innocence and joy,
S Where memory loves to dwell;
And brings to mind my many friends,
Who used to meet with me:
Oh! we were all so happy then,
Happy as we could be.


21





22 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


And each had something to impart,
Of friends that each could name;
For there were those who never met,
Unless when Christmas came.

And more than friends, and holiday,
And vacant hours of mirth-
Christmas should ever bring to mind
My blest Redeemer's birth.

And while I raise my heart to Him,
All other thoughts give way:
The happiest day in all the year-
Is it not Christmas-day!



Here Sarah stopped a little while,
And lifted up her head,
To turn at once to good account
The verses she had read.

For Fanny Blake had made a pause,
As she would something say;
And Sarah asked her what she thought
Of happy Christmas-day.






SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

"I think," said little Fanny Blake,
"It may be very good;
But I would rather hear by half
The Children in the Wood."

"That may be," Sarah mildly said;
"But time, with waving wings,
Is flying fast, and we should learn
To think of other things.

"Come, pay attention. This, to me,
Is very pleasant rhyme,
And.in the Children in the Wood
We'll read another time."


2*






24 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


MAKES me shut my eyes in awe,
JI D And quickly draw my breath;
For solemn is the thought it brings,
The day and hour of Death.

However young, fail not to keep
Thy latter end in view;
If aught be certain in thy life,
Death is as certain too.

The moments that compose our lives
Unnoticed glide away;
And tens of thousands of them pass
With every passing day.








































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Remember still, at heaven's high throne,

A simple child to bend. p. 9, 3,


-;7

C.







SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


81


Whether it prove a joy or grief,
Depends on where we go:
How blest, if passed in happiness!
How dreadful, spent in wo!

Remember, still, at heaven's high throne
A simple child to bend;
And thus put up a prayer to Him
Who is the sinner's friend:

"Whate'er in this uncertain world
My life, through time, may be,
Still let me, 0 my Saviour, pass
Eternity with thee."





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

"This is, indeed, a solemn thought;
And, oh how blest to know
That we, when all our days are past,
Shall to our Saviour go!"

So Sarah spoke, and fondly wished
She might not speak in vain;
And then she looked upon her book,
And thus went on again.

























































)












i







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f


The waters of the food prevailed over the highest
mountains. p 33. 31.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 35












SMUST remind us of the Flood,
When waters rose around,
And all, except one family,
Of human kind were drowned.
Men lived in sin. Then spake the Lord,
Noah! thou hast done well;
Now build thyself an ark of wood,
Where thou and thine may dwell."
He heard the voice of God, and built
The ark with speed and care:
The waters came, and all mankind
Then perished in despair.






36 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

But Noah and his family
Might well the flood endure;
They did what God had bid them do,
And thus were all secure.

Be our's to hear the word of God,
To live obedient still;
Confiding in a Saviour's love,
And swift to do his will;

That when the judgment-day shall dawn,
And floods of wrath shall rise,
Our souls with Christ our Lord may dwell,
Safe in the upper skies.









2,


. 97 38.


Little Samuel feared the Lord.




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


SIS the letter that begins
The sacred name of God:
Be this remembered ever, while
The path of life is trod.

Oh, how shall mortals speak of him,
The glorious Lord above;
The source of light and happiness,
Of wisdom, power and love!

Greater than all, and brighter far
Than the consuming flame;.
This God of glory, down from heaven,
As our Redeemer came.
3


83'





40 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

Oh, wondrous love! Amazing grace!
And did he die for me ?
Then let my soul without delay
From sin and folly flee.
With humble reverence would I bend
At his eternal throne;
And praise him for redeeming grace,
And trust in him alone-
That heaven, at last, my home may be,
Where I, when life is o'er,
The Father, Son, and Spirit blest,
For ever may adore.




Here naughty Fanny rudely yawned,
And turned aside her head;
And said she was quite tired to hear
So many verses read.
Well, now," said little Sarah Bell,
"We'll read no more to-day;
For I have many things to do,
And quick must haste away.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 41

"But mind me, Fanny! they that read,
Should never read in vain;
So let us on the verses think,
Till I come back again."
Then lightly tripped the child away,
With lively pleasant look;
And many a happy glance she gave
Upon her little book.
And when, before she went to rest
At night, she kneeled to pray,
And offer up her thanks for all
The mercies of the day;
With humble voice, and heart sincere,
She prayed that Fanny Blake
Might yet be taught to know the Lord,
For her Redeemer's sake.


















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PART THE SECOND.
THE morrow came, the glorious sun
His beams were spreading wide,
And Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
Were seated side by side.
And Sarah from her handkerchief,
With care and caution took,
(Where it was neatly wrapped,) once more,
The little picture book.
"Now, Fanny, how far had we read ?"
Said little Sarah Bell,
45






46 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.
As lightly she turned o'er the leaves.
But Fanny could not tell.
And Sarah still went talking on-
Why, Fanny, let us see;
If I remember right, my dear,
We read to letter G.
Ay! that we did, for here's the mark:
1 is the next, you know;
Now try to understand it well,
I'll read it very slow."








H


h


2/4
U


The missionary explaining the gospel to a Heathen
p. 47,




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 49


H SHOULD be known by every child,
And be remembered well;
It speaks of joy and sorrow too,
And stands for Heaven and Hell.

For Heaven, that scene of light and peace,
The rolling clouds above;
Where God and holy angels are,
And everlasting love.

And for that dismal world below,
Where sinners ever dwell;
Where wo and darkness always reign:
That dreadful place is Hell.





S SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

And must we then, whene'er we die,
To light or darkness go?
And joyful reign in Heaven above,
Or sink to Hell below ?

Oh let us, while we yet have breath,
Flee from the quenchless flame,
And seek the offered grace of God
In our Redeemer's name.
O Lord, thy mercy we implore,
Our souls betimes prepare,
The dreadful pains of Hell to shun,
The joys of Heaven to share.















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p 51, 52.


Village of I'olaters in Africa.




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


i


IS an idol: every breast
Has idols of its own;
Sometimes of gold and silver bright,
Sometimes of wood and stone.
And there are idols--sins, I mean--
Which young and old adore:
O God of mercy, in thy love,
Destroy them evermore.
If there be aught the world contains
Which I love more than Thee,






54 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.
That sinful love within my heart
Idolatry must be.
Then take that sinful love away,
And place thy love within;
And break down every image there
That wears the shape of sin.
Oh! give me with a contrite mind
To bend before thy throne;
And offer humble prayer and praise,
Through Jesus Christ alone.
Deeply inscribed upon my heart
Let thy commandment be-
That there may live within my breast
None other God but thee.



Then Sarah told her cousin dear,
There was, across the sea,
A wooden idol on a car,
As ugly as could be.
And people worshipped it, as though
It moved with life and breath;





SARAII BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. .5

And threw themselves beneath its wheels,
And there were crushed to death.
"Indeed !" said Fanny, quite amazed
"How foolish they must be,
To do so to a wooden god
That cannot hear nor see!"
"They know no better," Sarah said,
That dwell in such a place:
Their's is a god of cruelty,-
But our's, a God of grace."



S





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


JESUS our Saviour let us praise-
It is a blest employ:
Amid the sorrows of the world,
He gives his children joy.
There is a joy the wicked know;
But soon, alas! they find
It spreads its wings, and flies away,
And sorrow leaves behind.
And there are thousand joys, that God
In goodness scatters free;
But earthly joys that live to-day,
To-morrow may not be.


K.il





J j


'Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord piticth
them that fear him." p. 57, 58.








SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 59

Like flowers, a while they sweetly bloom,
In colours rich and gay:
Like flowers, they wither in their prime,
And fall and fade away.
Still would I, though my joys abound,
Or earthly sorrows lour,
Give all my moments to my God,
Through every changing hour;
That when from this expiring frame
All earthly joys are driven,
My soul exultingly may soar,
And find the joys of heaven.





60 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


1 LEADS us on to Knowledge still;
l Oh may we wiser grow
And ever turn to good account
The little that we know!
And what is Knowledge ? 0 my God!
Were human wisdom given;
If I could read the books of earth,
And count the stars of heaven;
In all my learning and my pride,
My folly would be shown,
Had I all knowledge in the world,
If TIIOU wert still unknown.





k


Though worldly knowledge Le possessed,
The heart it cannot fill. p. 61, 62.








SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 63

That I may knowledge gain aright,
Do thou my teacher be:
The entrance unto wisdom's way
Is, Lord, the fear of thee.
And teach me, too, myself to know,
While on my heavenly road;
I nothing am, and nothing have,
Which thou hast not bestowed.
Though worldly knowledge be possessed,
The heart it cannot fill;
Be mine to know the God of grace,
And learn to do his will.






SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


BIDS me listen to the Lark,
That, singing, soars on high;
And leaves the world with fluttering wing,
To carol in the sky.

How sweet it is, at early dawn,
The fragrant fields among,
To mark his happy, heavenward flight,
And hear his tuneful song.


64





L


The risen sun a rapture brings,
That cannot be repressed


1


p. 65, 66




















































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SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 67

The risen sun a rapture brings,
That cannot be repressed:
'Tis joy that tunes his little throat,
And fills his panting breast.
And shall the lark, then, rise and sing
For every blessing given,
And I, ungrateful, silent be,
Nor raise my heart to heaven?
Oh, rather let the dawn of day
Raise all my thoughts above,
And witness many a song of praise
For all my Saviour's love.
Oh, may thy Spirit draw my heart
Just like the lark to soar;
Then shall my soul, with faith and love,
My Lord and God adore.




Said Fanny, with a smiling face,
"I like that very well;
The pretty little lark !" "And so
Do I," said Sarah Bell.





68 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

"How often have I watched the lark,
And seen it rise and fall!
But Fanny, let us read the next;
I think I like them all."











































































































4.
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D






















Happy the d who in early years,
Receives tion well


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p. 69, 70.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


SMUST be Mercy; grateful sound,
STo those who feel within
The sorrows of a broken heart,
The sinfulness of sin.
When guilty man, in deep distress,
Condemned, was seen to lie,
'Twas mercy filled the Saviour's breast,
And brought him from the sky.

And Mercy fled the world around,
And spread the gospel wide,
Our dark, desponding souls to cheer,
Our wandering steps to guide.

t'


71





72 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

'Twas Mercy eased my troubled heart,
And raised my thoughts above;
And told me peace might yet be found
In my Redeemer's love.

Through all my joys and trials past,
Mercies have marked my way;
And still they gather round my path,
Where'er my footsteps stray.
For mercies manifold and great,
My God will I adore;
And still for mercy will I pray,
Till I can pray no more.









































In every joy, in every woe,
Would I my M aker see,


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p. 73, 7,.


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SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 75










SNATURE fair presents to view,
Through every changing hour;
In flood and field, and mountain wild,
In bird and beast and flower.
Where'er I turn around to gaze,
A thousand beauties rise,
And spread their ever-varied charms
In earth and sea and skies.
Whether the sun be shining bright,
Or showers incessant fall,
In every change, the Almighty God
Is seen amidst them all.
Thus through my life, wpte'er betide,
Obedient to thy will,





76 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

Oh, may the prayer arise, that God
Would shine around me still.
Whether with joy my heart be light,
Or filled with gloomy fears;
Whether my face be bright with smiles
Or stained with falling tears;
In every joy, in every wo,
Would I my Maker see:
Still all around, and in my heart,
May God my Saviour be.



"How should we love," said Sarah Bell,
"The God who dwells on high!
His hands have formed the fair round
world,
And made the smallest fly.
"The sun and moon and twinkling stars,
Or whether great or small;
He gave them light and bade them shine,
And he is Lord of all."









0


Birds of the sea.


P. 7 7, 7 S.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


p


O CALLS the mighty Ocean deep
Before my wondering eyes;
And I can fancy that I hear
Its roaring billows rise.
The ships are tossed upon the flood
When dreadful storms arise,
And ocean waves are swelling high,
As if they'd mount the skies.
What wondrous power does God possess,
Who can that sea command,
And hold its raging waves within
The hollow of his hand!
6


79





80 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

If he can quell the mighty deep
When all its billows roll,
How easy then for him to still
The tempests of my soul!
To calm the stormy thoughts I find
Within my troubled breast;
To bid my restless sorrows cease,
And lull my cares to rest!
0, Ocean! in thy wondrous power,
Mighty art thou to me;
How much more mighty still must thine
Almighty Maker be!




"How I should like," said Fanny Blake,
To live at the sea-side!
And see so many gallant ships
On its broad bosom ride."
"The sea is very wide and deep,
No doubt," said Sarah Bell;
"But God's amazing grace is more
Than we can think or tell."








P'p


If we would not fall over a precipice we must keep froiii
the edge of it. p. 81, 82.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 83


P THOU art Pride; that fatal sin
By which high angels fell,
From innocence and joy in heaven,
To punishment in hell.
If angels pure by thee were led
To act a sinful part,
What need have I, through every hour,
To watch my wandering heart.
With folly, weakness, vain desires,
And all my sins in view,






84 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

What need have I to pray to God,
That he may watch me too:
And put a bridle on my lips,
And close mine ears and eyes;
Defending me, when lofty thoughts
And vain desires arise.
Oh, may this thoughtless heart of mine
Be humble and sincere;
Nor let the seeds of sinful pride
Be ever fostered there.
For while confusion, pain and tears,
To bosoms proud are given;
In Christ the humble soul shall find
The way that leads to heaven.


1 //r//~








Q


q


(i


p, 85, 86


Say! Lovest thou the Lord thy God.





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


SASKS a Question, which we read
In God's most holy word;
And happy they who answer well:
Say, "Lovest thou the Lord?"
This question (and the solemn words
Upon our hearts should fall)
Was asked of zealous Peter once,
And may be asked of all.

Say, Lovest thou the Lord thy God?
Art thou obedient still,
And swift to learn his holy law,
And do his heavenly will?
6*


87






88 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

Dost thou, in all thy words and deeds,
Keep charity in view ?
For he who truly loves the Lord
Will love his brother too.

Whene'er we think of heavenly things,
Or read the sacred word,
This solemn question still should rise,
Say, Lovest thou the Lord?
And happier, reader, shalt thou be
Than words can e'er express,
If when the question's put to thee,
Thy heart can answer-Yes!




Now Sarah shut the book in haste,
The clock is striking eight:
"How quick the time has passed awayl
I shall be very late!
"Why, Fanny, I must run my way
As fast as I have power:
Who would have ever thought that I
Had been here full an hour!"




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE. 89

Then quick she bade her friend good-bye,
With manner sweet and mild,
And ran away with nimble steps,
A happy, active child:
Employing every moment, like
The little busy bee;
For at her work, or book, or play,
No child more quick than she.








_ ~ ~C_ __


d


Pnrt tt dbirb.



















4



















PART THE THIRD.

IT was, towards the close of day,
A pleasant sight to see
Both Sarah Bell and Fanny Blake
Seated beneath a tree.
The tree was very large and high,
And spread its boughs around;
And leaves were lying here and there,
And acorns on the ground.

The rains had washed the earth away,
And left a root quite bare;
98




94 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

And there they sat: the setting sun
Was wondrous bright and fair.
A pretty cottage was in sight,
With garden ground before;
The light blue smoke was rising high,
And woodbines at the door.
How sweet a thing it is to gaze
On childhood's happy hour,
Ere sorrow pierces through the heart,
Or worldly cares o'erpower !


























































































0






r


p, 95, 96


Ie that is down, need fear no fall




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


STELLS of Riches, glittering things!
But let thy heart beware;
For he who hasteth to be rich
Is caught in many a snare.

Though all the wealth of all the world
In sparkling heaps were thine,
Still wert thou poor amid thy gains,
Unblest with grace divine.

A camel easier may pass
Through a small needle's eye,
Than can a rich man, filled with pride,
Attain to heaven on high.
6


97





98 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

For those that thither go, though rich,
Renounce their treasures all;
And sinners, penitent and poor, .
Before their Saviour fall.
Wouldst thou be truly rich, and see
Thy treasures round thee rise;
Be rich in faith, and make secure
Thy treasures in the skies.
Then though the gold and silver bright
Shall quickly melt away;
Thy riches evermore shall last
Through heaven's eternal day.




1,























An& I will gladly joiWtihe throng,
That seek the house prayer.


S


p, 101.




SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


S SHALL still shadow forth to me
The Sabbath of my God;
And I will think of heavenly things
While on my way I plod.
When Sunday dawns, in cheerful haste
My head I'll joyful raise,
To greet the day of rest and peace,
The day of prayer and praise.
And I will gladly join the throng
That seek the house of prayer;


101






102 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

For God has promised in his love,
To meet and bless them there.
But will the God of earth and skies,
From heaven's exalted span,
Descend in mercy from above,
And comfort fallen man?
Oh yes, and let his promise be
Thy stay in every storm:
What he has written in his word,
His goodness will perform.
The Sabbath now that is enjoyed,
To man in love is given,
Till one more glorious shall arise,
Eternal and in heaven.



























































































L

























i






I. t


A visit to the grave-yard.


p. 103, 104





SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.


T MARKS our time, the fleeting space
To dying mortals given;
That they may learn the law of God,
And raise their thoughts to heaven.
Unwillingly we hear the truth,
And still are slow to learn,
That time, however swift, when past,
Will never more return.
And will the winged dart of death
Arrest my brief career ?
Shall I, as sinner or as saint,
With grief or joy appear?
ti*


105





106 SARAH BELL AND FANNY BLAKE.

Then not a moment let me lose,
But haste with heart and mind
To seek the pardoning grace of Christ;
For "they that seek shall find."
Though years in swift succession fly,
And time unnoticed glide,
Yet shall my every day be blest,
If God be near my side.
To thee, ere fleeting time shall pass,
My Saviour, I would flee;
And give myself, with all my strength,
Through all my time to thee.




How disposition shows itself
In manner and in look!
For Sarah's anxious face was fixed
Intent upon her book;-
While Fanny's eye was roving round,
The setting sun to see;
Or watching leaves that, now and then,
Fell rustling from the tree.




































t





U


U


While Fanny's eyes were roving much,
The setting sun to see. p. 107, 10.


r vy~ ~Yd; QI~~LRLle r




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